Jenn Connolly, Sarnia Ontario Branch Manager: Leading with Service

sarnia hercules slr, hoisting equipment

Jenn Connolly is our talented, energetic branch manager at our Sarnia, Ontario branch—She’s worked with people her entire career and knows how to keep her customers and team happy.

Read on to learn more about how Jenn honed her service skills, her tips for working with people and how she’s grown the Sarnia branch. 

Tell us about your educational/professional background:

I’ve been in customer service since I was twelve! MY grandparents owned a small business, so during school holidays I would work there and help with sales. I’ve worked in a variety of roles, whether at a bar, gas station, a McDonalds, or all three at once—Which I have done before.

I worked in call centres for about 6 years before I joined Hercules SLR, and was excited to make a switch.

Wow! That’s a lot to juggle—How did you do it? 

I was juggling a lot more than jobs, too! I lived in Hope, B.C. at the time. Throughout the week and my days would start at 5am where I’d head to a shift at McDonalds, then I’d head to an evening shift at a gas station and my days would end at 10pm. Oh, and Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays I would also work as a bar waitress—Three shifts in total!

Customer service is one of your strengths—How do you lead with service?

A huge portion of it is to know the product. Customer service means being positive, outgoing and working with everybody—Customers and coworkers. It’s important to meet their needs and know what they’re talking about so you can truly provide them with the best service or product for their issue. I work hard everyday to ensure everyone is happy. 

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Call centres in Sarnia, Ontario were always closing! (laughs) After they closed, I worked at the Waterville car plant, realized during my first few days that it wasn’t for me.

I had interviewed with Jason McNutt, and basically hounded him for days! When he told me I had the job, I quit the plant and started a week later—It had a come-home feel for me. 

The branch opened in January, 2013 and I’ve been here since. When I started, I trained in Brampton for 3 days—The last time I got that dirty was when I had a job pulling apart lawnmowers at 14! I was the sole employee here for awhile, which was hard to get used to—But it’s been so gratifying to watch our growth. 

Where have you traveled during your time at Hercules SLR? 

Jenn Connolly, Branch Manager

For work, I’ve travelled to Hamilton, Brampton and finally, finally made it to Nova Scotia to visit the Dartmouth branch and head office!

For pleasure? I go to Cuba twice a year. I actually met a Cuban family through a friend, and went straight from the airport to their house! I stay with them while I’m there, and it’s so nice—They actually have a small place near the back of their property, so my friend and I even have our own place there! They’re super nice to us, and we always bring some Canadian treats for them, too.  

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training with Hercules?

I’ve enjoyed travelling to our Brampton branch (which was actually in Mississauga at the time!) I’ve also done a lot of training at the Hamilton branch—Going there is always such a pleasure since I communicate with them everyday. It’s nice, and I think important to reconnect with them and remember they’re not just emails and phone calls. 

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Ideally, I’d like to visit all of them! I’ve never been to Newfoundland, and would love to see the branches there.

What’s something you’re most proud to have accomplished in your career at Hercules SLR?

I’m just proud of it in general—I love seeing our branch and company succeed in general. I’ve been at the Sarnia branch from the beginning, and I’ve been so proud of its growth. I’m excited for new employees that have recently joined our team, new clients and inspection opportunities. 

In terms of being proud? I’m proud of my customer service skills! Not everyone can work with the public, and do it well and enjoy it—I’ve really found my niche. 

What’s something you love about the securing, lifting and rigging industry?

It’s always changing! No two days look alike. There can be one question with ten answers, and our goals transform constantly—No two lifts are the same, and each client’s needs are specific to the job, job site & conditions and worker’s themselves. 

There are legislations and regulations that change constantly, too, so you have to be on top of your game.

What sort of challenges do you face as a woman in this industry, and how do you overcome/face them?

I think it’s important to know that rigging isn’t about gender, it’s about safety, no matter who you are. We have to work as a whole so we can do the best we can for our coworkers and customers—This is how I see it. I love that my customers just ask for Jenn, because I know my stuff.

Give us some advice for young women who work, or want to work in an industrial environment:

Some of the best advice I can give is to be willing to change. Everyday won’t be the same, and it’s important to work with it, not against it. Dealing with growth and change can definitely be a struggle for me, but Rose (Hercules SLR’s Vice-President of Operations) has taught me (and still reminds me!) that it’s normal to feel uncomfortable, but still important to learn to work with changes.

Don’t make the sandpaper so smooth you can’t work with it—Grit can be a good thing!  


NEED SARNIA SERVICE?

FOR QUESTIONS, QUOTES OR TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CRANE INSPECTIONS, REPAIRS & MAINTENANCE AT OUR SARNIA BRANCH, CONTACT US AT:

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM (519) 332-4462


FOR FURTHER READING ON CAREERS AT HERCULES SLR,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

WOMEN WITH SKILL: KELLY BAIRD-PESTELL TALKS RIGGING INDUSTRY & TEAMWORK

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: ANGELA PENTON, IMPROVING PROCESS

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: KIM REYNOLDS, WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Women in Industry: Adriana Martin, Branch Manager Talks Securing & Safety in Sudbury

women in industry adriana martin

What’s it like to be a women in industry? You’re about to find out. 

We talk to Sudbury, Ontario Branch Manager, Adriana Martin about being a woman in the securing, rigging & lifting industry, her advice for young women hoping to work in an industrial environment and her tips to lead a team that works hard, and plays hard together.  

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: What’s your educational and professional background like? 

Interestingly enough, I went to five years of concurrent university to become a schoolteacher. I taught as a supply (substitute) teacher for a couple of years – I taught grades 3 through 10 before I decided to seek something outside my industry, and ended up in government at the Ministry of Government Services. After that, I worked at a crane service company for five years – I worked with parts and was Head Planner there, where I scheduled the technician’s work. 

5 years later, I was offered a job at Hercules SLR as a CSR and – took it, quite clearly! After my second child was born, I was offered the Branch Manager position when I came back from maternity leave. I stepped into a brand-new role when I returned, and everyone from the branch here in Sudbury, to the executive team at our Head Office has been extremely supportive and helpful with the transition. 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: What excited you about working at Hercules    SLR?

I enjoyed my previous role as a Planner, and excelled in management. As a CSR at the time, I had my own role as Inside Salesperson, which excited me since I knew sales was my strength – I could perform to the best of my ability, and there was room to grow with the company. 

I was especially excited to get service flowing in Sudbury, because it was a huge opportunity but weren’t focused on it. Then, Sudbury had two service technicians but they didn’t have a full-time service department. Within months we had five service technicians, and were completing service calls daily.

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: What useful advice to lead a team do you have?

Transparency is the key to bring everything together. As a leader, I’ve found it important share important details with others, and my team appreciates being in-the-know. When the team’s on the same page, it’s easier for everyone to know what their expectations are. 

Sometimes, transparency can be uncomfortable but I value leading by example, with trust & integrity. I think having clear goals, and being open about the plan needed to achieve them helps our branch work seamlessly. 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: How has mentorship has played a role in your career at Hercules SLR? 

Like I mentioned, I received so much support from the executive team when I stepped into the management role. In Sudbury, Kelly inspired me as a working mom who is tremendously good at her job. She was a huge support and made me realize, “If she can do it, I can do it!” 

That’s another thing that’s inspiring about work at Hercules SLR – there’s women in power here and it’s very motivating. I see successful examples of women with families at Hercules SLR, like Lisa Barkhouse, a manager who has overcame challenges and showed tremendous growth the entire time, or Ina, our Supply Chain Manager. I try to look for success, and emulate it. 

In a way, I find mentors everywhere at Hercules SLR. I don’t know every single answer, but I know who to ask to figure it out. Our individual experiences both strengthen us as a team, and help us move forward as a company. 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: What’s something you’re most proud to have      accomplished during your career at Hercules SLR? 

I’m most proud to have my hard-work recognized, and gain the Branch Manager positon after two years. 

I’ve had experiences where you work hard, and you are good at your job, yet this is not when someone will pull you aside and tell you how great your work is – typically, you’re pulled aside when things are going poorly! It feels good to have my work acknowledged at Hercules SLR. 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: Where have you traveled during your time at Hercules SLR, and where would you like to go? 

So far, I’ve been to Hercules SLR’s head office in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and I’d love to go back! Even though it was cold (laughs), I’d love to see more of the city and explore more as a tourist. 

In the future I’d love to visit our other Ontario branches, in Sarnia, Hamilton and Brampton – especially because we work so closely already.

women in industry, Hercules slr in sudbury ontario
(L-R) Adriana Martin, Branch Manager & Kelly Baird-Pestell, Territory Sales Manager

Each branch in Ontario focuses on a different aspect of the rigging industry. In Sudbury, most of our business centres on crane and equipment servicing. Specifically, we repair cranes and crane equipment, conduct inspections, help manage equipment with CertTracker, our management tool that lets clients easily sort assets and provide equipment for cranes and other hoisting equipment. 

Service is Sudbury’s strength, and each branch masters something different which helps us grow and support each other. We work as a team here – it’s not branch against branch, it’s Team Ontario. 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: What do you enjoy most about the securing,  rigging & lifting industry?

Honestly, overcoming challenges as a woman in this industry. Sometimes men don’t take me seriously or realize I’m well-informed. We have three women in our Sudbury branch alone! Changing this mindset is something I enjoy.

For example, sometimes I’ll answer our phone and the person will ask to speak with the ‘person in charge’, not knowing it’s me! I’m always able to answer their questions and concerns, and am able to prove to them that women in industry are able to run the show. Even though it can be frustrating, it’s hugely rewarding. 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY, Adriana Martin: Finally, what career advice do you have for young women in industry working in an industrial environment, or the trades? 

It might sound like a cliché, but never give up and always do your best. You don’t always know the answer, but you can always find it. 

Don’t let people’s negative words get to you. There can be discouraging talk from outside sources, and if you take it seriously, can be demotivating. Stay positive, focus and push forward and you’ll reach your goals. When confronted with negative words, remind yourself that it’s their problem, not yours


SEEKING SERVICE IN SUDBURY?

FOR QUESTIONS, QUOTES OR TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CRANE INSPECTIONS, REPAIRS & MAINTENANCE AT OUR SUDBURY BRANCH, CONTACT US AT:

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 705-682-4167


FOR FURTHER READING ON WOMEN IN INDUSTRY,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

WOMEN WITH SKILL: KELLY BAIRD-PESTELL TALKS RIGGING INDUSTRY & TEAMWORK

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: ANGELA PENTON, IMPROVING PROCESS

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: KIM REYNOLDS, WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Florence Kelley and the Machine: First Female Factory Inspector

florence kelley, women in history at hercules slr

March is Women’s History Month—To celebrate, we’re sharing the store of Florence Kelley, a woman who’s responsible for many of the seemingly basic work-rights we have today. 

Florence Kelley is a social and political activist who made significant contributions to work and labour standards for factory workers and children—Read on to learn more about her incredible life. 

FLORENCE KELLEY: EARLY LIFE 

Florence Kelley was born to William D. Kelley, abolitionist, judge, founder of the Republican party and congressman. Florence was often sick as a child, and she would read to pass the time–Learning was heavily encouraged heavily by her father. 

Florence’s father, William Kelley, encouraged learning in all its forms. Kelley wanted his daughter to be aware of how children in other circumstances worked, and he would take her to tour factories where children manufactured steel & glass in dangerous conditions, for long hours and very little money. 

At Zurich University, Kelley translated the popular German book “The Condition of the Working Class in England” by Frederick Engels, a project she is well-known for. 

These experiences and her studies informed the work she would dedicate her life to.

FLORENCE KELLEY: LIFE AT HULL HOUSE 

Hull house was a social settlement in the Chicago slums that helped residents and community-members with things like childcare, kindergarten and college classes and grew to include shops and even community-clubs. Women who lived there typically worked there, too. Classes focused on traditional subjects, and also taught the community about topics like civil rights & duties. 

Hull house’s main work and achievement was to develop and enact state child labour laws, a juvenile court system and protection agencies for children. Hull House also supported Women’s Suffrage and various international peace movements. Unfortunately, Hull House was demolished in 1961 and the small, original house was made into a museum. Here, Kelley focused her attentions to 

Following Florence’s work with the Hull House inhabitants, Florence Kelley studied and submitted a report to the Illinois State Bureau of Labor. This led to Kelley being named Chief Factory Inspector in Chicago—The first woman to hold the position.

FLORENCE KELLEY: FACTORY CRUSADER  

Florenece Kelley at Hercules SLR
Florence Kelley

Kelley eventually stepped down as Chief Factory Inspector, but also worked as a special agent inspecting both the work, and living conditions in Chicago garment factories. With this experience, she then began work with the National Consumer League as their National Secretary. 

During this time, Kelley organized Consumers’ Leagues at local and state-levels and travelled, speaking out about the league’s various causes, like worker-rights issues. She founded the New York Child Labor Committee in 1902, and went on to found the National Child Labour Committee just two years later, in 1904. 

She often attended protest meetings, and would speak against sweatshop work conditions in factories. Kelley brought the media into factories. During this time, a very high number of children were diagnosed with smallpox in one large Chicago factory. Kelley presented her investigation findings’ to Illinois lawmakers, which saw that families infected with illness like diphtheria and smallpox were steadily manufacturing clothes during their illness.

Her efforts were huge in passing the Illinois Factory act of 1893. This act was actually based on a previous legislation draft she had written, and included some of the ideas she championed throughout her career. These details of the act included: 

  • An 8-hour work day for women 
  • Restricted child labour 
  • Establish an office of factory inspections

Other causes Florence Kelley published writings and crusaded for, were:

  • Compulsory schooling, available for all children
  • Children under 14 should  be prohibited from work
  • A minimum wage for workers 

Meanwhile, she also lived at a location known as the Henry Street Settlement, where she continued to promote social reformations, particularly those that involved child labour practices. She worked for the National Consumer League for 34 years, until her death. 

FLORENCE KELLEY: LEGACY

Who knows where the North American workforce would be without the work of Florence Kelley? She not only studied, but took action to ensure work conditions were better for women, children and families.

Her contributions were brave, vital and important for women, children and all industrial workers. 


WORK WITH WOMEN WHO MAKE HISTORY

VIEW & APPLY FOR POSITIONS AT HERCULES SLR BELOW

HR@HERCULESSLR.COM 902-468-6827


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

WOMEN WITH SKILL: KELLY BAIRD-PESTELL TALKS RIGGING INDUSTRY & TEAMWORK

WORKPLACE MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS: HOW HERCULES SLR SUPPORTS STAFF

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: KIM REYNOLDS, WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Suspension Trauma: 3 Must-Know Myths

suspension trauma

Suspension trauma has a few different names—Harness hang, harness-induced pathology and orthostatic intolerance (the medical term). Consequences can be fatal, and it’s important to be aware of symptoms and ways to prevent its onset.

Suspension trauma has its fair share of misconceptions—One of the biggest is that it’s a myth. 

In this article, we discuss three myths that surround suspension trauma you must know. 

MYTH #1: SUSPENSION TRAUMA ISN’T REAL

It is! Suspension trauma happens when a worker’s movement is vertically suspended, restricted and upright for an extended period of time and lose consciousness.

But why does this happen? Blood pools in the legs and makes them swell, while blood pressure drops. Typically, when orthostatic intolerance sets in the victim faints so blood will re-circulate through the body—A worker in restrictive fall arresting equipment can’t do this. 

It can be minor, too—A common example is people who are still for long periods of time and faint, or feel dizzy when they get up. 

Now, imagine you’ve arrested a fall, don’t have a rescue plan and first responders are still on the way. 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and now 25 minutes pass. You know that suspension trauma can set in after just 30 minutes. Time is ticking. You’re covered in sweat, you feel dizzy and terribly nauseous.

Finally, you’re cut down and pass out, unconscious. You’re in the hospital—There’s paperwork, lost-time and incident investigations to happen. Who knew a little slip could cause so much trouble?

Yes, you’re alive, but next time, you’ll definitely have a rescue plan. And suspension trauma is real.

MYTH #2: SAFETY HARNESSES MAKE SUSPENSION TRAUMA EXTINCT

Suspension trauma is still a reality. Yes, education, training and equipment reduce injuries and fatalities in industrial workplaces, but prevention is still a priority. Look at it this way—Vaccines exist for illness like the measles, but people still contract it when they don’t use preventative measures. 

Individual factors increase a worker’s risk to develop the trauma, and its effects are not easy to predict person-to-person. 

These factors include: 

  • Individual’s ability to manage anxiety/stress
  • Harness selection & fit
  • Poor training
  • Previous injury or illness 

This is why training is vital. It’s important to teach employees not only what happens when you use the wrong PPE, but psychological coping mechanisms to help a worker deal with a potential fall. Proper training will also emphasize the importance to continuously move your legs in specific ways to maintain circulation—It’s important The right safety harness and leg straps will allow the worker to move 

MYTH #3:  WHEN THE HARNESS IS OFF, IT’S OVER 

Okay, so when I take the safety harness off I’m fine, right? Wrong.  

Workers in vertical positions must receive medical attention immediately after release. In past suspension trauma cases, victims have died after the harness comes off—This is known as ‘rescue death’.

Some doctors think it’s caused when blood tries to circulate through the body at its normal pace, and can’t. Did you know leg muscles are one of your body’s auxiliary pumps? When legs hang, motionless and upright, it pinches the arteries and blood can’t flow to crucial parts of the body, like the heart and brain. 

  • Leg circulation
  • Heart circulation
  • Brain circulation 

Fortunately, like we mention above, industrial environments benefit with the right personal protective equipment (PPE) and training to prevent suspension trauma. Recorded injuries from suspension trauma are somewhat rare—But training and proper PPE are key to this.

A body harness that doesn’t fit properly, is fit with the wrong accessories or is uncomfortable, does more harm than good. Remember—Suspension trauma does exist, the right safety harness help prevent it and negative effects of suspension trauma can linger after the harness is off. It’s important to train yourself and workers (even those who may not be working at heights) of the risk and procedures to take before, during and after a fall.


START BEING SAFETY SMART

STAY SAFE AT WORK AND LEARN THE SKILLS TO GET THERE AT THE HERCULES TRAINING ACADEMY.

TRAINING@HERCULESSLR.COM 902-468-6827


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

HERCULES TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Women with Skill: Kelly Baird-Pestell talks Rigging Industry & Teamwork

kelly baird pestell rigging industry
Kelly Baird-Pestell is our Territory Sales Manager from Sudbury, Ontario and she’s worked in and around the rigging industry for most of her career—just because she’s behind-the-scenes, doesn’t mean her hands don’t get dirty.
 

Read on to learn more about her career path in the rigging industry, and her role at Hercules SLR. 

Tell us about your educational/professional background:

I completed a Business Administration diploma at community college and right from school, went to work in the mining industry. I worked as a mine clerk right out of college for 2 years, and then went to work for another company as their Service/Maintenance Planner, and this role included a lot – I was in-charge of contracts, ordering equipment parts and scheduling jobs for multiple businesses and mine sites in town as we had several contracts. I had a hand in most of went on at the mine. 

I had my third child, went back to work for a short time and decided it was time for a change. I saw a position with Hercules SLR as a Service Supervisor, and this proved to be the best move I could’ve made. Since then, I’ve been Operations Manager and now, as Territory Sales Manager I feel like I have a solid understanding of all aspects of the business.

What made you decide to go into the rigging industry after achieving your diploma? 

The Sudbury mining industry was booming at this time, so it made sense to follow the opportunity – I grew up with family who worked in the mining industry, so it was also something I was familiar with. (Did you know Mining is one of the main industries Hercules SLR serves?!)

I made a goal to get a job with a large mine that’s in Sudbury right out of school, and I did! Some people joke and say I have a horseshoe hanging over my head, (laughs) but I think it has more to do with knowing what I want and having the drive to go after it. I was a single mother that was able to spot an opportunity, decide what I wanted, and achieve it. I walked out of college with a diploma, and right into a job! 

I loved it. Even though I didn’t come from a technical background, I can learn anything I put my mind to. I jumped in headfirst, and even though the environment was tough, I was able to grow a thick skin quickly (important in this industry!), and learn how to hold my ground. 

I also love that the rigging industry impacts the whole community. Especially since mining is so prevalent in Sudbury, the rigging industry impacts our entire community – It’s nice to know work makes a difference.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

The biggest reason I joined the Hercules SLR team is the opportunity for growth. Sometimes, you’re thrown into things that take time to grasp and there’s so much going on that really, you’re forced to learn. 

We have some awesome training opportunities at Hercules SLR, like Covey Leadership Training, Rigging Fundamental training and meetings with suppliers about new products – this hands-on experience is just one of the reasons I wanted to work to Hercules SLR.  

I love working for a Canadian company, contributing to an end-result and actually having my voice heard. Even though we’re a national-wide company, it really has that small-company-feel. At Hercules SLR, I really feel like our executives listen to what we say, and will actually try our suggestions to see if they work. 

Where have you traveled during your time at Hercules SLR?

I haven’t travelled very much during my time at Hercules SLR – I’ve been to Hamilton, Ontario! However, I’d love to visit our head office on the East Coast. Eventually, I want to visit Hercules SLR’s East and West Coast branches and learn more first-hand about how different regions work, and what they focus on. 

rigging industry

 

What’s something you’re most proud to have accomplished in your career at Hercules SLR?

Honestly, I’m most proud of our team in Sudbury. Our region experienced a lot of change over a 6-month period, and during this challenging time we were able to come out stronger than ever. Our team not only brought in new customers, but we were even able to bring back customers we had lost. 

Advice on leading a team:

To be brutally honest, there was an Operations Manager here once who gave me some great, simple, advice – “Have work-life balance,” Which is something I used to struggle with. Now, I don’t live to work, I work to live. I enjoy my family, job and life in general.

To do this, I try to take a step back, get organized, not put too much pressure on myself and remind myself I can only do so much. I find if I’m stressed, I can’t work to my full-potential. So now, I try to put myself first– for me, this means eating healthy, going to the gym and spending time with my family, so I can do my job better. 

Being able to put myself first makes it easier to focus on the different priorities that arise each day. This company doesn’t run with only one person. Hercules SLR needs every team member it has to rise to top and be the leader in the rigging industry. I’m so grateful to be a part of it!

What do you love  most about your job and the rigging industry? 

I love the variety! Everyday looks different. I love helping our clients fix their problems  Nobody calls us because their crane is working! We’re constantly the solution for our clients, and I love being part of the solution, not the problem.

And, as I mentioned, I also love our Sudbury crew Adriana, Rick, David, Netasha, Frank and I make a great team!


Learn more about life at Hercules SLR: 

GET TO KNOW YOUR TRAINING SPECIALIST, JAMIE ENGLAND

GET TO KNOW HERCULES MARKETING SPECIALIST, AMANDA WHITE

GET TO KNOW YOUR LANGLEY, BC NDE INSPECTOR, CHRIS DAVIES


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Don’t Slip Up: Fall Protection Glossary

fall protection glossary

Sometimes you just want a quick, simple definition without all the fluff, so we’ve created a fall protection glossary that does just that.

Do you use a fall arrest system? If you work at 10-feet or higher, you need it – no ifs, ands or buts. Fall protection is a combined system of plans and equipment workers use to protect themselves and their tools from slips or falls, prevent them happening in the first place and minimize worksite risk. 

Read on to discover our fall protection glossary, and stay up-to-date on important safety terms. 

Like our fall protection glossary? Check out our Rigging Glossaries One and Two, and our guide to Rigging Slang.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: A 

ANCHORAGE

A way to securely attach your fall arrest system to the rest of your equipment. 

ANCHORAGE CONNECTOR

A piece that connects and secures your fall arrest, prevention or protection system so it can withstand the forces of work and a potential fall. 

ATTACHMENT POINTS

Loops or d-rings that connect to the body, and allow the worker to attach other components of a fall protection system to it. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: B

BODY HARNESS 

A full-body harness is used to protect workers it does this by distributing the fall’s force throughout the entire body, and ensures the worker’s body remains upright, even after a fall occurs. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: C

CCOHS

The Candian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety is a federal department corporation, and Canada’s national resource for workplace health & safety information. They promote the well-being – physical, psychosocial and mental health – of Canadians by providing information, training, education, management systems and solutions that support health, safety and wellness programs.

CONFINED SPACE

A confined space is an (often enclosed) area not meant for long-term human occupation, with limited exits and entries. Although these spaces are not usually built for humans, work needs to be done there – Some examples of these confined spaces include sewers, aircraft wing (a great example of a confined space that’s not necessarily enclosed), tanks and silos. 

CONNECTOR

A piece of small equipment, or accessory that’s used to connect parts of a personal fall arrest system – These range from individual components, like a carabiner, or those of a larger system, like a d-ring on an absorbing lanyard.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: Dfall protection glossary by hercules slr

DBI-SALA

DBI-SALA® products are trusted for the past 75 years, to help them get the job done well and get home safely. DBI-SALA® delivers fall protection solutions that enable workers to do their best work safely and comfortably. 

DECELERATION DEVICE

Any device used to slow a fall, or absorb energy to lessen the impact of a fall.

DECELERATION DISTANCE

The additional distance between the location of an employee’s attachment point when the fall occurs, between the attachment point’s location when the worker’s fall stops.

DEFLECTION

What tools do when dropped from heights – dropped objects don’t fall straight down, they tend to deflect in another direction (and can often harm innocent bystanders metres away, who are unrelated to the worksite).

D-RING (ATTACHMENT POINT)

An attachment point (can be on the front or back) that lets a worker connect pther components to their fall protection system, like a lifeline or deceleration device. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: F

FALL ARREST 

Fall arrest is the range of fall protection that focuses on the safety of a person who has already fell. 

FALL DISTANCE

Fall distance, or free-fall distance is the term given to the vertical displacement of the fall arrest attachment point on the worker’s fall protection equipment. 

FALL PROTECTION

Refers to the systems and equipment that keep workers safe at heights.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: H

HOLSTERS

Attachment for tool belt to prevent dropping tools when working at heights.

HORIZONTAL LIFELINE

A line held by anchorages, and lets worker attach a lanyard, SRL or other component for horizontal travel. These can be configured to arrest a fall, or for total restraint.

HAZARDS

Any object, situation or act that could cause injury, ill-health or damage workers, the property and the environment – These aren’t always readily apparent, but many hazards can be managed or minimized. There are many different types of hazards, including:

  • Ergonomic
  • Physical
  • Mechanical
  • Chemical
  • Biological 
  • Psychosocial 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: I

IMPACT RESISTANCE

This is an object’s ability to withstand strong forces or shock applied  for example, a worker’s safety harness and lanyard must be able to withstand the wear and tear that regular work gives.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: K

KARABINER

A connector (see below), or coupling link used to secure ropes, harnesses or other components of a fall arrest system. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: L

LADDER

Device used to extend a worker’s reach and work at heights. Commonly-used across a variety of industries to ascend and descend. 

LANYARD

A lanyard is a connection point to your harness, and can be constructed of rope, webbing or cable.  

LEADING EDGE

A leading edge is an under-construction and unprotected side of a surface (think a roof). Its location normally changes as work changes. Leading edges are normally sharp, abrasive and present hazards that you can minimize with fall protection. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: O

OSHA

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration is a regulating US agency who’s responsible to make sure workplaces are safe, and work within the necessary regulations and safety standards.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: P

PROTECTA

Protecta® Brand has comfortable features and fit, like shoulder pads, moisture-wicking back pads, and foam hip pads with mesh for extra breathability. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: R

RESCUE / RESCUE PLAN

Retrieval plan for worker’s at heights or in confined spaces – a rescue plan is an essential part of any fall prevention plan. 

RISK MANAGEMENT

Risk is present at nearly every jobsite, and risk management refers to the act of minimizing and managing those risks so hazards, injuries, fatalities and high financial consequences are prevented.

ROPE GRAB

A rope grab attaches to a safety harness, and typically is less costly than an SRL. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: S

SAFETY HARNESS

A safety harness (also see body harness) is used to protect a worker if they fall while working at height, or in a confined space by catching them as they fall. 

SHOCK-ABSORBER

Webbing device used to extend or lessen forces on the worker if a fall occurs.

SELF-RETRACTING LIFELINE/LANYARD

A self-retracting lifeline, or SRL is a deceleration device with a spring-loaded cable or line that will brake the worker if a fall occurs. They typically are a longer length, and are best applied when a standard shock-absorbing lanyard would not be able to stop the fall in time. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: T

TOTAL RESTRAINT

Refers to the control of a worker’s movement by the connection to an anchorage and restrictive equipment that doesn’t adjust, so a worker is completely stopped when a fall occurs. 


PAY ATTENTION TO FALL PREVENTION!

FIND MORE INFORMATION ON FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT, HOW TO CALCULATE FALL DISTANCE AND MORE ON OUR FAVOURITE SAFETY PRODUCTS FROM BRANDS LIKE 3M, MSA SAFETY AND HONEYWELL-MILLER BELOW.

3M DBI-SALA®

3M DBI-SALA® HARNESSES & LANYARDS

HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT HARNESS


FOR MORE ON FALL PROTECTION,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOG:

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT

FALL ARREST SYSTEM: DON’T FOOL WITH YOUR TOOLS


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

ISO and Construction: Great Things Happen When the World Agrees

iso and construction

ISO is the International Organization for Standards, and is responsible for creating consistent guidelines and specifications to ensure products and services meet rigorous guidelines– How do ISO and construction benefit each other? iso and construction

We’ve discussed what ISO means in the supply chain and we’ve debunked the myths – but what does it mean for the construction industry?  

WHY DO WE NEED ISO STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION?  

The world’s rapid population growth and rampant urbanization have brought an increasing need for a high-quality, safe and sustainable built environment. In the world of building and construction, ISO standards help codify international best practice and technical requirements to ensure buildings and other structures (known as civil engineering works) are safe and fit for purpose.

Updated on a regular basis to account for climate, demographic and social changes, ISO’s standards for construction are developed with input from all stakeholders involved – this includes architects, designers, engineers, contractors, owners, product manufacturers, regulators, policy makers and consumers.

WHO BENEFITS FROM ISO STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION?

INDUSTRY 

ISO standards help to make the construction industry more effective and efficient by establishing internationally agreed design and manufacturing specifications and processes. They cover virtually every part and process of the construction project, from the soil it stands on to the roof.

ISO standards also provide a platform for new technologies and innovations that help the industry respond to local and global challenges related to demographic evolution, natural disasters, climate change and more.

REGULATORS

Regulators can rely on best-practice test methods, processes and harmonized terminology that are constantly reviewed and improved, as a technical basis for regulation and policy related to construction.

CONSUMERS

ISO standards give consumers confidence in the construction industry, providing reassurance that buildings and related structures such as bridges are built to internationally agreed safety and quality standards. These help ensure that the buildings people live, work and study in are safe, comfortable and function as intended.

WHAT STANDARDS DOES ISO HAVE FOR CONSTRUCTION?

Of the more than 21 700* International Standards and related documents, ISO has over 1 100 related to buildings and construction, with many more in development. These cover :

 

iso and construction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHO DEVELOPS ISO STANDARDS? 

ISO standards are developed by groups of experts within technical committees (TCs). TCs are made up of representatives from industry, non-governmental organizations, governments and other stakeholders who are put forward by ISO’s members. Each TC deals with a different subject, such as buildings and civil engineering works or specific construction materials like cement or timber, often in close collaboration with other relevant international or intergovernmental organizations. As an example, ISO/TC 59, Buildings and civil engineering works, through its subcommittees and working groups, has published over 110 International Standards on aspects of quality and performance in the built environment. Visit our Website ISO.org to find out more about the standards developed in a particular sector by searching for the work of the relevant technical committee.

STRUCTURES

Ensures the components of structures are strong enough to withstand appropriate loads and everything fits together as it should is the objective of a number of ISO standards for construction. By establishing defined specifications and test methods, they help ensure structures are designed and built to agreed levels of quality.

  • ISO/TC 98, bases for design of structures, lays down the basic requirements for the design of structures. With standards focusing especially on terminology and symbols, loads and forces, it ensures constructions are built to last and can withstand outside forces such as extreme weather events and natural disasters.
  • ISO/TC 167, steel and aluminum structures, develops standards that specify requirements for the structural use of steel and aluminium alloys in the design, fabrication and erection of buildings and civil engineering works. Its scope of work includes materials, structural components and connections.
  • ISO/TC 165, timber structures, deals with the strength and load requirements of structural timber, while geotechnical analysis (interactions between soil and structure) is the focus of ISO/TC 182, Geotechnics. 

BUILDING MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS

Being able to count on reliable, quality materials is essential for the construction of safe and robust buildings. ISO has more than 100 standards related to the raw materials used in construction, such as concrete, cement, timber and glass. These include standards on terminology, testing procedures and the assessment of safety levels.

We also have over 500 standards on building products, such as doors and windows, wood-based panels, floor coverings, ceramic tiles and plastic pipes and fittings. These not only determine the correct dimensions and specifications to ensure products are manufactured to agreed quality levels, but also define test methods for assessing product safety and resistance to things like crushing or chemicals, so that they do not fail or deteriorate prematurely.

ENERGY PERFORMANCE AND SUSTAINABILITY

From insulation to energy-using products, improving the energy performance of buildings can make a significant contribution to climate-related targets. As a result, building regulations increasingly require energy-efficient designs and measures are put in place to help improve overall performance. 

  • ISO/TC 163, thermal performance and energy use in the built environment, has more than 130 standards providing guidelines and methods for the calculation of energy consumption in buildings, covering areas such as heating, lighting, ventilation and so forth. 

ISO’s energy standards portfolio includes the recently published series ISO 52000, Energy performance of buildings – Overarching EPB assessment, which defines methods to help architects, engineers and regulators assess the overall energy performance of new and existing buildings in a holistic way.

  • ISO/TC 205, building environment design, has a range of standards defining methods and processes for the design of new buildings and retrofit of existing buildings, to create acceptable indoor environments and practicable energy conservation and efficiency

ISO also produces standards that measure carbon emissions from buildings and structures – these include:

  • ISO 21930, sustainability in buildings and civil engineering works – cores rules for environmental product declarations of construction products & services, which establish good practices for environmental claims and communications in the construction sector. 

FIRE SAFETY & FIRE FIGHTING

Fires cause destruction and devastation, costing the lives and livelihoods of people. With the increased density of housing, protecting against fires and detecting fire risks have never been more important.

  • ISO/TC 21, equipment for fire protection and fire fighting, develops standards covering fire protection and fire-fighting apparatus and equipment, including fire extinguishers and fire and smoke detectors.
  • ISO/TC 92, fire safety, develops standards to assess fire risk to life & property, and mitigating such risks by determining the behaviour of construction materials and building structures. 
  • ISO 7240, fire detection and alarm systems, defines the specifications of fire detection and alarm system equipment used in and around buildings – including their testing and performance – in order to ensure they function effectively. 

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT IN CONSTRUCTION

Since most construction works are project-based, having documentation that is clearly understood by all stakeholders is essential to ensure each project is realized in a costeffective manner. Building information models (BIM) are shared digital representations of the physical and functional characteristics of any built object (including buildings, bridges and roads) and form a reliable basis for decision making. They also help protect against the loss of valuable information between stages and processes.

  • ISO TC 59/SC 13, ORGANIZATION OF INFORMATION ABOUT CONSTRUCTION WORKS, develops standards that define the common terms of reference and terminology used in BIMs, as well as requirements for the digital exchange of documentation and data. 

An example is:

  • ISO 16757-1, Data structures for electronic product catalogues for building services – Part 1 : Concepts, architecture and model 
  • ISO/TS 12911, Framework for building information modelling (BIM) guidance 

LIFTS AND ESCALATORS

Rising urbanization and denser populations mean buildings across the world are getting taller. Efficient lifts and escalators are thus essential to cope with the increased loads and access needs and must be operable in times of disaster, such as fire, to evacuate high-rise structures.

  • ISO/TC 178, lifts, escalators and moving walks, has over 50 standards, either published or in development, for all kinds of lifts. These cover requirements for everything from planning and installation to energy performance and safety. 

One prominent example is:

  • ISO/TS 18870, lifts/elevators – Requirements for lifts used to assist in building evacuation

DESIGN LIFE, DURABILITY AND SERVICE LIFE PLANNING

  • ISO/TC 59/SC 14, design life, develops standards that offer a methodology and guidance on how to plan the service life of buildings, including predicting costs and the frequency of maintenance and repairs over their life cycle. The ISO 15686 series on service life planning deals with a wide range of subjects in this area, such as performance audits and reviews, lifecycle assessment and maintenance and life-cycle costing. 

An example is: 

  • ISO 15686-5, buildings and constructed assets service life planning part 5: life-cycle costing, which helps track the cost performance over an asset’s lifespan.

ISO STANDARDS IMPROVE SAFETY, SUSTAINABILITY AND DURABILITY IN CONSTRUCTION

iso and construction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTICLE REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION VIA ISO: ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE


Learn more about ISO Certifications here:

ISO: WHAT DOES IT MEAN IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN

ISO: DEBUNKING THE MYTHS


WHY DO CERTIFICATIONS LIKE THIS MATTER?
find more information on quality & safety at Hercules SLR


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Engineer (by Default) Emily Warren Roebling

bridge engineer

Emily Warren Roebling (September 23, 1843 – February 28, 1903) is known for her contribution to the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge after her husband Washington Roebling developed caisson disease (a.k.a. decompression disease). Her husband was a civil engineer and the chief engineer during the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Emily Roebling

Engineer (by Default) Emily Warren Roebling: Early Life

Emily was born to Sylvanus and Phebe Warren at Cold Spring, New York, on September 23, 1843. She was the second youngest of twelve children. Emily’s interest in pursuing education was supported by her older brother Gouverneur K. Warren. The two siblings always held a close relationship. She attended school at the Georgetown Visitation Academy in Washington DC.

In 1864, during the American Civil War, Emily visited her brother, who was commanding the Fifth Army Corps (a.k.a. V Corps), at his headquarters. At a solider’s ball that she attended during the visit, she became acquainted with Washington Roebling, the son of Brooklyn Bridge designer John A. Roebling, who was a civil engineer serving on Gouverneur Warren’s staff. Emily and Washington married in a dual wedding ceremony (alongside another Warren sibling) in Cold Spring on January 18, 1865.

As John Roebling was starting his preliminary work on the Brooklyn Bridge, the newlyweds went to Europe to study the use of caissons for the bridge. In November 1867, Emily gave birth to the couple’s only child, John A. Roebling II, while living in Germany.

Engineer (by Default) Emily Warren Roebling: Brooklyn Bridge

On their return from their European studies, Washington’s father died of tetanus following an accident at the bridge site, and Washington took charge of the Brooklyn Bridge’s construction as chief engineer.  As he immersed himself in the project, Washington developed decompression sickness, which was known at the time as “caisson disease”.  It affected him so badly that he became bed-ridden.

As the only person to visit her husband during his sickness, Emily was to relay information from Washington to his assistants and report the progress of work on the bridge. She developed an extensive knowledge of strength of materials, stress analysis, cable construction, and calculating catenary curves through Washington’s teachings. Emily’s knowledge was complemented by her prior interest in and study of the bridge’s construction upon her husband’s appointment to chief engineer. For the decade after Washington took to his sick bed, Emily’s dedication to the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge was unyielding. She took over much of the chief engineer duties, including day-to-day supervision and project management. Emily and her husband jointly planned the bridge’s continued construction. She dealt with politicians, competing engineers, and all those associated with the work on the bridge to the point where people believed she was behind the bridge’s design.

In 1882, Washington’s title of chief engineer was in jeopardy because of his sickness. In order to allow him to retain his title, Emily went to gatherings of engineers and politicians to defend her husband. To the Roeblings’ relief, the politicians responded well to Emily’s speeches, and Washington was permitted to remain chief engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge.

The Brooklyn Bridge was completed in 1883. In advance of the official opening, carrying a rooster as a sign of victory, Emily Roebling was the first to cross the bridge by carriage. At the opening ceremony, Emily was honored in a speech by Abram Stevens Hewitt, who said that the bridge was

…an everlasting monument to the sacrificing devotion of a woman and of her capacity for that higher education from which she has been too long disbarred.

Engineer (by Default) Emily Warren Roebling: Later Life

Upon completion of her work on the Brooklyn Bridge, Emily invested her time in several women’s causes including Committee on Statistics of the New Jersey Board of Lady Managers for the World’s Colombian Exposition, Committee of Sorosis, Daughters of the American Revolution, George Washington Memorial Association, and Evelyn College.  This occurred when the Roebling family moved to Trenton, New Jersey. Emily also participated in social organizations such as the Relief Society during the Spanish–American War. She traveled widely—in 1896 she was presented to Queen Victoria, and she was in Russia for the coronation of Tsar Nicholas II.  She also continued her education and received a law certificate from New York University.

Engineer (by Default) Emily Warren Roebling: Tributes

Roebling is also known for an influential essay she authored, “A Wife’s Disabilities,” which won wide acclaim and awards. In the essay, she argued for greater women’s rights and railed against discriminatory practices targeted at women. Until her death on February 28, 1903, she spent her remaining time with her family and kept socially and mentally active.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON RIGGING,

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF ELEVATOR WIRE ROPE

WIRE ROPE: A MANUFACTURING AND TRANSPORTATION PIONEER

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY – INSPECTION TECHNICIAN HEATHER YOUNG


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Is a career in rigging right for you? Hercules SLR will lift you there.

Click here to learn more about career opportunities across Canada with Hercules SLR. 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Welcome to Hamilton, Ontario: Meet Jim Case, Rigger

rigger doing repair at hercules slr

RIGGING WITH OVER 15 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE: JIM CASE INTERVIEW

There’s so much experience to be found at Hercules SLR – today, we sit down with Associate Rigger Jim Case (he has over 15 years’ experience!) to discuss some cool projects he’s rigged, his path at Hercules SLR and some career tips for new workers starting out. 

Read on to learn more about Jim Case, and his job as a Rigger at Hercules SLR in Hamilton, Ontario. 

Tell us about your background as a Rigger, Jim: 

I started working in the rigging industry when I was 20 years old. I worked in a rope shop for 5 years and spliced rope. The company I worked for was bought, then switched hands a few times – I ended up making slings which, at the time, were more popular for us than rope. 

During my career, I’ve spliced a lot of wire rope for communication towers, steel mills, and have done a lot of work to drive belts. I’ve also had the chance to complete some projects for the US Military, specifically catapult ropes. And, I’ve done a bit of testing here in Hamilton, which is always fun! 

Nowadays, it’s easier to find a focus and not move around so much – workers will typically find their niche and grown within that. Examples of these niches could be circus rigging or offshore rigging.  

Now, I’m a rigger with Hercules SLR and fabricating synthetic slings – I enjoy work and keeping busy! 

Why did you decide to work in this industry?

Well, to be honest – I was 20 and needed a job! I put applications in, and I ended up really liking the industry. I’m doing the same job I was then, but now with Hercules SLR! 

I started working in the rigging industry in the late ’70’s – during the early 1980’s, many company owners were streamlining their business and selling off anything that wasn’t related to steel. This means I moved around a little bit! 

There’s a joke I always like to make – I’ve been bought and sold so many times, I don’t know if everyone or nobody wanted me! But, I’m very happy to have ended up with Hercules SLR. 

What’s something you’re most proud to have accomplished in your career at Hercules SLR?

Honestly, I’m proud of my attendance. I’m a loyal employee, and I never miss work.

Tell us about an exciting or cool project you’ve worked on during your time at Hercules SLR:

One of the coolest projects (that’s pretty notable too!) I worked on was preparing rope to temporarily open the roof of The O Stadium in Montreal, where they held the 1976 Olympics.

The O Stadium’s roof was originally intended to be retractable, but (infamously) a tower meant to support it wasn’t completed in time. This meant they needed a way to temporarily hold it open for the Olympic games, and I got to work on that project.

rigger, olympic stadium ropes, hercules slr
Aerial view of The O Stadium during the 1976 Olympics, with ropes installed by Jim

 For the O Stadium roof, we used gelded, 2inch rope and a special lubrication. This took us 2 weeks and we had a 12-guy crew! 

On a day-to-day basis, I really enjoy splicing rope. Even though it can be repetitive sometimes, it’s different everyday. Most of the orders take 1-2 hours to finish, so I can work on a few different types of projects throughout the day which is a nice variety. 

You’ve worked in the rigging industry for many years – tell us why it’s important to service your equipment and gear:

The main reason? Safety. Over the years, I’ve seen workers take a lot of shortcuts, which can lead to a lot of mistakes. Sometimes, workers can be resistant to change  – which is sometimes why they keep taking these shortcuts that might not be a safe procedure.

For example, I splice differently than some of the riggers in Brampton, but the end-product performs the same function. Some riggers stop splicing the rope on the left, right or vice versa. When you make things according to specified standards, you can sometimes take more liberties – like I said, as long as it performs.  

Tell us about a mistake you see made often in the industry:

The biggest mistake has got to be rigging equipment used improperly. When Hercules SLR receives a complaint that a product isn’t working like it’s supposed to, we have to see the equipment being used to remedy any issues they’re having.

In my personal experience, 90% of the time when this happens the equipment isn’t being used correctly – which is why it isn’t working correctly! 

What advice do you have for a new rigger, or someone just entering this industry?

A  big piece of advice I have for new workers in any industry really, is to plan your daily schedule at the beginning of your day – this makes it easier to deal with the flow of the day. 

For rigging, specifically, do the job right the first time! Earlier, you asked me about mistakes I see in the industry – rigging equipment passes through many different phases. It’s manufactured, used to lift various things and as I mentioned, is often used improperly. When rigging equipment fails, expensive loads can be damaged, companies can be shut down and people can be injured, or worse – killed. 

It’s important a rigger understands the consequences of cutting corners – and doesn’t do it. 

Any other helpful tips?

To select the right equipment for a lift, a big tip is to talk to someone who knows their stuff, and the end-user – whoever will be using the equipment. In a company, it can be helpful to talk to the sales team to learn more about this. 

For example, who will lift the rope? Do they have the capability to lift an 800-pound rope, or a 20-pound rope? They may want to select grommet-type or cradle-rope, which is usually smaller and more flexible. It’s important to make sure whoever’s at the end of the line can handle it. 

What’s something people might be surprised to learn about rigging?

Material and fabrication are surprising! People are astounded at the strength of nylon round slings! Sometimes, synthetic slings can be stronger and more flexible than other types of rope, like wire rope. For example, there used to be a rope made of Kevlar rope (this is what bulletproof vests are made of. FYI) that could float, but was heavier than steel – I haven’t seen it used recently, but it was used to pull huge barges. 

Finally, what do you like most about being a rigger at Hercules SLR? 

Our team. We have a great group of people here in Hamilton, Ontario. We’re like friends, but we actually get stuff done. 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Safety at Stake: New MSA V-SERIES™ Fall Protection

msa v-series

A BIG DAY FOR HARNESS WEARERS 

The MSA V-SERIES harness line is now available!  Introducing the V-FLEX™, V-FIT™, and V-FORM™—each designed for your comfort and safety needs.

Focus on your work instead of your harness. Why V-SERIES? We have three reasons:

1. Exclusive racing-style buckle eliminates the need for chest straps, creating a closer, more comfortable harness 

2. Athletic cut contours the harness to the body for increased upper torso mobility

3. Pull-down adjustment allows wearer to easily and quickly make adjustments to get the right fit

The safest fall protection harness is the one you’ll actually want to wear. Each V-Series harness delivers exceptional comfort – so you can focus on your work, not your harness.

SUPERIOR COMFORT

Exclusive racing-style buckle allows for a close, comfortable-fitting harness—Eliminating the need for bulky chest straps or cumbersome buckles.

 
INCREASED FLEXIBILITY

Racing-style buckle creates an athletic cut, contouring the harness to the body for improved upper torso movement on the job. 

 
ADJUSTABILITY

Pull-down adjustment allows you to quickly get the right fit that lasts throughout the work day.

 

 

 

So, what’s included in the MSA V-Series™? msa v-form series

MSA V-SERIES V-FORM™ SETTING THE STANDARD

Features: 

Racing-style buckle

Athletic cut

Pull-down adjustment

Easy-to-inspect stitch patterns 

msa v-series

MSA V-SERIES V-FIT™ RAISING EXPECTATIONS

Has all the benefits of V-Form™, plus:

Body-conforming shoulder pad 

Coated webbing

Horizontal leg straps

Dedicated attachment point for Personal Fall Limiters 

msa v-series

 

MSA V-SERIES V-FLEX™ RAISING EXPECTATIONS

Has all the benefits of the V-Fit™, plus: 

Thermoform shoulder pad designed for cooling

Leg padding

Swiveling hip juncture for mobility 

Integrated suspension 

 

MSA Safety Fall Protection Systems


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MSA SAFETY: NEW V-SERIES ENERGY ABSORBING LANYARD

MSA PRESS RELEAS: NEW JET-STYLE FIREFIGHTER HELMET

NEW FROM MSA: SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.