Brampton, ON: Inspector

Inspector

Brampton, ON

Full-time, Permanent

Who we are

The Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of four distinct companies—Hercules SLR, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales, and Wire Rope Industries Atlantic—with Hercules Machining & Millwright Services as a division of Hercules SLR. We are headquartered in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia and have been privately owned and operated for over 45 years.

While Hercules has grown into a multitude of industrial sectors, we specialize in equipment, products and services for securing, lifting and rigging applications. As an employer, we focus on continually enhancing the skills and capabilities of our employees and pride ourselves for building and improving upon our cultures of safety and dedicated customer service.

What we are looking for

A strong self-starter to join us in the role of Inspector in our Brampton ON branch. The Inspector performs inspections and testing of below the hook lifting gear, rigging and fall arrest gear to ensure safety certification is in accordance with provincial and federal regulations.

Key Responsibilities

  • Performs inspections on below the hook lifting gear, rigging gear and fall protection devices
  • Completes reports on inspected items neatly and accurately
  • Submits reports to administration upon completion or daily depending on job specifications
  • Maintains paperwork and records of used inventory for billing and certification purposes
  • Completes all inspections in accordance with appropriate regulations
  • Pick up and deliver of products to customers as required in company truck
  • Maintains company equipment used on a daily/weekly/monthly basis
  • Willing to work away and/or travel to job sites

Qualifications

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • Basic technical/mechanical work-related experience or courses
  • Previous mechanical experience is an asset
  • NDE/UT experience is considered and asset
  • Experience working at heights, Lifting Gear Inspection, Wire Rope Examiner and ASME/OSHA rigging fundamentals and requirements
  • Able to safely lift 50 lbs. from floor level to waist level
  • Previous experience working with wire rope is considered an asset
  • Must hold a valid driver’s license and be insurable

What we offer

  • Comprehensive compensation and benefits package
  • Company Group Insurance Coverage
  • Pension Plan
  • Health and Wellness Incentive

To apply, please send your resume and cover letter to hr@herculesslr.com. Please indicate which position you are applying to.

Please note: Successful candidates will be required to pass a criminal background check as a condition of employment.

Please note: Successful candidates must provide a driver’s abstract with driving records from the Department of Motor Vehicles showing less than 6 demerit points loss in the last 3 years and no criminal infraction on traffic laws and no responsible accidents other than the ones on file

We thank all applicants for their interest, only candidates chosen for an interview will be contacted.

Hamilton, ON: Experienced Rigger

Experienced Rigger

Hamilton, ON

Full-time, Permanent

Who we are

The Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of four distinct companies—Hercules SLR, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales, and Wire Rope Industries Atlantic—with Hercules Machining & Millwright Services as a division of Hercules SLR. We are headquartered in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia and have been privately owned and operated for over 45 years.

While Hercules has grown into a multitude of industrial sectors, we specialize in equipment, products and services for securing, lifting and rigging applications. As an employer, we focus on continually enhancing the skills and capabilities of our employees and pride ourselves for building and improving upon our cultures of safety and dedicated customer service.

What we are looking for

An experienced rigger to join in our Hamilton ON branchReporting to the Manager, Rigger’s prepare customer orders as per ISO and company work instructions; ensuring product quality standards are consistently met.

Key Responsibilities

  • Fabricates, set ups, and repairs rigging, supporting structures, hoists, and pulling gear, using hand and power tools according to customer requirements
  • Cut wire rope and bend strands to meet specifications
  • Follow Quality Control Procedures, as per ISO 9001:2000
  • Ensure a quality product is produced, as per the company quality standards
  • Organize, clean, and ensure overall maintenance of the rigging workspace
  • Maintain an efficient production speed with minimal quality issues
  • Responsible for inventory accuracy by recording items used in production
  • Process and requisition of materials and supplies for the rigging department
  • Ensure inventory is stored in an appropriate manner to ease accessibility and identification, and reduce the potential for damage to products
  • Drive company vehicles to various branches and customer locations, as required

Qualifications:

  • High school diploma, or equivalent
  • Minimum of 2-5 years experience in a rigging position
  • Rigging course or equivalent relevant experience
  • Previous experience working with wire rope
  • Able to safely lift 50 lbs. from floor level to waist level
  • Must hold a valid driver’s license and be insurable

What we offer

  • Comprehensive compensation and benefits package
  • Company Group Insurance Coverage
  • Pension Plan
  • Health and Wellness Incentive

If you would like to be part of a fast-growing, national company and would like to help expand our organization to the next level, we want to hear from you!

To apply, please send your resume and cover letter to hr@herculesslr.com. Please indicate which position you are applying to.

Please note: Successful candidates will be required to pass a criminal background check as a condition of employment.

We thank all applicants for their interest, only candidates chosen for an interview will be contacted.

Revolutionary Rigging | SSCV Sleipnir

Revolutionary Rigging | SSCV Sleipnir

The Sleipnir is a semi-submersible crane vessel (SSCV) and is the largest crane ship in the world! The SSCV Sleipnir was built in 2019 by Sembcorp Marine, and at that time surpassed the SSCV Thialif to take over the spot of largest crane ship and has continued to break records ever since. Read on more to learn a bit more about this piece of revolutionary rigging history! 

SSCV Sleipnir Crane Vessel Design

The Vessel

The SSCV Sleipnir is made up of a large platform supported by eight columns, four on each side, and one pontoon per side. This is the typical make-up of SSCVs, but what makes the SSCV Sleipnir unique is its design. In common practice, SSVC’s use larger columns under the cranes to provide support, but this can lead to severe pitching when the seas get rough. The SSCV Sleipnir uses rounded columns that are symmetrical at the front and rear and which allows for calmer motions at seas. The use of pontoons also helps to reduce drag.

The Cranes

Operated by Heerema Marine Contractors the vessel is equipped with two revolving cranes built by Huisman Equipment B.V., which each have a capacity of 10,000 tons at a radius between 27 to 48m with the overall boom length in 144m. The crane’s lifting capacity drops to 7,000 tons at a radius beyond this up to 62 m, and then to 4,000 tons at 82 m with a maximum operating radius using the main hoist of 102 m.

These two main cranes can be operated together to jointly lift up to 20,000 tons. These cranes each use approximately 33km of braided wire rope that’s 72 mm thick to lift. They are also equipped with an auxiliary hoist capable of lifting 2,500 tons at a radius between 33 to 60 m and a third whip hoist which is capable of lifting 200 tons at a radius between 37 to 153m.

Besides these two main cranes, the SSCV Sleipnir has a third auxiliary crane at the opposite end of the ship. This crane is capable of lifting or lowering 70 tons at a radius up to 12m down to 2,000m below the waterline.

Fun Fact: The slewing system in the SSCV Sleipnir (the system that allows cranes to rotate in their tub) uses the WORLDS LARGEST bearings at 30 m in diameter. Prior to the SSCV Sleipnir the largest bearing used to tub-mounted cranes were only 12 m in diameter – so they more the DOUBLED the size of the largest bearings at the time for the SSCV Sleipner. 

How it Works

Power for the SSCV Sleipnir is provided by a 12 MAN 8l51/60DF inline eight-cylinder four-stroke engines – yes, 12 engines! These 12 engines are grouped into four different engine tooms with three engines per room. These engines allow the SSCV Sleipnir to cross the Atlantic or remain at the station for one month.

The ship is propelled by a total of eight Wärtsilä azimuth thrusters, with four at the front and four at the end. All of these propellers are underwater mountable, which means the ship does not need to be drydocked to replace its truster unit. A 12-point mooring system using 6 12 ton anchors are used to hold the ship’s position during lifting operations. These anchors allow the ship to hold a position within a 30cm x 30cm area!  During its sea trials, the SSCV Sleipnir reached a speed of 22.6km/h and it’s cruising speed is rated at 19km/h.

Record-Breaking Rigging

Recently the SSCV Sleipnir set another record by successfully removing the 8100 MT Jotun-B jacket, setting a record for the largest single lift jacket removal. The jacket removal began on July 11, 2020, at the Jotun field approximately 200 kilometers west of Stavanger, Norway. The entire removal scope in the Jotun Field was completed in only four days, one day ahead of schedule!

Fun fact: during this project, skirt piles with diameters 2.7 m and 80 mm wall thickness were cut subsea. This was the largest to ever be done in this way. 

Heerema CEO Koos-Jan van Brouwershaven spoke on this project saying, “(W)e set records to break them, and we are proud to have worked alongside our client Vår Energi to complete the Jotun-B removal with mighty Sleipnir safely, sustainably and in the shortest possible time”

PHOTO SOURCE: Heerema Marine Contractors

No matter how unique and revolutionary your crane is, it’s always important to ensure you’re keeping up with mandatory maintenance and inspections.

Hercules SLR offers crane certifications & LEEA-certified inspections, repairs, predictive & preventive maintenance and crane parts & accessories like wire rope slings, hoists & whatever else you need to lift.

When you spend a long day lifting, hoisting and pulling, your body probably has some aches & pains. Did you know your crane is no different? Just like a weightlifter must take care of their body, watch what they eat and even ensure the palms of their hands are prepared to lift, your crane needs a similar level of care. (And, we know what happens when this level of care is overlooked).

Click here to discover what type of cranes Hercules SLR services, the equipment & products we service, sell & inspect and why looking after your crane benefits you in the long-run.


NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

Wabush, NL: Branch Manager

Branch Manager

Wabush, NL

Full-time, Permanent

Who we are

The Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of four distinct companies—Hercules SLR, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales, and Wire Rope Industries Atlantic—with Hercules Machining & Millwright Services as a division of Hercules SLR. We are headquartered in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia and have been privately owned and operated for over 45 years.

While Hercules has grown into a multitude of industrial sectors, we specialize in equipment, products and services for securing, lifting and rigging applications. As an employer, we focus on continually enhancing the skills and capabilities of our employees and pride ourselves for building and improving upon our cultures of safety and dedicated customer service.

What we are looking for

A strong leader to join us in the role of Branch Manager, overseeing our branch in Wabush, NL. Reporting directly to the General Manager, the Branch Manager is responsible for managing all critical functions within the branch to ensure efficiency, safety and profitability. The Branch Manager takes responsibility for growth and development of their team as well as champions continuous improvement initiatives that help Hercules transform customer satisfaction into customer loyalty.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Manages and coordinates branch activities with direct reports, sales and administration staff
  • Develops the operating budget and sales forecasts for the branch
  • Directs and coordinates branch financial and planning activities to fund operations, maximize investment and increase profitability
  • Reviews branch performance data (financial statements, sales activity reports) to monitor productivity and achievement of results; and make cost and program adjustments
  • Establishes and implements branch policies, goals and objectives that are in line with the company strategy and communicate changes to all employees
  • Prepares job quotes, bids, contact current and potential customers to drive sales
  • Establishes a working environment that fosters employee engagement and productivity
  • Implements company Performance Management program for employees
  • Mentors employees in career and professional development
  • Ensures a quality product is produced based on company and customer standards/expectations and specified requirements
  • Makes timely, informed decisions based on facts, goals, constraints, and risks while consulting key stakeholders before implementing decisions

Qualifications:

  • A university/college degree preferably in Business Management or a related discipline, or a combination of a high school diploma and relevant work experience
  • Management experience in operations is required
  • Exposure to sales, accounting, management, and marketing
  • Excellent interpersonal skills with the ability to communicate effectively with customers, vendors, supervisors, peers, and subordinates
  • Proficient with computers using email and Microsoft Office
  • General mechanical proficiency
  • Ability to work under pressure and in a fast-paced environment
  • Strong decision making and problem-solving abilities
  • Must hold a valid driver’s license and be insurable
  • Physical strength and stamina

If you would like to be part of a fast-growing, national company and would like to help expand our organization to the next level, we want to hear from you!

What we offer

  • A comprehensive compensation and benefits package
  • Health & Wellness Incentive
  • Personal & Professional Development
  • Fun & engaging working environment
  • Free parking

To apply, please send your resume and cover letter to hr@herculesslr.com. Please indicate which position you are applying to.

We thank all applicants for their interest, only candidates chosen for an interview will be contacted.

Please note: Successful candidates will be required to pass a criminal background check as a condition of employment.

Please note: Successful candidates must provide a driver’s abstract with driving records from the Department of Motor Vehicles showing less than 6 demerit points loss in the last 3 years and no criminal infraction on traffic laws and no responsible accidents other than the ones on file

10 Ways You Can Use a Tarp & Why Everyone Needs One

10 Ways You Can Use a Tarp & Why Everyone Needs One

Tarps, short for tarpaulins, are large sheets of strong, flexible, water-resistant or waterproof material, often cloth such as canvas or polyester coated with polyurethane, or made of plastics such as polyethylene. Inexpensive modern tarps are made from woven polyethylene; this material is so associated with tarpaulins that it has become colloquially known in some quarters as polytarp.

Fun fact: The word tarpaulin originated as a compound of the words tar and palling, referring to a tarred canvas pall used to cover objects on ships.

Tarps come in many different shapes and sizes and are classified based many different factors, such as material type (polyethylene, canvas, vinyl, etc.), thickness, which is generally measured in mils or generalized into categories (such as “regular duty”, “heavy duty”, “super heavy duty”, etc.), and grommet strength (simple vs. reinforced).

Since the mid-19th century, tarps have been put to MANY different uses, MUCH more then the 10 we’re going to touch base on today in this blog. However, here are 10 ways you can use a tarp, and why everyone should have one. After reading this list, you’ll be sure to have one stashed away, just in case!

1. Transportation

Of course, one of the most common and typical uses for a tarp is within the transportation industry. Here at Hercules SLR, we serve this essential industry in many ways including the sale of tarps (contact us if you’d like to learn more!). One of the most common uses of tarps within the transportation industry is flatbed trailer tarps. Flatbed trailer tarps protect cargo from weather damage and general wear-and-tear that highway travel can cause.

Types of Flatbed Tarps
  1. Lumber Tarps – Lumber tarps are used on loads that are tall and box-shaped. They have flaps at each end to cover the ends of lumber. Usually, two lumber tarps are used to cover a flatbed load.
  2. Steel Tarps – Steel tarps on the most commonly used flatbed trailer tarp. They are used to protect shorter and lower-profile loads, and also used in combination with lumber tarps.
  3. Smoke Tarps – Smoke tarps only cover the upper front portion of a flatbed load. This protects loads from getting covered in exhaust fumes and dirt.
  4. Machinery Tarps – Machinery tarps are designed to protect manufacturing or machine equipment from weather and road vibration.
  5. Coil Tarps – Coil tarps are commonly used to protect steel or aluminum coils and cable spools during transport. Their rounded top-half allows for a fitted cover over cylinder-shaped loads. The side flaps are more rectangular shaped and split in each corner to allow the transport chain to pass through.

2. Shelters/Tents

Many people consider tarps to be one of the handiest things to carry in their camping or survival bag. A basic tarp shelter can keep your head dry, it will help you conserve heat and it provides a sense of comfort and safety. Making a tarp shelter is easy and there are dozens of different ways and patterns to construct a suitable shelter with only a single tarp.

You can find many different ways to construct a tarp shelter but the A-Frame shelter is probably the most common. It’s made by stringing a paracord between two trees and draping the tarp over it. This shelter provides good rain and snow runoff and a good wind deflection. The downside of the A-frame shelter is that there is no floor, but you can solve that issue by, you guessed it, another tarp!

3. Water Catcher 

Another way a tarp can be a valuable part of your emergency preparedness kit is that it can be used to collect rainwater. People living off the grid sometimes use tarps to set up very elaborate rainwater collection systems – but even the novice wilderness adventure lover can experience truly living off the resources of the land while camping by collecting rainwater using a tarp. You can do this by securing a tarp to trees, allowing the tarp to dip down in the middle. Rainwater will collect here and can be consumed directly without needing to boil or purify the water. Most rain is perfectly safe to drink and maybe even be cleaner than the public water supply! However,  rainwater is only as clean as its container. So if your tarp is not clean or unable to stay clean during the collection process, you will need to boil and filter to ensure it’s safe to drink.

4. No More Weeds in the Garden

You can also put tarps to use in your yard! If pulling weeds makes you want to pull your hair out, there’s a simple solution – a tarp! Canadian farmer Jean-Martin Fortier recommends in his 2014 book, “The Market Gardener”, preventing weeds by laying black tarps on the piece of ground you’d like to make into your garden bend, before planting. It’s important to use a dark tarp as its dark color absorbs heat and warms the soil. The tarp will smother weeds before planting and also deter future one growing in the bed. Not only will this let you start your garden off with zero weeds, and limit the amount in the future but it will also improve the quality of the soil as well as attract earthworms tunneling up to the surface, and in effect, till it for you!

5. Dragging Heavy Items

As we mentioned above, tarps are used in many different facets of landscaping and gardening, including being used as a way to transport things around your yard! This one may be new to you, but tarps make it super easy to drag otherwise heavy and hard-to-move loads from one part of your yard to the other. Need to move a pile of dirt or leaves? Load it on top of a tarp and simply drag it to your next location. Find out how in the video below!

Pro tip: We would suggest having a specific tarp for these types of jobs or even retiring an old tarp for this use as you do run the risk of snagging the material on rocks or other debris on your yard, making it lose the ability to be used in other ways!

6. Covering Damaged Areas

Another way you may have seen tarps being used before is to temporarily cover areas of damage. One of the most common fixes people turn to a tarp to solve is a broken window. During the course of homeownership, you are bound to face a broken window at some point. Permanently repairing a broken window is not always an immediate option, but a quick fix will help keep weather and insects out until you can manage a more permanent repair or replacement.

7. Keeping things Clean

Tarps don’t just keep water out, they can keep just about anything out – including dirt, pet hair, small debris, and so much more! This makes tarps incredibly useful at keeping things clean. One of the most common ways this is put to use is within the car! Drape a tarp over your back seat and suddenly you have a totally spill-proof, dirt-proof, area to transport some messy things! Load the dog into the back after a day at the beach, or a pile of firewood on the way to the cottage and then simply remove the tarp and you have no mess to clean!

8. Blocking Wind & Creating Privacy 

While a tarp may not always make the most attractive wall, it can make a pretty effective one in the short term or in a pinch. Tie a tarp up to one side of a deck, to some trees around a campsite, or anywhere else where you’d like to block out the wind and create a temporary privacy barrier.

Check out the article which walks you through how to put of a temporary tarp wall anywhere, using a DIY support frame: How to Use a Tarp for a Privacy Screen

9. WATERSLIDE

Tarps aren’t just useful, they can be fun! Check out this video where the “I Like to Make Stuff” YouTube channel made a video where he made a 100ft Slip N Slide using a tarps. While you don’t need to take on a project this large, a little water on a tarp in the backyard can lead to hours of fun.

Pro Tip: Have fun, but be safe! Never run on or around a wet tarp and always survey the area for rocks or other debris before sliding around.

10. Keeping it all DRY

And, of course, you can use a tarp to keep just about anything dry. Lots of people find out the hard way how much damage water can do, and having a tarp around can stop that damage in a moment’s notice. You never know when you’ll need to protect something from water and/or rain – so keep a backup tarp around just in case! Use it as a car or ATV cover, cover a load on the back of your pickup, cover a temporary leak on the roof of the shed, protect your plants from a storm and SO MUCH MORE!


NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

Terrace, BC: NDE Inspector

NDE Inspector

Terrace, BC

Full-time, Permanent

Who we are

The Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of four distinct companies—Hercules SLR, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales, and Wire Rope Industries Atlantic—with Hercules Machining & Millwright Services as a division of Hercules SLR. We are headquartered in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia and have been privately owned and operated for over 45 years.

While Hercules has grown into a multitude of industrial sectors, we specialize in equipment, products and services for securing, lifting and rigging applications. As an employer, we focus on continually enhancing the skills and capabilities of our employees and pride ourselves for building and improving upon our cultures of safety and dedicated customer service.

What we are looking for

A strong self-starter to join us in the role of Inspector in Terrace, BC. The Inspector performs inspections and testing to ensure safety certification is in accordance with provincial and federal regulations.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Completes all inspections in accordance with appropriate regulations
  • Completes reports on inspected items neatly and accurately
  • Submits reports to administration upon completion or daily depending on job specifications
  • Maintains paperwork and records of used inventory for billing and certification purposes
  • Pick up and deliver of products to customers as required in company truck
  • Maintains company equipment used on a daily/weekly/monthly basis

Qualifications:

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • NDT-ASNT level II or CGSB Certification
  • Basic technical/mechanical work-related experience or courses
  • Previous mechanical experience is an asset
  • Experience working at heights
  • Able to safely lift 50 lbs. from floor level to waist level
  • Must hold a valid driver’s license and be insurable

What we offer

  • Comprehensive compensation and benefits package
  • Company Group Insurance Coverage
  • Pension Plan
  • Health and Wellness Incentive

To apply, please send your resume and cover letter to hr@herculesslr.com. Please indicate which position you are applying to.

We thank all applicants for their interest, only candidates chosen for an interview will be contacted.

Please note: Successful candidates will be required to pass a criminal background check as a condition of employment.

Please note: Successful candidates must provide a driver’s abstract with driving records from the Department of Motor Vehicles showing less than 6 demerit points loss in the last 3 years and no criminal infraction on traffic laws and no responsible accidents other than the ones on file

Safety Tips | The Importance of Forklift Training

Safety Tips | The Importance of Forklift Training

The Forklift is an incredibly useful piece of equipment, used throughout many industries to enhance productivity, speed up processes and protect the health and safety of employees. But they can also be extremely dangerous, with thousands of forklift accidents every year resulting in sometimes serious injuries, and usually caused by improper and unsafe operation or lack of training for the operatives.

Forklift driving takes a lot more than just lifting and moving materials – Forklift operators should have an understanding of safety & proper use, to keep materials, themselves, and others safe.

The most common causes of fatal forklift accidents include:

  • The forklift tipping over and crushing the operator: 42%
  • Crush injury between the forklift and a surface besides the ground: 25%
  • Crush injury between 2 forklifts: 11%
  • Being struck or run over by a forklift: 10%
  • Struck by falling material being carried by a forklift: 8%
  • Falling from a forklift platform: 4%

Industry statistics in the United States cite a 90% probability of a forklift being involved in a serious injury or fatality accident over its useful lifetime. The Occupational Safety & Health Administration estimates that forklifts account for 61,800 minor injuries, 34,900 serious injuries, and 85 forklift-related deaths every year. While these are United States statistics, industries here in Canada use forklifts in comparable numbers to the USA, so we can assume it’s just as much of a risk factor here.

What factors of your work environment contribute to forklift incidents?

The CCOHS sites the following 6 factors as the largest causes for forklift incidents within the workplace.

  • Production factors such as speed or stress.
  • Lack of proper tools, attachments and accessories.
  • Improper assignment of forklifts and operators.
  • Poor maintenance of forklifts.
  • Age of forklifts.
  • Lack of training or improper training of workers who have to operate forklift trucks. 

Training Requirements

Before any employee takes control of a forklift, ensure they’re trained in accordance with CCOHS requirements. If you are an employer or manager with employees who operate material handling equipment, you must under the law provide adequate training and a safe environment for your forklift drivers. 

  • Employers must have a training program that incorporates general principles of safe operation, the types of vehicle(s) used, any hazards created by using forklifts and powered industrial trucks, and CCOHS general safety requirements.
  • Trained forklift operators must know how to do the job safely, as demonstrated in a workplace evaluation.
  • Employers must provide formal and practical training. This may include using some combination of lecture, video, software training, written material, demonstrations, and practical exercise.
  • Employers must certify that operators have received all necessary training and evaluate each operator at least once every three years.
  • Employers must evaluate the operator’s performance and deem the employee competent to operate a powered industrial truck prior to operating the truck.

If your employees are in need of forklift training, the Hercules Training Academy has you covered! You come to us, we come to you, or we can connect online.

Hercules Training Academy: Forklift Safety (Narrow or Counterbalance)

Our forklift training course provides students with the fundamental knowledge and practical skills of operating lift trucks (narrow aisle or counterbalance). Our training experts will meet and exceed your local regulations and industry standards.

The program is a 1-day course that uses a combination of theory and practical training. Students are evaluated by means of a written test and a practical evaluation on the equipment. Upon successful completion of the program, a certificate will be issued.

Content Covered
  • Hazard assessments
  • Regulations
  • Pre-use inspections
  • Equipment stability
  • Operating principles
  • Refueling
  • Battery care

Forklift Driving | Safety Tips

Meet Professor Leo, he is Hercules SLR’s very own ‘top tips’ guy. Today Leo has 8 tips to make sure you stay safe when operating a forklift! Once you have a proper training course under your belt to act as your foundation, these are a few things to keep in mind to make sure you’re staying safe – Feel free to download and share!

 


Forklift Training in Ontario 20% OFF FOR THE MONTH OF JULY 

Hey Ontario, are you in need of Forklift Training? The Hercules Training Academy experts are here for you! Give us a call at 905-460-6809 or email contact@herculesslr.com and we can schedule training based on your availability. We are also happy to travel to you and train on-site while taking measures to stay safe and follow COVID-19 guidelines.

NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

Herc How-To | Keeping Cool at the Construction Site

Herc How-To | Keeping Cool at the Construction Site

When people think Canada they probably aren’t thinking a beautiful sunny paradise – But for a couple of months a year, it actually does gets hot outside! Summer has arrived, and parts of the country have already seen record or near-record highs this month & meteorologists say 2020 on course to be one of the hottest years since records began

The risk is increased for workers where the temperature can reach higher than the outside air temperature such as those performing roof work, road construction or doing interior work on a building with no air conditioning and poor ventilation.

Here are some tips that both employers and employees can use to keep cool, comfortable, and therefore safe when the weather rises.

Work in Extreme Temperatures: Legislation

Legislation can be a bit vague surrounding the rules and regulations on what employers specifically must do to keep employees safe with regards to heatstroke, and often these standards & regulations will differ provincially.

Generally, there is no specific temperature federally in Canada where work can’t be performed, however, the temperature might be a risk factor for potential hazards that make work unsafe to perform. In these cases, employers and employees have a responsibility to adjust conditions, or the right to refuse work if the temperature creates hazards.

The reason for this? There are factors that contribute to exposure limit (the time a worker can safely be exposed to a condition like heat) beyond just the temperature. Some of these are:

  • Relative humidity
  • Exposure to other heat sources
  • Air circulation & flow
  • Demands of work
  • If workers are acclimatized to the workload under the conditions
  • If workers have proper clothing & PPE
  • Amount of work compared to the number of breaks

There isn’t one magic temperature where work is canceled, but each province does have some legislation that describes temperatures suggested for different workplaces & conditions, particularly those in industrial jobs such as construction workers.

Another way employers, managers or supervisors might determine if the heat can be dangerous is to use TLV® Values. Sometimes these are used as legislation, and sometimes as guidelines provincially.

This table represents the criteria for workers’ exposure to heat stress, and are used as a guideline (and sometimes legislation) for employers to determine when work can be unsafe.

TLV® value chart

 

It’s also worth noting that TLV® Values are subject to change annually. Work levels are defined as:

  • REST: Sitting
  • LIGHT WORK: Sitting, standing to control machines, light hand or arm work
  • MODERATE WORK: Moderate hand & arm work, light pushing or pulling,
  • HEAVY WORK: Intense arm & trunk work, pick & shovel work, digging, carrying, pushing/pulling heavy loads and walking at a fast pace
  • VERY HEAVY: Intense activity at fast to maximum pace.

What Heat Does to Your Body

Heat does more than give you a burn (that’s bad, too—we’ll get into that later) which can result in vomiting. fainting, and is the worse cases, even death.

A healthy, normal human body maintains an internal temperature of 37°C, and generally feels most comfortable with an air temperature between 20°C-27°C, and humidity ranges from 35 to 60%. As the external environment warms, the body warms, too. Your ‘internal thermostat’ will introduce more blood to your skin and produce more sweat. This means the body increases the amount of heat it loses to make sense of the heat burden.

When environments are hot, the rate of ‘heat gain’ is more than the rate of ‘heat loss’ and the body temperature begins to rise. This rise results in heat illnesses.

When your body begins to heat up too much, you may become:

  • Irritable
  • Unable to focus or concentrate on mental tasks
  • Loss of ability to do skilled tasks or heavy work

Over-exposure to heat can lead to:

Heat Edema: Swelling (typically in the ankles) caused by work in hot environments.

Heat Rashes: Inflammation, which causes tiny red spots that prickle during heat exposure due to clogged sweat glands.

Heat Cramps: You might feel sharp pains in muscles in addition to the other symptoms of heat stress we list above. Cramps from heat are caused when your body fails to replace lost sweat with salt, and often happen when you drink too much water and don’t replace it with enough salt (electrolytes).

Heat Exhaustion: Caused when you lose body water and salt from excessive sweating. Symptoms involve heavy sweat, weakness, dizziness, visual disturbances, intense thirst, nausea, headache, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle cramps, breathlessness, palpitations, tingling, and numb hands & feet.

Heat Syncope: Heat-induced dizziness and fainting caused by insufficient blood flow to the brain while someone is standing. This usually happens when people aren’t used to an environment (are unacclimatized) and your body loses body fluids through sweat, blood pressure lowers & blood pools in the legs. Luckily, recovery is very quick when you simply rest in a cool area.

Heat Stroke: This is the most serious type of heat illness. Signs of heatstroke include a body temperature over 41°C and a complete/partial loss of consciousness. There are two types of heat stress, one where the victim does not sweat and the other, where they do sweat.

Heat Stroke: What Employers can do

As an employer, you have a responsibility to create the safest environment for your workers as possible.

Employers of workplaces under federal jurisdiction have the responsibility under clause 25(2)(h) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act to take every precaution reasonable in the circumstances for the protection of a worker. This includes precautions to protect workers while working in heat, or with processes that use heat.

Here are some things employers & employees can do to make work in heat more comfortable:

  • Use fans or other mechanical cooling measures
  • Wear light, loose-fitting clothing
  • Increase break frequency and reduce laborious physical activity when peak temperatures emerge
  • Drink cold beverages without salt, caffeine or alcohol, which can dehydrate you
  • Implement measures to create shade—For example, umbrellas, screens or tents

Heat Stroke: What Employees can do

Here are some tips & steps employees should take to protect themselves from the heat at work:

KNOW THE SIGNS

  • Recognize the signs of heatstroke, not just for yourself, but your coworkers, too. People suffering from heatstroke often don’t see their own signs, so being able to notice symptoms in others will help keep everyone on-site safe.
  • Symptoms of heatstroke include:
    • Headache
    • Nausea
    • Dry, hot skin
    • Confusion/Hallucinations
    • Seizures
    • Partial to complete loss of consciousness

You Notice That Someone has the Signs of Heat Stroke—What Should I do? 

These are some first aid measures you should use when you see someone suffering from heat-related symptoms.

  • Call 911
  • Move them to a cooler location with shade
  • Stay with the person until help arrives
  • Remove shoes, socks & as many clothes as possible
  • Apply cool water/cloths to their head, face, neck, armpits & groin
  • Do not force the person to drink liquid

6 Herc How-To Top Tips for Keeping Cool

1. Let Your Body Acclimate

Especially if you are a new worker or returning from any sort of extended leave due to illness or vacation – it’s important to let your body acclimate to work when in heat. All workers should expect work to be a bit harder in the heat near the beginning of summer, but as time goes on your body will adjust. Employers should expect and allow employees to work at a slower pace, slowly working up to 100% over 5 to 7 days so your body can adjust to the heat and strenuous activity.

2. Get an Early Start

Air temperature usually peaks between 3:00 pm and 6:00 pm, so the early bird gets the cooler worm! Try to schedule your jobs/days in a way that outdoor strenuous work can be completed early in the day. You’ll be in the best position if your days can be structured to be completed before these hot hours, but even just leaving the easier, or inside, work for these hours of the day can help you survive the heat.

3. Sunscreen

Whenever you are working outdoors you should be using sunscreen. Even on cloudy and overcast days, ultraviolet (UV) rays can reach you and cause sunburn. When working outside you should reapply often with a sunscreen that is either sweat-proof or waterproof to help ensure that you don’t sweat it all off in the first few minutes of work. It’s also a good idea to wear a wide-brimmed hat to block the sun’s deadly rays.

4. Proper Clothing

When working outside doing strenuous activity in the heat, light-colored, loose-fitting and lightweight clothing is the way to go. Choosing natural fibered clothing such as cotton is a good choice as it will be more breathable and will absorb moisture well. Moisture-wicking clothing is also a smart choice, as it will draw sweat off your body which will allow your body to cool quicker – this is especially important if you work in a humid climate where sweat evaporation becomes difficult.

5. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate

When working in hot weather conditions you should be drinking water or other fluids at least every 15-20 minutes. Cool water should be your main source of hydration. Sports drinks and coconut water are good options for restoring electrolytes and fresh fruits or fruit juices are good options if you’re feeling a drop in blood sugar. You should avoid coffee, soda, and alcohol as they all contain diuretics which will cause you to become more dehydrated.

If you experience any of the following symptoms you should immediately take a break to rehydrate:

  • increased thirst
  • dry mouth
  • swollen tongue
  • inability to sweat
  • weakness
  • dizziness
  • decrease in urine output

6. Take Frequent Breaks 

Taking frequent breaks in the shade is an important step to avoid heat-related illnesses. Whenever you are feeling overheated or presenting any of the above symptoms of heatstroke, you need to take at least a 5-minute break in a shaded area. This is also a good time to rehydrate or eat some food to restore your energy.

To really cool your body temperature down, try getting inside an air-conditioned space like a vehicle or job site trailer. You can also apply a cool, wet cloth to pulse points on your body such as the neck, wrists, and elbows. If you are working indoors with no air conditioning consider setting up some portable fans to increase air circulation and cool you off. There are also a number of personal cooling devices on the market like cooling vests or neck coolers that can help you beat the heat.

NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

5 Top Tips | Using Ratchet Straps Correctly & Safely

5 Top Tips | Using Ratchet Straps Correctly & Safely

One of the most popular methods for securing cargo, especially when it comes to shipping, is using ratchet straps – also known as lasing straps or tie-downs. Ratchet straps are the hammer of the transporters toolbox – with applications ranging wide from professional use to everyday common use. You may not realize it, but these simple straps are a large and important component in material handling.

As with any material handling equipment, it is important that you use it correctly, and take proper care of it. Your equipment is what keeps your load, yourself and your employees safe – so it’s your job to make sure it is set up for success! In this blog, we’re going to be sharing our 5 top safety tips to ensure your ratchet straps are being used to their full, and proper, compacity!

1. Using them Properly

When not used properly, ratchet straps can become damaged very quickly, and potentially cause road hazards. The proper way to use a ratchet strap is:

How to Use a Ratchet Strap

  • Step 1: Insert loose end of strap into mandrel of the ratchet
  • Step 2: Pull strap through slot in mandrel
  • Step 3: Pull slack out of strap to make strap tight
  • step 4: Crank the ratchet to desired tightening
  • Step 5: Make sure strap stays in line with other to avoid tangling/locking
  • Step 6: Lock handle down after tightening

How to Release a Ratchet Strap

  • Step 1: Pull trigger toward back handle
  • Step 2: Open ratchet all the way
  • Step 3: Webbing should release
  • Step 4: Pull webbing out of mandrel
  • Step 5: Pull trigger to unlock
  • Step 6: Close ratchet back down

2. Storage Methods

The working life of your equipment is affected by more than just how you use it – storing it incorrectly is one of the leading causes of damage. There are three main things you want to avoid when storing ratchet straps:

  1. Moisture – Storing ratchet straps is a place where they are exposed to moisture can cause it to mold and mildew. Mold can extremely weaken the strength of the webbing and the polyester can actually be destroyed, even in heavy-duty straps. This is a problem many people run into when choosing to store their ratchet straps in the back of their truck. This is also something to be aware of when using the straps in the rain – always ensure they are able to dry before putting them away.
  2. Direct Sunlight – Ratchet straps should always be stored in a dark, dry place away from direct sunlight. When exposed to harmful UV rays, they can get sun damaged – you’ll notice this by seeing the color of the strap fade.
  3. Friction & Heat – Exposer to heat, such as the sun, fire, or other heat sources can cause weakening issues. This can also occur if the straps rub against a sharp edge or other objects while in use. If you notice any burn marks in your straps, they must immediately be placed out of service.

3. Choosing the Right Ratchet Strap

You’ll need to consider the following when choosing tie-down straps:

  • Weight capacity (WLL – working load limit)
  • Length of straps
  • Type of hook: S-hooks, double J-hooks, flat hooks, and E-track systems
  • Whether you need extra security offered by tie-down straps that latch or lock
  • Whether you want extra protection for your cargo, vehicle, and straps

Weight Capacity of Ratchet Straps

One of the most important things to consider when choosing ratchet straps is their weight capacity. To get the right ratchet straps, you need to know the weight of your cargo and the total number of straps you will use to tie it down.

The weight capacity of a ratchet strap is designated by its safe working load limit (WLL), which is a measure of the maximum weight the strap can safely handle. To safely secure a load, the combined WLL of the ratchet straps used must be greater than the weight of the secured cargo. For example, if your cargo weighs 1,000 lbs and you are using 2 ratchet straps to tie it down, each strap must have a WLL of 500 lbs or greater. It is recommended that you always use ratchet straps in pairs.

Ratchet straps are also rated by their maximum load (or break strength), which is the amount of weight that will cause the ratchet strap to fail. The break strength is usually 3 times the WLL. You should always use the WLL to determine what ratchet straps are best for your application.

Length of Ratchet Strap

Ratchet straps need to be long enough to reach from tie-down point to tie-down point or from your cargo to a tie-down point on your trailer or truck. If the ratchet straps are too short, they won’t work at all. If they are a lot longer than you need, you will have long, loose ends that could get in your way. Even if you are using ratchet straps of the ideal length, there will still be a portion of the strap that must be secured so that it doesn’t flap in the wind. And because the same ratchet straps are often used for multiple applications, it’s almost impossible not to have long ends of the strap to deal with at some time.

4. Using the Right Amount

As we mentioned above, the industry standard is to use ratchet straps in pairs. Depending on the type of cargo you are transporting, there may be specific regulations as to how many ratchet straps need to be used. For example, if you’re transporting goods in pallets, boxes or stillages, you will need at least one strap per row. Or, if you’re transporting logs in a truck fitted with a headboard, you need to use at least one strap per bay for logs up to a maximum length of 3.3 meters with the bark still present. It’s important you look into regulations specifically for your region, industry, and type of cargo!

5. Daily Inspections Checking for Damage

Ratchet straps must be regularly inspected to ensure they are not damaged. Even “minor” damage can drastically reduce the strap’s capacity and increase the chance of failure during use.

The entire ratchet strap assembly must be inspected before each use and removed from service if any of the following are detected:

  • If the identification tag is missing or illegible
  • Holes, tears, cuts, snags or embedded materials
  • Broken or worn stitches in the load-bearing splices
  • Knots in any part of the webbing
  • Acid or alkali burns
  • Melting, charring or weld splatters on any part of the webbing
  • Excessive abrasive wear or crushed webbing
  • Signs of ultraviolet (UV) light degradation
  • Distortion, excessive pitting, corrosion or other damage to buckles or end fittings
  • Any conditions which cause doubt as to the strength of the ratchet strap

Hercules SLR can design and manufacture heavy or light duty ratchet assemblies that are weather and wear-resistant and will secure your load properly and safely.

All our tie-down straps and ratchet assemblies are manufactured from the highest quality proof tested webbing hardware. They can be supplied with any one of several standard or custom made end fittings to ensure that your load is adequately and safely secured. Larger ratchet assemblies are available in standard or long-handled versions.

Hercules SLR is here for you and all your transportation requirements! Load Binders, ratchet straps, tie downs, tarps, chains, ropes, slings, hardware and more. We remain open, while respecting the emergency measures put in place by our provincial governments and health advice.

We have set up specific drop-off and pick-up points in-store and you can call us ahead of time to make sure everything is ready before your arrival. Your safety is our priority and when you need us, we are here for you. Call us: 1 800 461-4876 or visit us online here to find the nearest branch: https://buff.ly/2FFkXMu

NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

Employee Spotlight | Lee-ah Durance, Customer Service Representative

Get to Know your Customer Service Representative, Lee-ah Durance

Get to know the team at Hercules SLR in Sarnia, Ontario! Meet Lee-ah Durance, the Customer Service Representative extraordinaire who wears many hats at the Sarnia branch.

Read on to learn more about Lee-ah’s role at Hercules SLR and what she loves about the rigging industry!

Tell us about your educational/professional background:

I come from business to business sales but in a different sector. This has helped me in my role at Hercules SLR. I have grown up with valley workers and understand the long hours and hard word that is everyday life of Chemical Valley. I am proud to now work alongside these men and women and can relate to them- which I think aids the customer relations and keeps them coming back!

An interesting fact about you is…

When training and learning about chain slings I found them easier to understand because of my jewelry making background. Chain sling components are just like jewelry components and comparing the two ensures I don’t miss pieces (like hammerlocks) in my chain slings.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

I have been working outside the house (I say this because I grew up on a hobby farm and have always had chores) since grade 9. Most of my experience is within an office, but I’ve worked on a farm; at a gas station and restaurant mix; and waitressed- to mention a few.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

When I first saw the job description I was drawn to apply because of my previous sales experience. I researched the company and read through the website. I felt like Hercules SLR was a company that treated their employees fairly and that there was room to grow both personally and professionally. Once I met Brian Moniz I found he was the personification of everything I had already read about Hercules SLR. This made me feel comfortable and excited to work with him and the company. When I was offered the job I was overjoyed- I knew that Hercules SLR was somewhere I wanted to work and grow.

What’s something you’re most proud to have accomplished in your career at Hercules SLR?

I am proud every time we get a return customer because of our service. A customer showed me a few pictures of a big lift they did with 8 black round slings. I had worked closely with him on this order and was really proud of the final product and images.

What do you enjoy most about working in the rigging industry?

I enjoy talking to the customers and hearing about our products in action. I grew up with industry workers and am proud and happy to be a part of it now.

Why do you work safe?

I work safe because at the end of the day I want to get home to my partner and step-daughter. I believe in a work-life balance. Although I love my job and believe I go the extra mile for my customers- I also want to be able to go home and enjoy time with my family and friends.

NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.