Leading and Sharp Edges – Fall Protection

Leading-And-Sharp-Edge

Leading and sharp edges, what you need to know when It comes to fall protection.

Professional football players need the best protective equipment available to stay safe on the playing field, from helmets to pads to mouth guards and beyond. Construction workers who work on Lambeau Field, the historic football stadium in Green Bay, Wisconsin, face even greater hazards and need the best protective equipment as well—particularly fall protection when they are working at height. They also must use appropriate equipment and use it properly to stay safe.

Two construction crew members who worked on the renovation of Lambeau Field know the value of quality fall protection equipment and proper training firsthand: the first fell from a steel beam six stories above ground. Less than two months later, another worker slipped from a beam and fell. Both escaped injury and possible death because of their fall protection equipment. Fortunately, these workers not only walked away after these accidents—remarkably, they were able to go back to work the same day.

1“Fatalities Prevented, Injuries Minor, Workers’ Comp Costs Slashed,” United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3252/3252.html. Accessed 12/9/14.

But what if they had been using the wrong products, or the wrong anchorage points, or had failed to take into account swing fall hazards or sharp edge hazards? Those workers may never have returned to work!

Many personal fall arrest systems rely on lifeline materials to perform under less than ideal conditions. But there are some applications where use of the wrong product—for example, where a lifeline contacts with a sharp edge—could have catastrophic results.

Product testing and certification organizations in the U.S. and around the world, including the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and CE in Europe, have been reexamining how lifelines in fall protection systems perform when subjected to these “sharp edge” applications. They’ve also placed a new focus on “leading edge” applications. Through this analysis, they have concluded that these two environments are unique in fall protection and involve increased risks due to the lifeline cutting, fraying or becoming otherwise compromised.

 

Understanding Leading and Sharp Edges

Sharp Edge
A sharp edge is one that, for practical purposes, is not rounded and has the potential to cut most types of lifelines. The ANSI standard for sharp edges, for example, involves testing the fall arrest device’s lifeline over a piece of steel bar with a radius of no more than 0.005” (5 one thousands of an inch). If the lifeline is cut or severely damaged, the device fails the test and does not comply with ANSI.

Leading and Sharpe Edges

Leading Edge
To visualize a leading edge, imagine a worker installing steel decking on a new building. Now
imagine the worker’s fall protection system is anchored at foot level behind him. As the worker
moves out and away from the anchor point while installing the decking, the worker is exposed
to a potential fall over the edge of the building or the edge of an elevated platform.

Unique Risks of Leading and Sharp Edges
In sharp edge applications the primary risk is the lifeline can be frayed or severed. Examples of
other related risks with falls over leading edges include:

  • Increased Fall Distance: When workers are attached at foot level, as they often are in leading edge applications, they will fall farther than they would if they were anchored at shoulder height or above. The image on the previous page (see Image A) demonstrates the sequence of events that happen when a worker falls off a leading edge, and why a worker needs additional clearance. The required clearance when anchored at foot level varies by product so make sure to reference the product instructions.
  • Lock-up Speed: Self-retracting lifelines react to a fall when the lifeline accelerates out of the housing at a certain velocity, generally about 4.5 feet per second. When self-retracting lifelines are anchored at foot level, the lifeline does not achieve the required acceleration during a fall until after the user’s D-ring passes over the leading edge and below the level of the anchor. This means the user has already fallen about 5 feet before the self-retracting lifeline device will engage to arrest the fall.
  • Increased Fall Arrest Forces: Falling further means the impact on the body through the fall protection system will potentially be higher when the fall is arrested. This is why many leading edge and sharp edge rated products contain additional energy-absorbing devices.
  • Increased Potential for Swing Hazards: If a worker falls, and is off to one side, he may swing like a pendulum. While this in and of itself is dangerous, the danger is compounded if the worker is on a sharp edge and the lifeline saws back and forth across that edge.

In 2012, ANSI released a new standard—ANSI Z359.14 on Self Retracting Devices (SRDs)2—to address leading edge or sharp edge applications for self-retracting devices (SRDs). The Z359.14 standard includes significant changes to the design and testing of leading edge (LE) SRDs. It provides a baseline for manufacturers to test their products against, in order to ensure they are safe and compliant.3 It also requires manufacturers to provide new information in product user instructions and on product markings.

2ANSI/ASSE Z359.14-2012 Safety Requirements for Self-Retracting Devices for Personal Fall Arrest & Rescue Systems, American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), http://www.asse.org. Accessed 12/9/14.
3“Standard/Regulation Information, Safety Requirements for Self-Retracting Devices ANSI Z359.14-2012,” Capital Safety, http://apicapitalsafety.com/api/assets/download/1/9168257. Accessed 12/9/14.

Both Compliant Equipment and Training Needed to Keep Workers Safe
While ANSI-compliant equipment is needed to keep workers on leading edges and sharp edges safe, it’s only effective if crews understand how to use it and why they need it. Proper training is essential to ensure that crews fully engage and understand the unique hazards related to sharp and leading edges. Hercules SLR has experienced training instructors that will come on-site to teach in and around workers’ normal environment to help them better understand and avoid the hazards of sharp and leading edges.

Greater Awareness Also Leads to Greater Safety
Fall protection experts agree that in addition to complying with the applicable standards, keeping workers safe at height also involves a much greater awareness of the unique fall protection risks that exist in particular applications, such as sharp and leading edge applications. This is particularly true for workers who have worked in sharp and leading edge environments for many years and have developed habits over time that may not be the safest practices in today’s environments.

All workers—and their employers—should be up-to-date on products, applications and training so that the appropriate equipment is used properly for any application faced by workers. In sharp and leading edge work, using a traditional product anchored at foot level may increase the risk of injury and create a false sense of security. Fortunately, Hercules and our partners at 3M™ DBI-SALA® MSA Safety offer a number of products specifically designed for foot level tie-off in sharp and leading edge environments.

Please contact a Hercules representative or visit your local branch for additional information.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Construction of new homes has leaped 18% in 7 years

Construction-Roof-Worker

Quebec’s economy continues to boom, the number of residential construction projects in the province has increased by nearly 20 per cent since 2011. And it seems that more rental housing is being constructed than previous believed.

For the first six months of 2018, the total number of residential construction starts stood at 19,317 — rental and non-rental — an increase of 18 per cent over the same period in 2011, according to a report by the Association des professionnels de la construction et de l’habitation du Québec obtained by the Presse Canadienne.

“Good job growth, interest rates that remain low and economic growth explain the record levels of construction starts we’ve seen over the past few years, particularly for the first half of 2018,” according to Georges Lambert, the association’s director of economic services.

Construction of rental units increased by 37 per cent over the period studied and, in what can be perceived as a sign of Quebec’s demographic changes, “almost one out of three is classified as a residence for elderly persons.”

Construction

Meanwhile, programs providing incentives to homeowners to renovate appear to have been popular, with municipalities recording a total of $1.1 billion reported renovation work for the first half of 2018, an increase of seven per cent compared with the year-ago period.

The Montreal region accounted for 59 per cent of the residential construction reported for the first six months of the year, Lambert said, noting that around “80 or 90 per cent of the jobs were created in the region of Montreal. … And that creates a demand for housing.”

Original articleMontreal Gazette

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Forklift Safety – Top Tips for a Safe Workplace

chariot élévateur

The Forklift is an incredibly useful piece of equipment, used throughout many industries to enhance productivity, speed up processes and protect the health and safety of employees. But they can also be extremely dangerous, with thousands of forklift accidents every year resulting in sometimes serious injuries, and usually caused by improper and unsafe operation or lack of training for the operatives.

Below are a few tips that will help you keep your workplace safe and ensure you get the most from your equipment and employees.

1.   Know the Stats

It’s important to know the dangers that come with using forklifts on loading docks and in warehouses. Keep these statistics in mind while training workers and safely operating forklifts.

  • Overturned forklifts are the leading cause of deaths involving forklifts; they account for 22% of all forklift-related fatalities
  • Workers on foot struck by forklifts account for 20% of all forklift-related fatalities
  • Victims crushed by forklifts account for 16% of all fatalities and falls from forklifts account for 9% of all forklift fatalities

2.   Know the Classes

These are classifications of six commonly-used types of forklifts, as recognized by OSHA, along with different types of trucks unique to each class.

  • Electric Motor Rider Trucks (such as rider-type counterbalanced forklifts and sit-down, three-wheel electric trucks)
  • Electric Motor Narrow Aisle Trucks (such as high lift straddle trucks and platform side loaders)
  • Electric Motor Hand Trucks or Hand/Rider Trucks (such as low lift pallet trucks and high lift straddle trucks)
  • Internal Combustion Engine Trucks with Solid/Cushion Tires (such as counterbalanced fork trucks with cushion tires)
  • Internal Combustion Engine Trucks with Pneumatic Tires (such as counterbalanced fork trucks with pneumatic tires)
  • Electrical and Internal Combustion Engine Tractors (such as sit-down riders)
  • Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks (such as vertical mast type forklifts, variable reach type forklifts, and truck trailer mounted)

Download a full list here

classes of forklifts

3.   Know the Common Hazards

Here’s a quick look at a few common hazards associated with forklifts.

  • Unsecured loads may fall, crushing pedestrians or drivers.
  • Forklifts may tip over, due to excessive speed or imbalanced loads
  • Workers may fall if they stand on the forks
  • Drivers may not see pedestrians, leading to collisions and fatal accidents
  • Improper or missing floor marking may lead to accidents between forklifts and pedestrians

4.   Know the Requirements

Before any employee takes control of a forklift, ensure they’re trained in accordance with CCOHS requirements. 

  • Employers must have a training program that incorporates general principles of safe operation, the types of vehicle(s) used, any hazards created by using forklifts and powered industrial trucks, and CCOHS general safety requirements.
  • Trained forklift operators must know how to do the job safely, as demonstrated in a workplace evaluation.
  • Employers must provide formal and practical training. This may include using some combination of lecture, video, software training, written material, demonstrations, and practical exercise.
  • Employers must certify that operators have received all necessary training and evaluate each operator at least once every three years.
  • Employers must evaluate the operator’s performance and deem the employee competent to operate a powered industrial truck prior to operating the truck.

5.   Know What to Watch For

Employees and employers should work together to ensure a forklift is safe to use before getting behind the wheel. Follow these steps before using a forklift.

  • Perform a daily inspection of all forklifts in use
  • Examine the tires and oil levels
  • Check for water, oil, or radiator leaks
  • Ensure forks are straight and not cracked
  • Test brakes, lights, the horn, and the steering wheel
  • Look for obstructions, uneven surfaces, overhead obstacles, and other potential hazards

inspections

6.   Stay Safe While Using A Forklift

Workers should do the following while behind the wheel to protect themselves and co-workers:

  • Make sure the load is balanced and fully secure to prevent a forklift from tipping over
  • Ensure both forks are as far under the load as possible before lifting
  • Drive with the load as low as safely possible
  • Pay attention to posted speed limits and warning signs
  • Always look in the direction you’re traveling; if a load blocks the view ahead, travel in reverse
  • Steer clear of areas where forklifts are prohibited or restricted
  • Keep an eye out for signs, floor marking, and other warnings for pedestrians and forklifts
  • Use the horn at intersections and in areas where pedestrians may be present

Travelling on an Incline

Keep the forks pointed downhill without a load, and pointed uphill with a load. Do not attempt to turn the lift truck until it’s on level ground.

Steering

Support the load by the front wheels and turn with the rear wheels. Do not turn the steering wheel sharply when travelling fast. If the lift truck is overloaded, steering will be difficult. Do not exceed load limits, and do not add a counterweight as an attempt to improve steering.

7.   Keep An Eye Out Around Your Facility

Even if you’re not operating a forklift, you can take steps to keep workers safe. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Post forklift safety signs, aisle markers, and forklift procedure labels—using pre-made signs, custom labels, or a combination of the two
  • Implement a floor marking system in your facility
  • Ensure safety signs are at all intersections where pedestrians and vehicles intersect
  • Use steering wheel covers and padlocks when necessary
  • Use proper lockout/tagout equipment to prevent forklifts from inadvertently starting up

Lift Truck Forklift Operator

8.   Safe Loading

It’s important to know the recommended load limit of the forklift (shown on the data plate) and the capacity of the fork, and to never exceed these limits.

Position the load according to the recommended load center. Do not add extra weight to counterbalance an overload. Keep the load close to the front wheels to keep the lift truck stable.

When inserting the fork, keep the mast of the forklift in an upright position before inserting the fork into a pallet. Level the fork before inserting it.

Raising the Load

Do not raise or lower the fork unless the lift truck is stopped and braked. Avoid lifting a load that extends above the load backrest if there’s any risk of the load, or part of it, sliding back toward the operator. Check for adequate overhead clearance before raising a load, and maintain a safe working distance from overhead power lines. Lift the load straight up, then tilt back slightly. Watch that the load doesn’t catch on adjacent loads or obstructions. Don’t back up until the forks are free.

When a load is raised, the lift truck is less stable. The operator must stay on the forklift when the load is in a raised position. Don’t allow anyone to stand or walk under the elevated part of the forklift, whether it’s loaded or unloaded.

Handling Pallets

Ensure that forks are level and high enough to go into the pallet, and that they go all the way under the load. Forks must be the proper width to provide even weight distribution.

Avoid trying to move or adjust any part of the load, the forklift or the surroundings when on the forklift. Do not use pallets elevated by forklifts as an improvised working platform.

9.   Develop a Visual Communication System

Here are a few tips for successful visual communication, which can alert operators and pedestrians to hazards caused by forklifts:

  • Use “Stop” signs, speed limit signs, and other traffic control devices
  • Implement way finding to improve the flow of traffic, keep pedestrians away from forklift paths, and direct forklifts along safe routes
  • Point out loading docks, shelves for inventory, and other important places within a warehouse
  • Post signs at junctions to warn pedestrians and forklift operators to stop and look for hazards
  • Display checklists and inspection requirements where forklifts are stored

10.  At the End of a Shift

Once the task is completed or the operative’s shift ends, the forklift should be returned to the designated area and parked safely in the authorized space.

Operatives should never change mid-shift, or in an unauthorized zone, without the new operative being given the time to check the vehicle and adjust the controls, seat and mirrors to suit them, in a safe and designated area.

Forklift

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Women in Industry – Angela Penton, Improving Processes

Angela-Penton

When Angela Penton returned to NSCC at 39, she’d already achieved success as a chef, a landscaper, a textile artist and a metalsmith. What she felt was missing, however, was a high school diploma.

“I left high school a year before I graduated,” says Angela. “Back then, you didn’t have to have your high school diploma to start an apprenticeship program, so I left and did cooking at NSCC.”

During that time, Angela’s artistry in the kitchen inspired her to branch out, and she soon found herself in a metalsmithing, design and art history degree, and running her own textile business on the side. As the demands of running a business, attending school and raising a young family became too much, Angela says she had to make a choice. “I left my degree with just a handful of courses remaining.”

Angela Penton 3“I ran my own business for six years, and also supervised at a landscaping company,” says Angela. “But, because I didn’t have my high school or degree, I was very limited in what I could do.”

With her heart set on a more stable and rewarding career, Angela decided she was going to finish what she had started.

Back to class

“I completed my last year of university first. Then, I enrolled in the Adult Learning Program. Because I had just finished my degree I was able to get credit for nearly all the high school credits that I required, except math.”

Through the program, Angela discovered her aptitude as a problem solver.  “I realized I really wanted to change careers and do something technical –– something that would allow me to get into a management role.”

Angela says she saw NSCC’s two year program options as the fastest route to starting a new career. “I wanted to get some real intensive education that would allow me to go right into the work world.” She adds,

“I looked through all of NSCC’s programs and I kept coming back to Industrial Engineering Technology because I saw that these professionals were in every industry. It was something that didn’t narrow my opportunities, as many of my life choices had up to that point.” ~ Angela Penton

Angela admits she was scared that she was “too old” to go back to school and worried that employers wouldn’t hire someone her age. “I knew I had the potential, but it took the program to retrain my mind to see myself as someone who could operate as a professional at that level.”

Entering the industry

She soon discovered that age wasn’t an obstacle. “I was past that point in life where I was worried about standing out, asking questions or feeling silly. I put myself out there and networked.”

Her hard work paid off. After graduation, Angela was hired as the Process Improvement Specialist for Hercules SLR — a specialty industrial equipment, products and services company.

Angela says her position is the perfect blend of creativity and technical thinking. “I felt badly about leaving my artistic career and thought that I’d never get to be creative again; but, I learned that creativity isn’t just limited to making things or designing things. It’s a way of thinking.”

Hitting her stride

Angela penton 2Angela says she now works to ensure that the company’s more than 400 employees remain focused on reducing operational waste and variance across processes.

Angela explains that a large part of the success of this project and others like it is strategic communication. “The first thing that we learn in the program is the idea that you have to go to where the work is being done — a gemba walk. See it, ask questions, learn from the person doing it and show respect. Treat them like the experts that they are.”

She adds, “It’s only when an Industrial Engineering Technologist does that, that we see the truly meaningful impact we can make.”

Original Interview can be found here 
Images copyright Matt Madden NSCC

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

 

Forklift Field Modifications Practices

Forklift

Between scratches, dents, and replaced parts, a forklift can undergo a lot of changes and repairs throughout its lifetime. It’s also common for customers to want to add additional features to a forklift after it arrives. How do you know for sure if the modification is acceptable or how it will ultimately affect your forklift’s safe operation? Here are a few helpful tips based on common misconceptions to help guide you down the right path.

One common misconception is that you don’t need permission to make changes to a forklift. While it’s true that not all modifications require approval, per ANSI B56.1 Section 4.2.1, there are some that do:

“Except as provided in para. 4.2.2, no modifications or alterations to a powered industrial truck that may affect the capacity, stability, or safe operation of the truck shall be made without the prior written approval of the original truck manufacturer or its successor thereof. When the truck manufacturer or its successor approves a modification or alteration, appropriate changes shall be made to capacity plates, labels, tags, and operation and maintenance manuals.”

To put this paragraph in simpler terms, it is stating that if the modification could affect the truck’s lifting capacity, stability, or safe operation, then you should seek prior written approval from the truck manufacturer to make the change. If you’re ever unsure if a modification will require approval, make sure to work with your local, authorized Toyota dealer to confirm. They can also assist with ordering and installing new data plates as necessary.

Forklift

Some of the common modifications that require approval per this regulation include:

  1. Drilling or cutting into the overhead guard or hood
  2. Changing attachments, forks, masts, or tire types
  3. Swapping counterweights
  4. Modifications that affect visibility

 

 

UL Rating

Many forklifts conform to or are certified for a certain Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) rating. There are also options available that modify a forklift to meet other UL rating standards so that they can be safely operated in certain types of environments. The UL rating certification verifies that the forklift and its configuration have been approved by UL to comply with these standards.

What many people don’t know is that any change to a forklift’s electrical, exhaust, or fuel system (among others) can void the UL rating of the truck. Changes as simple as swapping a wiring harness or installing a new strobe light can actually cause the forklift to no longer meet UL’s set standards.

If you need to replace an existing part, replacing it with the same manufacturer’s part as instructed by the manufacturer will typically not void the UL rating. For parts being added that aren’t replacing existing ones, it is important that the parts be approved by UL as a field installable option.  Manufacturers of approved field installable options for forklifts can be found on UL’s website. These pre-approved parts are specific when it comes to the brand/model of the part and the forklift, so it’s important to pay attention to this prior to making any changes. Just because a part is “UL approved” or “UL listed” does not mean that installing it will not void the UL rating of your forklift.

Finally, if a part is being installed or a modification is being made that isn’t pre-approved, UL can send out a field representative to observe the modification being performed. They may also need to test the truck afterwards to determine if it meets their requirements and, if it passes, they can grant their approval for it to maintain the UL rating.

Original article: Material Handling Network

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

New Measures to Enhance Safety of Marine Navigation

Marine Navigation

The government of Canada is taking additional measures to help enhance safety of navigation and emergency response in Canadian waters.

The measures were announced by Minister of Transport, the Honorable Marc Garneau in May, and awarded as part of Canada’s historic US $1.2 billion Oceans Protection Plan.

Marine Navigation

First, the Government of Canada will provide CAD 110 million over five years for the Canadian Hydrographic Service to chart 23 high-priority commercial ports and near-shore areas along all three coasts to create safer marine navigation for mariners.

The government says the new investment will fill important gaps in critical areas across the country that currently have limited and out-of-date navigational information, and give mariners high-resolution electronic navigation charts, navigational products and data for increased safety. To date, surveys of eight out of the 23 ports have been completed.

In addition, the Government of Canada will be adding seven additional coastal communities (nine total) to test a new information system showing where ship traffic is located—and other essential maritime information—as part of the Enhanced Maritime Situational Awareness initiative.

Through the CAD 62.5 million invested in the Enhanced Maritime Situational Awareness initiative, the Government of Canada will make CAD 9.8 million available over two years to support the implementation of these pilot project communities and work with them to develop, test and evaluate the new system.

The government has awarded an initial contract to Hercules SLR of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, to supply the Canadian Coast Guard with two vessel-based emergency tow kits, plus equipment and training. This initial contract is valued at more than $180,000, and is part of a plan to install tow kits and related equipment on all large Canadian Coast Guard vessels, including five vessels on the West Coast. The initial contract includes options for up to 62 additional tow kits and related equipment.

“The selection of a contractor to build a system that can provide near-real time data on local ship traffic will be one of the largest agile procurement projects in the Government of Canada’s history. Indigenous and coastal communities, Transport Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard will work together to award the contract,” the government said in a press release.

The government is also allocating $7.2 million over five years in the Marine Weather Information Services Demonstration Project. The project will deploy five smart buoys (two on the west coast and three on the east coast) that will produce data for tailored weather forecasts. These “smart buoys” will have innovative high resolution weather prediction systems that will enhance marine forecasting and improve marine navigation and safety for mariners.

“Our commitment to partnering with Indigenous Peoples and collaborating with coastal communities to protect Canada’s coastal ecosystems is clear and unequivocal,” commented Transport Minister, the Honourable Marc Garneau. “The marine safety and marine navigation improvements from the Oceans Protection Plan announced today will help us put safeguards in place for all vessels, including those carrying petroleum products overseas. We are determined to safeguard Canada’s waters – and know that a strong economy and a clean environment go hand-in-hand to benefit all Canadians.”

“Safe marine navigation and ensuring vessels can quickly be removed from trouble are essential to enhancing marine safety and preventing potential marine pollution incidents,” said Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, ?Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard. “This investment in the Canadian Hydrographic Service will help provide up-to-date navigation information in critical areas across the country, and these new tow kits will give the Canadian Coast Guard greater ability to tow vessels out of distress in emergency situations. Through the Oceans Protection Plan we are making our oceans safer, cleaner and healthier.”

The Government of Canada has already announced initiatives worth more than $600 million under the Oceans Protection Plan.

Learn more at gCaptain.

Questions? Quotes? Catalogue? Call 1 877 461 4876 or email sales@HerculesSLR.com 
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Marine Navigation

Women in Industry – Inspection Technician Heather Young

Heather Header

Heather Young is one of our Inspection Technicians here at Hercules SLR. We asked her some questions about herself and what made her decide to choose this career path.

Heather Young 1

Tell us about your educational background?

Heather: About 3 years ago I attended CONA , College Of The North Atlantic, in Port Aux Basque NL to start my career as an NDT Technician. NDT is also knows as Non-Destructive Testing. This trade specializes in using various methods to of welding defect detection, methods such as Magnetic particles in a flux field , bright red liquid penetrants, Ultrasounds and X-rays.

My most recent  educational milestone was obtaining an engineering course; LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineers Association)

What made you decide to go into this industry?

Heather: I have obtained knowledge over the years from previous jobs about industrial tools, welding, hydraulics and so much more. I took more of an interest in the welding side of things and decided it was time to start a career; a career that was welding related of course.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Heather: I worked at Princess Auto for 8 years, This is where I obtained the knowledge that over time became the reason why I was interested in becoming an inspector. I have learned a incredible amount of useful information in those 8 years from some incredible employees. Princess Auto was basically the jump start to the rest of my career.

What made you want to transition into Inspections ?

Heather: I wanted to work hands on with the products instead of just selling them . I wanted to solve problems associated with industrial applications, I wanted to learn how to use the tools, even how to fix them. I wanted to preform tests that were non-destructive and experience the fun side of destructive testing as a Heather Young 2bonus.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Heather: Hercules is a place that continuously gives opportunities to learn, I have learned beyond what I thought I could ever learn being an Inspections Technician. I wanted to be a part of Hercules as it enabled me to use the skills I learned in college and apply them to real life scenarios. Hercules also offers a wide broad range of different types of jobs which has gained me amazing experience. Everything from inspecting small shackles to working on the inside of large machinery.

Where have you traveled during your time as a Quality and Safety specialist for Hercules SLR?

Heather: I have traveled to other Hercules branches mostly to teach other inspectors the procedures and standards regarding offshore inspections. I also traveled to New Brunswick as an aid for a big job as well as for training purposes. I have been to numerous places here in Nova Scotia also, so many, that its often hard to remember all of them.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for your job at Hercules?

HeatherI enjoyed Travelling to Newfoundland the most. A few simple reasons for this, it is where I am from, I was able to see family while I was there and I also really liked the Hercules employees there, I felt welcomed instantly upon arrival.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?Heather Young 3

Heather: I would like to travel anywhere really. It is all good experience, everywhere is different and unique.

Is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Heather:  I enjoy what I do here at Hercules, so I do have set goals in mind. I would like to continue with the next levels of LEEA, gain more experience as a NDT Tech, and learn more regarding fall arrest equipment.

Lastly, is there anything about you that most people would not know?

Heather: About 6 years ago , I assisted with 2 roofing jobs on houses that needed renovating so they could be sold. It was a summer thing, both houses were located in NB. Since it was part time summer project, it didn’t last very long. I had no experience with using coil roofing nailers, (I only ever sold them) or placing shingles on a roof. It was very physically demanding and I got severely sunburned. I learned a lot from this experience though, I learned that pizza can be delivered to rooftops in NB if you ask .
I came to the conclusion that I enjoyed roofing, but carrying bundles of shingles up a ladder. wasn’t for me…No, not ever again.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

If you are interested in working for Hercules, we are always looking for talented people. Check out our careers page here.

 

 

 

 

Get to Know Your Training Specialist – Kevin Giles CRSP

Training -Kevin-Giles

Kevin Giles, CRSP is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists and Safety Consultants. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

Kevin: I’ve always had a passion for the outdoors, so I started my education at the Nova Scotia Community College in the Forestry Program. I went on to further my education at the Maritime Forest Ranger School in Fredericton NB and graduated in in 1997.

During the next 11 years I worked in many different aspects of forestry from privet woodlot management, and saw milling to large scale harvesting operations. In every job I did I always played a strong role in health and safety of the workplace, it became clear to me that this was the area I wanted to concentrate on, and I never turned back.

Training Kevin Giles 2

 

I completed the Health and Safety Professional (HSP) designation and was one of the first people to achieve the designation from the Canadian Association Of Provincial Safety Councils. In 2011 a major highlight of my career was achieving the Canadian Registered Safety Professional (CRSP) designation with the Canadian Board of Registered Safety Professionals.

During my 11 years with Hercules I have furthered my education in many areas including; train the trainer programs, Master Rigger, non-destructive testing, and completing 4 diploma programs with the Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA). As you can tell I love to grow my knowledge and am highly committed to continuous education, my next goal is to complete the Diploma program in Occupational Health and Safety with the University of New Brunswick, only 3 more courses to go!

What made you decide to go into this industry?

Kevin: As I mentioned the safety industry sort of came to me rather than me seeking it out. With every job I ever had since I was 16 years old I played some kind of role in safety, from being a first aid provider on the ski hills with the Canadian Ski Patrol, to being part of various safety committees, and developing policies and procedures with large industrial forestry operations and sawmills. The rigging industry has given me the opportunity to explore so many aspects of safety I find It amazing to think of.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Kevin: Upon graduation from the Maritime Forest Ranger School I worked with the SNB Wood Co-op and the Hants County Woodlot Owners Association helping private woodlot owners manage their woodlots for a verity of forest productivity, environmental, and wildlife goals. This was a very rewarding time and experience in my forestry career.

After 4 years in the privet woodlot industry I moved into several new roles in a more industrial forestry operation with JD Irving ltd., working as harvesting supervisor, planer mill supervisor, and chip plant supervisor. This industrial atmosphere gave me to opportunity to work with contractors, unionized workers, students and many more. Working in these environments which already had a very strong safety culture helped me to build confidence and a broad knowledge base of various safety program elements.

What made you want to transition into training?

Kevin: I’ve always enjoyed helping people and sharing my knowledge whenever I could. I started formally instructing with the Canadian Red Cross first aid programs and have taught for the Canadian Ski Patrol, Saint John Ambulance, Safety Services Nova Scotia, and various employers along the way. I enjoy when I can help a student or coworker have that “lightbulb moment” when everything seems to come together and they get a clear understanding of the topic.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Kevin: When I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in safety the opportunity to Join the Hercules team came available. The timing was right and it was the perfect fit. Having a fulltime safety professional was new for the company and it was new for me. I am very happy to say the company and myself have grown together over the last 11 years to build a strong safety culture.

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

Kevin: The majority of the training that we deliver is based in the maritime provinces, but we are able to deliver training anywhere in Canada.  I’ve delivered training from the coast of NL to the coast of BC and many stops in between, including Ontario, Quebec, PEI, NB and Alberta.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training?

Training Kevin-Giles-3

Kevin: Traveling to different parts of NL over the past few years has been interesting. The people are great, and it has been very interesting to see the change in safety culture since the oil industry has grown so much there. Some of the most memorable places to provide training has been in a federal prison, on various ships, sawmills, and airplane hangars. Sometimes you just don’t know what you are getting into and that is always exciting.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Kevin: I would really like to travel to the northern parts of Canada maybe up to Yellowknife or somewhere in the North West Territories.

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Kevin: I hope to be able to make a great success of our Hercules Training Academy and some day expand the course offerings to include some more of the academic safety programs to help companies build a strong safety culture.

 

Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses we can tailor make courses to suit your specific requirements, at our facility or yours. To find out more about our course and how we can help you raise the bar in safety training email us at: training@herculesslr.com

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

HGC Collaborates With the CNIB ‘Phone It Forward’ Campaign

CNIB Phone it Forward

This October The Canadian National Institute of the Blind launched it’s CNIB Phone it Forward campaign, and Hercules SLR and Group of Companies was excited to be a part of it.

Many people don’t realize the tremendous impact modern smartphones have in the lives of individuals who are blind. Today, accessible smartphone apps make it possible for people who are blind to do all kinds of things that may have seemed challenging before.

Modern smartphones allow people who are blind to:

  • Read prescription labels and take medication safely
  • Recognize the faces of loved ones
  • Access emergency assistance from sighted volunteers
  • Travel safely alone using GPS
  • And do hundreds of other day-to-day tasks most of us take for granted

Did you know?

All smartphones now offer built-in “voice over” technology, which reads aloud everything that appears on the phone’s screen so that a person who is blind can access it.

The need is overwhelming

Despite how life-changing smartphones can be for people who are blind, many people with sight loss still don’t own one – at least not one that’s advanced enough to help them in their daily lives.

For some people, it’s hard enough to make ends meet, let alone purchase the latest smartphone.

 

The CNIB Phone it Forward campaign is a really easy way to get unused smartphones into the hands of those who need them – it literally will change their lives.

The Hercules Group of Companies, Hercules SLR, Spartan Marine and Stellar Industries, are proud to be collaborating with the CNIB Phone it forward campaign, and will be stocking the envelopes at all our stores. If you want to donate a smartphone, call into any of our stores and pick one up. The leaflet included contains all the information you need.

CNIB phone it forward

In return for the donation of your old smartphone, you will receive a tax receipt for it’s value. When you register your phone they will tell you what it is.

Donation Process

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Register Your Donation

Donate today. Follow the steps to get a tax receipt quote for your smartphone donation and fill out the required information forms to register your donation.

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Pick Up An Envelope

Pick up a prepaid Phone It Forward donation envelope from one of our sponsors, the Hercules Group of Companies, Hercules SLR, Spartan Marine, Wire Rope Atlantic and Stellar Industrial, at a wide variety of locations across Canada.

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Send In Your Donation

Pack your smartphone donation and the required, signed documents generated in the registration process, in the envelope and drop in any Canada Post mailbox.

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Receive Your Tax Receipt

When your device is received and evaluated to confirm it matches the information provided to us, we will send out your tax receipt.

We look forward to seeing you in our stores!

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.
Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.
We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Crane Hand Signals – Downloadable Reference Sheet

Crane-hand-signals

A crane operator can’t hear you. So when your team removes an old rooftop unit and positions a new one, the people on the ground and on the rooftop must use established hand signals to communicate safely with the crane operator.

Ask any crane operator and they will tell you that one of the main factors for a successful project is coordination.

Working in-sync with your team on the ground is not only crucial for safety but can help your project run smoothly, on schedule and keep the boss happy. With absolute precision and accuracy needed for a job, being able to clearly communicate direction is critical – but this is not always an easy task. Construction sites can be exceptionally loud and busy, meaning verbal communication is at risk of being drowned out by roaring machinery.

So how does an operator, with a load suspended in air, follow instructions from their team? Using the simple but effective method of hand signals. This age-old technique is used by crane operators across the world, aiding them to accurately receive unmistakable directions without the need for fancy equipment or even words!

A Simple Solution
Hand signals provide a simple solution for the communication issues faced by crane operators. Although radios can be used to relay messages across the site, there are some situations when an operator will need extra assistance.

Crane Hand Signals 2

Construction sites are loud. They produce a high level of noise from activities such as digging, piling, and drilling, therefore it can be difficult to convey instruction in an accurate and time efficient way. There are also times when an operator’s directional visibility is obstructed or the visibility of a load area is partially blocked, conducting a lift within these types of conditions can put the operator and the workers around them at serious risk of injury.

Although it recommended to use hand signals during all lifts, it is in these situations when a signal person will definitely be called upon. Easy to understand, hand signals help the operator avoid any potential hazards, completing actions in a safe and timely manner.

The Role of a Signal Person
As the eyes and the ears of a dedicated area or crane, a signal person carries many responsibilities.  Before a person can direct the operation of a crane they must first undergo formal training and complete a qualification in crane signaling. In training, a person will not only develop an understanding of standard hand signals, but they will also be required to become familiar with many different types of cranes, how each crane functions and any hand signals specific to particular equipment. The trainee signal person is required to grasp an understanding of the large library of signals without any memory prompts and show competence in recalling these during an examination by a third-party provider.

The signal person is also responsible for preventing injury and accidents to the best of their ability, this is done by following strict procedure during crane operation, for instance standing in clear view of the crane operator, ensuring the operating area is clear of people or hazardous objects and performing one signal at a time to avoid confusion.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard method of signaling must be used when operating a crane unless non-standard hand signals are discussed during the pre-job meeting. OSHA enforces standards and training requirements for safe working environments across multiple industries, including construction in the United States.

Safety First
Safety is the number one concern for crane operators, a person performing the hand signals stand at a vantage point which allows them to view the load area from a perspective that is not visible to the crane operator. From this point, the signal person is able to confirm whether a maneuver is safe to perform and halt all activity if they observe a potential risk.

Cranes have incredible capabilities however if operated incorrectly, they can pose a significant danger to construction workers on the site and in some cases the public.  Hand signals have been established as a reliable, low tech and universal way to improve safety during operation and avoid accidents.

Download your Hercules, handy reference sheet illustrating the correct hand signals here

Crane-Hand-Signals-Illustration

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE FULL LIST OF OSHA STANDARD METHOD HAND SIGNALS.