Star Struck in Hamilton: Kevin Richardson from Heavy Rescue 401

heavy rescue 401 at hercules slr

The Hercules SLR branch in Hamilton, Ontario had a special visitor stop by – Kevin Richardson from the hit Discovery Channel show, Heavy Rescue 401. Read on to find out what he and the Hamilton branch in Hercules SLR got up to during his visit. 

HERCULES SLR MEETS HEAVY RESCUE 401

heavy rescue 401 at hercules slr
Kevin Richardson of Heavy Rescue 401 and Hamilton, Hercules SLR Branch Manager Brian Moniz

Hercules SLR was excited to have Kevin Richardson at the shop – a name and face you might recognize from hauling wreckage from accidents on the 401. 

Heavy Rescue 401 is a Discover Channel show that focuses on the first responders, tow and rigging companies that clean up accidents on Ontario’s busiest highway. Kevin worked for Metro Towing on the show, and is now with Ken’s Towing. 

Being responsible to clean up accidents in a timely manner on the busiest highway requires the best lifting equipment and service – an 18-wheeler tipped over on the 401 could back up traffic for eight hours, so people like Kevin need to remove the accident, and do it quickly. There’s no one-size fits all method to remove accident wreckage, so people like Kevin need to use different methods and equipment to get the job done.

Kevin came in to pick up a purchase and learn more about how Hercules SLR can help him do his job at Ken’s Towing, safely and effectively.

Brian Moniz, Hamilton Hercules SLR Branch Manager says, « It was really exciting to have Kevin walk in our doors. I’ve actually been watching the show with my family recently, and it’s been a great chance to show them what I do for work! On Heavy Rescue 401, they’ll use wire rope assemblies to lift cars, or rope to tow a truck from the ditch, and I get to show my family the things we work on, sell and what they help people do. Personally, I’m a fan of the show and I really like that I get to see different ways rigging and lifting equipment are applied by the end-user.«

HERCULES SLR HELPS HEAVY RESCUE 401’S KEVIN RICHARDSON

Kevin came to Hercules SLR after placing an order with a local competitor. He went to their shop and the order wasn’t complete, or even processed, even though he had placed the order one-month earlier and was promised a one-month turnaround.

Unhappy with the order’s outcome, Kevin stopped by the Hamilton Hercules SLR branch, to see if they could fix his issue.

Our Hamilton branch not only placed his order during the busy holiday season, but promised and delivered a two-week turnaround – compared to the one-month lead time promised to him by the competitor. 

We were especially thrilled to accomplish this during our busy holiday season – typically, turnaround times in Hamilton are actually shorter than two weeks.

heavy rescue 401, ken's towing at hercules slr
Ken’s Towing & Recovery – Kevin’s truck

LEADING WITH SERVICE: HOW HERCULES SLR GOES ABOVE & BEYOND

After waiting the two weeks promised for his order, Kevin came to the Hamilton branch to pick it up and take a short tour.

We know service means more than simply being handed the product – our Hamilton team told Kevin about Hercules SLR’s services he could use, like: 

  •  Hercules SLR custom sling-making services (specifically, we talked about a custom 30ft X 12″ web sling);
  •  Inspection services, which can be delivered on-site or in our shop;
  •  Our exclusive asset management tool CertTracker, which will allow Kevin and the Heavy Rescue 401 crew to pull certifications on the road or straight at a worksite and notify them of upcoming inspection dates. 
Kevin was impressed with the value, timely delivery and personalized service from the Hamilton branch – we hope to see Kevin on the next season of Heavy Rescue 401! 
 
Learn more about services at Hercules SLR – check out our blogs: 

SERVICES AT HERCULES SLR


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events. 

Webbing Sling Q&A: Delicate Material for Difficult Lifts

webbing sling from hercules slr

WEBBING SLING: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

If you’re a rigger or work in material handling, you likely encounter webbing slings often in your work. A synthetic webbing sling is fantastic to lift delicate or soft materials, since their soft surface offers more protection than abrasive materials, like wire rope. 

Webbing slings come in two types — duplex and simplex. A duplex webbing sling is made with two synthetic fabric layers stitched together for extra reinforcement. A simplex webbing sling is made with only one synthetic fabric layer. 

« Just one layer? That won’t do anything, » you might be thinking—but how wrong you’d be! Even though a webbing sling may not have the same reputation for strength as say, steel, a webbing sling is surprisingly strong. 

There are some misconceptions and often-asked questions about synthetic materials in the industry—so we’ve asked Hercules SLR experts from our Brampton, Ontario branch to help. 

Read on to find out the questions we hear about webbing slings, and how our experts’ answer. 

Q: What are they usually made from? 

Answer: A flat webbing sling is usually made from woven polyester, nylon (otherwise known as polyamide) and polypropylene.   

Q: Do flat webbing slings come in just one width? 

Answer Flat webbing slings come in different widths – but their ultimate flexibility and strength is noted by the number of webbing layers stitched together. webbing sling at hercules slr

Q: Should I use paint or dye to colour code webbing slings? This should help me identify them quickly and easily, right?

AnswerNO! Don’t use paint to colour code webbing slings—the solvents in the paint could corrode the synthetic material. A torn or broken sling is unsafe, and will drastically reduce it’s SWL. To identify a synthetic sling’s material, look for the label colour: 

Polyester (PES)—Blue Label, or blue with a green line down the center of the webbing. 

Polyamide (PA)—Green label

Polypropylene (PP)—Brown label

Q: What chemicals will affect webbing slings?

Answer: Polyester isn’t affected much by acid, but alkali’s will damage a polyester webbing sling. An alkali, or alkaline is basically a substance with a pH level higher than 7. Examples of alkali substances are sea water, baking soda, bleaches, lye and even blood. Polyamide’s are basically immune to alkali damage, but are damaged by even moderately-strength acids. They can also lose up to 15% of their SWL when wet. Polypropylene is resistant to acids and alkali’s, which makes them a good choice when you have to lift something which needs protection from chemicals. Be sure the polypropylene is stabilized to protect from ultraviolet degrading. 

Q: What markings should I look for on a webbing sling?

Answer: Look for the safe-working load (SWL), identification number and the label’s colour code.

 Q: How do I store my webbing sling?

AnswerIt definitely matters! Be sure to store your slings in a dry, cool place. Keep them out of sunlight or other ultra-violet radiation, and don’t store them in damp conditions. 

Q: So, they’re really strong – does that mean I can use them to lift anything? 

AnswerDon’t use a webbing sling for a critical lift! Make sure you use extra caution and have a detailed lifting plan for using a webbing sling with delicate or fragile lifting operations. 

Q: Okay, so what’s a critical lift?!

Answer: A critical lift is defined by WorkSafe BC as a lift with high risk factors that could cause the crane or hoist to fail, or poses a significant potential harm to human life. A critical lift is also one that needs a detailed rigging plan before the operation. 

Other factors that can make a lift critical are: 

  • When a piece of powered lifting equipment exceeds it’s rated capacity by 75%;
  • A mobile crane or boom truck goes over rated capacity by 90% lifting a load over 50% of its maximum permitted load radius; 
  • Tandem lifts— which is when more than one piece of powered lifting equipment is used, or is used to lift another piece of lifting equipment);
  • A person is being lifted;
  • The load is under-water or submerged. 

Q: Can I tie a knot in a webbing sling to make it shorter?

Answer: Never! Don’t knot, tie or twist a webbing sling. Don’t manipulate the sling’s angle, either—use the sling however the angle forms naturally.  

hercules slr webbing sling formation types
Figure 1—Webbing Sling Types

Q: When should I not use a webbing sling? 

Answer: Don’t use a webbing sling if you don’t know the SWL. Don’t use if the eyes or other part of the webbing sling is damaged, if the sling’s eye opens more than 20°. There are 5 different types of possible webbing sling eye formations—see figure 1. If using a Type 1 webbing sling (called a choker sling), be sure to protect the eye before use. 

Q: What should I keep in mind when using a webbing sling? 

Answer: There are a few things to consider to use a webbing sling safely—you should always: 

  • Avoid shock-loading.
  • Protect the sling with sleeves when sharp edges could tear its fabric—friction can cause heat damage, which is the most common form of ‘heat’ damage to webbing slings. To prevent, don’t let the sling run along the load’s surface and that it’s not pulled on any sharp corners. This is also known as ‘point loading’, when the load is pulled on a sharp corner, creating heat which results in heat fusion in the sling material. 
  • Never pull a sling from underneath a load. 

DOWNLOAD OUR SYNTHETIC SLING INSPECTION GUIDE


References: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/alkali, https://www.worksafebc.com/en/law-policy/occupational-health-safety/searchable-ohs-regulation/ohs-regulation/part-14-cranes-and-hoists

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Stop the Snap: Prevent Rope Snapback

rope snapback, rigging service, hercules slr

Dwayne Fader’s been with Hercules SLR for over 30 years and recently, he decided to ditch the dark Canadian Winter for summery, sunny Florida—before he flies away, we sit down with Dwayne to ask him a few questions about rope snapback. 

Rope snapback never fails to shock workers – it’s fast, forceful and damaging, yet preventable. Read on to learn more about the dangers of rope snapback, and discover our tips to prevent it. 

WHY DOES ROPE SNAPBACK?

When rope has too much tension applied to it and it breaks, it will snapback toward the direction of the pull because of kinetic energy—both wire and synthetic rope does this. Rope will always snapback, but you can’t always determine how fast it will snapback. It will always snapback to its pulling point, which is visible before or when you lift. This can cause terrible injuries, or even be fatal. 

The biggest thing you can do to prevent rope snapback is to inspect your rope before, during and after use. 

If you notice that there’s a lot of tension applied to the rope, you should re-rig the operation.  

rope snapback, rope, hercules slr, rigging ropeHOW-TO PREVENT ROPE SNAPBACK

How does one prevent rope snapback? Unfortunately, once the rope has broke there is nearly nothing you can do – except try to get out of its way.

Prevention is the main way to prevent injuries and fatalities caused by rope snap back. No matter the strength of a rope, it undergoes wear and tear like exposure to chemicals, harsh environments, friction and bends – this causes rope fibres to degrade over time. 

The best way to do this is with education and training for all workers—not just those who operate the rope. To keep rope in good working order, educate workers on:

  1. How to select the correct type of rope to use for the application/job; 
  2. Proper methods to handle the rope for application and beyond;
  3. When to remove the rope from service. 

To know when to remove your rope from service, you must conduct a rope inspection. To do this, inspect ropes before, during and after use. Training should also include inspection criteria for the ropes being used on the job, which can vary depending on the type of rope. This will help workers know what to look for, so they can tell if a rope should be taken out of service, or not. 

It should also cover the reality of what happens when a rope snaps back, areas where it’s most likely to snapback in a dangerous way (for example, sailboats typically have marked off « snapback zones » that indicate dangerous zones to stay away from) and an emergency plan of what to do when snapback occurs. 

ROPE MAINTENANCE TO PREVENT SNAPBACK 

SPLICING

Rope splicing is a method use to add a termination or join two ropes together without tying a knot.

Don’t tie a knot in rope, as knots reduce their safe-working load – splice rope instead to add terminations to a rope’s end. This also (typically) retains all of the rope’s strength or WLL. 

END-FOR-ENDING

End-for-ended rope is rope that’s rotated – the frequency depends on the rope and the application its used for. End-for-ending rope adds variety to the points of the rope where stress is regularly applied, which allows you to get more life from your rope. 

STORAGE

It may sound like common sense, but it’s important to store your rope properly. Improper storage could make your rope deteriorate and fail faster. 

ROPE SNAPBACK TRAINING

An effective method to make people aware of how wrong snapback can go is to educate them in the areas and methods discussed above – and to show how scary the reality is. 

Watch the video ‘Aircraft Carrier Cable Snap’ below for a frightening example of rope snapback. Note the crew near the back who are knocked to the ground by its force, also see the person who jumps it – TWICE: 

FINAL THOUGHTS

Remember – to prevent rope snapback, ensure you’re using the right kind of rope for the move or lift you’re planning. Be sure to train workers on proper use of rope, like rope splicing, end-for-ending and safety issues. 

 

References: Miles, A., & Prentice, G. (1986). Synthetic Line Snapback (pp. 1-9, Rep.). Naval Sea Systems Command., https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BuIbvX_B7sY, https://www.samsonrope.com/resources/rope-care, http://www.workingwaterfrontarchives.org/2015/01/29/rope-snap-back-and-parting-among-marine-safety-hazards/, https://www.ukpandi.com/knowledge-publications/article/best-practice-mooring-snap-back-zones-135637/, https://samsonrope.com/resources/rope-care 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Quality Assurance & Safety Specialist – James Golemiec

Quality Assurance

Get to know your Quality Assurance & Safety Specialist – James Golemiec

James Golemiec CRSP is our Health, Safety, Environment and Quality Assurance Specialist. We asked him some questions about himself and how he decided to choose this career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

James: I have a B.Sc. in biology and two separate, two-year university diplomas: one in Engineering and one in Education. I also recently completed a Diploma in OHS (3-years studying at nights and on weekends) and I passed the exam for Canadian Registered Safety Representative (CRSP).

What made you decide to go into this industry?

James:  I have a background in the wire rope business as a sales development rep. for a competing firm. I knew nothing about wire rope when I made the decision to join the industry, but I had experience in steel making and several years’ experience selling to industry, so I took a chance.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

James: I was a science/ industrial arts teacher before going into engineering sales. Later I spent years selling high technology products for companies based in Toronto and in Chicago.

What made you want to transition into Quality Assurance and Safety?

Quality-Assurance

James: Working for Maritime companies involves wearing various ‘hats’. When I started in engineering sales, one of my ‘additionally assigned tasks’ was to manage my company’s quality system, when one of our engineers quit. I dealt aerospace and electronics clients for injection molded plastics parts that we manufactured for them. I am detail-oriented, and a problem-solver, so managing a quality system came easily to me. My occupational health and safety role started 7 years ago, when I was hired by Hercules.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

James: I already had the background in quality assurance and in the wire rope industry. At Hercules I have ‘internal customers’ and I still occasionally get to use my teaching skills.

Where have you traveled during your time as a Quality and Safety specialist for Hercules SLR?

James: In my first two years at Hercules, one of my tasks was to install and inspect life lines. This work sent me to natural gas plants in Alberta, where I climbed 60- foot external ladders. I also traveled to power generating stations in New Brunswick, to install life lines in hot, dust-filled coal storage silos. These are jobs that our inspectors do; it is varied work and a lot of the time… it’s just plain fun!

Now, I occasionally travel across Canada to conduct the annual internal quality audits and to accompany our external auditor during the annual ISO9001 surveillance audits.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for your job at Hercules?

James: We have branches in small towns in northern New Brunswick and large cities like Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. I enjoy travelling in all provinces to perform audits at our branches. Every region is unique and our staff at each branch are always friendly and accommodating to me.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?
James: I haven’t been to some of the outlying branches in Ontario and it’s been a
James-Gwhile since I’ve been in New Brunswick and PEI.  I would enjoy going to those areas.

Is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

James: As companies like Hercules grow, their quality assurance and safety staff are generally expanded, to create improvements in product and service delivery and to improve their safety cultures.

The next step for someone in my position is to guide those improvements.

I also see Hercules performing external safety consulting for other companies, which is another profitable and growing area.  I look forward to being in that more senior role, in the next few years.

 

Lastly, is there anything about you that most people would not know?

James: I’m a licensed pilot; I’ve owned many motorcycles over the years and I enjoy oil painting (My life goal is to be ‘passable’ at portraits).

 

Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses we can tailor make courses to suit your specific requirements, at our facility or yours. To find out more about our course and how we can help you raise the bar in safety training email us at: training@herculesslr.com

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

 

Become a Rigger: Your Career Map

"become a rigger"-become-a-rigger-hercules-slr-rigging-careers

BECOME A RIGGER.

BECOME A RIGGER: YOUR CAREER MAP

                                    

BECOME A RIGGER: TRAINING & EDUCATION                                                                               

 

 

So you want to become a rigger?

A rigger’s main responsibility is to lift, lower, hoist and pull objects using machinery and lifting equipment like synthetic, chain and wire rope slings, hoists and cranes.

They are responsible to make and determine the best configurations and equipment to lift a load, be knowledgeable about safety & operating procedures and know how to fabricate, repair, inspect, install and service rigging and lifting equipment – lifting equipment can range from synthetic slings, wire rope, lifting magnets or cranes and aerial lifting trucks. 

Certain industries, or niche industries (particularly those that require you to use and operate heavy machinery and equipment like cranes and lifting trucks) will require a specific certification to operate them. 

A rigger can provide these services: 

  •  Inspections, on-site or in-shop
  •  Load tests 
  •  Crane repair, sales, inspection and installation
  •  Training
  • Sales and services 

BECOME A RIGGER: TRAINING AND CERTIFICATIONS                                                                

 

 

Many industries that use riggers or rig technician’s don’t require formal training, but do require and/or provide on-the-job learning, training courses and certifications.

However, it may be beneficial to complete a college or technical diploma, which can improve your chances of getting a job or apprenticeship.  

At Hercules SLR, our riggers have a combination of LEEA certifications and on-the-job training from our certified trainers and inspectors.  

Some of these include:

  • Lifting Certifications from LEEA
  • Training Courses 
  • College Diploma 

You also have the option to become a rig technician, which is a Red Seal Trade in Canada. According to the NSAA, a rig technician: 

  • Operates drawworks, rotary equipment and pumps 
  • Inspects rigs 
  • Maintains records of drilling operations
  • Oversees rig mobilization and demobilization 

You don’t need formal education to become a red seal technician, but must complete 9,000 apprentice hours to qualify to complete the rig technician red seal exam. A rig technician is responsible for the above duties, but also operating tools, wearing and ensuring the proper PPE is used and must operate lifting and hoisting equipment. 

become a rigger, "become a rigger"
Cranes, chains & cargo – a glimpse at common items and equipment found in rigging industry 

BECOME A RIGGER: ESSENTIAL SKILLS                                                                                              

 

                                                                                                 You might wonder— »This sounds nice, but what should I be good at to be a rigger? » A career as a rigger may be right for you if you’re:  

  • Mechanically inclined;
  • Comfortable with math and physics; 
  • Interested in a balance of both physical and administrative work, comfortable using technology;
  • A strong, effective communicator;  
  • An eye for detail and quick decision-making; 
  • Comfortable in harsh climate conditions, rigging often involves working in the extreme heat or       cold.  

BECOME A RIGGER: INDUSTRIES YOU COULD WORK IN                                                           

 

 

  • Entertainment (set and stunt rigging) & Theatre (stage rigging) 
  • Maritime, marine & fishing – sailboat rigging included 
  • Airline 
  • Construction  
  • Offshore Drilling/Oil and Gas 
  • Mining 
  • Manufacturing
  • Forestry
  • Transportation
  • Utilities 
  • Shipping/Receiving and Material Handling 

BECOME A RIGGER: LIKE THE SOUND OF THESE JOB TITLES?                                                   

 

 

If you become a rigger, you could have one of these job titles: 

  • Slinger
  • Parachute Rigger
  • Sailboat/Ship Rigger
  • Gantry Rigger
  • Machinery Mover
  • Hook Tender
  • Wire Rigger
  • Yacht Rigger
  • Grip
  • Crane Rigger
  • Acrobatic Rigger
  • Theatrical Rigger

BLOGS                                                                                                                                                             

 
 
 
 
Interested to learn more about rigging, becoming a rig technician and rigging and lifting equipment? Check out our blogs below:
 

HERCULES TRAINING ACADEMY

TRAINING COURSES

References: https://www.nscc.ca/Learning_Programs/Programs/PlanDescr.aspx?prg=MIRG&pln=MARINDRIG, https://nsapprenticeship.ca/trades#accordion58, https://www.myplan.com/careers/riggers/description-49-9096.00.html, http://www.red-seal.ca/trades/rigtech/2012n.4.1_.4v.2rv.3.2w-eng.htmlhttps://www.jobhero.com/how-to-become-rigger/, https://www.myplan.com/careers/riggers/description-49-9096.00.html
 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Stuck in a Tight Spot? what to know in a confined space

confined space, hercules slr, how to work in confined spaces

Most workers will have to work in a confined space at some point in their career – although common, many workers and employers don’t plan or account for common hazards found in them. 

Read on to discover commonly-found dangers in confined spaces and how to prepare for them. 

WHAT’S A CONFINED SPACE? 

A confined space is an area that:

  • Is large enough to enter and do work in;
  • Has limited entries and exits;
  • Isn’t meant for long-term human occupancy.
  • Examples: Silos’, tunnels, sewers, wells, underground utility vaults, an empty tanker trailer

WHAT’S A PERMIT-REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE (PRCS)?

Yes, it’s a confined space that you need a permit to enter – but a permit-required confined space also:

  • Contains or has the potential to contain serious safety or health hazards like:
    • Engulfment
    • Toxic Atmosphere
    • Puzzling Configuration
    • Heat or Cold Stress
    • Slipping Hazards
    • Flammable Atmosphere
    • Oxygen Deficiency

CONFINED SPACE HAZARD: 2 FACTORS THAT CREATE HAZARDS

  1.  Failure to see and control hazards associated with the confined space
    • Atmospheric hazards
    • Physical hazards
  2. Poor Emergency response time or plan
    • Many injuries or fatalities in confined spaces occur when other workers attempt to save coworkers injured in a confined space
    • Nearly 60% of worker fatalities occur when trying to save someone else from a confined space hazard 

Nearly 60% of deaths in confined spaces happen to the would-be rescuer

CONFINED SPACE: KNOW THE HAZARDS

Hazard #1: Oxygen Deficiency

Normal air has an oxygen content of 20.8-.9% – when there’s less than 19.5% available, you’re in a oxygen-deficient space. When this level decreases, even by 1-2% the effects are felt immediately. When working in a space with this level, remember to wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). 

What leads to oxygen deficiency? Inadequate ventilation, poor air quality, oxygen consumed from welding, decomposition, rust are some of the factors that cause oxygen levels to drop.

Oxygen Deficiency Levels

  • Minimum for safe entry: 19.5%
  • Impaired judgement and breathing, accelerated heartbeat: 16%
  • Faulty judgement and rapid fatigue: 14%
  • Nausea, vomiting, inability to perform simple tasks, unconsciousness: 6-10%
  • Rapid loss of consciousness, death in minutes: Less than 6%
Hazard #2: Oxygen Displacement

Oxygen displacement occurs when there’s an inert gas (it’s worth noting inert gas is different than a noble gas – an inert gas doesn’t chemically react, and a noble gas does chemically react under certain conditions. All noble gases are inert, but not all inert gases are noble).

When enough of a inert gas is in a confined space, it displaces the oxygen which makes it difficult – well, impossible to breathe. For example, nitrogen is non-toxic, colourless and odourless – but will displace the oxygen in a room.

Hazard #3: Fire & Flammable Atmosphere

Flammable atmospheres are caused by flammable liquids, gases and combustible dusts which if lit, can cause an explosion or fire. The ignition doesn’t have to be a flame – it can be something as simple as static electricity or a small spark.

Hazard #4: Physical

You can become engulfed after being trapped or enveloped by material. Electrocution can happen when electrical equipment is activated, and mechanical energy can activate and cause physical injury. 

Other physical safety hazards, although small that can still cause injury are inadequate lighting, noise, vibration and radiation. Nearby traffic, vehicles and other heavy machinery could also be a hazard. Objects and slippery areas pose falling hazards, and hot or cold temperature extremes also pose a threat. Extremely high temperatures can cause your body to undergo heat stress. 

Heat Stress Symptoms

In a confined space (and other areas) your body might not be able to cool down which can cause heat exhaustion or heat stroke to occur.

Heat exhaustion symptoms include:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Confusion
  • Vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Pale, clammy skin

When these symptoms occur, you should move to a cool area, raise your legs, take off any heavy clothing, drink water and apply a wet cloth to your skin. 

Heat stroke symptoms include:

  • Dry, pale skin – with no sweat
  • Hot, red skin that looks sunburnt
  • Unable to think straight, seizure, unconsciousness

When this occurs:

  • Call 911
  • Move victim to a cool area
  • Loosen or remove heavy clothing
  • Place icepacks at your armpit and groin

To protect yourself:

  • Try to work or accomplish physical parts of work during the coolest parts of the day
  • Use spot ventilation
  • Use buddy system
  • Drink cold water – try to drink around every 15 minutes and take frequent breaks
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine in high temperatures, and be mindful of medication as this can increase your risk of heat  stroke.

confined space, hercules slr, srl, self-retracting lifeline, inspections, repairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONFINED SPACE: PROCEDURES

Before you start work in a confined space, it’s essential to follow a procedure to control and/or minimize safety hazards and remain safe on the job. Follow this procedure before working in a confined space:

  • Conduct a pre-entry evaluation (like a discussion with everyone who will be working at the site);
  • Identify and eliminate potential hazards that can enter the space, both atmospheric and physical;
  • Use forced air ventilation and use lock out/tag out if necessary;
  • Complete an entry permit – Assign an entrant, attendant and supervisor and any other relevant competent person needed on the site.

The Authorized Entrant will:

  • Know hazards that will face workers during entry;
  • Wear proper PPE;
  • Maintain communication with the attendant;
  • Know the signs of overexposure/heat stress and stroke;
  • Evacuate the confined space when ordered to or when over-exposed to hazard(s).

The Authorized Attendant will:

  • Keep their position outside the entrance at all time;
  • Know the signs and symptoms of overexposure;
  • Prevent unauthorized people from entering the space;
  • Maintain communication with entrants;
  • Begin the emergency response/rescue plan if needed;
  • Complete an evaluation of the entrance before they start work;
  • Make sure personnel know the hazards;
  • Implement any necessary control measures, for example – ventilation;
  • Complete any permits that are necessary to enter the space;
  • Complete any tests needed to enter the confined space safely.

One of the most important parts of starting work in a confined space is to ensure you have necessary retrieval equipment for entry, exit and emergency rescue situations.

As we mentioned, almost 60% of confined space deaths happen to someone trying to rescue a coworker – It’s natural to want to save a life, but it’s important that you’re not part of the death count—This makes confined space planning essential to complete work that’s both efficient and safe. 


Choosing and having the proper PPE for the job is essential to staying safe amidst hazards in a confined space. This may include self-retracting lifelines, anchorages or body harness’ – click the link below to find out more about Hercules SLR’s fall protection services. 

Fall Protection

Check out our blogs to learn more about fall protection and staying safe at heights: 

Sources: Canadian Centre for Occupational Health - https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/hsprograms/confinedspace_intro.html 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Welcome to Ontario: Brampton Riggers Talk Chain Hoist Safety

chain hoist,

CHAIN HOISTS

Chain hoists (sometimes referred to as chain falls or their older term, ‘chain blocks’) are popular piece of equipment to lift heavy loads. A chain hoist is durable and allows heavy loads to be lifted with ease since they require much less strength on the part of the rigger. However, this means they’re more likely to be abused since they typically make a lift much easier, but are not suited for every application.

Rigger Colin Grieg of Brampton, Ontario shared what to look for when inspecting your chain hoist and tips for use.

Before you install your chain hoist, check: chain hoist, Welcome to Ontario: brampton riggers talk chain hoist safety, hercules slr

  • Clean the load chain with a solvent, then add slack to the chain and make a link-by-link inspection for nicks, gouges, twisted links and excessive wear or stretch;
  • That the load chain anchor pin is in good condition;
  • That the top and bottom hook safety catches are operating correctly;
  • Check hooks for cracks, damage, distortion and excessive throat opening – a damaged hook often means it was misused and should be removed from service;
  • Hooks swivel freely;
  • Check name plate and see that SWL, ID number and colour code (if used) are clearly visible.

After installation and mounting, check:

  • That load chain sits correctly in the pocket wheel. To do this, run the unloaded hook up and down a reasonable distance – the chain should run free of snags or binds;
  • The hoist is rigged to lift in a straight line from hook to hook;
  • The hoist is free to swivel on the upper hook;
  • For damage on the handwheel and gear covers.

CHAIN HOISTS: hand chain

Although hand chains are not load bearing, make sure:

  • The chain is free of twists and damage to links;
  • The chain is smooth to touch and ‘joint’ links sit firmly in the chain wheel’s pocket;
  • The chain wheel turns freely with no signs of a bent spindle, buckled wheel or damaged ‘chain pockets’;
  • Make sure operation in ‘hoist’ mode produces a ‘hard’ sound – this is the sound of a ratchet running under a spring-loaded pawl.

CHAIN HOISTS: safety first

  • If the chain’s twisted, don’t use the hoist;
  • Don’t use the load chain as part of a sling configuration;
  • Chain hoists can only be used at its maximum capacity to lift a load vertically – if you must lift a load at an angle, the hoist’s capacity is greatly reduced;
  • Don’t operate a chain hoist beyond the capacity specified – you will cause the bottom hook to run beyond it’s range of lift, and possibly add too much weight to the load-chain slack-end anchorage;
  • Don’t lift a load beyond it’s specified SWL (safe-working load);
  • Don’t let dirt, grease or other harmful debris/chemicals to collect in the load’s profile or hand-chain wheels;
  • Don’t use your load chain if it jumps, is not ‘smooth’ or has marks – this means it’s likely ‘out of pitch’ and should be replaced and removed from service;
  • You should not need extra force/strength to operate your chain hoist – if using extra strength, stop the lift immediately and find the cause. (An easy tip? If it takes more than one man – something’s wrong!)

CHAIN HOISTS: post-mount & pre-use 

After you mount your chain hoist but before you actually use it, you should inspect the following:

  • The chain hoist shouldn’t be allowed to lay against a support, since this can cause the hook or frame to bend and damage the unit;
  • Make sure the hoist can swivel through 360° on the top hook;
  • Make sure the ‘member’ the hoist hangs from is sat all the way in the middle of the chain hoist’s saddle.

CHAIN HOIST: crane hooks

When you suspend a chain hoist from a crane hook, stay safe with these tips:

  • The chain hoist’s SWL will be reduced by 15% – this allows dynamic loading;
  • A safety link with a SWL of 5 times the load weight should be fit between the crane hook and load shackle;
  • Before you hoist with a crane, conduct a short lift test with both to make sure the hoist brake is locked.

CHAIN HOIST: storage 

To store your chain hoist:

  1. Raise bottom hook
  2. Wrap load chain
  3. Wrap hand chain
  4. Secure ends

When storing your chain hoist, be sure to: 

  • Lubricate chain hoist with oil or grease – be careful, as misapplied lubricant may enter the brake disc and cause it to fail under the load;
  • Make sure you have a dedicated spot to store your chain hoist – this place should be dry and free from injurious pollution and extremes of temperature;
  • Chain hoists should be suspended by their top hooks, and the hand chain should be clear of the ground – this will prevent damage to the chains;
  • Don’t use strong solvents on your chain hoist – ensure wet or dirty chain hoists are clean before storing.

CHAIN HOIST HOW-TO: light load brake lock-out test

  1. Suspend chain hoist from a suitable lifting point, and apply a load test of 5% chain hoist SWL to the load hook;
  2. Stay clear of the load – raise test load 70 to 100mm from the ground;
  3. Enter restraint pin through lack side of load chain;
  4.  Operate the chain hoist and lower the direction until the restraint pin gives a lock against the heavy pull of the chain hoist;
  5. Remove the restraint pin and make sure the brake engages right away, which will stop the load from dropping;
  6. If the load drops – don’t use the chain hoist. Remove them from service, and have them repaired.   

VIEW CHAIN HOISTS  chain hoist, hercules slr, lfiting equipment


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Samson Introduces: Innovative Running Rigging Lines

rigging lines, rigging services, samson rope, Samson Introduces: Innovative Running Rigging Lines

INTRODUCING: NEW RUNNING RIGGING LINES FROM SAMSON ROPE 

Samson, the worldwide leader in high-performance rope continues to introduce innovations in sailing, with rigging lines that are stronger, easier to splice and highly responsive.

Samson is pleased to introduce a breakthrough in engineering and design, with three new double-braid running rigging lines for sailors and upgraded the XLS and MLX franchises.

Samson presents XLS3 TM and MLX3 TM, plus a brand new line for the elite racer, GPX TM. These new sailing lines have all been built on a unified framework, and are tailor-made with the best materials to meet sailors’ unique demands.

Samson is also changing the way recreational marine lines are discussed, adding focus on a more relevant specification for sailors, Elastic Stiffness.

Until now, focus has been on the strength of a line. While strength is important, it is not representative of the sailor’s experience using a particular line. Samson’s rope is already stronger than sailors need—so they took their cue from professional racers, who look at elastic stiffness (resistance to stretch under load) as the most meaningful measurement of responsiveness to a particular command or action. Each of Samson’s new running rigging lines has an elastic stiffness measurement:

rigging lines, samson-rope-elastic-stiffness-lifting-equipment, Samson Introduces: Innovative Running Rigging Lines

 

 

 

 

GPX™

GPX is Samson’s grand prix racer: Samson’s highest performing racing line, built with a special blended core of Dyneema® SK99 and DM20, which results in almost zero stretch under constant load (also known as ‘creep’).

This means that its elastic stiffness is low – the line does what you want it to do, when you want to. The cherry on top? Samson GPX is a blend of polyester and Technora® UV-protected fiber, that provides heat resistance and superior grip.

MLX™

MLX3 is a club racer’s dream – super light and strong to keep you in the lead. It’s built with a blended-HMPE and polyester core, and has a 24-strand polyester cover. MLX3 offers the best line for the recreational racer who’s just as competitive as the pros.

XLS3™

XLS3 is built for the weekend cruiser who desires optimal performance. XLS3 is a strong polyester/polyester-double-braid rope and is stronger and more responsive than its XLS – this results in a high-performing, reliable line.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Crane Equipment: cranes, chains & automobiles

crane equipment, hercules slr, rigging services

Cranes have been used since the first century – in that time, they were powered by humans or animals to lift heavy loads. Cranes have adapted and come a long way since – they now use an assortment of crane equipment and hardware to lift, lower and even sometimes move horizontally.

Read on to learn more about the modern variety of crane equipment available and Hercules SLR’s tips for using it.

CRANE EQUIPMENT: an overview

For rigging with cranes, different types of lifting equipment (also known as tackle) are used. These include:

  • Wire Rope Slings
  • Synthetic Slings
  • Shackles
  • Snatch Blocks
  • Hooks
  • Chain Hoists
  • Chain Pullers
  • Eye Bolts
  • Tirfors
  • Jacks
  • Lifting Beam
  • Spreader Beams
  • Beam Clamps
  • Plate Clamps

CRANE EQUIPMENT: wire rope slings

Pay special attention to wire rope slings as they are susceptible to server wear, abrasion, impact loading, crushing, kinking and overloading – small changes in the slings’ angle affect the safe working load of the sling. Care should be taken around rough edges and wire rope slings – even an edge you might not consider ‘sharp’ can make considerable damage to your wire rope sling, making it unsafe and ineffective. Use sleeves, wear pads or corner protectors to protect your wire rope sling from damage.

Be sure to not drop a load or run a load over the sling – this will crush the sling. Also, don’t stop and start suddenly while you lift and lower with a wire rope sling, as this increases the slings’ stresses and increases possible failures.

WIRE ROPE SLING SPLICES

crane-equipment-hercules-slr-rigging

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIRE ROPE SLING IDENTIFICATION 

There are three ways to identify wire rope slings: the SWL, I.D. number and certificate number.

  1. Hard-stamped on ferrule
  2. A tag which has a wire running through the tag and eye of the sling
  3. Large metal washer where the wire of the sling is passed through when you make the eye of a sling

WIRE ROPE CONFIGURATIONS

There are three main wire rope sling configurations:

  1. Double-Choker Hitch
  2. Pair of Double Wrap Chokers
  3. Single Choker Hitch

Round slings’ are versatile – they’re strong, yet delicate to the load to lift. They’re light, flexible in many directions and malleable which is especially helpful when lifting an awkward or delicate load.

crane-equipment-hercules-slr
Synthetic Round Sling Label

CRANE EQUIPMENT: synthetic round slings 

Round slings’ are not easily damaged by sunlight, humidity, grease, dirt or seawater. Round slings’ are identified by the colour of the label, and also have the SWL on it.

CRANE EQUIPMENT: web slings 

Web slings are suited for particularly those that can be easily damaged. They’re easy to damage if you use them improperly – your web sling shouldn’t touch a sharp edge, heat or chemicals that will cause damage.


CRANE EQUIPMENT: hardware

SHACKLES

For crane lifting, two different shackles are typically used – bow and d-shackles. When using synthetic slings with a crane, two types of shackles are available, wide sling shackle and a round sling shackle. Web sling shackles are wider and bow out in the middle, and round sling shackles are narrow and sometimes have small valleys in the shackle bow, which supports the synthetic strands better.

These prevent the sling from bunching and pinching, which can be an issue with bow or d-shackles – it also reduces the SWL capacity of the sling.

To use shackles for crane lifting safely, follow these tips:

  • Don’t replace the shackle pin with a bolt – only the proper fitted pin should be used. Bolts aren’t meant to take the bend that a pin can handle.
  • Pins must be straight and all-screw pins must be completely seated
  • Cotter pins should be used with all round pin shackles
  • Shackles worn at the crown or pin by over 10% of original diameter should be removed from service and destroyed.
  • Don’t pull your shackle at an angle with a sling or hoist rope – this reduces the shackle’s capacity by 50%. Spacers can be used to centralize the load on the pins with spacers.
  • Don’t use screw pin shackles if the load can roll under load and unscrew

SHEAVE BLOCKS

A sheave block is a single, or multi-sheave block which opens on one side – this opening allows a rope to be pulled over the sheave and eliminates the need to be threaded through the block. When crane lifting with wire rope, sheave blocks can be purchased with configurations for hook, shackle, eye and swivel fittings.

  • Sheave blocks are normally used when it’s necessary to change the direction of pull on the line. When this happens, the stress on the sheave block is significantly greater than the angle between the lead and load lines. 
    crane equipment, rigging services, hercules slr, Crane Equipment: cranes, chains & automobiles
    Pulley with a sheave on a mobile lifting crane, with 25-ton lifting capability
  • When the lines are parallel, 1000lbs on the lead line results in double the weight on the block—2000lbs on block, hook and whatever the connection points are attached to. As the angle between lines increases, the stress on the block and hook is reduced.

HOOKS

Many different hooks are available for lifting and rigging operations – check with manufacturer instructions and warnings before using in a crane application.

When using hooks to lift with a crane, follow these tips:

  • Ensure hoisting hooks are fitted with safety latches (except grab and sorting hooks)
  • Inspect hooks often, looking for wear in the hook’s saddle – check for cracks, corrosion and if the hook’s body is twisted.
  • Inspect the shackle’s throat opening – if the hook’s been overloaded or is weak, the throat will open. If this is the case, remove from service and destroy so no one else attempts to use it.
  • Inspect for cracks in the hook’s saddle and neck
  • Be sure the hook is stamped with its SWL
  • Note that the SWL applies when the load is in the saddle of the hook, as this reduces the SWL.

TURNBUCKLES 

Turnbuckles are sometimes called rigging screws and can be supplied with eye end, jaw end, stub end fittings and/or a combination of these.

  • Use turnbuckles fabricated from alloy steel with weldless construction.
  • If turnbuckles have end fittings, ensure hooks are fit with safety latches.

CHAIN HOISTS / CHAIN BLOCKS 

Chain hoists are often used with cranes to move larger equipment and machinery. Chain hoists vary in size and length, and require little effort to execute a lift.

Chain hoists are durable, but can be damaged easily. To prevent damage, check:

  • The SWL is right for the application/load
  • The chain hoist has been inspected or certified by a third party
  • The hoist’s body is free of cracks or broken castings
  • The hook isn’t deformed and is fit with a safety latch
  • Anchor pins are in place correctly, and are the right type
  • Chain is in good working condition
  • SWL is clearly marked on the chain hoist block

A lever hoist is similar to a chain hoist, but operates slightly different with a lever to lift and lower the load – it can also be used to pull loads.

EYE BOLTS 

When lifting with a crane and eye bolts, ensure eye and ring bolts are made of alloy steel and have shoulders or collars.

Do not load eye bolts at an angle – angular loading reduces the weight of the load they can safely support.

TIRFOR

A tirfor is a mechanical device, equipped with a level handle to operate. They’re used to pull and add tension, and can also be used to lift if they have blocks.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Apprenez à connaître votre formateur – Boris Satiric

get-to-know-your-trainer-boris-hercules-slr

Boris Satiric, est l’un de nos spécialistes de la formation très expérimentés.

Nous nous sommes assis avec Boris pour découvrir ce qui l’a mené à une carrière de formateur.

Boris Satiric, is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.

Parlez-nous de votre expérience professionnelle, Boris :

Boris : J’ai passé 12 ans de service dévoué dans le Royal Highland Regiment of Canada – Black Watch, je me suis entraîné et qualifié dans plusieurs aspects du leadership, j’ai acquis des compétences opérationnelles dans différents environnements et je me suis entraîné avec un large éventail d’armes et de véhicules.

Durant mes années comme membre du corps professoral de l’Université Laval et de l’École polytechnique en tant que technicien électricien pour réseaux à haute tension, j’ai développé mes connaissances et mes compétences techniques qui m’ont aidé à gérer différentes exigences techniques dans l’industrie.

Au cours de mes 12 années passées chez Hercules, j’ai acquis de nombreuses compétences et qualifications supplémentaires, dont la certification LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association), avec de l’expérience dans les équipements de protection contre les chutes, les grues à tour, etc.

LEEA Logo

Qu’est-ce qui vous a poussé à vous lancer dans cette industrie ?

Boris : Ma décision était basée sur mes premières impressions et expériences que j’ai eues quand j’ai commencé à travailler pour Hercule. Je savais que cela me convenait techniquement et j’ai décidé de poursuivre ma carrière dans ce domaine et de progresser au sein de l’entreprise. J’aime les défis que présente le travail et chaque jour est différent.

Qu’est-ce qui vous a donné envie de faire la transition vers la formation ?

Boris : Avec mon expérience du leadership et de l’enseignement dans les Forces canadiennes, j’ai décidé d’utiliser mon enseignement et mes connaissances techniques pour aider d’autres personnes à comprendre les risques du gréement et du levage, et comment relever ces défis. Lors des visites chez les clients, en tant qu’inspecteur, j’ai remarqué un manque de compréhension des dangers et ce message DOIT être transmis pour éviter les accidents et assurer la sécurité au travail.

boris-get to know your trainer-hercules-slr
Boris inspecte le fil de grue à tour de 52 étages de haut
Où avez-vous voyagé pendant votre formation en tant que spécialiste de la formation pour Hercules SLR ?

Boris : Une grande partie de la formation que j’offre est basée dans l’Ouest canadien, mais Hercules peut donner de la formation n’importe où au pays, alors j’ai hâte de voyager partout où le travail me mènera.

Y a-t-il un endroit où vous aimeriez voyager à l’avenir avec Hercules SLR ?

Boris : J’adorerais voyager à travers le Moyen-Orient et l’Amérique du Sud ! Hercules est actuellement une entreprise nationale au Canada, mais au fur et à mesure de son expansion internationale, j’aimerais retourner en Europe, en Australie, aux États-Unis ou en Asie.

Enfin, y a-t-il quelque chose que vous espérez accomplir au cours de votre carrière dans l’industrie ?

Boris : J’espère obtenir plus de cours LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association) pour approfondir mes connaissances dans le domaine et accroître mon potentiel de gestion. Mon principal objectif est toutefois de continuer à contribuer à la culture de sécurité d’aujourd’hui.

Hercules SLR propose un large éventail de formations à la sécurité. En plus de nos cours standard, nous pouvons adapter les cours à vos besoins spécifiques, dans nos locaux ou dans les vôtres. Pour en savoir plus sur notre cours et sur la façon dont nous pouvons vous aider à relever la barre de la formation en sécurité, envoyez-nous un courriel à :  training@herculesslr.com

Hercules SLR fait partie du groupe de sociétés Hercules qui offre un portefeuille unique d’entreprises à l’échelle nationale avec des emplacements d’un océan à l’autre. Nos sociétés offrent une vaste gamme de produits et de services qui contribuent au succès d’un large éventail de secteurs d’activité partout au Canada, notamment l’énergie, le pétrole et le gaz, la fabrication, la construction, l’aérospatiale, l’infrastructure, les services publics, le pétrole et le gaz, les industries minière et maritime.

Hercules Group of Companies est composé de: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales et Wire Rope Atlantic.

Nous avons la capacité de fournir toute solution dont votre entreprise ou votre projet aura besoin. Appelez-nous dès aujourd’hui pour plus d’informations. 1-877-461-4876. N’oubliez pas de nous suivre sur Twitter LinkedIn et Facebook pour d’autres nouvelles et événements à venir.