Samson K-100 hoist line: the first synthetic crane rope

Samson K-100 hoist line: first synthetic crane rope-hercules-slr
Samson Rope K-100 Hoist Line: an industry leader

Samson rope’s K-100 hoist rope is the first of its kind – a synthetic rope to be used with mobile cranes for hoisting applications. Traditionally, steel wire rope has been used for lifting applications with cranes – the K-100 is suitable for crane or truck hoist rope, or mobile crane hoist line applications.

K-100 hoist line: what’s the benefit?

The K-100 hoist rope has a high strength-to-weight ratio, bend fatigue durability and is easy to spool. It has a strength similar to wire rope – but reduces load weight by 80%. It also meets maximum line pull requirements with its 5:1 safety factor.

Samson has coated the K-100 rope in their proprietary coating that includes Dyneema® – this improves its cyclic bend performance compared to sheave applications commonly found on mobile cranes. It has a fibre core/cover – specifically, a polyester control core and a high-modulus (low elasticity) blend.

Samson K-100 Crane Hoist features:
  • Corrosion resistant – no rust or lube needed, which helps eliminate environmental concerns
  • Easy handling, reeving and installation
  • Reduced wear on sheaves and drums
  • Reduces number of change outs caused by kinking, bird-caging, or damage from diving
  • Reduces risk of hand injuries from broken wires, increased handling safety
  • Has same load pull and load chart, but with a 5:1 safety factor
  • Standardizes main and auxiliary hoist to one rope
  • Torque-neutral construction reduces load spin and cabling
  • Resistant to drum-crushing
Safety Factor: calculating stress-based design factor

There are different definitions of safety factor across many industries – which is also commonly known as the design factor. The Samson K-100 rope uses the safety or design factor calculation related to rigging and lifting applications.

The safety factor is the theoretical reserve capability of a product, which is determined by dividing the ultimate load by the working load limit (WLL). The ultimate load may also be known as nominal breaking strength. This calculation is expressed as a ratio – the K-100’s safety factor is 5:1.

k100-samson-rope-crane-hoist
Samson K-100 Crane Hoist Elongation
Samson Rope K-100 Hoist Line: weight matters

Another benefit of K-100 crane wire is it’s weight – as we mentioned, it’s 80% lighter than wire rope and can be beneficial for operators who travel during Spring Thaw Restrictions in Canada. Spring Thaw Policies are periods of time during/following Canadian Spring, (specific timelines and affected zones vary from province to province – if you’ve experienced a Spring in Nova Scotia versus British Columbia you know why!) and limit damage to at-risk roads.

Studies show that pavement reacts to a load 50%-70% greater in the Spring. Basically, the same axle a truck drives on daily can cause 5-8 times more damage in the Spring than any other time of the year, due to the heavier load. For mobile operators with a lot of terrain to cover, the K-100’s reduced weight can make your highway travels that much easier.

Samson Rope K-100 Hoist Line: inspection matters, too

No matter how good or durable a rope is, it will show wear and tear after a period of time. Some used rope won’t reduce strength, but many will. Before inspection, consider the following:

  • The length of rope;
  • The time it’s been in service;
  • The type of work it does;
  • Where the damage and the extent of the damage.

On a regular basis, inspect your Samson K-100 rope for the following conditions/damage and take the proper corrective action (repair or retire) based on your findings:

samson-rope-k100-crane-hoist-line-hercules-slr

 

 

Ultimately, Samson’s K-100 crane rope brings increased safety, easy handling and straight-forward inspection procedures. Hercules SLR Business Development Manager, Dwayne Fader says “Steel wire rope will always have its place – but innovations like this that are much lighter and easy to work with are always exciting.”

Information via Samson Rope – Find more information on the K-100 Rope here

Interested in purchasing K-100 Samson Rope for your crane? Drop us a line at sales@HerculesSLR.com or info@herculesslr.com – our experts will find the perfect rope for your lifting needs.

Want more crane training? Participate in our Overhead Crane Operator and Fundamentals of Overhead Crane courses – e-mail training@herculesslr.com to sign up. Or, click here to discover more Hercules SLR training courses.

Need hands-on training? Look no further. Discover our range of Hercules SLR Training Academy courses below:

References: 
- https://www.canadacartage.com/understanding-canadian-spring-thaw-regulations/
- https://www.samsonrope.com/docs/default-source/case-studies/cs_viant_crane_k-100.pdf
- https://samsonrope.com/docs/default-source/case-studies/cs_digging_and_rigging_k-100_web.pdf

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

 

Important: Preventative Equipment Maintenance

Preventative Maintenance

Underestimating the importance of equipment maintenance could be taking a toll on your bottom line. The saying “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” is too often the way some view equipment maintenance. Why pay for service on your equipment if there’s nothing wrong with it? Believe it or not, there are several reasons. All equipment is an investment — one that requires time and money to keep in optimal shape.

BENEFITS OF MAINTENANCE

Preventative equipment maintenance is key to extending equipment life and ultimately saving you time and money. While your perception may be that paying for preventative maintenance is unnecessary spending, the reality is that without it, you’re often left with more expensive repairs. At Hercules SLR we believe in the importance of preventative maintenance, here are just some of the reasons why:

KEEP EQUIPMENT RUNNING EFFICIENTLY

When equipment runs efficiently, work get done on schedule, keeping that optimal condition is key to maintaining that level of equipment efficiency. If maintenance is overlooked, efficiency suffers and ultimately, your bottom line suffers as a result.

SMALL PROBLEMS BECOME BIGGER PROBLEMS OVER TIME

We’ve all seen it; something isn’t working exactly the way it used to, but it isn’t affecting the job, so we continue, sometimes even adjusting how we use the piece of equipment to keep things moving. While it may seem like this is the most efficient way to get the job done in the short term, it could cause you major problems long-term.

THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM, THE MORE THE EXPENSE

While it may seem like it makes no sense to spend the time and money to have your equipment inspected or repaired when you’re able to work around it, the reality is that waiting, is going to cost you even more. Bigger, more complex repairs come with a bigger price tag. Think of more than parts? yes, a more complex problem will likely come with having to replace more and/or larger parts that are expensive, but it doesn’t end there.

Larger problems often translate to more downtime, the more downtime means you’re suddenly behind schedule and/or unable to take on a new project. Employees scheduled to use that equipment need paying, so now you are paying for work that cannot be done during the downtime.

Don’t wait for the bigger problem — invest in the small one.

REDUCE INJURIES AND FATALITIES

Within the construction industry, 17% of fatal construction accidents are due to contact with objects and equipment. If your equipment isn’t being serviced on a regular basis, there’s a chance it isn’t working properly. If it isn’t working properly, you’re increasing your chances of workplace injury or death because of equipment failure.

Regardless of how much safety training you or your employees have been through, they don’t have control over equipment failure. Of course, there will always be unexpected breakdowns, but you can minimize them through being proactive about your equipment maintenance.

Workplace injuries and fatalities are tragic and expensive. Company morale suffers, and so does your bottom line. One of the benefits of maintenance doubles as a proactive step in reducing the number of injuries or fatalities you have on site. You can’t put a price on your team’s safety in the field.

cert-track-en

Service records and documentation answer many of these questions and put many of the concerns of the unknown to rest. At Hercules SLR all our customers have access to CertTracker®, our FREE online equipment management system.

CertTracker® delivers innovative solutions that streamline any inspection and maintenance process. Mobile computing, Radio Frequency (RFID) tagging and internet applications provide you with enhanced accuracy and operational efficiency. Not to mention eliminating most of the paperwork.

CertTracker Cycle

The CertTracker Advantage

 TRAIN OPERATORS AND TECHNICIANS

In conjunction with technology, there is no substitution for the human touch. It takes a trained operator to understand the problem and a trained technician to know how to fix it or to alert someone that it needs repairing. Educating your equipment operators and any technicians you have on staff is key to extending the life of your equipment, as they will be sure that small problems don’t turn in to big ones.

If training isn’t feasible, there needs to be a summary of best practices and an operation manual in place so you can ensure operators are using the equipment the way it was meant to be used. Always respect all weight limits and guidelines. An untrained equipment operator could unintentionally cause costly repairs, so make sure the best practices and expectations are outlined clearly and regularly.

SET AND STICK TO A MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE

Every piece of equipment is different. They all have their own intricacies and need a maintenance and repair schedule to match. Rather than waiting for parts to cause a problem, replace them when they are scheduled to be replaced.

How do you know when that is? The piece of equipment will have an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) maintenance recommendation. Commit to it. It may seem like by being proactive you’re attempting to fix something that isn’t broken, but trust us, neglecting to do this will result in expensive repairs.

CONDUCT REGULAR INSPECTIONS

No, inspections are not the same thing as maintenance schedules. equipment should be inspected every time it’s used. Trained operators should know what to look and listen for to ensure equipment is working properly. Checking for simple things, like signs of wear on equipment, can go a long way. The reality is equipment is often used with vibration, high temperatures and friction? all of which contribute to the wear and tear. Add age to the mix, and you have a recipe for deterioration.

This happens with all equipment, and the key to extending equipment life is to make sure you do something as simple as adding an operator visual inspection to your equipment use requirements. Noticing slight wear and tear may seem small, but these things can be identified through a visual inspection and fixed before they cause a larger problem.

HOW QUALIFIED ARE THE TECHNICIANS INSPECTING YOUR GEAR?

When it comes to inspections, testing, repairs and certification, you need to know that you and your equipment are in safe and experienced hands.

The Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA) is established across the globe as the leading representative body for all those involved in the lifting industry worldwide. They provide third party training and examination for technicians in the lifting equipment industry.

At Hercules our inspectors have undergone this internationally recognized training and some hold multiple diplomas.

OUR TECHNICIANS ARE:

  • Familiar with the most recent technology in the lifting industry
  • Skilled and confident in their inspection skills
  • Constantly learning and expanding their knowledge
  • LEEA Registered Technicians

LEEA Header

For all your maintenance requirements, let our experts help. If you need to book your equipment in for service or have any concerns, questions or call us Toll Free on:  1-877-461-4876.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

 

 

 

Women in Industry – Kim Reynolds Warehouse Associate

Kim

Kim Reynolds is our dedicated, hardworking shipper/receiver at our Dartmouth location. We sat down with her to find out more about her and how she decided a career in Shipping was her calling.

Tell us about yourself:

Kim: I was born in Windsor Nova Scotia but grew up in Centre Rawdon. I remember spending a lot of time visiting my grandparents who lived two houses up from us. It was lovely having family so close. We used to have a hobby farm with goats, chickens, pigs and ducks. We also were lucky enough to have two big gardens and a small strawberry patch. Back then money was tight, so we were self-sufficient and grew our own food and harvested our own milk from the goats.

When I turned 16 my parents sold the house and we moved to the Annapolis Valley. It was a shock to the system living in a town having been so used to country living.

I finished my final school years at Kingstec Community College, back then they had grade 10-12 mixed with the college. The year I graduated, was the last time they were mixed, and it reverted to being solely a Community College.

What was your work experience before Hercules?

My work experience is many and varied before joining Hercules. My parents were unable to assist with further education and not wanting to have a large student loan hanging over me I went to out to work full time and took evening and online courses.

I started working when I was 13 and that includes Babysitter, Farm Hand, House Cleaner, Bakery Assistant, Chicken Plant Worker, Infantry Woman and Shipper/Receiver.

What made you decided to work for Hercules?Kim-2

Kim: Having seen the job posting and knowing they were looking for a Warehouse Associate, I did some research on the company and decided it was a good fit, not only with my past work experience but with the company’s values and opportunities it offers for progression. The people are great and working at Hercules is like having an extended family.

Management are very supportive, especially during busy periods, if I need a hand, they roll their sleeves up and muck in, asking what they can do to help. This is the first job where I have ever experienced that happen. This really shows they care about their employees and is just one of the many reasons I enjoy working for Hercules. Everyone is part of the team, looking to play their part in the best way possible.

What challenges do you face on a daily basis?

Kim: Every day is different; in the warehouse we face many different challenges. Organization is key! With so many deliveries coming in, orders to be picked, making sure everything is shipped out on time and emails are answered, multitasking is a must.

Hercules is a safety company. How do you ensure you work safe?

Kim: Every morning I always ensure I wear my correct Personal Protection Equipment. I start the day by doing a forklift check to make sure it is safe to use. When I need to lift boxes that are too heavy I always ask for assistance.

What are your aspirations and goals within the company?

Kim: When I started with Hercules, I knew I wanted progress within the company. I really enjoy my current role but am looking to spread my wings and further my potential in other departments as and when the opportunity presents itself.

What are your passions outside of work?

Kim: When I am note at work you will find me cooking up a storm in the kitchen. I love to bake and enjoy the simple pleasures in life such as spending time with my family and making memories.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Rigging Tips: avoid common wire rope damage

common-wire-rope-damage-wire-rope-slings

Wire rope has many applications—today the focus is on Wire Rope slings. Read on for tips from our Brampton rigging experts to inspect your wire rope sling and prevent common wire rope damage, so your wire rope slings have a long life.

Wire Rope: basic components

A piece of wire rope has three main components. Individual wires that make up each strand, the strand itself and finally, the core it’s built around. (See figure 1). The core is typically composed of fibre core (FC) or steel wire core, called independent wire rope core (IWRC). The steel core increases strength by 7% and the weight by 10%, which provides more support to the outer strands than fibre cores. Steel cores resist crushing and are more resistant to heat.

The design factor of wire rope tells you the ratio between minimum breaking load of the rope and the working load limit (WLL).

Figure 1

Wire Rope Lay Patterns

wire-rope-lay-patterns
(L-R) Right Lay/Ordinary Lay, Left Lay/Ordinary Lay, Right Lay/Lang’s Lay, Right Lay/Reverse Lay (Cross Lay)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wire Rope Sling Inspection: what to look for

It’s important to inspect your wire rope sling before use to prevent common wire rope damage—but also for safety. Wire rope slings don’t normally pass around a pulley, therefore it’s important to look out for wear from the environment, like:

  • Abrasive dust, little to no lubricant
  • Normal wear-and-tear
  • Corrosion (look for discolouration, lack of flexibility and rough to-the-touch feel)
  • Abrasion
  • Thermal damage (over-heating)
  • Termination failures

When inspecting the wire rope itself, look for wear at the crown, the core strands and inter-strand wear. Check for kinked, damaged or broken wires. This kind of damage is often caused by slinging a previous load incorrectly—if excessive wear is present, it may be best to look at how wire rope slings are used on the worksite. Keep reading for tips to avoid common wire rope damage and wear and tear on slings.

Wire Rope Sling Don’ts:

  • Don’t join slings by threading eyes;
  • Don’t pull loops in your sling or use a knotted/kinked sling;
  • Don’t tie knots in sling legs to reduce length;
  • Don’t overload the sling;
  • Don’t pull from under a load;
  • Don’t lift a container with only two slings;
  • Don’t place slings near welding/cutting operations;
  • Don’t force the eye to open more than 20° (this places undue tension on the ferrule);
  • Don’t stand under a load;
  • Don’t land the load directly on the sling;
  • Don’t wrap a wire rope around a hook—this kinks the wire and ruins the sling.

Wire Rope Sling Do’s:

  • Always use a shackle with at least the same SWL to join slings together;
  • Use suitable storage/packaging;
  • Minimum radius sling can be bent is 3 times diameter of sling wire rope.

Most damage to wire rope slings is caused by unnecessary chaffing against the load, ground or nearby objects. Avoid abrasion and don’t place your sling in contact with adjacent structures, don’t drag your wire rope sling from under a load, and avoid double-choke hitching to prevent common wire rope damage.

Wire rope sling corrosion is a major cause of deterioration, and is caused by poor storage, exposure to weather and corrosive chemicals. Thermal damage happens when the operating temperature is too high, electric arching was used during welding or if the sling was exposed to lightening. External wear can typically be seen from the outside, however, it’s more difficult to asses internal damage—the rope must be opened up. See figures 2 and 3 for examples of internal wire rope corrosion.

Internal wear is most affected by pressure and friction. Factors that affect internal wear include:

  • Level of rope tension
  • Bending ratio
  • Bending frequency
  • Lack of lubricant
  • Tension fatigue (affected by degree of tension)
wire-rope-slings-rigging-equipment
Figure 2

 

wire-rope-slings-rigging-equipment
Figure 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wire Rope termination: what to look for

  • Wire breaks
  • Corrosion
  • Reduction in rope diameter
  • Unusual rope movement
  • Evidence of rope end
  • Evidence of any incorrect fitting
  • Evidence of any component wear

Avoid Common Wire Rope Damage: battening down

When a rigger strikes the eye of a sling in a choke hitch to force the bright closer to the load in an attempt to ‘make it more secure’—this is known as battening down (not to be confused with a batten from theatre rigging), and is actually very dangerous. The bight should always assume its natural angle, which is usually about 120°.

wire-rope-slings-rigging-equipment
Battening down: dangerous!

Practice inspections and know what to look for, avoid battening down, avoid exposing your wire rope sling to abrasive forces and chemicals, and you can avoid common wire rope sling damage.

Want more wire rope? Check out our pages on types of wire rope construction and wire rope grades.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Risk Management: safety is every riggers’ business

risk-management-safety-is-every-riggers-business

Risk Management: what is it?

Risk management is the systematic process of assessing risk and acting in such a manner, or implementing policies and procedures in order to avoid or minimize loss associated with such risk. Essentially, risk management is a set of actions that reduces the risk of a problem, a failure, or an accident. The ISO 31000 defines risk management as “the effect of uncertainty on objectives”.

For the most part, risk management methods consist of the following methods:

  • Identify and characterize threats
  • Assess the vulnerability of critical assets to specific threats
  • Determine the risk (i.e. the expected likelihood and consequences of specific types of attacks on specific assets)
  • Identify ways to reduce those risks
  • Prioritize risk reduction measures based on strategy

Risk Management: know the definitions

Hazard: something with the likelihood to cause harm

Harm: physical injury or damage to health.

Risk: likelihood the hazard is realized – it happens

Severity: likelihood hazard or risk will occur, and the number of people affected and extent of consequences

Control Measures: the arrangements made to reduce risk

 

Risk Matrix

The purpose of the risk matrix is to determine the risk category. Once you have identified the project risks, review each risk in turn and assess both the likelihood of the risk happening and the severity of the impact on the project if the process doesn’t go as planned.

Consequences

risk-matrix

Risk Management: FLRA is more than just a funny word

Field Level Risk Assessment (FLRA) is a process used to assess the related hazards and their risks for a specific task or job.

A FLRA:
  • Helps reduce injury and to process loss
  • Is an industry standard
  • Is a requirement of most industrial establishment’s safety program
  • Is a requirement on most work sites

A FLRA should be completed:

  • At the start of each shift
  • Before re-starting work which has been stopped for a period of time
  • When site or work conditions change during a job
  • Before starting a new task or job for which there is no safe work procedure
  • Always check for specific requirements with onsite contact or employer
Who Can Conduct a FLRA?
  • Anyone can conduct a FLRA
  • All members of the work team need to participate
  • Sometimes other personnel on the work side need to be included
  • Sometimes a specialist or person familiar with the job and site needs to be involved

Risk Management:  your basic rigging plan

Follow this basic rigging plan to manage risk and avoid potential hazards. When you plan each lift, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Has a competent rigger been assigned?
  • Has a risk assessment been conducted with all team members?
  • What is the communication plan?
  • Has the rigging been inspected? (Pre-lift and annually?)
  • Is the rigging fit for the load type and purpose? (I.E. WLL, material, size, etc.) 
  • What is the weight of the load?
  • Where is the load’s center of gravity?
  • What is the sling angle?
  • Will there be any side or angular loading?
  • Are wear pads required against corners, edges, protrusions or abrasive surfaces?
  • Have the applicable hitches been selected for load control and stability?
  • Will personnel be in the way of the load or lifting equipment?
  • Is there any possibility of snagging? (Vertical, horizontal, travel path)?
  • Are there environmental concerns? (I.E. wind, temperature, visibility, power lines)
  • Is a tag line required to control the load?

Risk Management: complete a pre-use check

Pre-use safety checks are required before a rigger uses any lifting equipment or accessories – follow the manufacturer instructions and applicable ASME standards.

This includes a basic physical check of the equipment, which can significantly reduce the risk of health and safety issues that may arise on site during everyday operations.

ASME Standards

ASME Standards state: ASME B30.9 requires that sling users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of environment, and rigging practices. Sling identification is required on all types of slings.

ASME B30.26 requires that rigging hardware users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of environment, and rigging practices. All rigging hardware to be identified by manufacturer with name or trademark of manufacturer.

References: https://www.iso.org/home.html

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Fall Protection Training: don’t get left behind

fall-protection-training-dont-get-left-behind

Fall Protection Training: don’t get left behind

Fall protection and training for is easy to overlook when there’s a job to be done—who has time to strap on a safety harness? You do.

Worker at height with SRL

At Hercules SLR, safety is a priority in all areas of our company. We spoke with some experts around the office about fall protection safety training – think safety harnesses, self-retracting lifelines and anchorage lines. They all agree that equipment alone is not enough – workers must be trained to use it properly. Training should be engaging, hands-on and fun to have workers actually use this equipment.

We want workers and employers alike to be aware of fall protection’s importance and the difference the right training makes. Read on to discover tips from our safety experts that will make you and your employees want to use their fall protection gear.

Fall Protection Training: are you credible?

Credibility is a large aspect of effective training and communication—do you sit behind a desk all day? Do you climb a 12-foot ladder daily? Regardless of the words you say, who you are will effect the message you’re trying to deliver.

“I had a professor in University who was from Poland, and her Family had escaped from the Nazi’s during their reign – her experience gave her credibility when she taught us European history, and even as students it made us pay attention,” remarks Business Development Manager, Consultant and Safety Trainer & Inspector Lou Gould on the difference credibility makes.

Fall Protection Training: know your audience

It’s important to know that while there’s overlap, there are differences among the industrial trades—it’s important to know the differences and not generalize when explaining the importance of fall protection gear.

Says Gould “Once, I was at a meeting where the topic was roof workers safety. The guy who was giving the presentation was an electrician, but was only speaking from his experience. I noticed right away a lot of guys in the room ‘check out’ so to speak, since he wasn’t addressing their specific problems or issues. It’s important to know your audience, especially when you’re trying to get an important point across.”

Experience is a great teacher. He continues, “The classroom is a sharing experience with everyone you’re with. Personally, I am a story-teller, and I’ve found this makes a great environment to learn. Whether it’s a situation you’ve been in or just witnessed, being able to say ‘I’ve seen someone use this before and protect them’ tends to stick in everyone’s head better than reading straight from a text.”

Use industry-specific examples to show how fall protection gear will improve and enhance their daily work. For example, talking to roofers? Mention how slippery roofs become during inclement weather – something your audience relates to.

Fall Protection Training: risk management vs. risk communication

When you reflect on an incident, there are typically thousands of tiny moments that led to that one disaster. All are entirely preventable – nothing is random. However, explaining how a fallen wrench can lead to a fatality isn’t something all trainers can do.

In the safety industry, we talk about risk management all the time, but we never talk about risk communication. Risk communication is the ability to explain the process of an injury, how they can escalate and what is being done to mitigate or in worst-case scenarios, investigate and provide conclusions. In the safety industry, many trainers have extensive knowledge but are don’t deliver it in a way that makes their audience pays attention.

ppe-fall-protection-training-safety-harness
Hercules SLR employee at height with their safety harness

It’s not enough to say “an 8-lb wrench dropped can cause fatal injuries” – which is an approach many trainers take. Hercules SLR trainers know that reading out facts is not enough. It’s much more effective to say “an 8-lb wrench dropped from 200 feet above has 2,833 pounds of force per square inch – which is equal to a Clydesdale horse hitting a 1 square inch area.”

It’s important to explain causation when you emphasize the need for proper PPE equipment and fall protection training. Many workers have the perception that fall protection PPE and training is only essential for “big accidents” – think falls from height or worksite explosions. But the right training emphasizes PPE’s role in daily work.

Causation vs. Big Accidents

Help workers visualize common accidents that occur on worksites and the role causation plays in daily workplace safety. For example, the nursing profession has many different hazards to mitigate. A few factors that contribute are, long shifts, high-stress nature of the job, aggression in the workplace, high emotional environment, poor housekeeping and lifting at awkward angles. The stressors through the day can contribute to injury and low-productivity. Financially, employers and owners can expect to pay much more to repair or replace misused equipment, rather than taking measures to maintain it in the first place.

The proper equipment and training will reduce discomfort caused by misusing PPE & fall protection gear, while reducing worksite injury and accident and improving productivity.

Fall Protection Training: most importantly, make it fun

We hate to break it to you—but if you’re boring no one will listen to you.

Many Hercules SLR students that enroll are actually already certified riggers. Often, they’ll start to work on-site and realize they’re making too many errors, or they enroll in other rigging courses and realize their skill isn’t on par with their peers.

Going forward, a big trend is the transition to a blended-training model. Blended training involves both a practical and classroom/online component, with a focus on engaging, hands-on activities, demonstrations.

Our Aerial Work Platform Training course is a great example of this. We spend 3-4 hours in the classroom and cover theory, and then we operate machines all afternoon. Right now, industry trend is to complete an online module that before the practical, then students come to the facility and complete their final practical test. This gives our trainers more hands-on training with the students and equipment than is available with more traditional training models.

Hercules SLR Training

Hercules SLR offers high-quality safety training and certification courses. We’ll customize courses to fit your workplace’s specific needs, and we’ll provide training on-site or at a Hercules SLR facility.

We don’t just offer safety and fall protection training – we’ll inspect, repair and certify your equipment too. Have your inspection done with Hercules SLR and gain access to our exclusive asset management tool, CertTracker. CertTracker maintains inspection records, gives advance notice of inspection due dates and schedules service times – Consider it your tool for great safety compliance.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Get to Know your System Administrator, Aamir Khan

it-career-system-administrator-hercules

Aamir Khan is our System Administrator at our Head Office in Dartmouth, NS. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided on a career in the IT (information technology) industry. 

Tell us a bit about yourself, Aamir: it-careers-hercules-slr

I started studying in Pakistan and did my Bachelor of Science in Electrical (Telecom) Engineering from COMSATS University. I worked there for a Telecommunication and Networking based company in a Network Support Engineer position. After that, I enrolled at Dalhousie University here in Nova Scotia where I completed my MEng in Internetworking degree. I started my career here in Canada with a Gaming company. 

What was your work experience like before coming to Hercules SLR?

I’ve built my career working various roles in the Information Technology services environment. In my role as Systems Administrator at a renowned gaming company, I managed all the IT operations including network and servers in their Halifax studio. I’ve assisted all IT helpdesk patrons with their hardware and software issues for both PCs and Macs. My main duties were user management, IT equipment procurement & inventory, networks, IT security, servers, client services troubleshooting and desktop administration.

In my role as Network Support Engineer with a large Telecommunications company in Pakistan, I provided technical support to field technicians and customers to resolve network issues. I also assisted L1 network engineers and reduced the number of escalated ticket counts per day. I also researched issues on computer systems to resolve complaints, answer inquiries and outline solutions.

What made you decided to work for Hercules?

I saw a posting at Hercules SLR and they were looking for a skill set like mine. Even though I wasn’t familiar with the securing, lifting and rigging industry I decided to apply and it was a great opportunity! 

“My daily challenges are less about technology than about learning how to get things done.

What challenges do you face on a daily basis in your role and your IT career?

The best part of the job is getting to provide support and solution to technical problems to almost everyone in the company. My daily challenges are less about technology than about learning how to get things done. The academic world is often about examples and theory, and the real-world is about solving problems that arise. As a System Administrator I faced issues concerning group policy enforcement, mail-box optimization, mail flow, backup and restore, email tracking, printer usage, security and data protection, patching and restoration, performance issue, keeping users within baseline of organizational IT and security policy, hardware failure and replacement and answering requests for service fixes and tickets for IT problems.

Everyday is a challenge and learning experience from me. Someone said that good judgement comes from experience and that experience comes from bad judgement. You have to gain experience in order to learn how to solve problems.

Hercules is a safety company. How do you ensure your work safe?
it-career-hercules-slr

As a system admin, I’m responsible to ensure the necessary integrity and reliability of systems and keep systems safe from external attacks by following ethical standards. These include ensuring that the operating system, software, and other applications are updated with the latest security patches. To work safe, I regularly keep logs and record system activities to ensure systems and networks are not interrupted so business operations are kept up and running.

What are your aspirations and goals within the company?

As Systems Administrator I want to utilize all the resources available for my role and to upskill my career. Also, I’d like to master all the IT operations! My goals are to advance my career in the field of IT by taking up the relevant certifications that have been approved and suggested by the company.

I want to see myself in the position of a systems engineer within Hercules SLR. These positions work to build the IT infrastructure of a company, and look for ways to optimize company technology to increase production and save money.

What are your passions outside of work?

I’m health conscious, so whenever I get free time I go to the gym. I also love travelling and have travelled many places across Canada. I have passion and plan to travel across the world!

As I mentioned, my previous experience is in the gaming industry—I like to play video games and program mods for the existing games. Apart from that I also play cricket.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Warehouse Safety: 8 steps to take after a racking accident

racking-accident-hercules-slr

As we mentioned in our previous blog on warehouse and forklift safety, the winter months are a busy time for warehouse personnel. There’s retail, inventory, and in these modern times, the hustle and bustle doesn’t stop on December 25 – there’s boxing day sales, new years events and more to keep your warehouse busy. During these busy times, a racking accident is more likely to occur.

Many warehouses use a racking system – a material handling storage system meant to store materials on pallets, which are commonly known as ‘skids’. Racking accidents look disastrous and can cause injury – they also take time, money and resources to repair (and this is before the cost of replacing the damaged materials).

Racking accidents tend to occur more than once, generally when proper incident investigation and reporting does not take place – these accidents will continue to happen. Managing a racking accident effectively will ultimately improve your companies whole risk management plan.

To prevent further accidents from taking place, proper incident reporting is absolutely necessary. Norm Kramer, a consultant from Ontario’s Workplace Safety & Prevention Services says incidents often remain unreported, for two reasons:

  1. An ineffective reporting system: It may be common-place to say a racking accident or damage is no big deal in the workplace, and/or the reporting process is too complicated and “not worth dealing with”.
  2. Employees fear consequences: workers may fear discipline or termination after reporting an accident or near-accident.

Here are 8 steps to take after a racking accident in your warehouse:

racking-accident-warehouse-safety-hercules-slr
Accidents happen!
Racking Accident: Be Proactive

Have an investigation team already in place. This team should include people who are aware of accident investigation and causation techniques, and are also familiar with roles and routines of the specific workplace. Examples of these team members could be immediate supervisors, outside-contracted employees, union representatives (if necessary), safety committee members or employees familiar with the role.

Create a basic response plan to follow after an accident/emergency, and post in a common area where all employees can see it.

1. Racking Accident: Consult Workers—And Equipment

Examine the injury/incident that has taken place and take not of the situation at hand. Remember to include the basics – who, what, when, where and how. If needed, don’t forget to acquire medical attention. Inspect the rack and determine the type and amount of damage.

2. Racking Accident: Control the Area

Protect worker safety and secure the area if needed. You may need to contain the damage, or unload the racking structure if safe to do so.

3. Racking Accident: Communicate Hazards

Inform workers of hazards on the warehouse floor, and any other obstacles workers should be aware of.

4. Racking Accident: Find the Source

Identify the cause of the accident/hazard. The cause could be incompatible forks and pallets, poor visibility in the warehouse, or not enough space between racking and the forklift to turn properly.

5. Racking Accident: Put Controls in Place

Place controls on the root source of the accident/incident to remedy it. Controls may range from more training, a different warehouse layout or inspections/repairs to equipment.

6. Racking Accident: Keep Communication Open

Keep communication open with management, human resources and any other management or employees relevant to the accident. Be sure to share relevant forms, documents and other required materials with them.

7. Racking Accident: Repair and Inspect

Be sure to have your racking equipment inspected and/or repaired by a qualified professional. Depending on which province you’re in, these regulations may differ. Factors to consider include: building regulations, fire codes and employer responsibilities regarding safety.

Check with your provincial labour ministry for rules and regulations related to storage and material handling, warehouses and other engineered equipment. The Canadian Centre of Occupational Health and Safety recommends following the Canadian Standard Association (CSA) for Steel Storage and Steel Racking units, A344.1 and A344.2.

Forklift Safety at Hercules SLRracking-accident-warehouse-safety-forklift

At Hercules SLR, we provide hands-on training with a focus on safety—we provide lasting knowledge you and your employees can practically apply. Find more information on our Forklift (Narrow Aisle or Counterbalance) Safety Training course here.

Find more information on Hercules SLR inspection services here, so your forklifts remain in top condition. Learn more about the benefits of our asset management tool CertTracker® for your forklifts and other heavy machinery and equipment.


References:

  • http://www.wsps.ca/Information-Resources/Articles/9-steps-to-take-after-a-racking-incident.aspx
  • https://www.safeopedia.com/2/1210/prevention-and-control-of-hazards/injury-prevention/10-critical-steps-you-must-take-when-investigating-and-reporting-accidents
  • https://www.hni.com/blog/bid/92062/workplace-incident-report-7-immediate-steps-to-take-after-an-injury
  • http://www.iamaw.ca/new-csa-standard-for-steel-storage-rack-safety/

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Warehouse Safety: is your forklift holiday season ready?

warehouse-safety-forklift-training

Warehouse Safety: forklifts and lift trucks

Warehouse Safety—why is it important? Warehouse work presents various short and long term heath and safety issues – these range from musculoskeletal injuries from awkward bending and lifting positions, to chemical and biological hazards from chemicals and natural factors like dampness or mould.

Warehouses are also busy places—we live in an age where everyone wants things “now!”—but during the holiday season, warehouses tend to become even more crowded. Employees, heavy equipment & machinery and packages on the floor all create obstacles for forklift and lift truck operators. Warehouse safety is easy to overlook during busy periods, especially when employees rush to meet deadlines and fill orders.

Busy times enhance the need for warehouse safety, since this is when hazards are most likely to become injurious or fatal. We know warehouse safety can feel like a nuisance, but we assure you—it never is.

In this article on warehouse safety, the spotlight is on forklift and lift truck safety on the warehouse floor. Forklifts are great to lift and move almost anything, and have become essential to any warehouse operation. However, each year there are nearly 500,000 serious injuries from forklift accidents and 85 fatalities.

Read on for common dangers for a forklift found on the warehouse floor, and our tips to keep your forklift operating safely and smoothly.

Forklift & Lift Trucks: common warehouse incidents

As we previously mentioned, forklifts are a very common presence in most industries and are found in the majority of warehouses. Due to being found in so many places, one of the biggest dangers forklifts present is the assumption that they aren’t dangerous. Often, workers become “used” to operating a forklift and forget to follow certain operating procedures, which can result in accidents.

The Infrastructure Health & Safety Association (IHSA) says common forklift injuries and accidents involving workers include:

  • Forklifts being driven off loading docks;
  • Falling between a dock and an unsecured trailer;
  • A worker being struck by a forklift when it’s in reverse and the operator cannot see the worker;
  • A forklift tipping over and crushing an operator or worker;
  • The load on a lift truck isn’t secured or loaded properly and falls off the forks;
  • The operator not keeping their arms and legs inside the cab, which causes them to slip/fall when they get out of the cab.

It’s still a piece of heavy machinery that can cause escalating incidents, as we’ve seen from certain viral videos. This is why it’s important to train new employees and existing employees, to ensure they’re updated on current operating procedures and safety standards. Other common forklift accidents include racking and property damage—which can include anything from damage to other equipment or the building itself. The IHSA says these accidents are caused by three main factors:

  1. Insufficient training
  2. Little safety rule enforcement
  3. Lack of safe operating procedures

Warehouse Safety: inspect your forklift

warehouse-safety-forklift
Hands in? Check. PPE? Check. Looking ahead? Check.

When using a forklift under normal conditions, the CCOHS recommends inspecting forklifts both daily and every six months. A daily visual inspection should include looking for any visible defects or cracks, while a 6-month inspection should be done by a certified inspection technician.

To inspect your forklift, look for:
  • Exposed wires coming from any cables;
  • Worn, loose or dirty battery plug connections;
  • Clogged vent caps;
  • Leaks in the hydraulic system;
  • Damaged wheels;
  • Wear, bends or cracks in forks;
  • Broken or chipped carriage teeth;
  • Chain anchor pins that are worn, loose or bent;
  • Damp/dry spots that would indicate a leak;
  • Chipped paint or other marks indicating damage (thought it seems minor, this is essential for roll-over protection);
  • Securely held hoses that aren’t crimped or worn.
Before operating your forklift, make sure:
  • Air pressure is good in tires;
  • Positioning latches are in good working condition;
  • Engine oil, fuel and radiator water levels are good;
  • Battery is fully-charged and secured in place.
 Operational Inspection Checklist—make sure:
  • Horn works loud enough to be heard clearly in working environment;
  • Floor brake and pedal works—check pedal travel;
  • Parking brake holds against slight acceleration;
  • Deadman seat brake holds against slight acceleration;
  • Clutch and gearshift shifts smoothly with no jerks;
  • Lights and gauges work on dash control panel;
  • Steering is not “sticky” and works smoothly;
  • Lift mechanism operates smoothly (to check, raise forks to maximum height and lower completely);
  • Tilt mechanism moves smoothly and holds (to check, tilt mast all the way forward and back);
  • Mast and carriage don’t have any lose or missing bolts, chain tension or damage;
  • Cylinders and hoses aren’t leaking;
  • Your seatbelt is fastened;
  • Forklift does not make unusual sounds.

Your daily inspection should include not only the forklift, but the warehouse floor itself. On the warehouse floor, look for:

  • Misplaced items on the floor that will create an obstacle;
  • Overhead obstructions;
  • A registered fire extinguisher that’s able to use.

Warehouse Safety: operating & controlling your forklift

warehouse-safety-forklift
Don’t be a dummy—don’t overload your forks!

When you lift a load, be sure to not move or adjust any part of the load while it’s on the forks.

To load pallets, CCOHS suggests ensuring forks are:
  • Level;
  • High enough to stack the pallet;
  • Proper width to distribute weight evenly (otherwise they’ll become unstable);
  • Under the load completely and reaching two-thirds of the load length.
Driving with a Load 101

Support the load with the front wheels of the forklift, and be sure to turn with your back forklift wheels. Be sure to never overload your forks, as this makes it difficult to maintain control of the forklift—do not add a counterweight to fix this!

When travelling on an incline, keep forks pointed downwards when travelling without a load and keep them pointed upwards when travelling with a load. Do not turn until on level ground.

Tips to maintain control with pallets:
  • Carry load with front wheels;
  • Turn with rear wheels;
  • Don’t take sharp turns at high speeds;
  • Don’t overload or add extra weight.

Be sure to avoid any sudden stops and always look in the direction that you’re travelling, whether going forward or in reverse. When in reverse, go slowly, sound your horn before proceeding and stop if vision is limited or blocked. Sound your horn, and proceed with caution.

While driving the forklift, obey posted signs, keep forks as low to the floor as possible and tilted back, decrease speed at turns and sound the horn. Remember, when it comes to using your horn— it’s better to make too much noise than not enough.

While on the floor look, remember to look for:
  • Oil spots
  • Wet spots
  • Loose objects
  • Holes
  • Rough surfaces
  • People/vehicles on the floor or roadway

Forklift Safety at Hercules SLRwarehouse-safety-forklift

At Hercules SLR, we provide hands-on training with a focus on safety—it’s important for us to provide a lasting impression and knowledge you and your employees can take with them. Find more information on our Forklift Safety Training courses here.

Find more information on Hercules SLR inspection services here, so your forklifts remain in top condition—Plus, learn more about the benefits of our asset management tool CertTracker® for your forklifts and other heavy machinery and equipment.

References:- https://www.ihsa.ca/pdfs/magazine/volume_11_Issue_4/safety_talk_lift_trucks_warehouse.pdf- https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/safety_haz/forklift/control.html
- https://www.ccohs.ca/headlines/text16.html

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Crane & Hoisting System: the dangers of side pulling

cm hoisting system at hercules slr

Crane & Hoisting System Safety: guest post from CM Canada

Overhead lifting operations, like a hoisting system or cranes, are necessary in workplaces around the globe. The ability to lift and move material safely is critical to the success of many businesses. Failure to follow safe lifting practices can lead to serious personal injury and cause damage to equipment and facilities.hoisting-system

While there are many aspects to safe lifting procedures, one critical issue to discuss is “side pulling” and how to avoid it. Today, Hercules SLR welcomes guest blogger CM Canada to discuss the dangers of side pulling when using a crane or hoist.

Crane & Hoisting System Safety: overhead hoists are designed to raise loads vertically

Accordingly, the load being lifted must be centered under the hoist (Figure 1). Side pulling (Figure 2) occurs when you attempt to lift any load that is not located directly under the hoist. Another form of side pulling occurs when a crane operator attempts to use the trolley drives or bridge to apply force to move an object horizontally when the load isn’t first fully suspended on the hoist – it should be clear of the floor or other support. Regardless of how a side pull is applied, unintended, damaging and potentially dangerous results can occur. Side pulling a hoist or crane, in most cases, results in a violation of OSHA regulations, and numerous industry standards – check your provincial regulations for specific standards.

hoisting-system-cm-bandit
CM Bandit Hoist

ASME B30.16, a safety standard for overhead hoists (underhung) states that:

Hoists shall not be operated unless the hoist unit is centered over the load, except when authorized by a qualified person who has determined that the components of the hoist and its mounting will    not be overstressed. Should it be necessary to pick a load that is not centered under the hoist unit, precautions should be taken to control the swing of the load when it is picked clear of its support.

Crane & Hoisting System Safety: what are the dangers of side pulling?

  • As the load is lifted free of the floor or other support it will attempt to center itself under the hoist, causing the load to rapidly swing in a horizontal arc (Figure 3). This pendulum effect can cause serious injury to personnel or damage to other equipment in the area.hoisting-system
  • The wire rope or load chain can be forced out of the grooving or pockets on the hoist drum or lift wheel. This can damage the chain/rope, and may also cause damage to drums, sheaves, and other components. In the best case scenario, this can lead to costly repairs and downtime. More importantly, it could cause the chain or wire rope to break and the load to drop, putting equipment, facilities, and personnel at serious risk.
  • Side pulling at an angle that is not in line with the length of the bridge or monorail (Figure 4) could cause the trolley hoist to tip, making the trolley inoperable. In the worst case, the trolley hoist could actually be pulled off of the beam. This side pull condition also puts stresses on the beam itself and could cause the beam to skew (Figure 5).
  • Side pulling is not considered “normal operation” of the hoist and therefore may void the manufacturer’s warranty.
  • Attempting to lift a load that is located beyond the end of a bridge beam or monorail (Figure 6) could damage the safety stops at the end of the beam. In rare cases, this has caused the trolley hoist to fall off the end of the beam.

rigging equipment

 

 

 

 

 

The number of inquiries professional riggers receive regarding side pulling amaze me. These are sometimes phrased like “what is the maximum angle of side pull that is permissible with your hoist?” Customers may also make a statement such as “The distance from my bridge beam to the floor is only 20’ but I need a few feet of additional wire rope on the hoist so I can pull materials out of the adjoining bay.”

These are the GOOD situations, where at least the potential for side loading has been made known and it can be properly addressed. What worries me are the situations where these circumstances may exist but are not made known to the hoist/crane manufacturer or crane service provider.

Fact: Side pulling is one of the most common and most dangerous mistakes with overhead cranes. 

Crane & Hoisting System Safety: 5 steps to help avoid side pulling hazards

  • Make sure that all new crane and monorail systems are designed and installed by qualified material handling professionals.
  • Have existing overhead lifting equipment and lifting applications reviewed by a qualified person to ensure these systems are properly located to provide full hook coverage (without side pulling) for all locations where materials to be lifted are located.
  • Arrange for hoist and crane operator safety training of all personnel within your organization who may use overhead lifting equipment as well as all managers or supervisors who may direct others to use that equipment.
  • Ask your overhead lifting equipment provider about the availability and functionality of devices such as overlay limit switches, rope guides and others equipment used to detect, prevent or reduce the damaging effects of unintended side pulling.
  • Consider using an adjustable lifting beam and counterweight to allow an off-center load to be lifted without creating side-pull on the hoist.

Reproduced with Permission from Columbus McKinnon. Original article here: http://blog.cmworks.com/crane-hoist-safety-dangers-side-pulling/ 

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.