Wire Rope Slings – Care and Maintenance

Wire-Rope-Sling

Terry Young, president of Construction Safety Experts, in the US, discusses identification, inspection and removal criteria for wire rope slings. The ASMEB30.9-2006 Standard requires wire rope slings to show the name or trademark of the manufacturer, diameter or size, number of legs, if more than one, and the rated loads for the types of hitches used and the angle upon which it is based.

The initial identification is done by the manufacturer and should be maintained by the user so as to be legible during the life of the sling. Replacement of wire rope slings identification should be considered as a repair and is required to be performed by the manufacturer or a qualified person. It must be marked to identify the repairing agency.

Wire rope sling 2

Additional proof testing is not required when replacing sling identification. An initial inspection should be performed prior to using new, altered, modified or repaired wire rope slings. It should be conducted by a designated person to verify compliance with applicable ASME 30.9-2006 standards.

A frequent visual inspection for damage must be performed by the user or designated person each day or shift the sling is used. The best safety practice is to inspect the wire rope before each use, task or lift.

Any condition meeting the ASME 30.9 – 2006 removal criteria or other condition that may result in a hazard must result in the sling being removed from service. The sling should then not be returned to service until approved by a qualified person. Written records are not required for frequent inspections.

A periodic inspection is to be conducted at intervals, not exceeding one year. This requires a complete inspection for damage to the sling by a designated person. The inspection should be conducted on the entire length, including splices, end attachments and fittings.

The frequency of periodic inspections should be based on frequency of use, severity of service conditions, nature of lifts being made and experience gained from the service life of slings used in similar circumstances or conditions.

Guidelines for the time intervals are

  • Normal service – yearly
  • Severe service – monthly to quarterly
  • Special service – as recommended by a qualified person or manufacturer
  • A written record shall be made and maintained of the most recent periodic inspection

Removal criteria

A wire rope sling shall be removed from service if conditions such as the following are present.

  • Missing or illegible sling identification
  • Broken wires
  • For strand- laid and single-part slings, 10 randomly broken wires in one rope lay, or five broken wires in one strand in one lay.
  • For cable-laid slings, 20 broken wires per lay.
  • For six- part braided slings 20 broken wires per braid.
  • For eight-part braided slings 40 broken wires per braid.
  • Severe localized abrasion or scraping
  • Kinking, crushing, birdcaging or any other damage resulting in damage to the rope structure
  • Evidence of heat damage
  • End attachments that are cracked, deformed or worn to the extent that the strength of the sling is substantially affected
  • Severe corrosion of the rope, end attachments or fittings.
  • Other conditions including visible damage that may cause doubt to the continued use of the sling

Hook removal criteria is listed in the ASME B30.10 Standard. Rigging hardware removal criteria is listed in the ASME B30.26 Standard.

Read original article here at International Cranes and Specialized Transport

For all your rigging repairs, inspections and services, call Hercules! Our inspectors are trained to the highest standard and are LEEA registered.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Hercules Employees are Energized and Engaged

Hercules-Careers

Hercules SLR provides our employees with an array of specialized and diverse functional careers with a focus on each employee’s long-term learning and growth.

We hire and keep the best, and continually improve the skills and capabilities of individuals and teams. And, we look for people with a strong work ethic, who are team and customer service oriented. For fulfilling careers, Hercules SLR is a great place to work.

If you are a self-motivated individual who wants to become a valued member of this successful and energetic organization, we encourage you to have a look at our current job opportunities. If we do not have a job for you advertised, check back as we are always on the lookout for people that are the right fit for the company.

Hercules SLR offers a competitive compensation and benefits package along with career path development.

People Development

Development opportunities at Hercules SLR are never ending, especially on the job learning, stretch assignments, job shadowing and specialized training. we support our employees so that they can continue learning, be comfortable in their careers and have a great work/life balance.

We place a strong emphasis on formal leadership and technical skills training. We invest heavily in these two areas to ensure that our company has the right skills and capabilities to keep our workforce at the top of their careers and to meet future business needs.

Current Opportunities

Hercules-careers

If you are interested in applying for a role:

  • E-mail your resume and cover letter to: hr@herculesslr.com
  • Mail your resume and cover letter to: Human Resources, 520 Windmill Road, Dartmouth, NS B3B 1B3

If you’re looking for a chance to thrive in a challenging environment, then Hercules SLR is where you want to be!

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Get to Know Our Trainers: Steve Hache, CD

Steve-Hache

Steve Hache, CD is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

Steve: It was a dream of mine to pursue a career in the Canadian Armed Forces so, I joined the Royal Canadian Navy at 19 years old. In the 21 years of dedicated service in the RCN, I trained in and became qualified in a number of technical aspects ranging from complex seamanship evolutions, boarding operations, Steve Hachecrane operations, forklift operation, small arms, etc. to rigging and hoisting.

During my time as faculty with Nova Scotia Community College, I was introduced to the field of adult education and obtained my Community College Education Diploma (adult education – teaching, learning). I had an interest in safety so I successfully completed the Construction Safety Supervisor certification through Nova Scotia Construction Safety Association.

While I was employed with MSA Security in the United Arab Emirates I took courses in course design (HBI Learning Centers, Sydney, Australia) and adult education and assessment (Global Maritime And Transportation School, NY, USA).

What made you decide to go into this industry?

Steve: It made sense to continue with the field of safety and, rigging and hoisting since that’s what I was accustomed to. While I was in the RCN, there were constant opportunities to operate cranes or forklifts and perform rigging or hoisting tasks. Almost daily, we were called upon to remove or replace machinery out of engineering spaces, load or unload missiles, torpedoes, stores, operate cranes, etc., so, rigging and hoisting was a regular occurrence.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Steve: Upon retirement from the Royal Canadian Navy I accepted a job working for an American security company in the United Arab Emirates. There I would be exposed to a whole new and exciting culture, training their Coast Guard in seamanship, basic boat operations, tactical boat operations and maritime law enforcement. This was an extremely challenging and rewarding experience!

Experience-logos

After a couple of years in the UAE, I came home and accepted a temporary position at NSCC as faculty of the Marine-Industrial Rigging program where I was tasked with turning a part-time program into a full-time program. The faculty and staff of NSCC were first-rate! I learned a great deal from each and every one of them.

After my temporary position at the community college, I was employed as a training manager and fall protection trainer for Total Fall Protection. There I gained a great deal of experience in training and gained a huge appreciation for the wide variety of industries within the maritime provinces.

What made you want to transition into training?

Steve: Speaking to groups of people was not a difficult thing for me to do since I have been doing so ever since I entered the workforce. In the military, I had to brief command on, and supervise, complex seamanship evolutions, rigging operations, boat operations, etc. However, teaching and training didn’t come naturally. My first role as a trainer was in the Royal Canadian Navy where I was posted to the Bedford Rifle Range as a small arms instructor. Nervous at first, but I grew to love it! I actually enjoyed speaking in front of people!

From there, my career path has been based on speaking in front of groups of people.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Steve: That’s easy – I have always appreciated the staff at Hercules SLR. When I was faculty at NSCC, they consistently treated myself and any student that I sent their way with the utmost respect and care. The program work terms that the students completed were extremely beneficial to them and also ended up with employment for a number of them. We developed and maintained a positive working relationship.

training

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

Steve: A great deal of the training that we deliver is based in the maritime provinces but we are able to deliver training anywhere in Canada. The majority of the training I’ve delivered is mainly in Nova Scotia but I’ve also delivered training in Ontario and New Brunswick as well.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training?

Steve: Abu Dhabi, UAE was awesome!! I met a great deal of fantastic people there and would welcome any chance to go back.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Steve: I would love to travel back to British Columbia! Hercules SLR has branches across the country and I’ve always loved BC. Other than that, I’d love to go back to Europe, Australia, United States, or Asia.

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Steve: I am hoping to get more LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association) courses under my belt to further my knowledge in the field. My main focus though is to continue to contribute to today’s safety culture.

Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses we can tailor make courses to suit your specific requirements, at our facility or yours. To find out more about our course and how we can help you raise the bar in safety training email us at: training@herculesslr.com

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Oh, Deer! Avoiding Wildlife on the Highway.

wildlife-on-highway2

Important driving tips as peak season approaches

Fall brings beautiful autumn colours and more wildlife onto Ontario’s roads – and a need for drivers to be extra vigilant.

The number of animal strikes on Ontario roads has increased from 8,964 in 1999 to 13,152 in 2014, including two fatalities and 410 injuries, according to the Ontario Road Safety Annual Report. This represents a 45 per cent increase over a 15-year period.

Crashes involving animals – mainly moose and deer – are a growing problem. October to January is a peak time for vehicle collisions with wildlife, and autumn is the most dangerous time. Collisions with wild animals can result in serious vehicle damage, personal injury, or even death.

Approximately 13,000 highway collisions in Ontario each year involve wildlife, with an estimated cost of more than $1 billion, and the number is growing. In northeastern Ontario, wildlife collisions are even more frequent, and can account for as high as 50 per cent of the total number of collisions along some highways. The risks to drivers are especially high in remote areas of the province, where the likelihood of encountering a large animal on the roadway is higher.

Employees at high risk

Coyote

For Ontario workers, motor vehicle incidents account for more than 38 percent of all worker traumatic fatalities, including wildlife collisions. Driving is one of the highest risk activities an employee can undertake. Unlike a worksite, employers cannot control the types of drivers and vehicles that share the road with their employees.

If employers have workers driving from site to site, travelling to a meeting, or even going

out on a coffee run, the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board considers them to be occupational drivers. Between 2006 and 2010, the board reported more than 7,000 lost-time injury claims and 149 fatalities involving occupational driving.

Did you know?

  • On average, there is a motor vehicle-wild animal collision every 38 minutes
  • One out of every 17 motor vehicle collisions involves a wild animal
  • Motor vehicle-wild animal collisions are increasing annually. In 2014, 13, 152 collisions were reported.Many more go unreported.
  • 89 percent occur on two-lane roads outside of urban areas
  • 86 percent occur in good weather
  • Wild animals are unpredictable at all times, however, there are two peak times when the risk of a collision is highest: May and June and from October to January.

If you could talk to the animals
Frequently asked questions about animal behaviour

What should drivers know about wildlife behaviour in order to anticipate hazards? 

Animal behaviour is related to the “fight-or-flight response.” There is a certain amount of space in which an animal feels safe; but once that boundary is violated, the animal’s reaction is unpredictable. Even if an animal sees you, it may still jump in front of your vehicle. Some animals travel together, for example deer, bears, and mother-offspring pairs. If one animal crosses the road, others may follow. If an animal has crossed the road, it may turn and cross again. Animals standing calmly at the side of the road may bolt unexpectedly.

Why do deer swerve in front of the vehicle?deer-on-highway

n an attempt to avoid predators, deer run in a twisting or dodging motion. That is why deer may make a sudden swerve right in front of a vehicle – that is how they are “programmed” to respond to a threat.

Is wildlife attracted to the road?

Humans know that the road can be a dangerous place, but wildlife may actually be attracted to its wide open spaces. Roadside forage and road salt attracts wildlife. In the winter, ploughed roads offer easier movement. In the summer, increased wind provides relief from biting insects.

Wildlife Bridge

To reduce the risk of collision, Ontario developed the province’s first wildlife overpass. The structure was built as part of the expansion of Highway 69 between Parry Sound and Sudbury, in an area where collisions with large animals, including white-tailed deer, moose, elk and black bears, are common. Fencing along the highway guides the animals towards the overpass. For cost-effectiveness, designers took advantage of existing landscape features. Similar overpasses have been built in Banff National Park, the United States and Europe. There are also plans to install wildlife crossings under Highway 69.
 
Wildlife Detection System

In 2010, a “break the beam” wildlife detection system was installed on Highway 17 near Sault Ste. Marie. When an animal crosses in front of the beam, a flashing light on the wildlife sign is activated, signalling motorists that animals are nearby. When the lights flash, drivers reduce speed and become more alert to movement along each side of the roadway. The preliminary findings of this new technology are very promising: in the five years preceding installation, there were 11 reported wildlife collisions; however, in the first two years of the system’s installation, there has only been one reported collision.

Continue reading here


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Aerial Work Platform an Overview of Safety Practices

aerial-work-platform

Aerial Work Platforms (AWP’s) are generally used for temporary, flexible access purposes such as maintenance and construction work or by firefighters for emergency access, which distinguishes them from permanent access equipment such as elevators. They are designed to lift limited weights — usually less than a ton, although some have a higher safe working load (SWL)) – distinguishing them from most types of cranes. They are usually capable of being set up and operated by a single person.

Aerial devices were once exclusively operated by hydraulic pistons, powered by diesel or gasoline motors on the base unit. Lightweight electrically powered units are gaining popularity for window-cleaning or other maintenance operations, especially indoors and in isolated courtyards, where heavier hydraulic equipment cannot be used. Aerial devices are the closest in appearance to a crane- consisting of a number of jointed sections, which can be controlled to extend the lift in a number of different directions, which can often include « up and over » applications.800px-Hebebuehne_Scissorlift

The majority of manufacturers and operators have strict safety criteria for the operation of Aerial Work Platforms. In some countries, a licence and/or insurance is required to operate some types of Aerial Work Platforms. Most protocols advocate training every operator, whether mandated or not. Most operators also prescribe a range of pre-usage checks of the unit, and manufacturers recommend regular maintenance schedules.

Work platforms are fitted with safety or guard rails around the platform itself to contain operators and passengers. This is supplemented in most models by a restraining point, designed to secure a harness or fall arrester. Some work platforms also have a lip around the floor of the platform itself to avoid tools or supplies being accidentally kicked off the platform. Some protocols require all equipment to be attached to the structure by individual lanyards.

Extreme caution must be taken when using AWPs in the vicinity of overhead power lines, as electrocution may result if the lift comes in contact with energized wiring. Non-conductive materials, such as fiberglass, may be used to reduce this hazard.

AWPs often come equipped with a variety of tilt sensors. The most commonly activated sensor (especially with two people on a lift), will cause the machine to refuse to raise the platform beyond a certain height. Sensors within the machine detect that weight on the platform is off balance to such a point as to risk a possible tip-over if the platform is raised further. Another sensor will refuse to extend the platform if the machine is on a significant incline. Some models of Aerial Work Platforms additionally feature counterweights, which extend in order to offset the danger of tipping the machine inherent in extending items like booms or bridges. Some lifts are also fitted with sensors which will prevent operation if the weight on the platform exceeds the safe working load.

As with most dangerous mechanical devices, all AWPs are fitted with an emergency stop button or buttons for use in the event of a malfunction or danger. Best practice dictates fitting of emergency stop buttons on the platform and at the base as a minimum. Other safety features include automatic self-checking of the AWP’s working parts, including a voltmeter that detects if the lift has insufficient power to complete its tasks and preventing operation if supply voltage is insufficient. Some AWPs provide manual lowering levers at the base of the machine, allowing operators to lower the platform to the ground in the event of a power or control failure or deliberate use of the machine, e.g., by unauthorized persons.

Read more about Aerial Work Platforms here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Farewell to Sylvia as She Retires After 17 Years of Service

Sylvia Header

There will be less of a background hum in the Sewing Department at Hercules Dartmouth after tomorrow, as we bid farewell to a long serving, much valued employee Sylvia Marchand as she embarks on her well-earned retirement.

By the end of Friday, Sylvia will have worked at Hercules for 17 years, 4 months and one week. dedicated, hardworking, a true team player and highly regarded, she will be sorely missed; none more so than by friend and colleague Nevenka Kosanic.  Sylvia and Nevenka have sewed synthetic slings side by side in the department for 12 years, between the two of them they make a truly dynamic duo!

Chris-and-Sylvia
Hercules President and Owner Chris Giannou with Sylvia Marchand
Sylvia-and-Nevenka
Sylvia and Nevenka

It has been known that as well as sewing slings, Sylvia has helped numerous employees with the fixing of pants and various other garments ripped in the line of duty, which comes in handy when it comes to avoiding the odd embarrassment at work!

This morning everyone came together at the weekly meeting to say farewell and wish Sylvia well for the future. Hercules President Chris Giannou and Branch Manager John Shillington presented her with a plaque and collection in honour of her time with the company.

Sylvia, huge thanks once again from everyone here at Dartmouth, for your friendship and tireless work ethic! We salute you. It’s now time to kick back and relax…You have earned it!

John-and-Sylvia
Dartmouth Branch Manager John Shillington and Sylvia Marchand

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Steel Wire Rope – How, Where, What and Why

steel wire rope

Steel wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix forming a composite « rope », in a pattern known as « laid rope ». Larger diameter wire rope consists of multiple strands of such laid rope in a pattern known as « cable laid ».

In stricter senses the term « steel wire rope » refers to diameter larger than 3/8 inch (9.52 mm), with smaller gauges designated cable or cords. Initially wrought iron wires were used, but today steel is the main material used for wire ropes.

Historically, steel wire rope evolved from wrought iron chains, which had a record of mechanical failure. While Fraying_steel_wire_ropeflaws in chain links or solid steel bars can lead to catastrophic failure, flaws in the wires making up a steel cable are less critical as the other wires easily take up the load. While friction between the individual wires and strands causes wear over the life of the rope, it also helps to compensate for minor failures in the short run.

Steel wire ropes were developed starting with mining hoist applications in the 1830s. Wire ropes are used dynamically for lifting and hoisting in cranes and elevators, and for transmission of mechanical power. Wire rope is also used to transmit force in mechanisms, such as a Bowden cable or the control surfaces of an airplane connected to levers and pedals in the cockpit. Only aircraft cables have WSC (wire strand core). Also, aircraft cables are available in smaller diameters than steel wire rope. For example, aircraft cables are available in 3/64 in. diameter while most wire ropes begin at a 1/4 in. diameter. Static wire ropes are used to support structures such as suspension bridges or as guy wires to support towers. An aerial tramway relies on wire rope to support and move cargo overhead.

History

Modern steel wire rope was invented by the German mining engineer Wilhelm Albert in the years between 1831 and 1834 for use in mining in the Harz Mountains in Clausthal, Lower Saxony, Germany. It was quickly accepted because it proved superior to ropes made of hemp or to metal chains, such as had been used before.

Wilhelm Albert’s first ropes consisted of three strands consisting of four wires each. In 1840, Scotsman Robert Stirling Newall improved the process further. In America wire rope was manufactured by John A. Roebling, starting in 1841 and forming the basis for his success in suspension bridge building. Roebling introduced a number of innovations in the design, materials and manufacture of wire rope. Ever with an ear to technology developments in mining and railroading, Josiah White and Erskine Hazard, principal owners[9] of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company (LC&N Co.) — as they had with the first blast furnaces in the Lehigh Valley — built a Wire Rope factory in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania in 1848, which provided lift cables for the Ashley Planes project, then the back track planes of the Summit Hill & Mauch Chunk Railroad, improving its attractiveness as a premier tourism destination, and vastly improving the throughput of the coal capacity since return of cars dropped from nearly four hours to less than 20 minutes. The decades were witness to a burgeoning increase in deep shaft mining in both Europe and North America as surface mineral deposits were exhausted and miners had to chase layers along inclined layers. The era was early in railroad development and steam engines lacked sufficient tractive effort to climb steep slopes, so incline plane railways were common. This pushed development of cable hoists rapidly in the United States as surface deposits in the Anthracite Coal Region north and south dove deeper every year, and even the rich deposits in the Panther Creek Valley required LC&N Co. to drive their first shafts into lower slopes beginning Lansford and its Schuylkill County twin-town Coaldale.

The German engineering firm of Adolf Bleichert & Co. was founded in 1874 and began to build bicable aerial tramways for mining in the Ruhr Valley. With important patents, and dozens of working systems in Europe, Bleichert dominated the global industry, later licensing its designs and manufacturing techniques to Trenton Iron Works, New Jersey, USA which built systems across America. Adolf Bleichert & Co. went on to build hundreds of aerial tramways around the world: from Alaska to Argentina, Australia and Spitsbergen. The Bleichert company also built hundreds of aerial tramways for both the Imperial German Army and the Wehrmacht.

In the last half of the 19th century, steel wire rope systems were used as a means of transmitting mechanical power including for the new cable cars. Wire rope systems cost one-tenth as much and had lower friction losses than line shafts. Because of these advantages, wire rope systems were used to transmit power for a distance of a few miles or kilometers.

Safety

The steel wire ropes are stressed by fluctuating forces, by wear, by corrosion and in seldom cases by extreme forces. The rope life is finite and the safety is only ensured by inspection for the detection of wire breaks on a reference rope length, of cross-section loss, as well as other failures so that the wire rope can be replaced before a dangerous situation occurs. Installations should be designed to facilitate the inspection of the wire ropes.

Read more about Wire Rope here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLR, Hercules Machining & Millwright Services, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Toronto – More cranes than NYC and LA Combined

reflected-crane

Toronto has more tower cranes decorating its skyline than New York City and Los Angeles combined.

This summer, real estate consultant Rider Levett Bucknall (RLB) released its third quarter crane index. The report is generated by counting cranes in major cities throughout the United States and Canada.

Cranes in Toronto

For the third consecutive crane index, Toronto has the highest number of cranes of all the cities surveyed with 97, an increase of nine cranes compared to the last count by the consulting firm.

The Toronto construction market continues to be led by the residential sector, which makes up more than 86 per cent of the total crane count, according to RLB. Other active construction sectors include mixed-use and commercial developments, followed by education, healthcare and hospitality.

The crane count in Toronto is expected to continue to climb, as the city will see a boost in infrastructure spending. More than 400 high-rise projects have been proposed, adding to the city’s crane count.

In New York City, RLB counted 20 cranes, a small increase compared to the previous count of 18. The increase is attributable to new projects breaking ground at a steady pace; the current count shows 11 cranes on mixed-use development sites, three in transportation projects and three in the commercial sector.

cranes-toronto
The view of Toronto from a Comedil 250 tower crane. The crane is one of 97 tower cranes operating in the city this summer. Photo by Adam Chiarot

In Los Angeles, the crane count held from January 2018. While 22 of LA’s 36 cranes are in use for mixed-use projects, there are several projects in other sectors that are shaping the skyline. Several infrastructure projects, including three bridges, and a new concourse at LAX, are underway. As well, cultural projects like the new Lucas Museum and a $40 million facelift for the city’s music centre, will boost LA’s crane count.

Seattle in second

Seattle placed second in the crane count, with 65 cranes city-wide, 20 more than the previous survey. Cranes are erected in Seattle for a variety of uses, including 27 cranes for mixed-use, 17 for residential projects and 11 for commercial applications.

The crane count in Calgary has grown from the 22 crane installations to 26. An increase in employment and new infrastructure projects, including a ring road and a light-rail line, help boost the city’s strong residential sector.

With two-thirds of the city’s construction activity is in multifamily buildings, with 6,500 units currently being built, 18 cranes are dedicated to the residential sector. As well, the Calgary Cancer Center, a $1.4 billion healthcare facility, will add jobs and services to the city. Other major projects include 500,000 to 1 million square-foot warehouses and two community recreation centers.

Read the original article here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLR, Hercules Machining & Millwright Services, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Crane Work Wraps Up at New Winnipeg Towers

Crane Winnipeg
Huge Liebherr mobile crane may have been tallest ever seen in city
In May, the skyline of downtown Winnipeg was changed significantly with the removal of the last tower crane on site at True North Square. Phase 1 of the project, involving Tower 1 at 242 Hargrave and Tower 2 at 225 Carlton, began in January 2016. The substantial construction effort required significant crane work, with construction handled by PCL Constructors Canada Inc. and the dismantling subcontracted to Sterling Crane.

“Tower 1 topped off its structural building form in December 2017, reaching its final height of 17 storeys, and subsequently its tower crane was removed in January 2018,” says True North Real Estate Development president Jim Ludlow. “Tower 2 topped off in March 2018 at 25 storeys and its tower crane was removed in May 2018. These milestones have had a visible impact on the skyline of downtown Winnipeg, so they have been very exciting and rewarding to observe as we progress towards a new cityscape.”PCL project manager David Enns says his company was responsible for the cast-in-place concrete structure on both towers. This involved supplying the concrete, the placing of concrete and rebar, form work, concrete pumping, and the installation of precast stairs and landings, and other material handling. For much of the heavy lifting, PCL utilized two cranes – a Liebherr 316 ECB12 and a Liebherr 316 ECH12.

“They were the best choices mostly because of the overlapping coverage,” Enns explains. “When we sized them, we made sure that it could accommodate the form work systems that we wanted to use. It was based on them working in conjunction with each other with the overlap in height and the jacking sequences, including how they would tie into the structure in order to be efficient.”

The way the cranes were staged required them to be tied into the structure, once the structure progressed past a certain height. When PCL began work on Tower 1, the timing of the construction of Tower 2 was not yet known for certain. In order to ensure that there was sufficient coverage for the full site, both tower cranes were tied to Tower 1.

“Both were top climbing tower cranes,” Enns says. “The biggest reason for that is because of the limited real estate that we had. We couldn’t afford to bring in big mobile cranes every time we needed to jack the cranes up as the structures progressed. They were able to climb themselves up, and then when we were done, they had the ability to climb themselves down prior to full dismantle.”

Preparation for the selection of tower cranes involved a detailed review to ensure the cranes had the right capacities to accommodate the required lifts and the size of the flyer cables, core forms and gang forms. They also had to reinforce the foundation walls around the tower cranes to prepare for the mobile crane load imposed on the structure during the dismantling of the tower cranes.

Crane-Winnipeg“It’s pretty common to see tower cranes with a couple of precast piles under the foundation, but for our tower cranes, our foundations were cast-in-place concrete raft slabs, with four caissons a piece to support them because they were freestanding fairly high right off the bat,” says Enns.

The key challenge for this job was limited space – city roads and the St. Mary’s Church bound PCL on three sides. With limited room to maneuver or stage materials, there was a constant focus on scheduling and sequencing to make sure that they had material delivered as needed.

“Otherwise, not only would the site get overrun, but the tower cranes would be so booked up that we couldn’t keep them focused on the high-priority activities,” Enns says. “They’d just be stuck moving non-critical material around all day and night.”

On both towers, Sterling Crane was subcontracted to dismantle PCL’s tower cranes following the construction.

Scott Baraschuk, branch manager for Sterling Crane in Winnipeg says that the dismantling was a very straight forward operation, however it did require the use of a very large mobile crane.

“Whatever they need, we’ll handle for them,” Baraschuk says. “In this scenario, it was the dismantling – to provide a mobile crane to dismantle their tower crane; just to provide a means of hoisting everything down. This particular one was the Liebherr LTM 1500 8.1. When we erected these towers a few years ago, the intent was to down climb the tower back to roughly 150 feet for dismantling. We now have the LTM 1500 available so I suggested we look at taking the tower at full height. This reduced the dismantle time by several days and eliminated the need to climb the tower crane down.”

The Liebherr LTM 1500 8.1 was utilized for the dismantling operations on both towers, however, it was used in two different configurations for each tower. During the dismantling for Tower 2, the crane was configured in a way that made it one of the tallest cranes ever seen in the Winnipeg skyline. Media coverage of the project claimed it was the single tallest crane ever used in the city, but Baraschuk can’t confirm that.

“I can’t say for certain, but it is certainly a contender,” he says. “It had roughly 380 feet of tip height in this configuration.”

It was an easy choice to use the Liebherr LTM 1500 for Tower 1, since it was locally available and easily capable of performing the job. Tower 2 had the same demands, but the flexibility of the 276-ft. telescopic boom was an added benefit given the site restrictions and their setup.

“We were able to maintain our setup into one city block, avoiding the closure of an intersection to build a long luffing jib. This resulted in significant time and cost savings to the customer.” Baraschuk says. “The biggest challenge is site congestion with a crane this large. When working in a downtown setting, you have got a lot of obstacles – you have public safety to be concerned about and numerous underground utilities as well.”

“We pride ourselves on having a fleet with industry leading technology and we have purchased a number of these units to capture new markets and niche jobs where you need a certain type and size of crane to perform,” adds Jeff Chernish, director of business development for Sterling Crane. “We provide efficient customer solutions similar in nature throughout Canada and we appreciate the visibility that this has brought us in Winnipeg.”

Tower 1 at 242 Hargrave Street is quickly approaching substantial completion, scheduled for the end of June 2018. It is comprised of retail and office space, and construction crews are currently focused on lobby finishes, amenity floor finishes, and mechanical, electrical, and elevator commissioning.

Tower 2 at 225 Carlton Street is scheduled to be completed a year from now. It contains some retail and office space but is predominantly comprised of residential rental suites. Construction teams are currently installing a high-performance glass curtain wall, after which internal finishes in the lobby and suites will become the focus, with an aim to welcome residents next spring.

Phase 2 of the project is a hotel and condominium complex being developed by Sutton Place Hotel & Residences. They aim to break ground this summer and be complete in 2020 or 2021.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLR, Hercules Machining & Millwright Services, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Columbus McKinnon Expands Hoist Offerings

CM-Hoist

SUPPLIER NEWS – Columbus McKinnon Corporation has expanded its offering of the unique CM Hurricane 360° hand chain hoist and introduces its new Yale® YK™ and Shaw-Box® SK™ electric wire rope hoists.

The CM Hurricane 360° Hand Chain Hoist

The unique Columbus McKinnon Hurricane 360° hand chain hoist to include new 15 and 20-ton

capacity units as well as a full line of army-type, integrated trolley models. Designed for versatility and safety, the CM Hurricane 360° features a patented 360-degree rotating hand chain cover that allows operators to lift and position loads from virtually any angle.

“Because of its unique design, the CM Hurricane is the ideal hand chain hoist when working in tight spaces, above the load, in drifting applications and when the operator needs to maintain a safe distance when handling a load,” said Andre Schon, Senior Global Product Manager – Manual Hoist Products. “Now, with the addition of higher-capacity units and integrated trolley models, we have made this one-of-a-kind hoist more versatile than ever.”

New army-type, integrated trolley CM Hurricane hoists feature a compact, low-headroom design that provides even more flexibility in applications with low ceilings or limited space. Available as plain or geared models, these trolley hoists have reduced side clearances an

d end approach to aid in maneuvering heavy loads in tight spaces. They can be easily adjusted to fit a wide range of beam widths and profiles and have trolley wheels designed for smooth rolling with pre-lubricated, encapsulated ball bearings.

Rugged, durable and easy to maintain, the CM Hurricane 360° is available in capacities ranging from 1/2 to 20 tons with standard lifts up to 30 feet. It is also backed by Columbus McKinnon’s lifetime guarantee. All models are now available with optional chain containers as well.

The Yale® YK™ and Shaw-Box® SK™ Electric Wire Rope Hoists

CM-Yale-YK-HR

The new Yale® YK™ and Shaw-Box® SK™ electric wire rope monorail hoists are German engineered and offer reliable operation, high efficiency and long life, and are competitively priced for the U.S. market.

The Yale YK and Shaw-Box SK are designed with safety in mind, incorporating standard safety features such as a block-operated limit switch, adjustable geared limit switch, motor temperature control and overload protection.

“The new YK and SK hoists feature a modular system that allows you to easily configure and design a hoist solution to your exact application needs,” said Carlos Bassa, global product manager, wire rope hoists. “With a wide range of lifting capacities from one to 10 tons and three frame sizes, these units can be used everywhere from equipment production lines to warehousing facilities.”

The Yale YK and Shaw-Box SK are ideal for applications with space limitations, featuring a low headroom trolley that can be used on monorail runways and single-girder overhead travelling cranes. Assembled in Wadesboro, North Carolina, with German-made components, the YK and SK have short lead times to meet tight deadlines.

Columbus McKinnon’s new YK and SK hoists are available through its Crane Solutions Group, which is dedicated to serving the company’s partners in the crane industry. With the acquisition of STAHL CraneSystems in 2017, Columbus McKinnon is able to leverage the combined technologies of its Yale, Shaw-Box and STAHL product lines to offer the most comprehensive wire rope hoist and crane component portfolio available, while simplifying its product offering for ease of selection and purchase.

Learn more about the Yale YK and Shaw-Box SK electric wire rope hoists at www.cmworks.com

About Columbus McKinnon

Columbus McKinnon is a leading worldwide designer, manufacturer and marketer of motion control products, technologies, systems and services that efficiently and ergonomically move, lift, position and secure materials. Key products include hoists, cranes, actuators, rigging tools, light rail work stations and digital power and motion control systems. The company is focused on commercial and industrial applications that require the safety and quality provided by its superior design and engineering know-how. To learn more about the CM Hurricane 360°, the Yale YK, the Shaw-Box SK or any of their products, call Columbus McKinnon Channel Services at 800-888-0985 or visit www.cmworks.com.

Read original article here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLR, Hercules Machining & Millwright Services, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.