NDT in Langley, BC: advantages of non-destructive testing

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What is Non-destructive Testing?

Advantages of non-destructive testing are numerous.

Non-destructive testing (commonly known as NDT) uses different methods to test, inspect and evaluate defects in materials or mediums without compromising the integrity of the product. Internal and external damages can be found, and the product can then be repaired or used after testing—this makes NDT an excellent choice when multiple parts or materials need inspection.

For example, NDT can be used to find defects in metal used during the automotive fabrication process. Advantages of non-destructive testing include the sample size, time, and most essentially—the product is able to be used or repaired in the future.

At Hercules SLR, we conduct two types of NDT—Magnetic Particle (MP) and Liquid Penetrant (LT) testing.

Advantages of Non-Destructive Testing in Langley, ON: what do we do?

Here in Langley, BC we use three main techniques when we conduct Magnetic Particle testing. These are Dry Powder, Black & White and Fluorescent Particle testing methods. Each has a specific application and sensitivity.

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An example of a pin tested at the Langley, BC facility.

The most common items we get in Langley for testing would be Port Container Pins. We receive 50-100 per month. After that, our most tested item are tow sockets. We also do annual Lifting Gear Inspections. The Ports are a key to our future expansion here in Langley.

Dealing with the materials that we do, responsible disposable is more important now than ever. At the NDT department in Langley, we properly dispose aerosol cans and waste in designated waste containers that conform and comply with all environmental laws and standards.

Hercules SLR Inspectors: varied skill set

The CGSB (Canadian General Standards Board) is one of the biggest standard’s development and conformity assessment organizations in Canada, a part of the Government of Canada, Department of Public Works and Government services. They support the economic, regulatory, procurement, health, safety and environmental interests of stakeholders including government, industry and consumers. They’re also a charter participant of the National Standards System (NSS).

Essentially, having CGSB certification means you’re held to a very high standard and have the training to ensure you’re giving the highest quality service you can.

Chris Davies, our Langley Inspector has CGSB certifications in Magnetic Particle Inspection Level 2 and CGSB Liquid Penetrant Inspection Level 2; he’s also written his CGSB Ultrasonic Testing (UT) Level 1 exam.

Additional courses and certification that Hercules SLR technicians have include:

  • LEEA Rigging & Hoist Course
  • Crosby Clamp Inspectors Course
  • Kito Academy
  • Continental Rigging & Hoisting Certification
  • Confined Space Entry and Monitor
  • Fall Protection
  • Fire Extinguisher Training Certification
  • H2S Alive Certification
  • Management & Employee Relations Course
  • Dealing with Difficult Employees Course
  • WHMIS training
  • Lean Manufacturing/Production
  • 5S Production Methods
  • Dangerous goods training
  • Wildlife Awareness Certification

Advantages of Non-destructive Testing: technology keeps up

Connective communication technology plays a large role in NDT,  and the industry has embraced changes in technology and sharing knowledge.  We use the internet to source NDT-related blogs, sample defect photos and research on changing topics within industry. In the past, we only had very expensive books, manuals or had to make time-consuming phone calls to other colleagues in the industry.

Advanced technology has allowed us to move things a bit more quickly!

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Non-destructive testing in the aviation industry.

Non-destructive Testing: industry experience varies

We’re proud of the wide range of industry experience found at the Langley, Hercules SLR branch.

Chris Davies, a Langley Inspector who’s worked in aviation and oil and gas explains some advantages of non-destructive testing in different industries and the variety of experience they provide. “Aviation and Nuclear Industries are an entirely different world from the majority of typical day-to-day NDE Inspections. I only experienced this late in my career while working for the Oil and Gas Industry. The level of skill and experience varies due to types of inspections done, amount of exposure to actual defects and hands-on inspection, versus how long an individual has been licenced.”

He gives this example:

If Jane Doe works in the Aerospace Sector for 2 years, but works 7.5 hours a day on a wet bench (MPI) or dip tanks (LPI), she averages about 260 work days or 1900-2000 hours of experience per year and exposure to dozens of defects per day.

If John Doe works in the Oil/Gas Industry for 15 years, but works an average of 1-2 hours of actual hands-on and uses a Yoke and inspects on Closure, Socket or Stitch Welds. Let’s say he works a 10-on-10 off schedule. He works 183 days, or has 300-370 hours of experience per year and finds few defects per month.

The difference in hands-on experience is significant:

  • Jane, after 2 years, has almost the same hands-on experience as Joe has after 15 years.
  • Jane has over 10 times the exposure to find discontinuities (defects), versus Joe with 15 years of industry experience.

Advantages of Non-destructive Testing: found everywhere

Today, non-destructive tests are used in industries like Aviation, Space, Ships, Bridges, Refineries Mining, Nuclear, Manufacturing, Fabrication and in-service inspections.

Ever drive a car? Chances are, you use something in your daily life that’s been NDT inspected  at some point in time.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Rope Grab: 6 fall protection tips from Hercules SLR

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Working at height? You have different options when it comes to connectors that aid in fall arrest and fall restraint—a rope grab is a popular option. 

Rope grabs are a popular option because they’re often more cost-effective than SRLs (self-retracting lifelines), they allow for mobility in restraint situations, their lifeline length is longer and they can be used beyond the length of the longest SRLs.

Rope grabs are critical to many fall protection plans—read more to find out top six tips you need to know when using a rope grab.

Rope Grabs: top 6 tips

  1. 30” connectors are integral

CSA Z259.2.5-17 is a new CSA Standard that relates to rope grabs and certification for use. Users are required to use a 30” connector which is now integral to the unit. The new Standard tests for  maximum arresting force (MAF) which is included in the scope of testing  and most units will incorporate an energy absorber into the connector to meet that need.

  1. 6’ lanyards are not safe

Convention has dictated that 6-foot lanyards be used in fall arrest systems but in reality, this is very unsafe in the event of a fall on a rope grab.

When a 6-foot lanyard is used, the potential free fall on a trailing (automatic) rope grab can be 12 feet, which is considered a factor 2 fall. Using a regular energy absorber, the falling user would fall through the energy absorber and continue their fall into the backup lanyard, in essence, creating a second free fall. In certain cases where the lifeline isn’t matched to the rope grab, the potential for  damaging the lifeline also exists. This would be considered a catastrophic failure that could lead to injury or death.

This is why it’s of the utmost importance to follow manufacturer instructions for lanyards. Manufacturers will outline the proper connector length limit, which is 30” in Canada and may differ elsewhere.

  1. Rope grabs should always be matched to a lifeline – and tested!

We cannot overemphasize the importance of matching a rope grab with a proper lifeline and then testing it to ensure it will do its job in the event of a fall.

The testing process helps us verify a few important things:

  • Mobility of the rope grab on the lifeline. This ensures the mobility is not jeopardized by the type, stiffness or flexibility of the lifeline which could prevent the rope grab from snagging and being pulled along during the climb of the user, causing a longer free fall.
  • That the lifeline will survive the impact of a fall and allow the user the opportunity to be rescued. When a lifeline is broken during a fall, the odds of the user surviving the fall are low.
  • The rope grab is compatible with the lifeline. Even though a lifeline might look another manufacturer’s  lifeline, the yarn content within the rope of the lifeline may not be  the same. Therefore properties of mobility, tensile strength and wear may not be the same and the rope grab might not function properly on it.
  • That the lifeline is designed to be used as a lifeline. Polypropylene, or store bought yellow  ropes do not function well as lifelines. They are not UV protected and tend to deteriorate quickly. They also “fur” and harden at an accelerated rate when compared to approved lifelines.
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3M™ Self Trailing Rope Grab
  1. The difference between using a rope grab for fall restraint and fall arrest

In general, it is better to use a manual rope grab for fall restraint. This is because manual adjustment allows a lifeline to be set at a specific length with an appropriate setback from fall hazards. Trailing rope grabs, or automatic rope grabs, can often open/unlock (even while in the park feature) and allow the user to surpass the setback zone and enter a fall hazard area. Tying a knot in a lifeline to help locate a trailing rope grab is not an option. Doing so can reduce the strength of the rope by 50% and the strength loss is permanent. Undoing the knot does not restore lifeline strength.

Using a rope grab for fall arrest can be served by a manual or automatic unit, depending on whether or not vertical mobility is required. If vertical mobility is required, a trailing, or automatic, robe grab is ideal while a manual rope grab is better suited for when horizontally-oriented mobility is required in restraint.

  1. Safe movement from lifeline to lifeline should be anticipated

In certain fall restraint applications, it’s important to understand the process of movement from one lifeline to another.  If required, consider the following:

  • Plan the work zone so that users understand where the transfer points are and the process with which to proceed with the transfer.
  • The transfer point should be well back of any fall hazard and should provide an intermediate anchorage with which to make the change. Sometimes this will require the user to carry a second rope grab as part of their toolkit to complete the transfer from one lifeline to another.
  • Other transfer options many include: tying off to an anchor with a lanyard in order to facilitate the transfer from one lifeline to another. That lanyard can then be removed and the user  can return to work.
  1. Proper maintenance and storage is crucial

Like any tool, proper storage and maintenance of a rope grab is important to ensure the efficacy of the rope grab and the lifeline.

Rope grabs should be stored in a cool, dry place out of the sun and be kept away from dirt, grime, chemical contaminants and moisture.

When a rope grab is exposed to a dirty work environment, it is important to wipe it down with soapy water and leave it to air dry. This helps ensure that contaminants do not affect the operation of the rope grab and contaminate the rope channel.

Similar to rope grabs, lifelines must be keep clean and dry and stored in a similar environment. Grime and dirt in the yarn of a lifeline can cause breakdown, weakening or hardening of fibers, elongation and loss of strength. Chemical or debris contaminant will render the lifeline unusable, and it should be removed from service and replaced as this represents a failure during the inspection process.

 

Original article: https://safetytownsquare.3mcanada.ca/articles/rope-grabs-user-tips-that-matter

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Hercules Training Academy: Non-destructive Testing

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This week, 7 technicians from Ontario and Nova Scotia participated in non-destructive testing at the Hercules Training Academy in Dartmouth, NS. They focused on learning and improving Magnetic Particle and Liquid Penetrant Inspections, two of the most commonly-used forms of non-destructive testing.

Non-destructive testing uses various methods to test, inspect and evaluate defects in various materials or mediums without compromising the integrity of the product.

For example, a chain sling can be inspected to determine what internal material characteristics are there, what’s defective and what’s different than is supposed to be. This allows materials and equipment to be serviceable after testing.

Non-destructive testing is important as it lets us find defects on equipment and material workers are actually using (called in-service testing) and ensures products and equipment in use are safe for the public and those using it.

Before a product is in use, (the fabrication and manufacturing process) a technician will use non-destructive testing to control the manufacturing process, manage quality and lower production costs. When something is being constructed, non-destructive testing is used to protect and maintain material quality during the joining process, fabrication and erection phases.

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Jeff Shillington, Area Manager practices his non-destructive testing skills to find defects on a welded part.
Destructive Testing and Non-Destructive Testing: What’s the difference?

During destructive testing, small samples of the material is tested instead of what’s actually being used by the public or a worker. For example, a sample of a welded piece from production may be tested to determine it’s physical structure—things like ductility, yield, ultimate tensile strength, fatigue strength, impact strength and fracture toughness.

When testing is over, the product is obviously unserviceable. While destructive testing is essential and often useful, (when mass-producing something, for example) this isn’t financially realistic for many industries, or products where a limited amount is manufactured. This is where non-destructive testing steps in.

Magnetic Particle (MP) Testing

Magnetic Particle testing uses one, or multiple magnetic fields to find discontinuities on and near surfaces of ferromagnetic materials. The magnetic field is applied with either a permanent or electromagnet.

If the magnetic field finds an issue (discontinuity) that intersects directly with the magnetic field, it creates magnetic flux leakage. Magnetic flux lines don’t travel well in air—coloured ferromagnetic particles are applied, spaces in the air are reduced, which creates a visible indent on the surface. Magnetic particles are sometimes dyed with fluorescent dye that glows under a UV-light.

Yokes, prods, coils, ‘wet’ benches and central conductors are techniques used to perform magnetic particle inspection.

Liquid Penetrant (LT)  Testing

When a highly-fluid, or viscose liquid is applied to the surface, it penetrates fissures and spaces that can access the surface. The extra liquid is then removed and what is left in the void flows back out. This creates a mark which shows where defects or issues may be. Liquid penetrants may also be visible with a UV or black light. It’s important that the testing surface is clean and clear of any materials or liquid that could compromise testing (anything that could block the liquid from entering cracks and voids).

The liquid sits on the surface for awhile, during what’s known as the ‘penetrant dwell time’. After this, the penetrant is removed and a developer is applied to the surface—this makes voids appear clearer, and the object is then visually inspected.

Liquid penetrants used during this process include solvent removable, water-washable and post-emulsifiable penetrants.

Hercules: Dedicated to Learning

It’s important to Hercules SLR to offer training, education and opportunities to learn.

Keeping technicians up-to-date with the latest emerging technologies and skills are one of our core values—it allows us to provide the best, service for our customers and clients.

We’ll help you regulate and improve the safety of your securing, lifting or rigging devices and bring them to industry standards, in dynamic or static settings. We’ll also supply full certification for your equipment to prove it complies with both provincial and national safety standards.

All Hercules SLR customers have access to our web-based certificate tracking system, CertTracker®.  Our CertTracker® system helps you maintain inspection records, provide inspection notice due dates and schedule service times. We can ensure your worksite equipment stays certified. 

Hercules SLR offers both destructive and non-destructive equipment testing services—click here for more information.

References: https://www.asnt.org/MinorSiteSections/AboutASNT/Intro-to-NDT.aspx

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: lifting with eye bolts

eye-bolt-rigging-lifting-equipment

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: select the right eye bolt

There’s a lot of hardware to consider when researching lifting and rigging equipment. Links, hooks, swivels—today we’re talking eye bolts. Eye bolts are used to attach a securing eye to a structure, so ropes or slings can be pulled through.

Keep reading to discover how to select and use the right type of bolt, their dimensions and Working Load Limits.

Eye bolts are marked with thread size, not with their rated capacities. Make sure you select the correct eye bolt based on type and capacity for the lift you are conducting.

  • Use plain or regular eye bolts (non-shoulder) or ring bolts for vertical loading only. Angle loading on non-shoulder bolts will bend or break them.
  • Use shoulder eye bolts for vertical or angle loading. Be aware that lifting eye bolts at an angle reduces the safe load.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s recommended method for angle loading.
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Shoulder bolt, used incorrectly.
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Shoulder eye bolt, with load applied correctly. 
Incorrect way to apply angle load.

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: using eye bolts safely

  • Orient the eye bolt in line with the slings. If the load is applied sideways, the eye bolt may bend.
  • Pack washers between the shoulder and the load surface to ensure that the eye bolt firmly contacts the surface. Ensure that the nut is properly torqued.
  • Engage at least 90% of threads in a receiving hole when using shims or washers.
  • Attach only one sling leg to each eye bolt.
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Direction of pull

 

  • Inspect and clean the eye bolt threads and the hole.
  • Screw the eye bolt on all the way down and properly seat.
  • Ensure the tapped hole for a screw eye bolt (body bolts) has a minimum depth of 1 1/2 times the bolt diameter.
  • Install the shoulder at right angles to the axis of the hole. The shoulder should be in full contact with the surface of the object being lifted.
  • Use a spreader bar with regular (non-shoulder) eye bolts to keep the lift angle at 90° to the horizontal.
    • Use eye bolts at a horizontal angle greater than 45°. Sling strength at 45° is 71% of vertical sling capacity. Eye bolt strength at 45° horizontal angle drops down to 30% of vertical lifting capacity.
    • Use a swivel hoist ring for angled lifts. The swivel hoist ring will adjust to any sling angle by rotating around the bolt and the hoisting eye pivots 180°.

 

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: eye bolt techniques to avoid

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Don’t run your sling through an eye bolt!
  • Do not run a sling through a pair of eye bolts: this reduces the effective angle of lift and puts more strain on the rigging.
  • Do not force the slings through eye bolts. This force may alter the load and the angle of loading.
  • Do not use eye bolts that have been ground, machined or stamped.
  • Do not use bars, grips or wrenches to tighten eye bolts.
  • Do not paint an eye bolt. The paint could cover up flaws.
  • Do not force hooks or other fittings into the eye; they must fit freely.
  • Do not shock load eye bolts.
  • Do not use a single eye bolt to lift a load that is free to rotate.
  • Do not use eye bolts that have worn threads or other flaws.
  • Do not insert the point of a hook in an eye bolt. Use a shackle.
  • Do not use non-shouldered bolts to lift horizontally—non-shouldered bolts should only be used to lift vertically.

 

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: eye bolt dimensions

 

Machinery Eye Bolt

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Screw Eye Bolt

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Regular Eye Bolt—Forged

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  • The Ultimate Load* is 5 times the WLL**. Maximum proof-load*** is 2 times the WLL.
Shoulder Eye Bolt—Forged

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  • Ultimate Load is 5 times the WLL. Maximum proof-load is 2 times the WLL.
Definitions

* Ultimate Load: The load at which the item being tested fails or no longer supports the load.

** Working Load Limit: The maximum combined static and dynamic load in pounds or tonnes should be applied to the product in service, even when the product is new, and when the product is uniformly applied in direct tension to the product.

*** Maximum Proof-Load: The maximum tensile force that can be applied to a bolt without deformation. This is usually between 85-95% of the yield strength.

Need more definitions? Find common securing, rigging and lifting definitions on our ‘Quality and Safety‘ page.

Fact sheet via CCOHS: https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/safety_haz/materials_handling/eye_bolts.html

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Tool Fall Protection: more important than you think

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Tool Fall Protection: confidence at heights

During Summer 2018, in Providence, Rhode Island ironworkers strapped on their fall protection—tool fall protection included, to start work on a major project.

“That guy’s nuts!” exclaims Steven Strychasz, a nearby civilian watching ironworkers work on the steel skeleton new Residence Inn Providence Hotel.

The guys who’s ‘nuts’? That’s Kyle Coulombe, 31 an ironworker who climbing 50-feet, with an 800-pound beam suspended over his head while working on the hotel.

Fall Protection: essential for working at height

Crane operator Steve Berube inches his hoist so Coulumbe can align a bolt hole at the end of a coloumn so the two will connect. Then, he walks along the beam to connect the other coloumn while the crane holds steady. Coulumbe attaches his safety line to the top flange of the beam. He now hangs from the crane hook by a cable. He resets his cable line, and continues working.

This amazes the crowd—his ability to seamlessly navigate and climb around the huge iron columns and beams.

What allows Coulumbe to do this with ease? His skills, his nerves, but mainly—the fall protection attached to his safety harness. His fall protection system not only keeps his body safe, but his tools too. Coulumbe carries approximately 60 pounds of tools in his harness daily, including nuts, bolts and a 9-pound sledge hammer.

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Fall Protection: it’s for your tools, too

Tool fall protection is also essential when working at heights. Many people don’t consider the damage or pain from, for example—a nine-pound sledge hammer falling on their head. However, according to Canadian Occupational Safety (COS) in 2013 there were nearly 9000 injuries caused by falling tools. 23 of these injuries were fatal.

Tool Fall Protection: do the math

To put this in perspective, COS suggests calculating with physics—they use a common, eight-pound wrench as example. If this wrench was dropped from 200-feet above, it would hit with 2,833 pounds per square inch of force—the equivalent of a Clydesdale horse hitting a one-square inch area. This is why tool fall protection is just as important as securing your body.

According to COS, the shape of a tool or equipment can have an equally disastrous effect. For example, a two-pound hammer could drop from a three-metre height onto a hard hat, and the impact would be minimal—but a two-pound sleever bar dropped from this height would go directly through the hard hat, and will puncture the skull.

Accidents don’t just happen from tools falling. Often, a worker attempts to catch his tool and can lose his balance, or drops the tool which then becomes a tripping hazard for unsuspecting workers below.

Next time you work at height, protect yourself, others and your tools with the right fall protection.

Read our blog on the importance of choosing a comfortable safety harness to ensure your fall protection fits properly.

References here: https://www.wireropenews.com/news-201808-When-Lives-are-on-the-Line.html
http://www.providencejournal.com/news/20180721/iron-men-love-their-jobs-bolting-together-future-in-providence
https://www.cos-mag.com/personal-process-safety/31597-objects-falling-from-heights-on-construction-sites-lead-to-injuries/

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Hercules SLR: DBI-SALA® ExoFit STRATA™ Body Harness

3m-dbi-sala-safety-harness-fall-protection-fall-arrest

Body Harness: Why are they so Uncomfortable?

Comfort is one of the main reasons workers don’t wear proper fall-protection equipment, or a body harness. Yet falls are the leading cause of death in construction, and compliance with safety standards is a major issue, according to OSHA.

DBI-SALA® ExoFit STRATA™ Body Harness: Comfortable, Cool & Light to Wear 

3M Personal Safety Division and Capital Safety, two world industry leaders in personal protective equipment and fall protection products have designed a solution for the discomfort—the DBI-Sala ExoFit Strata body harness.

“The safest harness is the one workers actually wear. Since launching the harness in the fall of 2015, hundreds of workers have made the switch to ExoFit STRATA,” says Tim Thompson, soft goods manager at Capital Safety. “Workers and managers alike have caught on to the overall benefit of utilizing equipment that compliments workers while on the job, and leaves them feeling comfortable even after they end a shift.”

Features

In July 2015, Capital Safety parented with ergonomics specialists from the Sweere Center for Clinical Biomechanics and Applied Ergonomics at Northwestern Health Sciences University to look at the need for new innovation from harness development. Their research looked at the most common complaints from workers—the load on the back and shoulders, limited range of motion and body temperature. The ExoFit STRATA™ Body Harness was created  in response to these complaints. exofit-strata-body-harness

The ExoFit STRATA features solution-based elements, including a first-of-its-kind LIFTech™ Load Distribution System. LIFTech takes the weight off a worker’s shoulders and redistributes it down to the hips, which reduces force on the shoulders up to 85%. PolarMesh™ padding keeps users’ backs cooler with greater air flow. A Revolver™ Vertical Torso Adjuster and Tri-Lock Revolver™ Connectors, which offer added security around the legs, allow wearers to adjust their harness to the perfect fit. An EZ-Link™ Quick SRL Adapter helps workers efficiently attach their personal SRL, which reduces the time it takes to connect and disconnect by up to 80 percent. Tech-Lite™ Aluminum D-Rings allow for optimal reliability without adding significant weight to the harness.

Find body harnesses and more fall protection equipment at Hercules SLR.

Original article: http://www.capitalsafety.com/caadmin/Pages/DBI-SALA-ExoFit-STRATA-Harness-Helps-Workers-Lighten-Up.aspx

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Rigging Glossary: ABC’s of rigging, ‘A’ to ‘Crane’

rigging-terms-rigging-glossary

Hercules SLR knows rigging, A through Z!

There are many terms and regulating bodies to know and remember when it comes to securing, lifting and rigging—some commonly used in the industry, some not.

Hercules SLR is here to help you keep up with the rigging industry and its jargon.

We’ve put together a guide of rigging terms that you should know, starting with A, B and C.

Rigging Terms: A-C

‘A’

Acceleration Stress: Additional stress created by increase in load velocity.

Aggregate Strength: Wire rope strength found by total individual breaking strength of the element of strand or rope.

AISE: Association of Iron and Steel Institute

AISI: American Iron and Steel Institute

Alternate Lay: Lay of wire rope in which strands alternate between regular lay and lang lay.

Angle of Loading, or Angle Loading: The inclination of a sling’s leg or branch measured from the horizontal and vertical plane. The angle of loading should be five degrees or less from the vertical plane.

ANSI: American National Standards Institute

API: American Petroleum Instituterigging-lifting-hoisting

Armoured Rope: Steel-clad rope

ASME: American Society of Mechanical Engineers

ASTM: American Society for Testing Materials

AWS: American Welding Society

‘B’

Bail: U-shaped member of bucket, load or socket, usually used as a lift point. Can also be other fitting used on wire rope, or a swivel hoist ring’s attachment point.

Barrel: Lagging/body part of a rope drum in a drum hoist.

Base: Mounting flanges or feet, used to attach a hoist to its supporting structure or foundation.

Basket Hitch: A sling set-up where the sling is passed under the load and has both ends, end attachments, eyes or handles on a hook, or single master link.

Bearing Life (or Rated Life): The number of revolutions or hours, that an identical group of bearings used at a 90% constant speed will finish or exceed before the first signs of wear or fatigue develops. Essentially, 10 of 100 bearings will fail before their rated life. Minimum Life and L10 also mean Rated Life.

Becket: A wedge socket type of wire rope end termination.

Becket Line: Part of rope in a multi-ply reeving system that’s dead-ended on one of the blocks.

Becket Loop: A loop or a strand of small rope attached to the end of a large wire rope to facilitate installation.

Bird Cage: A common term used to describe the look of wire rope that’s been forced into compression. The outer strand forms a ‘cage’, and at times can displace the core.

Bleeding Line: Caused when the wire rope is overloaded. This squeezes the lubricant from the cable out and  makes it run excessively.

Block: A term applied to a wire rope sheave (pulley) inside plates. It’s fitted with an attachment like a shackle or hook.

Braided Wire Rope: Wire rope formed by plaiting component wire ropes.

Brake: Device used for slow or stopping motion with friction or power.

Brake, Eddy Current: Device for controlling speed in hoisting or lowering direction, done by putting a supplementary load on the motor. Interaction of magnetic fields creates an adjustable or variable direct current in stator coils, this starts currents in the rotor, which is how this loading happens.

Brake, Holding or Parking: Brake that automatically sets and prevents motion when power is off.

Brake, Mechanical Load: Friction device used for multiple discs or shoes, used to control load speed in only the lowering direction. The brake stops the load from overhauling the motor.

Braking, counter torque: See counter torque. 

Breaking Strength: Measured tensile load needed to make cable, chain, wire rope or any other load-bearing element break.

Breaking Strength/Ultimate Strength: Average force at which a product, like a roundsling, (in the condition it would leave manufacturing) has been found by testing to break when growing force is applied, at a uniform rate of speed on a standard pull testing machine.

Bridge Travel: Crane travelling horizontally and parallel with bridge runway rails.

Bridge Trucks: Assembly made up of wheels, bearings, axles and structural framework that supports the end reactions of bridge girders.

Bridle Sling: Sling made of multiple wire rope legs with a fitting that attaches to the lifting hook.

Bright Rope: Wire rope made of wires that aren’t coated with zinc or tin.

Brooming: Unlaying and making wire ropes’ strands and wires straight at the end while installing a wire rope socket.

Bull Ring: The main, large ring of a sling where the sling’s legs are attached. This is also called the master link.

Bulldog Clip: Wire rope cable clamp, or clip.

Bumper or Buffer: Energy-absorbing device that reduces impact when two moving cranes or trolleys meet, or when they meet the end of its travel.

Cab: The operator’s compartment on a crane.

Cable: Term used to refer to wire ropes, wire strand and electrical conductors.

Cable Crowd Rope: Wire rope used to force the bucket of a power shovel into material being handled.

Cable-Laid Wire Rope: Wire rope made up of several individual wire ropes wrapped around a wire rope core or fiber.

Cable Laid Grommet-Hand Tucked: An endless wire rope sling made from one length of rope, wrapped around the core by hand, six times. The ends of the rope tuck inside the six wraps.

Cable Laid Rope: Wire rope made of six wire ropes wrapped around a fiber or core. hercules-slr-securing-lifting-rigging

Cable Laid Rope Sling: This mechanical joint is made via a wire rope sling from a cable laid rope. It has eyes fabricated by pressing, or swaging one or more metal sleeves over the rope junction.

Cableway, Aerial: Conveying system for transporting single loads along a suspended track cable.

Camber: The slight curve given to beams and girders to compensate for deflections caused by loading.

Cheek Plate(s): Stationary plate that supports the pin (axle) of a sheave or load when rigging.

Cheek Weights: Overhauling weights attached to side plates of a lower load block.

Chinese Finger: Wire mesh pulling grip. Normally, a line is inserted through the wire rope, and it tightens around the line when pulling force is applied.

Choker Sling: Wire rope with eyes spliced on each end. Used to lift the load.

Choker Hitch: Sling set-up with one end of the sling passing under the load and through an end attachment, handle or eye on the other end of the sling.

Clearance: The horizontal or vertical distance from any part of the crane to a point of the nearest obstruction (the area you can ‘clear’).

Clevis: U-shaped fitting with holes in each end where a pin or bolt is run through.

Clip: Fitting to clamp two parts of wire rope.

Closed Socket: Wire rope end fitting made of basket and bail.

Closing line: Wire rope that closes a clamshell or orange-peel bucket, and then operates as a hoisting rope.

CMAA: Crane Manufacturers Association of America

CMV: Commercial Motor Vehicle

Coil: Circular bundle of wire or fiber rope not packed on a reel.

Collector: Contact device that mounts on bridge or trolley to collect current from the conductor system.

Come-along: Lever-operated chain or wire rope devices designed for pulling, not lifting; also called pullers. Unlike hoists, the tension is held by a releasable ratchet. They are smaller and lighter than hoists of equal capacity, and aren’t meant to lift, but meant for activities like skidding machinery.

Conductors (Bridge or Runway): Electrical conductors located along the bridge girder, or runway that provide power and/or control circuits to the crane and trolley.

Conical Drum: Grooved hoisting drum of tapering diameter.

Continuous Bend: Reeving of wire rope over sheaves and drums so that it bends in one direction, as opposed to reverse bend.

Control Braking: A method of controlling hoisting or lowering speed of the load by removing energy from the moving load or by imparting energy in the opposite direction.

Controller: A device or group of devices that serve to govern, in some predetermined manner, the power delivered to the motor to which it is connected.

Controller (Spring Return): A controller which, when released, will return automatically to a neutral position.

Control Panel: An assembly of magnetic or static electrical components that govern the flow of power to, or from a motor. These respond to signals from a master switch, push-button station, or remote control.

Core: Member of wire rope round which the strands are laid. This could be fiber, a wire strand, or an independent wire rope.

Corrosion: Chemical decomposition caused by exposure to moisture, acids or alkalis.

Corrugated: A term used to describe the grooves of a sheave or drum when worn so as to show the impression of a wire rope.

Cover plate: The top or bottom plate of a box girder or junction box.

Crane: A machine for lifting and lowering a load vertically and moving it horizontally; the hoisting mechanism is an integral part of the machine. The term applies to fixed , mobile, powered or manually-driven machines.

Cranes are another group of definitions entirely! Really—click here to read our ‘Cranes’ Glossary.

Hercules SLR will continue our ‘Rigging Glossary’ with rigging terms in the alphabet D-Z—check our ‘Blog’ page for future rigging glossaries, and to read our ‘Crane Glossary’.

Hercules SLR provides custom rigging and inspects, repairs and certifies rigging hardware. Head to our  ‘Inspections & Repairs’ page for more information, or e-mail sales@herculesSLR.com.

Original article here: https://riggingcanada.ca/articles/rigging-terms-glossary/

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Confined Spaces: Choose the Best Fall Protection Equipment

Confined-space-header-2
Proper Fall Protection Equipment: stay safe in confined spaces

We’ve given you tips for remaining safe in confined spaces and preventing injury—but how do you choose the best fall protection equipment to keep yourself and others safe? Read on and discover Hercules SLR’s tips for choosing the safest fall protection equipment for work in confined spaces.

Three Essential Components to Confined Space Fall Protection Equipment

When choosing the best fall protection equipment, you typically need an anchorage, body support and a connector. If entering a confined space vertically without a fixed ladder, you must have an anchor point that supports the required forces.

If entering horizontally, but with a vertical position, or you must retrieve someone or something (for example, on the side of a tank) you must have a side-entry system. This attaches to the access point with a bolt or clamp, and provides anchorage and a base for your winching mechanism.

When undertaking task-specific work, like entering a manhole, for example, tripods are the best option. They are easy to transport between locations, however, tripods only accommodate specific sized openings. If tripods aren’t enough, or more versatility is needed a davit arm, or post is another option to consider.

Davits are great for use at various types of worksites. Davits are a versatile choice as they can be fixed or portable. Some feature adjustable bases capable of hoisting workers over large openings, while others have fixed a “v” shaped adjacent to the opening.

confined space training

Support Yourself

Supporting body weight is an essential function of fall protection equipment—it’s important to consider comfort and durability when choosing appropriate fall protection equipment.

Have an employee working in a confined space for an extended period of time, or in various spots throuconfined-space-fall-protection-equipment-safety-harnessghout the day? Consider investing in a high-quality body harness with built-in shoulder, back and leg padding with soft edging for maximum comfort.

Need durability above all? Consider a harness with a protective coating specifically designed to be easily cleaned and repel dirt, grease and grime.

Need to access a confined space infrequently? Consider a basic harness, an economical option for work in confined spaces during a short period of time.

Easy Retrieval is Key

As we mentioned in our previous article, easy retrieval from confined spaces is key. For work in confined spaces (particularly for an extended period of time) consider a specialty harness with D-rings on each shoulder strap. A Y-Lanyard connects the two D-rings to a winch line, which allows workers to be raised and lowered vertically.

Your winch, or winching mechanism will include a steel or synthetic line and will be your connector. Your line will have a crank, and will connect to a tripod or davit system in order to lower and raise the employee. Security is a major benefit of this fall protection equipment—it includes a braking system, so if the winch operator release the winch, the worker being raised and/or lowered won’t fall.

For ease of use and frequent raising and lowering, a power drive is an optional feature to consider in your winch—it still has manual capabilities, and can be used automatically as well.

Find information and the best fall protection equipment at Hercules SLR.

Source here: https://bit.ly/2Jv4HOB

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Wire Rope: A Manufacturing & Transportation Pioneer

Wire-Rope-Pioneer
Early Life

Andrew Smith Hallidie was born Andrew Smith, later adopting the name Hallidie in honour of his uncle, Sir Andrew Hallidie. His birthplace is variously quoted as London in the United Kingdom. His father, Andrew Smith (a prolific inventor in his own right, responsible for inventing the first box door spring, a floor cramp and had an early patent for wire rope) had been born in Fleming, Dumfrieshire, Scotland, in 1798, and his mother, Julia Johnstone Smith, was from Lockerbie, Dumfriesshire.

Andrew_Smith_Hallidie
Andrew Smith Hallidie

The younger Smith was initially apprenticed to a machine shop and drawing office. In 1852 he and his father set sail for California, where the senior Mr. Smith had an interest in some gold mines in Mariposa County. The mines proved disappointing, and he returned to England in 1853. Andrew Smith Junior, however, remained in California, and became a gold miner whilst also working as a blacksmith, surveyor and builder of bridges.

Inventions

In 1855, young Hallidie built a wire suspension bridge and aqueduct 220 feet long at Horse Shoe Bar on the Middle Fork of the American River. During 1856, whilst working on the construction of a flume at a mine at American Bar, the now, Andrew Smith Hallidie was consulted over the rapid rate of wear on the ropes used to lower cars of rock from the mine to the mill. These ropes wore out in 75 days—unsatisfied with this, Hallidie manufactured rope for the project consisting of three spliced pieces one-eighth of an inch thick, 1200 feet long. These lasted for two years—a vast improvement from the previous 75 day standard.

Hallide invented the Hallidie Ropeway, a form of aerial tramway used for transporting ore and other material across mountainous districts in the west, which he successfully installed in a number of locations, and later patented. After a few years of drifting from camp to camp working claims, narrowly avoiding disasters both natural and man-made, and briefly running a restaurant at Michigan Bluff in the Mother Lode, he abandoned mining in 1857 and returned to San Francisco. Under the name of A. S. Hallidie & Co., he commenced the manufacture of wire rope in a building at Mason and Chestnut Streets, using the machinery from American Bar.

In addition to aerial tramways, his rope was used to build suspension bridges across creeks and rivers throughout northern California. He was often away from the City on his bridge projects until in 1865 he returned to San Francisco and focused his energies entirely on manufacturing and perfecting wire rope. The discovery of the Comstock Lode silver mines in Nevada increased the demand for wire rope.

The city became a major industrial center for mining operations in the 1860s and Hallidie prospered, becoming a leading entrepreneur, US citizen, husband to Martha Elizabeth Woods, and in 1868 President of the prestigious Mechanic’s Institute.

Hallidie’s ‘Endless Wire Ropeway’—Precursor to Cable Cars

It was about this time that Hallidie began to implement a scheme for urban transportation he had been considered for some time, based upon his use of wire rope for the aerial tramways. He worked on improving the tensile strength and flexibility of his wire to develop an “endless” wire rope that could be would around large pulleys, which could then provide continuous underground propulsion for a car that could be attached or released at will from the cable. Hallide took out a patent Endless Wire Rope Patentfor this “Endless Wire Ropeway” and for years it dominated the construction of tramway at mines throughout the West. However, it was the implementation of his Endless Wire Ropeway for moving streetcars in San Francisco that brought him lasting fame and a place in the history books.

It is here accounts differ as to exactly how involved Hallidie was in the inception of the first cable car at Clay Street Hill Railway. One version, has him taking over the promotion of the line when the original promoter, Benjamin Brooks, failed to raise the necessary capital.

In another version, Hallidie was the instigator, inspired by a desire to reduce the suffering incurred by the horses that hauled streetcars up Jackson Street, from Kearny to Stockton Street.

There is also doubt as to when exactly the first run of the cable car occurred. The franchise required the first run no later than August 1, 1873, however at least one source reports that the run took place a day late, on August 2, but that the city chose not to void the franchise. Some accounts say that the first gripman hired by Hallidie looked down the steep hill from Jones and refused to operate the car, so Hallidie took the grip himself and ran the car down the hill and up again without any problems.

The named engineer of the Clay Street line was William Eppelsheimer. Given Hallidie’s previous experience of cables and cable haulage systems, it seems likely that he contributed to the design of the system.

wire rope cable car

The Clay Street line started regular service on September 1, 1873, and was a financial success. In addition, Hallidie’s patents on the cable car design were stringently enforced on cable car promoters around the world and made him a rich man.

A. S. Hallidie & Co. became the California Wire Works in 1883 with Hallidie as president. In 1895, it was sold to Washburn and Moen Co., the oldest manufacturers of wire in the United States (established in 1831).

Hallidie died on April 24, 1900 at the age of 65 of heart disease at his San Francisco residence, but his name lives on. In San Francisco, Hallidie Plaza (near the Powell and Market Street cable car turntable) and the Hallidie Building (an office building in the city’s Financial District) are named after him.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Hercules’ Tips: Prevent Synthetic Round Sling Damage

roundsling

We’ve discussed what to look for when assessing your synthetic round sling for damage—but how do you prevent damage from happening in the first place?

Read on for essential tips to prolong the life of your synthetic round slings.

Round Sling

First and foremost, you should avoid activities that cause chemical burns, bunching, tears or exposed yarns. To prevent damage to your round sling, refrain from:

  • Dropping or dragging it along the ground or rough surfaces;
  • Pulling slings from under loads when load is resting on the sling—place blocks under load if possible;
  • Shortening or adjusting the sling using unapproved methods;
  • Twisting or knotting the sling;
  • Exposing sling to damaging alkali’s or acids;
  • Exposing sling to sources of heat damage or weld splatter;
  • Using slings or allowing exposure to temperatures above 194° (90°C) or below -40°F (-40°C).
  • “Tip Loading” a sling on a hook rather than centering it in base, or “bowl” of the hook;
  • Using hooks, shackles or other hardware that have edges or other rough surfaces which could damage the sling;
  •  Running/driving over sling with a vehicle or other equipment.

In addition to these factors, exposing synthetic slings to certain chemicals can cause minor or total degradation—time, temperature and concentration factors affect degradation. Consult your sling’s manufacturer for specific applications.

Sharp Edges and your Sling

One of the most crucial aspects of protecting your sling is ensuring it’s kept away from sharp edges. It’s important to note that edges or surfaces in contact with your sling don’t have to be “razor” sharp to cause sling failure. Slings can be damaged, worn down or even torn as tension between your sling, connection points and cargo develops.

Protect damage to your sling from corners, protrusions or contact with any edge that isn’t rounded or smooth. To do so, a qualified person will determine appropriate methods for protecting the sling in relation to the conditions it will be used in. The qualified person may use specially developed protectors like sleeves, wear pads or corner protectors to shield the sling from harsh edges.

Conducting lift tests (in a non-consequence setting) is recommended to test your safe-guarding methods—remember to inspect your sling after each lift test for damage and suitability.

Can my Sling Ever Touch Edges?

Avoid your sling directly contacting edges, unless the edge is:

  • Smooth and well-rounded;
  • The size of the radii is adequately large. Use the table below (Image 1) to determine the minimum edge radii suitable for contact with synthetic slings.
Image 1

Prevent further damage to your sling by storing it in a clean, dry and dark place. Use mild soap and water to wash your sling, and never place it in the washing machine. Avoid storing somewhere your sling may be exposed to acids or other harmful chemicals or splatters.

Overall, even when following every safeguard described above things may go wrong. Be sure to asses your load properly, never place any part of your body between yourself and the sling, and always ensure all personnel are clear from lifted or suspended loads.

Original Article here: https://riggingcanada.ca/articles/safe-usage-guides/round-sling-safety-bulletin/round-sling-safety-bulletin.pdf

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.