Confined Space Hazards | Training Tuesday

man entering confined space

4 CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS | TRAINING TUESDAY

Welcome to Training Tuesday! This week, the focus is on confined space hazards and the top 5 hazards you should know about before you enter, exit, or just work around them.  

This article will cover

  • How to define a confined space 
  • 4 specific confined space hazards 
  • What needs to happen before you enter a confined space 

We’ve covered what a confined space is on the blog before—But what specific hazards should you be on the lookout for?

Confined spaces pose hazards by their very definition—The Canadian Occupational Safety and Health Regulations define a confined space as ‘a partially or enclosed space, that may become hazardous to an employee who enters it due to’: 

  • Its design, construction, location or atmosphere 
  • The materials or substances in it, or
  • Any other conditions relating to it. 

4 CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS

When investigating accidents that occur in confined spaces, reports show they occur because worker’s aren’t well-trained or informed on the potential hazards when they enter confined spaces.

Oxygen deficiency causes about 50% of confined space deaths, and often, no testing is done before these accidents. Over 50% of confined space deaths are from rescue attempts by other workers. 

Four specific hazards workers face in confined spaces are: 

  1. Oxygen deficiency and oxygen enrichment
  2. Fire and/or explosion
  3. Toxicity
  4. Drowning in liquids and/or entrapment in free-flowing solids. 

Why are these things so hazardous in confined spaces? Read on to find out. 

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS | OXYGEN DEFICIENCY—AND THE OPPOSITE

Lack of oxygen is the first hazard facing workers who must enter a confined space. Before entry (and if your risk assessment calls for it) you must test the space for oxygen with an oxygen monitor. You may also need to test the air while you work in the space.

Oxygen deficiency is caused by:

  1. Gases like nitrogen that displace flammable gases   
  2. Oxygen is taken by: 
  • Combustion of flammable substances, like in-welding and other ‘hot work’ 
  • Explosions or fires (Oxygen levels can be dangerously low after a fire is out, since oxygen replaces the products of combustion) 
  • Chemical reactions like metal rust
  • People who work in the space and use available oxygen as they breathe 

Normal air has 21% oxygen by volume—These are the effects of reduced oxygen levels: 

  • 16% Oxygen: Judgement and breathing become impaired—You become quickly exhausted
  • 12% Oxygen: Worker becomes unconscious, and will die unless taken to fresh air
  • 6% Oxygen: Breathing difficulty—This level of oxygen is fatal immediately 

OXYGEN ENRICHMENT—THE OPPOSITE

Too much oxygen is just as bad as not enough oxygen. An oxygen-enriched atmosphere has more than 23% oxygen by volume. 

What’s the risk of too much oxygen? Flammable materials like clothing and hair will burn immediately. Do not use pure oxygen to ventilate a confined space—This is a fire and explosion hazard.  

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS FIRE AND EXPLOSION

Combustible gases have an explosive range with a lower explosive limit (LEL), and an upper explosive limit (UEL). If the fuel and air mixture is below the LEL or over the UEL, ignition won’t take place—Gas is combustible between its LEL or UEL. 

What else contributes to explosions or fires?

  • Chemicals
  • Poor ventilation 
  • Static electricity 
  • Machinery 

WHAT’S HOT WORK? 

Hot work is considered work that can produce an ignition. It’s important to 

Hot work can be:

  • Welding
  • Cutting
  • Grinding
  • Work with non-explosion proof electrical equipment 

Before you perform hot work in a confined space, you should:

  • Purge/ventilate the area to reduce combustible concentration of airborne dust or mist to a safe level 
  • If ventilation or purging can’t reduce combustible dust, the space must be made inert—This is done by adding an inert gas to alter oxygen levels. The space must be monitored continuously to make sure the atmosphere stays inert. 
  • Wear proper respiratory personal protective equipment, and have the right gear on-hand to rescue or let nearby personnel enter (Like we mention, over 50% of confined space deaths happen to people who try to rescue others, so this is very important). 
  • Make sure the space is purged and consistently ventilated to maintain an atmosphere of less than 5% the LEL
  • Make sure the space is purged and consistently ventilated to maintain an oxygen concentration under 23% 
  • Continuously monitor atmosphere levels in the space
  • Have an entry permit that includes provisions for hot work and includes the appropriate measures to take. 

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS TOXICITY

There are two huge risks posed by toxic gas in confined spaces. 

  • Chemical asphyxiation 
  • Irritation to respiratory system, skin or eyes 

Especially harmful toxic gases include: 

  • Hydrogen sulphide (H2S): Hydrogen sulphide is a by-product of sewage treatment, petroleum and other industrial processes. Hydrogen sulphide is particularly dangerous as it has a noticeable smell in small concentrations, but hydrogen sulphide gas takes away your sense of smell too, which can make a worker think they’re safe or the smell has dissipated, when in reality, it still lurks. It’s important to note that hydrogen sulphide collects in low areas since it’s heavier than air. 
  • Methane (CH4): Highly explosive. Methane is a by-product of sewage that leaks from gas lines, and can be found in coal mines. Methane displaces oxygen, which can smother workers.  
  • Sulphur dioxide (SO2): Colourless with a strong smell, sulphur dioxide is poisonous in small amounts. 
  • Carbon monoxide (CO): Colourless, odourless, tasteless and fatal in very small concentrations. It comes from incomplete combustion. Being overexposed to carbon monoxide can cause ears to ring, nausea, headache and sleepiness. 

TEST CAREFULLY FOR TOXICITY BEFORE PERSONNEL ENTERS A CONFINED SPACE.

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS | DROWNING IN LIQUIDS AND/OR ENTRAPMENT IN FREE-FLOWING SOLIDS 

This one is pretty self-explanatory, but in confined spaces where liquids or flowing solids are present (and they often are) there’s always risk of these substances drowning, suffocation, burns or other injuries.

Some of these substances include: 

  • Water (in a tank, for example) 
  • Grain (in a silo) 
  • Materials, like soil, that fall into an excavation or trench 

AVOID CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS—DO THIS BEFORE YOU ENTER: 

Before a worker enters a confined space, these steps must be followed: 

1) Identify the confined space 
2) A plan for entry and work is in place
3) Training is given to all employees who work in or near the space
4) Entrant training
5) Attendant training
6) Training in the use of Personal Protective Equipment
7) Provide the PPE
8) Air Monitoring Protocols, which include possible purging or inerting of the space and then ventilation

HERE ARE SOME MORE TIPS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU ENTER OR WORK IN A CONFINED SPACE:

worker descends into confined space

GOOD RULE TO FOLLOW: IF YOU CAN’T TEST, IF YOU CAN’T VENTILATE, IF YOU DON’T HAVE BREATHING APPARATUS, IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN ENTRY PROCEDURE DON’T GO IN. 


VISIT OUR BLOG FOR RELATED READING:

CONFINED SPACES: HERCULES’ SAFETY TIPS

STUCK IN A TIGHT SPOT? WHAT TO KNOW IN A CONFINED SPACE

CONFINED SPACE: RESCUE & RETRIEVAL—3M GUEST BLOG


NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES WIRE ROPE SLING INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

National Emergency Preparedness Week | What you Need to Know

national emergency preparedness week header

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK

Since 1996, National Emergency Preparedness week happens each year in Canada for one week. This year, it’s being held from May 5-11. 

This is a national awareness campaign and is a collaboration between the provinces, emergency organizations and other groups across the country. It’s a great time to make sure your workplace, and your home is equipped with an emergency plan and kit to stay safe if an emergency happens. 

National Emergency Preparedness Week is meant to showcase the importance of being prepared for a range of emergencies—These three steps are recommended to prepare: 

  • Know the risks 
  • Make a plan 
  • Get an emergency kit 

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 1) KNOW THE RISKS 

One of the most useful (yet simple) things you can do to be prepared for an emergency is to understand the region you live in. Natural disasters are a risk in Canada, and they can vary depending on which region you live in. 

There are some risks other than natural disaster that are important to prepare for—These can include technological hazards, industrial or transportation accidents or power outages. 

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 2) MAKE A PLAN 

It’s important to have a plan in-case of an emergency. You can have an emergency plan that works for a variety of different circumstances. 

They plans might be different depending on your family, location and other factors. It doesn’t take long to create an emergency preparedness kit either—20 minutes is all it takes to ensure you, your workplace and family is safe in case of an emergency situation. 

Some important things to keep in mind when creating your emergency plan are: 

  • Be familiar/Have copies of your provincial emergency response plan. 
  • Plan how your family/workforce will communicate with each other if an emergency happens and you’re not together 
  • Plan for specific risks like earthquakes, power outages and severe storms 
  • Keep people from your neighbourhood in mind that may need extra help during an emergency, for example, an elderly neighbour, and assign ‘block buddies’ for those who require one. 

GET YOUR DOWNLOADABLE EMERGENCY PLAN CHECKLIST HERE

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 3) GET AN EMERGENCY KIT 

Emergency kits can be bought from places like Red Cross First Aid, the Salvation Army, or you can create you own. 

We recommend looking at your emergency kit each year and be sure to replace the food inside. 

GET YOUR DOWNLOADABLE EMERGENCY KIT CHECKLIST HERE

Here are some additional items you might want to keep in your emergency kit (beyond the basic items found on the checklist above). 

In your car:

  • Blanket 
  • Candle & matches 
  • Spare clothes and shoes 
  • First aid kit with seatbelt cutter 
  • Flashlight (crank or battery-powered)—Replace batteries once a year 
  • Non-perishable food 
  • Contact information
  • Radio—Replace batteries once a year 
  • Small shovel, scraper and snowbrush
  • Warning light or road flares 
  • Water 
  • Whistle
  • Antifreeze, windshield washer fluid
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Road maps
  • Sand, salt or cat litter (non-clumping)
  • Tow rope and jumper cables 

FAST FACTS:

  • Around 5,000 earthquakes happen in Canada each year.
  • The Saguenay flood of 1996 was Canada’s first billion-dollar disaster and caused mud, rocks, water and trees to become dislodged and 12,000 people had to evacuate their homes.
  • Only 40% of Canadians have an emergency kit prepared, yet 85% of Canadians say it’s important to have one. 
  • Hailstones range in size—They can be the size of peas or baseballs.
  • Hurricanes can cause more widespread damage than tornadoes—Their damage can hit over 1,000 kilometres.
  • In storms, power lines, ice or branches can fall even hours after the storm has ended. 
  • One of the worst storms in Canadian history was an ice storm on the East Coast in 1998—Power outages lasted up to 4 weeks, and restoration efforts cost nearly $3billion. 
  • In 2007, 410 severe weather events plagued the prairie provinces—This is almost double their nearly average of 221 severe weather events.
  • The cost of natural disasters worldwide has increased by $7billion over the past decade. 
  • The biggest landslide in Canadian history saw a 40-metre deep scar that covered 80 city blocks in 1894 at Saint-Alban, Quebec. 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS INSTRUCTIONS 

We’ve given you a lot of tips about what you should include in your emergency preparedness kit. Here are more steps you can take for an emergency plan: 

In an emergency

  • Follow your emergency plan
  • Get your emergency kit 
  • Make sure you’re safe before assisting others 
  • Listen to the radio or television for information from authorities—Local officials might advise you to stay where you are. Follow their instructions! 
  • Stay where you are until it’s safe to evacuate. 

Evacuation orders

  • NOTE: Authorities won’t ask you to leave home unless they have a reason to believe you’re in danger 
  • If ordered to evacuate, take your emergency kit, wallet, personal identification for each family member and copies of essential family documents with you. Bring a celluar phone and spare battery or charger with you, if you have one. Use travel routes specified by local authorities. 
  • If you have time, call or e-mail your out-of-town contact (Here’s a printable list you can use to write down contact information) 
  • If there’s time, leave a note that tells others when you left and what you’ve shut off. If officials give the direction, shut off water and electricity. 
  • If you have a natural gas service, leave it on unless officials tell you to turn it off. If you do turn off the gas, the gas company will have to reconnect it—Note that in a major emergency, it could take weeks for a professional to respond in a major emergency. 
  • If you have them, take pets with you. Lock your home and follow instructions from authorities. 
  • If you go to an evacuation centre, register personal information at the registration desk—Leave only when authorities advise it’s safe. 

FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOG:

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: BUILDING A SAFETY CULTURE AT HERCULES SLR

FALL PROTECTION SAFETY: WHAT’S YOUR IQ?


SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT—HERCULES SLR PROVIDES WORKPLACE SAFETY TRAINING, INSPECTIONS & MORE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


 FACEBOOK LINKEDIN  TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Chain Sling Inspection | 5 Steps for In-Depth Inspection from CM

chain by columbus mckinnon

In-Depth Alloy Chain Sling Inspection | 5 Steps

How should you conduct an in-depth alloy chain sling inspection? Columbus McKinnon is here on the Hercules SLR blog to share what a professional rigger needs to know when they perform an alloy chain sling inspection. 

This blog will cover: 

  • Twists and bends in your chain sling,
  • Nick, cuts & gouges in the chain links 
  • Wear and corrosion 
  • Chain stretch and elongation
  • OSHA guidelines for chain sling inspection 

Read on to become a chain sling inspection pro. 

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION PART 1: TWISTING & BENDING

Consider that chain is evaluated by applying loads in a pure tensile link end-to-link-end fashion and rated accordingly.

Rigging chain around edges or corners alters the normal loading pattern significantly. A lack of proper padding or consideration of the D/d ratio (see above) for chain can result in twisted and bent links. Once a chain is twisted or bent it will alter inner link stresses which can result in failure. For this reason, all chain containing twisted or bent links must be removed from service immediately.

Since 1933, the National Association of Chain Manufacturers represents domestic manufacturers of welded and weldless chain and have conducted D/d testing on alloy chain. 

As a result of this testing, the NACM came out with the chart below which shows reductions in working load limits based on D/d ratio of alloy chain rigged around an edge or a corner. Consult the manufacturer for any D/d below 2.  ASME B30.9 2014 has adopted this chart into the new standard.

columbus mckinnon chain sling rated capacities

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION PART 2: NICKS & GOUGESchain sling link tensile and compression stress pattern

When chain is used to lift, pull or secure materials, the outside surface of the links can come in contact with foreign objects that can cause damage. Nicks and gouges frequently occur on the sides of a chain link, which are under compressive stress, reducing their potentially harmful effects.

The unique geometry of a chain link tends to protect tensile stress areas against damage from external causes. Figure 1 shows that these tensile stress areas are on the outside of the link body at the link ends where they are shielded against most damage by the presence of interconnected links.

Tensile stress areas are also located on the insides of the straight barrels, but these surfaces are similarly sheltered by their location. However, gouges can cause localized increases in the link stress and can be harmful if they are located in areas of tensile stress, especially if they are perpendicular to the direction of stress. Refer to Figure 1.

Figure 2 shows nicks of varying degrees of severity. Reading clockwise, at three o’clock there is a longitudinal mark in a compressive stress area. Since it is longitudinal and located in a compressive stress area, its effect is mitigated, but good workmanship calls for it to be filed out by hand.

At about five o’clock there is a deep transverse nick in an area of high-stress. A similar nick is located at six o’clock in the zone of maximum tensile stress. Both of these nicks can create a potentially dangerous escalation of the local stress and must be filed out with careful attention to not damage other parts of the chain link or chain. A nick that was located at eight o’clock has been filed out properly.

Although the final cross section is smaller, the link is stronger because the stress riser effect of the notch has been removed. The remaining cross section can now be evaluated for acceptability by measuring it and applying the criterion for worn chain. See the “Wear Allowances Table” below. 

chain sling wear allowances table

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION PART 3: WEAR & CORROSION

When used in rigorous material handling applications, chain becomes worn or corroded easily. It is important to inspect chain for defects on a regular basis to avoid an unsafe lifting condition or even operator injury. When corrosion and wear occur, it results in a reduction of link cross-section which can lead to decreased strength of the chain.

Corrosion can occur anywhere chain comes in contact with harsh chemicals, water or when it is used in tough environments.

Wear can occur in any portion of a link that is subject to contact with another surface.

The natural shape of chain confines wear, for the most part, to only two areas. These are, in order of importance, (a) at the bearing points of interlink contact, and (b) on the outsides of the straight side barrels that may be scraped from dragging chains along hard surfaces or out from under loads.

collapsed chain link example
Figure 2: Inspection for interlink wear can easily be detected be collapsing the chain.

Figure 2 illustrates the condition of interlink wear and shows how to inspect for it. Notice how easily such  wear can be detected by collapsing the chain to separate each link from its neighbors. An operator or inspector can also check for corrosion using the same method.

When chain wear or corrosion is observed, the next step is to determine how severe the damage is and if the chain can still be safely used.

General surface corrosion can be removed by cleaning and oiling the chain. If pitting is observed after cleaning and oiling, remove from service. Next, the operator should take a caliper measurement across the worn section of chain and compare it to the minimum allowable dimension for that chain.

See the Wear Allowances chart above for minimum section dimensions or chain wear allowances for Grade 80 and 100 Chain. If the chain does not meet these minimum dimensions, it should be removed from service and replaced.

 

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION PART 4: STRETCH & CHAIN ELONGATION

A visual link-by-link inspection is the best way to detect dangerously stretched alloy chain links.

Reach should be measured from the upper bearing point on the master link to the bearing point on the lower hook. The smallest sign of binding or loss of clearance at the juncture points of a link indicates a collapse in the links’ sides due to stretch. Any amount of stretch indicates overloading, and the chain should be removed from service.

Note: A significant degree of stretch in a few individual links may be hidden by the apparent acceptable length gauge of the overall chain. This highlights the importance of link-by-link inspection.

Alloy steel sling chain typically exhibits well over 20% elongation before rupture. The combination of elongation and high strength provides energy absorption capacity.

However, high elongation or stretch, by itself, is not an adequate indicator of shock resistance or general chain quality and should not be relied upon by riggers to provide advance warning of serious overloading and impending failure.

Prevent overloading the chain sling by selecting the right type and size of sling. Again, any amount of stretch means the sling’s been overloaded and it should be removed from service.

There is no short-cut method that will disclose all types of chain damage. Safety can only be achieved through proper inspection procedures. There is no adequate substitute for careful link-by-link scrutiny.

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION PART 5: OSHA CHAIN SLING INSPECTION

OSHA Chain Sling Inspection standards have gone through minimal changes since they were published on July 27, 1975. These regulations serve as a guide for rigger’s and other competent personnel that will inspect chain slings. 

Applicable sections of the Code of Federal Regulations (29 CFR 1910.184) include:

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION | 1910.184(d) Inspections

Each day before being used, the sling and all fastenings and attachments shall be inspected for damage or defects by a competent person designated by the employer. Additional inspections shall be performed during sling use, where service conditions warrant. Damaged or defective slings shall be immediately removed from service.

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION | 1910.184(e) Alloy Chain Slings

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION: 1910.184(e)(1) Sling Identification

Alloy steel chain slings shall have permanently affixed durable identification stating size, grade, rated capacity and reach.

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION: 1910.184(e)(2) Attachments

  • 1910.184(e)(2)(I)

Hooks, rings, oblong links, pear shaped links, welded or mechanical coupling links or other attachments shall have a rated capacity at least equal to that of the alloy steel chain with which they are used or the sling shall not be used in excess of the rated capacity of the weakest component.

  • 1910.184(e)(2)(ii)

Makeshift links or fasteners formed from bolts or rods, or other such attachments, shall not be used.

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION: 1910.184(e)(3) Inspections

  • 1910.184(3)(I)

In addition to the inspection required by paragraph (d) of this section, a thorough periodic inspection of alloy steel chain slings in use shall be made on a regular basis, to be determined on the basis of (A) frequency of sling use; (B) severity of service conditions; (C) nature of lifts being made; and (D) experience gained on the service life of slings used in similar circumstances. Such inspections shall in no event be at intervals greater than once every 12 months.

  • 1910.184(e)(3)(iii)

The employer shall make and maintain a record of the most recent month in which each alloy steel chain sling was thoroughly inspected, and shall make such record available for examination.

  • 1910.184(e)(3)(iii)

The thorough inspection of alloy steel chain slings shall be performed by a competent person designated by the employer, and shall include a thorough inspection for wear, defective welds, deformation and increase in length. Where such defects or deterioration are present, the sling shall be immediately removed from service.

Please note that while the requirements under (d) for daily inspections are not explicit as to scope or maintenance of records, it is possible that individual OSHA inspectors may have different views on conformity—The minimum 12-month interval inspections required under (e) call for thorough inspection and written records.

To ensure you remain compliant with chain sling inspection in your area, be sure to check both manufacturer and provincial standards. 


FIND MORE CHAIN SLING INSPECTION READING ON OUR BLOG:

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE

RIGGING TIPS: AVOID COMMON WIRE ROPE DAMAGE

WIRE ROPE: A MANUFACTURING & TRANSPORTATION PIONEER


NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES CHAIN SLING INSPECTION, REPAIRS & MORE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


 FACEBOOK LINKEDIN  TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

How we Make a HUGE Wire Rope Sling in Hamilton, Ontario

spools to make wire rope sling

HOW HERCULES SLR IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO MAKES A GIGANTIC WIRE ROPE SLING

What are we up to at Hercules SLR in Hamilton, Ontario? We’re making big things – a big wire rope sling, specifically.  

Check out these shots of Bryan Jarret, Production Supervisor and Adam making a sling for crane-use. It takes both of these guys just to hold it! 

So, how do Hercules SLR rigger’s make a sling this big? We’ll show you. 

WIRE ROPE SLING MAKING—WATCH HOW IT’S DONE

rigging tech pressing wire rope sling

 

 

 

 

 

This is Bryan Jarret, our Production Supervisor at Hercules SLR in Hamilton, Ontario. Here, he’s pressing these huge lengths of wire rope to form a 6-foot eye on each end. 

This large sling will eventually be used on a crane for one of our clients’ here in Ontario. 

HOLDING A SLING IS A TWO-MAN JOB

rigging techs hold wire rope sling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A sling this size takes about 1-hour to splice. Each foot weighs about 15-20 pounds on its own. One technician holds the sling, while the other technician splices the opposite end. 

FORMING THE WIRE ROPE SLING EYE

wire rope sling socket swaging

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A wire rope this size has a WLL of 76,000lbs. If these two rigging technicians were standing on top of one another, the sling would still be taller than both of them! 

BIG WIRE ROPE SLINGS NEED BIG MUSCLE

rigging techs swage and splice steel cable sling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here, they complete the pressing/swaging process on the other side. As the wire rope strands become tighter, the technicians must manually bend through the eye, which takes a lot of arm-strength!  

There you have it, folks—Here’s how our riggers make a sling that lifts BIG things. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES WIRE ROPE SLING INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 790-3112


FOR RELATED WIRE ROPE SLING READING,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE

RIGGING TIPS: AVOID COMMON WIRE ROPE DAMAGE

WIRE ROPE: A MANUFACTURING & TRANSPORTATION PIONEER


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK LINKEDIN  TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Forklift Driving | Training Tuesday

forklift operator driving in warehouse

FORKLIFT DRIVING

Forklift driving takes a lot more than just lifting and moving materials – Forklift operators should have an understanding of safety & balance, to keep materials, themselves and others safe. One of the biggest risks forklift drivers face is tipping-over. According to OSHA, approximately 25% of forklift fatalities were from tip-over incidents. 

Yes, it might seem basic, but it’s important to recognize the forklift’s centre of gravity and stability triangle. In this blog, we’ll discuss tips to keep you balanced and everything else you need to know to stay safe in, out and around the forklift.

This Training Tuesday, we’ll cover:

  • Some of the biggest safety risks associated with balance and the most common type of forklift
  • Forklift centre of gravity & the stability triangle
  • Other factors that contribute to forklift accidents and tip-overs 
  • How to conduct visual & operational forklift inspections 
  • Safety tips to remain balanced & safe while driving a forklift

There are four main potential safety risks considering balance and forklift driving. These are:

  1. How likely the forklift is to tip-over forward;
  2. How likely the forklift is to tip-over on its side;
  3. Maximum braking-level (or stopping distance) the forklift can perform;
  4. Maximum level of reversed-acceleration the forklift can perform. 

In Canada, counter-balanced forklifts are one of the most often-seen types of forklift. 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

As we mentioned earlier, a counterbalance forklift has three ways it can tip—forward, or sideways, on the left or right

While driving a forklift, it’s important to maintain its centre of gravity. The centre of gravity lives within the stability triangle

Centre of gravity is defined as the point within the triangle where the bulk of the mass is located. Although we don’t recommend trying it out, the centre of gravity is also the point where the forklift could balance. Again—Take don’t try this one out, we recommend taking our word for it. 

Calculating the forklifts’ centre of gravity is complex (and unnecessary for daily use), but there are a few important things to understand in order to remain balanced as you operate the forklift. 

When the forklift is stationary, it won’t tip as the force is on the centre, but tilts forward when force is applied to the front tines (also called forks) or its back. It’s also worth noting that a forklift is more likely to tip sideways, than forwards. Therefore, adding a load to the front forks decreases the chance the forklift will tip on its side.   

Alternatively, lifting the forks on the truck with a load will cause the forklifts stability to decrease on all sides.

The diagram below shows the stability triangle. 

forklift driving stability triangle diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | WHAT ELSE CONTRIBUTES TO ACCIDENTS? 

Like we mentioned, some types of loads are more likely to cause your forklift to tip. Here are some features of a load that create hazards: 

  • Awkwardly stacked or piled in a way that causes instability
  • Unmaintained pallets 
  • Load is too heavy or blocks the operators vision 

Here are some of the features of a forklift that contribute to forklift accidents, like tip-overs:

  • Faulty steering, brakes, clutch, transmission or mast assembly 
  • Inadequate or malfunctioning safety devices
  • Forklift emissions
  • Poorly organized controls and displays on the forklift 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | SAFETY TIPS

To help maintain centre of gravity, here are a few tips to help you stay stable while operating a forklift with a load: 

  • Don’t distribute load unevenly on the forks, this will increase the frequency of sideways tip-over 
  • Don’t load the forklift beyond its WLL, this will make the forklift prone to tipping 
  • Be sure to move the load all the way to the back of the forks 

What are some risk factors of work design that contribute to forklift accidents?:

  • Stress or increased speed 
  • Not using the correct tools, attachments and/or hardware 
  • Incompetent operator, or improper forklift assigned
  • Badly serviced, unmaintained and/or aging forklift(s)
  • Lack of training for workers/operators 
  • Poor work layout for travel

Here are some risk factors while operating the forklift that contribute to accidents: 

  • Driving at high speeds
  • Driving with an elevated load 
  • Improper parking, reversal, turning, braking or acceleration with forklift  
  • Poor communication and/or warnings for nearby personnel
  • Blocking wheels on semi-trailers of railway car improperly 

If you’re operating a forklift, you should never

  • Drive a forklift without any capacity ratings listed
  • Travel in a forklift with a load raised more than 4inches 
  • Leave truck alone while running, or with a load 
  • Let unauthorized personnel operate a forklift (We’ve all seen the episode of The Office where Michael operates the forklift? Okay, good.) 
  • Attempt to adjust the load from the operating cab
  • Raise a load extending over the load backrest, unless no part of the load can slide back toward the operator 
  • Use pallets with forks as a make-shift elevated work platform (it’s more common than you think!) 
  • Let personnel stand/walk under any elevated part of the forklift 

It’s important to communicate potential hazards for everyone working in a space where forklifts are found, and use proper signals to keep yourself and others safe. Here are some more tips to help keep others safe while driving a forklift: 

  • Restrict access to areas where forklifts are used (and create procedures to keep work safe when they must enter spaces where forklifts operate) 
  • OR, create designated walkways or travelling paths to separate pedestrians from forklifts 
  • Pedestrians should always let the forklift driver know when they’re in the area—Eye contact is a simple way to make your presence know
  • Keep the area, particular the travelling path free from obstacles and ensure it’s well-lit 
  • Be careful when driving around sharp/blind corners, doorways and narrow aisles. Honk your forklift horn at intersections.
  •  Wear hi-vis clothing & PPE
  • Load the forks so your line of vision is clear
  • Avoid driving the forklift near people-heavy areas
  • Don’t walk under or near forks

FORKLIFT DRIVING | INSPECTION

A forklift operator should inspect their forklift daily, at the beginning of each shift and before each use. 

The operator should do a visual circle-check of the forklift (a walk-around) and an operational pre-use check. What do these involve?  

During a visual inspection before use, the operator should: 

  • General condition/cleanliness (this includes the forklift and surrounding floor & overhead work areas)
  • Ensure a charged fire extinguisher is nearby 
  • Make sure engine oil, fuel and radiator fluid levels are correct 
  • Establish that the propane tank’s fuel-tank mounting system, fuel-tank position pin, propane relief valves and hose are in good condition
  • Make sure the battery is fully-charged, there are no exposed wires, plug connections are in good condition, vent caps are clear, electrolyte levels in cells are acceptable and are in-place with hold-downs or brackets 
  • See that bolts, nuts, guards, chains or hydraulic hose reels are not damaged, disconnected or missing
  • Check for wear, damage and air-pressure (pneumatic tires) in wheels & tires 
  • Ensure forks/tines are not bent or chipped and are level & properly positioned—Also check that positioning latches and carriage teeth aren’t broken or worn 
  • Make sure chain anchor pins aren’t worn, loose or bent 
  • Make sure there are no fluid leaks, damp spots or drips 
  • Ensure hoses are secured and not loose, crimped or worn
  • Check for grease & debris in operator compartment
  • Make sure the seatbelt fastens & works properly
  • Guards: Ensure guards, overhead guards and roll-over protection structure (ROPS) are secure & undamaged 

During a pre-operational inspection, the forklift operator should check: 

  • FOOT & PARKING BRAKE: Ensure pedal holds & unit stops smoothly, and brake holds against slight acceleration
  • DEADMAN SEAT BRAKE: Make sure it holds when operator rises from seat
  • CLUTCH & GEARSHIFT: Make sure they shift smoothly, and don’t jump or snag
  • DASH CONTROL PANEL: Check that all lights & gauges are operational
  • HORN: Make sure the horn sounds loudly enough to be heard over work
  • BACK-UP: Make sure the reverse alarm and other warning devices work properly
  • LIGHTS: Ensure headlights and warning lights function properly
  • STEERING: Make sure the steering-wheel works smoothly
  • LIFT MECHANISM: Make sure they operate smoothly—You can check by lifting forks to their maximum height, then lowering them completely
  • TILT MECHANISM: Make sure the tilt mechanism works properly & holds the load—You can check by tilting the mast forward and backwards completely. 
  • CYLINDERS & HOSES: Check these last and make sure they’re not leaking after doing these checks.
  • BE SURE TO LISTEN FOR UNUSUAL SOUNDS/NOISES! 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CONCLUSION

There are many work-related issues that contribute to forklift driving, safety & general operation.

Ensure you conduct the three types of inspections we cover in this blog, be mindful of the forklift’s stability triangle & forks, keep travel slow, steady & free from obstacles to ensure your safety and others around you—And never let someone drive the forklift without proper training, or who hasn’t been designated.  


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES RIGGING EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR ARTICLES RELATED TO FORKLIFT DRIVING,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

FORKLIFT SAFETY: TOP TIPS FOR A SAFE WORKPLACE

WAREHOUSE WOW: HOW OUR DISTRIBUTION CENTRE LEADS THE INDUSTRY

WAREHOUSE SAFETY: 8 STEPS TO TAKE AFTER A RACKING ACCIDENT


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT | CM Hurricane 360 °

cm hurricane 360 hand chain hoist by columbus mckinnon

THE CM HURRICANE 360 TACKLES THE MOST CHALLENGING APPLICATIONS

One of the most versatile hand chain hoists yet is the CM Hurricane 360.

Unlike traditional hand chain hoists; the CM Hurricane 360° may be used in any direction due to its patented, one-of-a-kind hand chain cover that rotates 360°, which gives a convenient way to move loads without standing under or near the load.

The CM Hurricane 360 Hook-Mounted Hand Chain Hoist has a Weston-style brake system that gives superior load control and reliable performance, which makes it an excellent choice for challenging applications that require versatility. CM captured the flexibility of the CM Hurricane 360 to show you what a little hoist with big muscles can do for productivity and value. 

Have you ever dealt with these tough conditions when operating a hoist? Check out these videos and see for yourself how well the Hurricane handles the job.

https://youtu.be/G8dMU5O0kp4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPAi-CHbvzY


FIND MORE COLUMBUS MCKINNON

VIEW CM PRODUCTS, SPECIFICATIONS & MORE FROM HERCULES SLR BELOW

#WheresYourCM?

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR READING RELATED TO THE CM HURRICANE 360,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING SAFETY | 12 TIPS FROM CM

3 TIPS TO INSTALL YOUR CM TROLLEY

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT IN HAZARDOUS AREAS


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Rigging and Lifting Slings | All About Synthetics

industrial rigging and lifting sling being sewn

There’s a lot of different terminology and rules to remember about synthetic rigging and lifting slings – but Hercules SLR has you covered. 

When you think of a heavy duty sling, you might wonder why a rigger would choose a synthetic material over something ‘heavy duty’, like chain. They exist for a reason—Some benefits of synthetic rigging and lifting slings include: 

  • Economical
  • Flexible/Easy-to-store
  • Great for applications where steel or wire rope slings could damage a delicate load. 

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | WHAT THEY’RE MADE OF

Synthetic slings, or textile slings are made out of fabricated materials like nylon or polyester. Colour codes are used to identify the synthetic sling’s material. The colour is identified by a label on rigging and lifting slings – These are: 

  • BLUE: Polyester (ES) 
  • GREEN: Polyamide (PA)
  • BROWN: Polypropylene (PP) 

In terms of their construction, synthetic slings are often known as web slings or round slings. 

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | SAFETY TIPS

There are many safety tips to keep in mind when lifting with synthetic slings. Here are a few simple safety tips and tricks to keep in mind:

  • Store synthetic slings in a cool, dry place that’s free from exposure to ultra-violet light, like sunlight. 
  • Never pull your sling from under a load 
  • If the tags/labels are unreadable, don’t use the sling 
  • Be careful when using the sling around sharp corners or edges—Sharp corners can tear the synthetic sling 

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | INSPECTON

Synthetic slings should be inspected on a semi-regular basis. There are three types of inspection you must do with your synthetic sling(s)—These are: 

1) INITIAL INSPECTION

Before using your synthetic sling, a designated person or the user must check the sling to make sure it’s the correct to use for the application, and to ensure the sling meets the manufacturer’s specifications. A designated person is someone who has a recognized degree or certificate in an applicable field (like rigging) or someone who has extensive knowledge, training, experience and has successfully demonstrated the ability to solve or resolve problems that relate to the application.

This inspection should happen whether the sling is new, repaired or altered in any way. 

2) FREQUENT VISUAL INSPECTION 

Whoever is handling the sling, should conduct a visual inspection(s) each time it’s used. Further conditions for frequent visual inspection is:

A) A visual inspection for damage shall be performed by the user or other designated person each date or shift the sling is used. 

B) If the sling has any conditions that could cause hazard, the sling should be removed from service and not returned until it’s been approved by a designated person. 

3) PERIODOC INSPECTION 

Each part of the sling must be inspected individually—Take care to expose and examine all surfaces and individual component. 

Periodic inspections should not exceed one year—Inspect your synthetic sling at least once annually. Inspection frequency is based on how often slings are used, the kind of lifts being made, experience gained on service life of slings and how severe service conditions are.

Severe service conditions are defined as: 

  • Normal service—Yearly
  • Severe service—Monthly to quarterly
  • Special service—This is recommended by a qualified person 

When you inspect your sling, look for these conditions: 

  • Bent or twisted fittings 
  • Chemical damage
  • Crushing or knots 
  • Cuts and broken stitching 
  • Exposed internal cover due to cut or abrasion 
  • Heat damage 
  • Holes, cuts, tears or snags 
  • Missing or illegible sling identification
  • Severe abrasion
  • Twin path tell-tails not extending 1/2″ past the tag area 
  • Ultra-violet ray damage
  • Worn or broken stitching 

rigging and lifting synthetic web slings and orange synthetic round sling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | KNOW YOUR ANGLES 

What do we mean when we discuss sling angles? Sling angle is the space where the sling and the horizontal part of the load meet. 

Rated capacity, rated load or working load limit refers to the maximum working load that the sling manufacturer says the sling can hold. The terms ‘rated capacity’ and ‘working load limit’ are commonly used to describe rated load. The angle is important as the sling angle creates tension, which can impact the rated capacity of the sling.

Safe sling angles are typically 45­° greater from the horizontal point of the load. 

When we talk about sling angles, it’s important to talk about sling hitches. Hitches refer to the different way a sling can be applied to a load. The angle of multi-leg slings will effect the rated capacity of the bridle or multi-leg sling.

The most common types of hitches found in rigging are: 

  • VERTICAL: Method of rigging a web sling where the load’s attached to one end of the web sling, and the other end of the web sling is attached to the lifting device. 
  • CHOKER: Method of rigging a web sling in which the web sling is passed around the load, then through itself, then attached to the lifting device. 
  • BASKET HITCH (90°): Method of rigging a web sling where the web sling is passed around the load, and both ends are attached to the lifting device. A method of rigging a sling where it’s passed around the load, then through one loop eye, end fitting, or other device, while the other loop eye or end fitting at the other end is attached to the lifting device. Any hitch less than 5 degrees from the vertical may be considered a vertical hitch. 
3 most common rigging hitches
3 Common Rigging Hitches with Synthetic Slings

The degree of the angle determines the rated capacity of the sling—To find out if a sling has the rated capacity you need for a lift, take the angle between the sling leg and the horizontal, then multiply the sling’s factor. 

As the sling angle decreases, so does the rated capacity. Here’s a chart for example:

SLING ANGLE DEGREES LOSS FACTOR
901
850.996
800.985
750.966
700.94
650.906
600.866
550.819
500.766
450.707
400.643
350.574
300.5

 

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS: OTHER FACTORS THAT REDUCE CAPACITY

It’s important to remember that rated capacities are based on perfect conditions. There are many other factors that reduce capacity. These include:

  • Swing: Suspended loads can swing, which place more dynamic forces on the hoist in addition to the weight of the load. These additional forces (see point below) are difficult to quantify and account for, and could cause tip-over of the crane or failure of hoisting hardware. The force of the swinging causes the load to drift away from the machine, which increases the radius and side-loading on equipment. Keep the load directly below the boom point or upper load block. This is best accomplished by controlling the load’s movement with slow motions. 
  • Condition of equipment: Again, WLL and rated capacities are based on perfect conditions – this includes equipment and hardware. Damaged equipment should be taken out of service immediately. 
  • Dynamic forces: WLL and rated capacities are meant for static loads. Safety factor accounts for the dynamic motions of the load & equipment. 
  • Weight of tackle: Hoisting equipment’s rated capacity doesn’t account for the additional weight of blocks, hooks, slings, equalizer beams and other parts of the lifting tackle. The weight of these accessories combined must be added to the load’s total weight, the capacity of the lifting equipment including design safety factors and should be large enough to account for the extra load to lift. 

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | TERMINOLOGY 

Read on to discover MORE rigging and lifting sling vocabulary you need to know.

ABNORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS: Environmental conditions that unfavourable, harmful or detrimental to/or for the operation of a sling, such as excessively high or low ambient temperatures, exposure to weather, corrosive fumes, dust or moisture-laden atmospheres and hazardous locations. 

ABRASION: The mechanical wearing of a surface that results from friction with other materials or objects. 

ANGLE OF CHOKE: Angle that’s formed with in a sling body as it passes through the choking-eye or fittings.

ASSEMBLY: Another word for sling.

AUTHORIZED: Approved by a duly-constituted administrative or regulatory authority.  

BODY (SLING): The part of a sling between the eye(s), end-fittings or loop eyes. 

BRIDLE SLING: A sling composed of multiple legs with the top ends gathered in a fitting that goes over the lifting hook. 

D/d RATIO: The relationship between the curvative upon which the sling is used (D) and the nominal sling diameter (d).

DESIGNATED PERSON: Selected or assigned by the employer or employer’s representative as being competent to perform specific duties.

END-FITTING: Terminal hardware on the end of a sling. See sling

EYE OPENING: The opening in the end of a sling of the attachment of the hook, shackle, or other lifting device or the load itself.

FABRICATION EFFICIENCY: The sling assembly strength, as a percentage of the material strength prior to fabrication.

FITTING: Hardware on the end of a sling, also known as a component

GROMMET SLING: A type of endless sling. 

LENGTH, SLING: The distance between the extreme bearing points of the sling.

SINGLE-LEG SLINGS WITHOUT END FITTINGS: Measured from pull to pull with or from bearing to bearing of eyes.

SINGLE-LEG SLINGS WITH END FITTINGS: Measured from pull to pull of end fittings or eyes. 

LOOP EYE (WEB SLING): A length of webbing that has been that’s been folded back upon itself, forming an opening, and joined to the sling body to form a bearing surface. 

PLY: A Layer of load bearing webbing used in a web sling assembly. 

PROOF LOAD: The specific load applied in performance of the proof tests. 

PROOF TEST:A nondestructive load test made to a specific multiple of the rated load of the sling. 

SPECIAL OR INFREQUENT: Service that involves operation other than normal or severe, which is approved by a qualified person. 

SPIRAL: A single transverse coil that is the basic element from which metal mesh is fabricated.

SPLICE (WEB SLING): The part of the sling that’s lapped and secured to become an integral part of the sling.

ASSEMBLY SPLICE (WEB SLING): Any splice that joins two or more parts of the sling without bearing any of the applied load.

LOAD BEARING SPLICE (WEB SLING): The part of a sling that is lapped and secured to become an integral load bearing part of the sling. 

TRIANGLE CHOKER FITTING: An end-fitting for metal mesh or synthetic web slings; similar to the triangle fitting, except that is also a transverse slot through which a triangle fitting can be passed to facilitate a choker hitch on the load.

TRIANGLE FITTING: An end fitting for metal mesh or synthetic web slings, containing a single eye opening for connecting the sling to the lifting device. 

YARN: A generic term for a continuous strand of fibers. 

WE HOPE THIS HELPS—WHETHER YOU WORK OFFSHORE, IN ENTERTAINMENT OR CONSTRUCTION, THIS HANDY GUIDE TO RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS TERMS WILL HELP YOU TALK SLINGING SLANG WITH EASE.

HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES ON RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

POLY-WHAT?! ALL ABOUT SYNTHETIC SLINGS

SYNTHETIC ROUNDSLING—FREE INSPECTION DOWNLOAD GUIDE

HERCULES HOW-TO: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

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Which Rope Has the Greatest Tension?

wire rope rigging, Which Rope Has the Greatest Tension?

WHICH ROPE HAS THE GREATEST TENSION?

Which rope has the greatest tension? That’s a good question, with many answers that might surprise you. 

Rope tension can be a confusing concept for some to grasp (they’ve even studied why students have such a hard time grasping the concept of tension with a block and pulley)—we’re going to explain why ‘which rope has the greatest tension?’ isn’t necessarily the best question to ask.

Instead, we’re going to discuss how tension affects rope, and why different rope will demonstrate different tensions depending on the conditions. 

Rope tension is affected by a number of things. like the size/weight of the load, length of rope, diameter of the sheave, speed/velocity of the pull and any wear & tear the rope has been placed under. 

In this article, we’ll cover:

  • What’s rope tension, and why does it matter? 
  • Hoisting equipment selection
  • Tension fatigue—What is it? 
  • Tensile strength—What is it? 
  • Rope at Hercules SLR 

WHICH ROPE HAS THE GREATEST TENSION?

WHAT IS ROPE TENSION? 

Tension refers to what happens when a rope or cable is used to transmit a force. Put even simpler, rope is under tension when it’s attached to something. 

Consider what happens when a rope and hoist pulls a piece of building material. In this scenario, the rigger themselves isn’t in contact with the load, they’re not placing direct force on the load—The rope is. 

It’s a simple concept, with many ways to calculate, which all depend on different circumatances, like the weight the rope must lift and other factors that might impact tension. 

WHICH ROPE HAS THE GREATEST TENSION? 

There are many ways to discuss rope tension. Steel (iron combined with other mined materials) is considered to have one of the greatest tensile strengths. However, steel wire rope’s construction and fabrication can impact tensile strength, and its rated capacity.

This might seem a bit over-complicated, but it’s worth understanding how tension works, even if you’re not a physicist. Most mechanical applications use tension, which is calculated in newton’s. 

What’s a newton? A newton is the force you need to accelerate a 1-kilogram mass by 1-metre per second if no friction is present. However, this can change very quickly—that’s why for the sake of practicality, we won’t discuss what these calculations are, but how tension impacts a rigging operation. 

EQUIPMENT SELECTION & TENSION

Tension can help you understand rope’s breaking strength, as well. Breaking strength refers to the weakest point of the rigging (in this case, a rope) whether it be the webbing, end-fittings, or tensioning device.

A tensioning device is used to apply force at a particular point in the rigging to create tension. This is typically done to reduce hazards that would happen otherwise.  

TENSION FATIGUE

Tension fatigue happens to steel wire rope or synthetic rope when it’s subjected to different stress-levels (represented by the stress level exerted on the rope).

Basically, tension deteriorates with time and the older a rope is, the less accurate it’s original ratings become.

TENSILE STRENGTH

First of all—What’s tensile strength? Tensile strength (in this case) measures the force that would break the rope when under pressure. 

There are three kinds of tensile strength—They are:

1) Yield Strength

Yield strength refers to the highest amount of stress the rope can withstand without causing any deformations to the original rope dimension’s. 

2) Ultimate Strength

The ultimate tensile strength refers to the total amount of stress or force the rope can take.

3) Breaking Strength 

Breaking strength refers to a rope’s ability to withstand a lift, pull or move at a specific point. 

ROPE AT HERCULES SLR 

Although we didn’t necessarily tell you ‘which rope has the greatest tension’, we hope this helps you decide which rope to choose based on their tensile properties and what works best for the application, lift and load.

Hercules SLR carries rope for marine, safety, rescue, arborist applications and more—Drop us a line and we’ll pair you with the best rope for whatever application you have. 


RIG IT RIGHT

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR RELATED READING,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

RIGGING TIPS: AVOID COMMON WIRE ROPE DAMAGE

STOP THE SNAP: PREVENT ROPE SNAPBACK

SAMSON K-100 HOIST LINE: THE FIRST SYNTHETIC CRANE ROPE


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Why Workplace Culture Matters | #HercAtWork

why workplace culture matters

FUN AT WORK: WHY WORKPLACE CULTURE MATTERS 

Fun at work is important, and this is one of the reasons why workplace culture matters — Seriously. We’ve went over our passion for safety before, but we’re also passionate about fun. 

Why is fun important? Well, an article from Monster states that a focus on happiness at work not only leads to a more positive workforce, but a better bottom-line, too.

Studies found organizations that had fun and were allowed to be silly were linked to higher employee engagement, retention and profitability. Another study completed by the University of Warwick found that happier employees put in more effort, and were more productive by 12%, and in some cases even 20% more productive.  

There are more abstract benefits that show why fun workplace culture matters, too—Workplaces that allow employees to have fun also allow them to be more creative, which often leads to employees to find unique solutions to organizational problems.   

Fun really is a win-win situation for employers, managers and employees. 

workplace culture matters employees dressed up for Halloween at Hercules slr
Some of our staff from ‘Accounts Receivable’ at Head Office having fun on Halloween

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHY WORKPLACE CULTURE MATTERS | HOW HERCULES SLR HAS FUN

Here are just some of the ways we have fun at Hercules SLR: 

  • Contests and incentives for reaching goals, targets & achievements 
  • Social committee with activities like mini golf, axe-throwing and arts & craft nights  
  • Company comraderies
  • Collaborative and upbeat environment 

WHY WORKPLACE CULTURE MATTERS | PERKS OF HERC 

At Hercules SLR, we work hard and take pride in our work, but we know that sometimes it’s nice to sweeten the deal.

Hercules SLR offers: 

  • Fully-equipped break-room with vending machine, complementary coffee & tea and cooking appliances like a grill, toaster & kettle
  • On-the-job training (Videos, manuals, online power-point & resources) 
  • Free parking

WORK WITH HERC

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? 

HR@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR MORE ON WHY WORKPLACE CULTURE MATTERS,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

MEET YOUR HERCULES SLR INSPECTOR, QUINCY WARNER

MEET QUALITY ASSURANCE & SAFETY SPECIALIST, JAMES GOLEMIC

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Tips for Taglines | Training Tuesday

riggers using taglines to control and secure a load

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES

Taglines — What are they, what are they used for and why do we rig with them? We’ll tell you — Welcome to the new series from Hercules SLR, called Training Tuesday. 

In this series, every Tuesday, we’ll bring you a new topic about rigging, hoisting, fall protection, heavy machinery, workplace safety and more.

We’ll cover why the issue is important, advice for safe-use, application pointers so you get the most from your gear and training tips for employers and employees. 

This week, our Training Tuesday topic will be Taglines—In this blog, we’ll cover:

  • What’s a tagline?
  • When to use a tagline? And how to do it safely 
  • What not to do when using a tagline to lift 
  • Tagline standards, rules and regulations 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHAT ARE TAGLINES? 

So, what’s a tagline? A tagline is a line (often constructed of synthetic materials, otherwise known as a ‘soft line’) that attaches to a load and provides control while minimizing movement of the object during lifting operations. Simply put, taglines are used to prevent line rotation when lifting with cranes. 

Using taglines may add potential hazards to personnel involved in the lifting operation. These hazards should be assessed before the lifting operation begins. So, when is it appropriate to use a tagline to help secure a load? There are a couple of conditions: 

  • The crane’s load will swing back and forth (etc. a load on an especially windy day) 
  • The load’s rotation will create hazards 
  • A load needs to be positioned or connected in a particular way when it lands 

Read on for more tips to use taglines safely, what you should never do when securing a load with taglines and more tips for best-use. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | SAFETY TIPS FOR TAGLINES

When rigging with taglines, make sure:
  • Tagline is free of knots 
  • Taglines should have sealed ends so they don’t fray
  • One rigger should be assigned to each tagline and be able to safely position themselves away from the load 
  • To secure long loads with taglines, attach them to the very ends 
  • Taglines should be long enough that the assigned rigger can be in a safe location for the duration of the lift
  • Taglines must be held so the rigger can easily release the line if the load swings—This is important since it prevents the rigger from being thrown off-balance and into a more dangerous position
  • Wear the proper protective gloves when you handle taglines 
  • You know the working-load limit of the tagline 
  • Taglines are fit according to your company’s procedures/regulations 
  • Taglines are attached at a spot where they can be easily removed 
  • The load rotation can be controlled with taglines (if it’s rotating/swiveling uncontrollably).
When rigging with a tagline, do not
  • Use taglines if they’ll create any sort of safety hazard
  • Use taglines to control a lift during inclement/adverse weather conditions 
  • Go near or beneath, or let another rigger go beneath a load to retrieve a tagline 
  • Detach the tagline from the load until the crane operator and banksman position the load in its final location, with no load on the lifting gear  
  • Loop the tagline around your wrist, or any other part of the body
  • Use taglines for routine back-loading of supply vessels
  • Temporarily or permanently attach, loop, twist or tie a tagline to adjacent structures or equipment in an attempt to control the load
  • Use a tagline if there’s not enough clearance-room for the rigger to move from any spots where the load could fall 
  • Operating the tagline will cause a handler to be near a pinch point (A pinch point is any area where personnel risks having their extremities caught by a machine or equipment)
  • Allow taglines to fall into rotors 
  • When ever possible, attach your hook to a load block to prevent twisting of the hoist line. 

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function.”

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function. In everyday operations, workers handle, transport and store materials. They may do so by hand, manually-operated materials handling equipment, or by power-operated equipment,” says the U.S. Department of Labour/OSHA Training Institute. 

This is why it’s important to eliminate risk whenever possible and ensure taglines provide more help than hazard to a lift—Remember when not to rig with taglines.

taglines controlling a load

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES & OSHA STANDARDS 

In Canada, each province has their own specific Occupational Health & Safety Laws, which are usually broken down into:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Acts 
  • Occupational Health & Safety Regulations/Codes 
  • Standards 
  • Industry Association Code of Practice 

Be sure to check with regulations and standards in your province for further details on how to use taglines. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHEN TO USE TAGLINES

It’s important to note that taglines only work in tension. The handler should be able to hold the tagline at waist or shoulder-level—When the tagline must be held higher than this, it’s less effective it is at controlling the load. 

Sometimes, if the rope’s not long-enough, the handler’s instinct will be to pull the rope down, and end up pulling down on the load. This makes the tagline non-effective, and creates a more likely scenario that the load will fall on the handler. 

Yes, we discuss how taglines can create pinch points, however they can also help prevent them in some cases. Sometimes a load can twist around the crane that’s lifting it, and cause the load to bounce off nearby equipment or other parts of the crane—this can create pinch points, so taglines can be an effective way to control this.

TRAINING TUESDAY | CONCLUSION 

Taglines provide extra security for positioning and landing difficult loads, particular in inclement weather—However, rigger’s should exercise caution before using taglines extraneously.

Using taglines when unnecessary can sometimes create more hazards on-site, like producing pinch points or obstacles that could injure workers—This is why a rigging plan is especially important before conducting any lift , to ensure taglines are the right securing equipment for the application at-hand.

Taglines should be used to control block rotation, secure the load’s landing or when inclement weather will cause the load to swing uncontrollably—But don’t use them if they create more hazardous conditions for the handlers, rigger’s and any other personnel on-site. Remember, preventing injury is the priority of any lift—Safety should always be #1. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com