CCOHS Forum 2019: Changing World of Work Explored

Forum: 2019 Changing World of Worksafety-conference

A wise person once said, « safety doesn’t happen by accident. » This is why the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety will hold it’s 6th conference, called Forum: 2019 The Changing World of Work, which they host every few years. This year, it will be held in Winnipeg, Manitoba on March 5-6, 2019.

The Forum brings together industry leaders, innovators and subject experts who represent government, labourers and Canadian workplaces. At Forum 2019, industry members will discuss their experiences and knowledge of existing and new health and safety issues in the workplace – the focus of 2019’s Forum will be the workplace of today and tomorrow. Topics of discussion will include the changing workforce, the changing workplace and the way the nature of work changes in modern times.

Right now, speakers at Forum 2019: The Changing World of Work include:

forum-2019-changing-world-of-work
Safety gear
  • Futurist Nikolas Badminton will set the stage with a keynote on artificial intelligence and how the world of work may change over the next 5, 10, 15 years and beyond
  • Lionel Laroche, President, MultiCultural Business Solutions Manager on bridging cultural diversity in the workplace
  • Steve Tizzard: building a mentally healthy, peer to peer support program on the Hibernia Platform
  • Darby Allen, Fort McMurray’s Fire Chief (Ret.) will close the event with his inspiring personal story of leading through a crisis

The event is currently being developed, with more details to come. To find more information on Forum 2019: The Changing World of Work, visit ccohs.ca/forum.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Herc How-To: avoid these common rigging mistakes

common-rigging-mistakes-hercules-slr

The rigging trade serves many industries, however, there are many common rigging mistakes workers make daily.

Rigging is to set a load up to move, lift, secure, lower or hoist with the use of ropes, chains, slings, hoists and other materials. The load can range from materials on an offshore rig or even people – even Cirque de Solei rigs their performers (how do you think they’re lifted to perform gravity-defying stunts?!)

One of the most common rigging mistakes is a load being secured, rigged and lifted by anybody other than a competent person. A competent person is someone who:

  • Has knowledge of the task
  • Knowledge of the potential or actual hazards of the task
  • Knowledge of the Act’s and Regulations pertaining to the task
  • Has training and/or certifications to perform the task safely

However, there are quite a few common mistakes when it comes to rigging – read on for the most common mistakes people make when rigging and slinging:

  • Competent (trained) riggers not assigned
  • Use of improper hand signals
  • Not inspecting gear frequently enough
  • Not knowing what to inspect for
  • Slings missing tags or tags not legible
  • Capacity of rigging gear not known
  • Improperly made below the hook devices
  • Wire rope slings formed with clips
    commom-rigging-mistakes
    Rigger ensures the lift goes according to plan
  • Too small hardware connected to the sling eye
  • Too large hardware connected to the sling eye
  • Bunching or pinching of synthetic slings
  • Loose shackle pins or other connections
  • Missing latches on hoist hooks
  • Placing too many slings in hoist hook, shackle or other hardware
  • Side loading or misalignment of hardware
  • Beating down chocker hitch
  • Basket capacity used when not vertical
  • Basket hitch (wire rope) over small diameter
  • Capacity of bridle not adjusted for angle
  • Sling’s load not properly distributed
  • Use of horizontal sling angles smaller than 30°
  • Choker and basket hitches at a horizontal sling angle smaller than 60°
  • Bunching slings on accessories/hardware

There you have it – avoid these common rigging mistakes and you’ll slingin’ like a pro in no time.

For further training and certification, read more on our safety and training courses. Interested in what happens during courses at the Hercules Training Academy? Read our blog on the Rigging Fundamentals Course at the Hercules SLR Training Academy.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

NEWS: planning is essential in confined spaces

confined-space-training-news

Confined spaces—we’ve discussed the dangers of working in confined spaces, confined space training and the importance of choosing the right fall protection equipment on our blog before.

On Tuesday, November 20 in Uruguay, two shoreshide dock workers died and two were hospitalized after being exposed to a fumigant. Currently, the Uruguayan Navy is unsure which chemical caused the fatalities and injuries—however, it’s believed to be caused by the treatment phosphine, a fumigation gas used to control pests in agricultural and wood product cargoes. Phosphine is denser than air and can settle into low-lying pockets, reports the Maritime Executive.

Investigators say two dock workers from an independent company entered a freighter from Panama when they lost consciousness and collapsed—a crewmember say the dock workers struggle and entered the space wearing a face mask, but removed it while trying to rescue the workers. He also collapsed and is in the hospital in an induced coma. A third member of the company is also in hospital with injuries, reports the Maritime Executive.

According to the president of the Uruguayan Transport Union, Cesar Bernal, dock workers were not aware half of the ship’s cargo was treated with a fumigant. They followed their normal procedure for entering the space in the freighter, and were affected immediately by the fumes.

The industrial trades will benefit from improved communication regarding hazardous fumes, and more effective training regarding fall arrest and confined space entry and exit training. Something like an SRL (self-retracting lifeline) may help in a situation like this, where a worker can easily lift himself from a dangerous space. The National Institute for Occupational Health & Safety reports that 60% of confined space fatalities in coastal accidents are rescuers.

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety (CCOHS) recommends that employers develop a confined space hazard assessment and control program—especially since most workers in the industrial trades will work in a confined space at least once during their career. This program should be specific to the work being done, and employers may need to implement more than one program.

confined-space-training
A technician working offshore.

CCOHS recommends your plan include the following:

  • Description of roles and responsibilities of each person or party (e.g., employer, supervisor, workers, attendants, and emergency response team);
  • Advice on how to identify confined spaces;
  • Identification and assessment of all potential hazards that may exist at the beginning of the work as well as those that may develop because of the work activities;
  • A plan to eliminate or control all identified hazards;
  • Written work procedures;
  • Confined Space training program for all the workers that will enter confined spaces;
  • An entry permit system for each entry into a confined space;
  • Development of an emergency plan complete with training and equipment in case an unforeseen situation occurs;
  • An emergency response system;
  • Reporting and investigating incidents related to work in confined spaces;
  • Record and documentation control;
  • Program review whenever there is a change in circumstances or at least annually, to identify program weaknesses and make any necessary changes to the program.

Confined Space Training

Unfortunately, many injuries and fatalities are easy to prevent if the proper safety measures and plans are put into place. Give you and your employees the knowledge and skills they need to be safe in confined spaces. Browse information on our Confined Space Entry & Attendant, and more safety courses here.

 

References here: 
- https://maritime-executive.com/article/two-uruguayan-dockers-dead-in-confined-space-accident
- https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/hsprograms/confinedspace_program.html

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Watch: Hang Glider Travels Without Safety Harness

In recent safety news, a tourist from the United States decided to go hang gliding for the first time during asafety-news-hang-glider vacation in Switzerland—and was in for a huge surprise.

Chris Gursky and his wife Gail take a vacation to Switzerland, and decide to soak up the beautiful scenery by hang gliding. He takes off with his instructor—who forgets to attach his safety harness to the glider. Gursky hangs on for a terrifying 2:14 before they land.

Says Gorsky, « The landing was a rough one, but I lived to tell the story. »

The video shows Gursky hanging on to the glider by one hand and attempting to grab his tandem instructor, while the instructor navigates with one hand and holds on to Gursky with the other.

Gursky had a fractured wrist following the landing, and will need surgery. However, Global News says he’ll glide again—“I will go hang gliding again as I did not get to enjoy my first flight,” notes Gursky.

Watch the terrifying video below:

Safety News: Fall Protection at Hercules SLR

At Hercules SLR, we know the importance of the right fall protection gear. We’re committed to providing hands-on & interactive training, the best safety products and inspection services so you and your employees get the most from your safety gear and harnesses.

Find more information on Hercules SLR training here—for tips on how to properly inspect and ensure you’re using your safety harness properly, read our blog « Safety Inspection: make your harness a habit« .


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Steel Cable: market growth driven by automotive industry

steel-cable-wire-rope-filaments

The steel cable or wire rope market expects to grow at a CAGR (compound annual growth rate) of 4.2% in the coming period heading into 2023, reports PR Newswire.

Wire rope or steel cable provides strength, flexibility and has many applications. Steel cable is used in elevators, rigging and lifting applications, theatre sets, and is used as a reinforcing material for automotive tires and conveyor belts.

Filaments, which are fine strands of steel are significantly useful for the fabrication of automotive tires. Advantages of wire rope or steel cable filaments include high thermal resistance a better travelling performance. Currently, the global wire rope market is being greatly influenced by market entrants in the automotive industry.

steel-cable-wire-rope
Example of fraying wire rope—notice the individual strands that make up each rope.

Right now, technology and a need for lighter tires are two growing demands in the automotive industry. Flat-run tires, eco tires and nitrogen tires are three examples of tech-driven tires that create a demand for a flashier, updated tires for manufacturers. Their industry has a need for lighter tires, which means steel cable will be a sought-after material for automotive fabrication. These steel cable filaments will be used in application for heavy equipment tires, cargo truck tires, conveyor belts, rubber framework and light truck tires.

As the famed architect Walter Grophius said, « New synthetic substances—steel, concrete, glass—are actively superseding the traditional raw materials of construction. » Even in modern days, fabrication and manufacturing industries are constantly finding news ways to use to use familiar, synthetic materials.

Article via PR Newswire: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/steel-cord-market-is-expected-to-be-driven-by-rising-demand-from-automotive-industry-by-2023-million-insights-816253904.html 

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Aircraft Maintenance: rigging service leads market growth

rigging-service

The aircraft maintenance industry projects to grow from USD 19.23 billion in 2018, to 23.5 billion by 2023, with a 4.10% CAGR from 2018 to 2022. Rigging service is a main segment driving market growth for the aviation maintenance industry.

The reason for the maintenance industry’s growth is due to the rising number of flights per aircraft, more new aircraft deliveries from OEMs and a greater need to carry out repairs and maintenance of existing aircraft fleets.

In particular, growth in the service part of the market is expected to be lead by rigging service & component replacement segments. Market growth in the aircraft maintenance industry has been broken up and will be lead by segments including replacement & rigging service, defect rectification service, engine & APU service, Aircraft on Ground (AOG) and line station setup & management service.

rigging-service-aviation-maintenance
Workers service an aircraft.

The aircraft maintenance market’s been segmented into transit and routine checks—transit checks are carried out by technicians at the airport ramp. These routine maintenance checks include pre-flight and post-flight checks, service checks, overnight and weekly checks. Pre-flight checkups are conducted by the flight crew, a process that begins from the flight deck in order to ensure it’s servicing status, if any faulty components need to be replaced and make sure the aircraft function is smooth.

We provide lifting & rigging equipment to rent or purchase, both destructive & non-destructive testing and serve the airline industry—find out more about our clients and industries we serve here.

News via PR Newswire: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-aircraft-line-maintenance-market-is-projected-to-grow-at-a-cagr-of-4-10-from-2018-to-2023–300664810.html

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Rigging Hardware we Love: Crosby® 4-50 clip applications

crosby-clip-wire-rope-application-rigging-hardware

Rigging hardware is essential to our daily jobs—today, the spotlight is on both the G-450 (Red-U-Bolt®) and SS-450 (316 Stainless Steel) Crosby clips. Read on to discover application tips and specifications for the 450 Crosby clips.

Efficiency Ratings

Efficiency ratings for wire rope end terminations are based upon the minimum breaking force of wire rope. The efficiency rating of a properly prepared loop or thimble-eye termination for clip sizes 1/8” through 7/8” is 80%, and for sizes 1” through 3-1/2” is 90%.

Number of Clips

The number of clips shown (see Table 1) is based upon using RRL or RLL wire rope, 6 x 19 or 6 x 36 Class, FC or IWRC; IPS or XIP, XXIP. If Seale construction or similar large outer wire type construction in the 6 x 19 Class is to be used for sizes 1 inch and larger, add one additional clip. If a pulley (sheave) is used for turning back the wire rope, add one additional clip.

The number of clips shown also applies to rotation-resistant RRL wire rope, 8 x 19 Class, IPS, XIP, XXIP sizes 1-1/2 inch and smaller; and to rotation-resistant RRL wire rope, 19 x 7 Class, IPS, XIP, XXIP sizes 1-3/4 inch and smaller. For other classes of wire rope not mentioned above, we recommend contacting Crosby Engineering to ensure the desired efficiency rating.

Elevator Application

For elevator, personnel hoist, and scaffold applications, refer to ANSI A17.1 and ANSI A10.4. These standards do not recommend U-Bolt style wire rope clip terminations. The style wire rope termination used for any application is the obligation of the user.

Applications: Crosby Clips

Refer to table 1 to follow instructions below:

crosby-ubolt-applications-specs

1. Turn back specified amount of rope from thimble or loop. Apply first clip one base width from dead end of rope. Apply U-Bolt over dead end of wire rope—live end rests in saddle (Never saddle a dead horse!). Use torque wrench to tighten nuts evenly, alternate from one nut to the other until reaching the recommended torque. (See Figure 1) wire-rope-crosby-clip-applications2. When two Crosby clips are required, apply the second clip as near the loop or thimble as possible. Use torque wrench to tighten nuts evenly, alternating until reaching the recommended torque. When more than two clips are required, apply the second clip as near the loop or thimble as possible, turn nuts on second clip firmly, but do not tighten. (See Figure 2) wire-rope-crosby-clip-applications

3. When three or more Crosby clips are required, space additional clips equally between first two – take up rope slack – use torque wrench to tighten nuts on each U-Bolt evenly, alternating from one nut to the other until reaching recommended torque. (See Figure 3)

wire-rope-crosby-clip-applications4. If a pulley (sheave) is used in place of a thimble, add one additional clip. Crosby clip spacing should be as shown. (See Figure 4)

5. Wire Rope Splicing Procedures: The preferred method of splicing two wire ropes together is to use inter-locking turnback eyes with thimbles, with the recommended number of Crosby clips on each eye (See Figure 5). An alternate method is to use twice the number of clips as used for a turnback termination. The rope ends are placed parallel to each other, overlapping by twice the turnback amount shown in the application instructions. The minimum number of clips should be installed on each dead end (See Figure 6). Spacing, installation torque, and other instructions still apply.

wire-rope-splice-crosby-clip-application6. Important: Apply first load to test the assembly. This load should be of equal or greater weight than loads expected in use. Next, check and use torque wrench to retighten nuts to recommended torque. In accordance with good rigging and maintenance practices, the wire rope end termination should be inspected periodically for wear, abuse, and general adequacy.

Info via:https://www.thecrosbygroup.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/56.pdf

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Construction Safety Tips: secure your worksite

construction-safety-secure-worksite

Construction safety: a growing need

Construction safety—this looks different to many people. Whether it’s wearing safety glasses, full PPE or never working at the sight of rain, safety standards are rarely the same for all workers or worksites.

The construction industry is currently growing, therefore, construction safety is a growing issue, too. Builders now seek to accommodate a growing population by building apartments, condominiums and other buildings that maximize available space, says Statistics Canada. In 2017, the Canadian Home Builders’ Association reports nearly 600,00 on and off-site jobs in new home construction.

Basically, communities are growing and business is boomin’—project managers and contractors alike should consider ways they can secure their worksites. Read on for 6 construction safety tips from CONEXPO to help secure your worksite.

Construction safety: 6 tips

1) Communicate with law enforcement

Establish connection with local law enforcement units, ideally before construction begins. Ask about the crime in the local area, trends or other crimes common to the area.

2) Keep technology offsite

Theft of private information via technology is a real issue facing project managers. Take home computers at the end of the day, and limit private information on the worksite to limit computer-theft and a company crisis.

3) Post warning signs

Make the perimeter of your jobsite clear. Warning labels are essential to mark hazards or injuries that could happen to trespassers. Make sure signage accompanies other security measures (like barbed-wire fences) to clarify the warning. Proper signage can help a company avoid a slew of legal issues when and if intruders become injured.

construction-safety-danger-warning-sign
Post signs like this around the worksite perimeter.
4) Keep track of your equipment

Be sure to park heavy equipment in a well-lit and secure area, and have a checkout procedure in place for equipment, tools and materials on the worksite.  Lock gas caps and equipment when the worksite is closed with anti-theft devices. If using expensive or high-valued equipment, consider hiding a GPS-tracking device on it.

5) Understand potential theft

Look at your worksite and try to imagine potential situations—thieves may steal equipment that helps them steal other things. For example, a saw may be stolen to cut the lock from an excavator and drive it away. Try to position tools and equipment that can break locks away from each other.

6) Assign a loss prevention manager

Assign an employee to survey the worksite at the beginning and end of each day, track equipment checkout, maintain contact with law enforcement and track worksite entrances and exits.

Securing your worksite is an essential aspect of construction safety. Be proactive—protect worksite equipment and ensure productivity and progress isn’t slowed or stopped due to thieves or vandalism.

References: 
- https://www.chba.ca/CHBADocs/CHBA/HousingCanada/Information-Statistics/Impacts/1%20Canada%20Economic%20Impacts%20of%20New%20Home%20Construction%202017.pdf
- https://www.equipmentjournal.com/on-the-job/construction-site-safety/

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

NDT in Langley, BC: advantages of non-destructive testing

advantages-of-non-destructive-testing-magntic-particle

What is Non-destructive Testing?

Advantages of non-destructive testing are numerous.

Non-destructive testing (commonly known as NDT) uses different methods to test, inspect and evaluate defects in materials or mediums without compromising the integrity of the product. Internal and external damages can be found, and the product can then be repaired or used after testing—this makes NDT an excellent choice when multiple parts or materials need inspection.

For example, NDT can be used to find defects in metal used during the automotive fabrication process. Advantages of non-destructive testing include the sample size, time, and most essentially—the product is able to be used or repaired in the future.

At Hercules SLR, we conduct two types of NDT—Magnetic Particle (MP) and Liquid Penetrant (LT) testing.

Advantages of Non-Destructive Testing in Langley, ON: what do we do?

Here in Langley, BC we use three main techniques when we conduct Magnetic Particle testing. These are Dry Powder, Black & White and Fluorescent Particle testing methods. Each has a specific application and sensitivity.

advantages-of-non-destructive-testing-port-container-pin
An example of a pin tested at the Langley, BC facility.

The most common items we get in Langley for testing would be Port Container Pins. We receive 50-100 per month. After that, our most tested item are tow sockets. We also do annual Lifting Gear Inspections. The Ports are a key to our future expansion here in Langley.

Dealing with the materials that we do, responsible disposable is more important now than ever. At the NDT department in Langley, we properly dispose aerosol cans and waste in designated waste containers that conform and comply with all environmental laws and standards.

Hercules SLR Inspectors: varied skill set

The CGSB (Canadian General Standards Board) is one of the biggest standard’s development and conformity assessment organizations in Canada, a part of the Government of Canada, Department of Public Works and Government services. They support the economic, regulatory, procurement, health, safety and environmental interests of stakeholders including government, industry and consumers. They’re also a charter participant of the National Standards System (NSS).

Essentially, having CGSB certification means you’re held to a very high standard and have the training to ensure you’re giving the highest quality service you can.

Chris Davies, our Langley Inspector has CGSB certifications in Magnetic Particle Inspection Level 2 and CGSB Liquid Penetrant Inspection Level 2; he’s also written his CGSB Ultrasonic Testing (UT) Level 1 exam.

Additional courses and certification that Hercules SLR technicians have include:

  • LEEA Rigging & Hoist Course
  • Crosby Clamp Inspectors Course
  • Kito Academy
  • Continental Rigging & Hoisting Certification
  • Confined Space Entry and Monitor
  • Fall Protection
  • Fire Extinguisher Training Certification
  • H2S Alive Certification
  • Management & Employee Relations Course
  • Dealing with Difficult Employees Course
  • WHMIS training
  • Lean Manufacturing/Production
  • 5S Production Methods
  • Dangerous goods training
  • Wildlife Awareness Certification

Advantages of Non-destructive Testing: technology keeps up

Connective communication technology plays a large role in NDT,  and the industry has embraced changes in technology and sharing knowledge.  We use the internet to source NDT-related blogs, sample defect photos and research on changing topics within industry. In the past, we only had very expensive books, manuals or had to make time-consuming phone calls to other colleagues in the industry.

Advanced technology has allowed us to move things a bit more quickly!

Non-destructive Testing: industry experience varies

We’re proud of the wide range of industry experience found at the Langley, Hercules SLR branch.

Chris Davies, a Langley Inspector who’s worked in aviation and oil and gas explains some advantages of non-destructive testing in different industries and the variety of experience they provide. « Aviation and Nuclear Industries are an entirely different world from the majority of typical day-to-day NDE Inspections. I only experienced this late in my career while working for the Oil and Gas Industry. The level of skill and experience varies due to types of inspections done, amount of exposure to actual defects and hands-on inspection, versus how long an individual has been licenced. »

He gives this example:

If Jane Doe works in the Aerospace Sector for 2 years, but works 7.5 hours a day on a wet bench (MPI) or dip tanks (LPI), she averages about 260 work days or 1900-2000 hours of experience per year and exposure to dozens of defects per day.

If John Doe works in the Oil/Gas Industry for 15 years, but works an average of 1-2 hours of actual hands-on and uses a Yoke and inspects on Closure, Socket or Stitch Welds. Let’s say he works a 10-on-10 off schedule. He works 183 days, or has 300-370 hours of experience per year and finds few defects per month.

The difference in hands-on experience is significant:

  • Jane, after 2 years, has almost the same hands-on experience as Joe has after 15 years.
  • Jane has over 10 times the exposure to find discontinuities (defects), versus Joe with 15 years of industry experience.

Advantages of Non-destructive Testing: found everywhere

Today, non-destructive tests are used in industries like Aviation, Space, Ships, Bridges, Refineries Mining, Nuclear, Manufacturing, Fabrication and in-service inspections.

Ever drive a car? Chances are, you use something in your daily life that’s been NDT inspected  at some point in time.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Tool Fall Protection: more important than you think

tool-fall-protection-safety-harness

Tool Fall Protection: confidence at heights

During Summer 2018, in Providence, Rhode Island ironworkers strapped on their fall protection—tool fall protection included, to start work on a major project.

« That guy’s nuts! » exclaims Steven Strychasz, a nearby civilian watching ironworkers work on the steel skeleton new Residence Inn Providence Hotel.

The guys who’s ‘nuts’? That’s Kyle Coulombe, 31 an ironworker who climbing 50-feet, with an 800-pound beam suspended over his head while working on the hotel.

Fall Protection: essential for working at height

Crane operator Steve Berube inches his hoist so Coulumbe can align a bolt hole at the end of a coloumn so the two will connect. Then, he walks along the beam to connect the other coloumn while the crane holds steady. Coulumbe attaches his safety line to the top flange of the beam. He now hangs from the crane hook by a cable. He resets his cable line, and continues working.

This amazes the crowd—his ability to seamlessly navigate and climb around the huge iron columns and beams.

What allows Coulumbe to do this with ease? His skills, his nerves, but mainly—the fall protection attached to his safety harness. His fall protection system not only keeps his body safe, but his tools too. Coulumbe carries approximately 60 pounds of tools in his harness daily, including nuts, bolts and a 9-pound sledge hammer.

tool-fall-protection-safety-harness
A secured worker at height.

Fall Protection: it’s for your tools, too

Tool fall protection is also essential when working at heights. Many people don’t consider the damage or pain from, for example—a nine-pound sledge hammer falling on their head. However, according to Canadian Occupational Safety (COS) in 2013 there were nearly 9000 injuries caused by falling tools. 23 of these injuries were fatal.

Tool Fall Protection: do the math

To put this in perspective, COS suggests calculating with physics—they use a common, eight-pound wrench as example. If this wrench was dropped from 200-feet above, it would hit with 2,833 pounds per square inch of force—the equivalent of a Clydesdale horse hitting a one-square inch area. This is why tool fall protection is just as important as securing your body.

According to COS, the shape of a tool or equipment can have an equally disastrous effect. For example, a two-pound hammer could drop from a three-metre height onto a hard hat, and the impact would be minimal—but a two-pound sleever bar dropped from this height would go directly through the hard hat, and will puncture the skull.

Accidents don’t just happen from tools falling. Often, a worker attempts to catch his tool and can lose his balance, or drops the tool which then becomes a tripping hazard for unsuspecting workers below.

Next time you work at height, protect yourself, others and your tools with the right fall protection.

Read our blog on the importance of choosing a comfortable safety harness to ensure your fall protection fits properly.

References here: https://www.wireropenews.com/news-201808-When-Lives-are-on-the-Line.html
http://www.providencejournal.com/news/20180721/iron-men-love-their-jobs-bolting-together-future-in-providence
https://www.cos-mag.com/personal-process-safety/31597-objects-falling-from-heights-on-construction-sites-lead-to-injuries/

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.