IMPORTANT | Inspection Notice – 3M™ DBI-SALA® ExoFit NEX™ Harnesses

3m dbi-sala and exofit logo

3M Fall Protection Logo

 

 

3M INSPECTION NOTICE

Read on for an important 3M Fall Protection inspection notice – 3M Fall Protection has learned of the possibility of a manufacturing defect in a dorsal d-ring of ExoFit NEX™ harnesses manufactured between January 2016 and December 2018. Although there have been no reported incidents involving this condition, a dorsal d-ring with this defect will not support the load in a fall arrest event which could result in serious injury or death. Harnesses manufactured only within this date range require immediate inspection for lot number 09P1 stamped into a dorsal d-ring. We believe that only one harness was manufactured with a defective D-ring, but we urge inspection of all potentially affected harnesses out of an abundance of caution in the interests of worker safety.

End Users: Upon receipt of this inspection Notice, immediately inspect your harness following the steps below:

3M INSPECTION NOTICE STEP 1: Locate the label pack on the harness to identify the manufacturing date. If the harness has a manufacturing date of 16/01 (2016, January) through the end of 18/12 (2018, December), continue to step 2. If the harness is not in this range, the unit is not impacted by this notice. If the harness is within this date range, continue to step 2.

3M INSPECTION NOTICE STEP 2: Locate the D-ring on the back of the harness to inspect for a stamped lot date of 09P1. If you find a D-ring with code 09P1 and the harness has a manufactured date within the affected date range, take the harness out of service immediately. If the D-ring is not stamped with code 09P1, you may continue using your harness.

Please note that both the manufactured date range (2016, January through 2018, December) on the harness label AND the lot number code 09P1 stamped on the D-ring must be present on the same harness for the harness to be considered suspect and removed from service. All other harness/d-ring combinations are acceptable for use.

End-users: If you find an affected harness, take the unit out of service immediately. You can contact us at 3M Customer Service at 1833-998-2243 or at 3MCAFPServiceAction@mmm.com to return your harness and a replacement harness will be provided free of charge.

Distributors: Please contact our Customer Service department at 1-833-998-2243 or email at 3MCAFPServiceAction@mmm.com to obtain a listing of harnesses sold to you with the affected manufacturing date range. If after inspection you discover you have an affected product in stock, please return the harnesses to 3M Fall Protection immediately for replacement. Please immediately forward this Inspection Notice to any of your customers who have purchased ExoFit NEX product within the affected manufacturing date range from you and provide any assistance requested by your customers to complete the process.

3M remains committed to providing quality products and services to our customers. We apologize for any inconvenience that this situation may cause you or your customers. We appreciate your continued support of 3M Fall Protection products and services.


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

3M Guest Blog | How-to Prepare for Confined Space Access

confined space access hercules slr

Accessing a confined space takes planning to ensure that everyone who enters, exits and works in the space can do so safely. Read on for tips from 3M on how-to prepare for confined space access. 

By the time you are accessing the confined space, a hazard assessment has been completed, but if not, one needs to be conducted to ensure all hazards have been identified. This thorough review will help you identify the right equipment to access the confined space properly. It also is essential to have proper training that will allow you to understand and identify the risks associated with this specific kind of work and then mitigate these risks and hazards effectively. Finally, before any work can begin, air quality should be tested to make sure the conditions are suitable for entry.

As you can see, there is a lot of planning and steps that must be conducted before accessing a confined space on your job site. This includes making sure that you have identified a primary point of contact and resource for issues pertaining to confined space entry. Often this may be the HSE management as well as the supervisor. Let’s explore some of the steps to take before accessing any confined space on your job site.

Confined Space Access | Hazard Assessment

Every single time a confined space is going to be accessed, you need to review the risk assessment for that space and validate that there aren’t new risks or hazards because of the work being done or events happening around the space. This reassessment ensures the workers entering the space will be protected properly based on these current conditions. The conditions often change and, therefore, this assessment should be constantly updated. This may include a variety of issues, such as unsafe levels of gas requiring respiratory protection, the presence of flammable substances, loud noises requiring hearing protection, and control of all energy sources (lock-out/tag-out).

This part of planning should also include a pre-work (or pre-access) briefing. During this part of the preparation, all the work, the time it will take, and emergency protocols that may be needed should be reviewed so everyone is on the same page.

Confined Space Access | Air Monitoring

Prior to any confined space entry, you are required to carry out air testing when it is known (e.g. from information on a previous hazard assessment or chemicals used in a previous activity in the space) that the atmosphere in the confined space might be contaminated or to any extent unsafe to breathe. Gas detection instruments should be checked to make sure they are working properly per product user instructions.

Most confined space air monitoring is accomplished using a four-gas analyzer. This checks the atmosphere for oxygen concentration and to determine the presence of various hazardous fumes, gases, vapors and particulates. Based on your hazard assessment, there may be a need for gas-specific monitors to determine lower-level concentrations that may be present.

Confined Space Access | Equipment Needed for Access

Without the proper equipment and training, safety and efficiency may be compromised and rescuing someone may be delayed if a problem does arise. 

Think about it this way: confined space access, hercules slr, securing, lifting and rigging

 

 

 

 

 

The key people involved in entries into confined spaces are the entrant, attendant, supervisor and rescue teams. All these participants require thorough training on the right equipment to minimize the risk of injury. Rescue plans that outline each step regarding how to work in the space and how to react if a problem occurs must be in place and be well-known by all parties in order to minimize the time required in case the need to rescue, remove or retrieve is needed.

Now think about it this way – this is how you can be prepared if you think it through:

confined space access, hercules securing, lifting and rigging

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The various types of confined spaces may all have different access points, involving vertical or horizontal entry and these will require different access equipment. Examples include a tripod, davit, pole hoist, side entry system, winch, and SRL retrieval. Having the right equipment in good working order and proper training on how to use these solutions for entrants can help prevent risk and in some instances, prevent the need for anyone else to enter if a rescue does become necessary.

The equipment used for access can be your initial rescue equipment. However, for certain entries, rescue teams may want specialized equipment, which should be available nearby during access work and be in good working order. Inspecting this equipment and making sure the rescue team is trained on rescue procedures and how to use this equipment is vital. They also should be trained in resuscitation procedures in the case that becomes necessary. Reviewing a rescue plan before anyone accesses the space should also be a part of your plan.

Confined Space Access | Additional Tips for Accessing a Confined Space

Besides conducting a thorough hazard assessment, air monitoring and making sure the right equipment is being used correctly, here are some additional steps you should keep in mind when conducting confined space work:

  • All entrants for permit and non-permit work, as a best practice, should wear a full body harness. The harness should be designed for the intended use in the space.
  • Authorized entrants who enter a permit space must wear a chest or full body harness with a retrieval line attached to the center of their backs near shoulder level or above their heads connected to a fixed point outside the permit space. The best practice is that the other end of the retrieval line is attached to a mechanical advantage device.
  • Permit spaces greater than five feet deep require a pre-rigged retrieval system with mechanical advantage. It is very important that users be trained on the use of the retrieval system. However, always consider a mechanical advantage regardless of the depth of the confined space.
  • All individuals have the authority to stop work for any confined space entry where they observe that the requirements of the safety program that the job site has put in place are not being followed correctly. This includes the attendant, entrant and supervisor.
  • The confined space attendant who will be present outside the space the whole time while workers access and work inside should be able to maintain some sort of communication with the workers inside the space. Because the people inside the space may not be visible, other means of communication (such as an electronic voice communication system) should be considered.

Once the work is completed, everyone should review what worked well, inspect all the equipment used to see what needs repairs or should be replaced. You should also update the risk assessment with your findings for future workers who may need to access the space.

There is a lot to consider when accessing confined spaces. If you’re not sure where to start, call your local Hercules SLR and book your fall protection demo now. We’ll show you the 3M fall protection equipment we’re loving right now for confined space access, how to use it and the right equipment for you. 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE VIA 3M HERE


BOOK YOUR FALL PROTECTION DEMO NOW

SHOW & TELL ISN’T JUST FOR KIDS—HERCULES SLR WILL SHOW YOU HOW 3M EQUIPMENT  WORKS AND KEPPS YOU SAFE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

 

Don’t Believe Us—Just Watch: Book your 3M Fall Protection Demo

3m fall protection equipment from hercules slr

NEW! 3M Fall Protection Demo Bag 

Hercules SLR knows the value of fall prevention—That’s why we’ve put together kits with some of our favourite 3M fall protection gear to show you the difference it makes. 

3M FALL PROTECTION | WHY IS FALL PREVENTION IMPORTANT? 

In Canada, every year over 14,000 workers are injured due to falls and over 27,000 workers are injured due to dropped objects like hammers, cell phones and work-radios—These are just the recorded incidents. 

Fall protection for all kinds of workers should include the right kind of PPE for the kind of work you do, but prevention plans, rescue & retrieval plans and tool fall protection equipment, plans and risk assessment measures. 

3M FALL PROTECTION FOR TOOLS | STOP THE DROP

It can be easy to underestimate the impact of slips and falls—It can be even easier to underestimate the impact of dropped tools and equipment, so it’s important to take preventative steps to eliminate the risk of injury. 

Often, tools fall from heights due to poor risk assessment & planning, human error, poorly stored tools and fixtures & fittings on-site that have failed. Since tools are often dropped by accident, focus should be on preventing these incidents from happening at all.

Tool fall protection normally focuses on secondary protective measures, like safety nets and toe boards, but it’s rare that tool fall protection plans employ a primary system to prevent drops. These precautions are often taken after an accident or injury occurs. 

WHAT KIND OF DAMAGE DOES A DROPPED TOOL DO? 

There are two main kinds of incidents when tools fall—These are direct impact and deflection. Direct impact injuries happen when the dropped object hits you directly on the head, and deflection happens when the tool bounces off another surface and strikes you. 

Let’s imagine a scenario—You’re working at heights, 200-feet (or 6-metres) above ground on scaffolding. You stop to check something, when your foot nudges the tape measure and it slides out and falls to the ground. 200-feet below. Even though the tape measure only weighs about 1.5lbs, it hits with a force of 3,750lbs. To put that in perspective, a hippo’s average weight is 3,300-4000lbs. 

This happened to a worker in New Jersey, who was delivering sheet metal to a work site when he was killed by a falling tape measure. Falling objects pose risk to the worker who drops it too, since the knee-jerk reaction is often to reach out and try to catch it which could cause you to slip and fall. 

Fall protection protects you from falls, while tool fall protection is designed to save others. We’ve covered comfortable fall protection equipment on the blog before and that it’s important to remember a safety harness isn’t a one-size fits all solution. Tool fall protection is the same.

Many workers find tool fall protection distractive and obtrusive—This is why it’s important to select a drop prevention system that’s comfortable and reasonable for workers to use. 

WHAT SHOULD MY PLAN INCLUDE? 

Your fall prevention plan should consider and plan to account for: 

  • Tool size & fit
  • Tool form & function
  • Attachment points for each tool (great starting point for tool protection) 
  • Drop-tests with attachment points, before used on the worksite 

3M FALL PROTECTION DEMO BAG | WHAT’S INSIDE?

3M fall protection, protecta vest-style harness at hercules securing, lifting and rigging

3m protecta rebel SRL

 
3m fall protection shock-absorbing lanyard
The 3M Twin-Leg Shock-Absorbing Lanyard has double-leg loops for 100% tie-off with convenient snap-hook and flat, steel rebar hooks at leg ends to keep you balanced in case you fall. 
3m fall protection dbi-sala harness
The 3M DBI-SALA® Vest-Style Harness has back D-ring and tongue-buckle leg straps, quick-connect and pass-through buckles with detachable shoulder padding that give ultimate comfort. It has an industrial-strength magnet that secures your items, even when tipped upside down.
 

3M SAFE BUCKET

3m fall protection demo safe bucket

The 3M safe bucket is your best friend for preventing dropped tools. 

The 3M Safe Bucket (100lb Load Rated Drawstring Canvas) includes: 

  • Adjustable Radio Holster (1500089)
  • Hard Hat Tether (1500178) 
  • Tool Lanyard, Coil Ether, 5lb. (2.3kg) capacity—Single-leg with self-locking carabiner with hooks at both ends. (1500063)
  • Python Canvas pouch (1500119) 

3M FALL PROTECTION DEMO BAG | BOOK YOUR DEMO NOW 

What’s a Fall Protection Demo, you ask? Book a fall protection demo with your local Hercules SLR branch and a representative will: 

  • Share the features & benefits of the 3M Fall Protection Demo Bag Products 
  • Show you how to use the tool fall protection attachment points 
  • Discuss your unique PPE needs based on your employees and type of work 

BOOK YOUR FALL PROTECTION DEMO NOW

SHOW & TELL ISN’T JUST FOR KIDS—HERCULES SLR WILL SHOW YOU HOW 3M EQUIPMENT  WORKS AND KEEP YOU SAFE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK LINKEDIN TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Confined Space Rescue & Retrieval: Guest Blog from 3M

3m confined space rescue from hercules slr

Incidents that prevent workers from self-rescue can occur in confined spaces due to ill-conceived attempts to rescue and retrieve others, but planning for a rescue can help prevent tragic results.  

Proper rescue and retrieval plans aren’t often created for confined spaces – over 100 deaths occur annually inside confined spaces in the United States according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics1. In almost all of these incidents, investigations reveal no rescue plans were in place. Before entry or work begins, OSHA requires you have a defined and documented rescue and retrieval plan that’s specific to your confined space – whether a tunnel, storage tank, manhole, elevator shaft, reaction vessel, ductwork or even wastewater treatment facility.

But a detailed rescue and retrieval plan is only one critical step of preparation (one of the four elements 3M talks about here). Rescue and retrieval needs to be performed by a competent person, who’s completed proper training. They must also understand how to select, wear and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and other tools or equipment that will be needed.

HAVE A RESCUE PLAN IN PLACE BEFORE ANY ENTRY OCCURS

There are many aspects of a robust rescue plan, but at minimum the rescue plan should include:

  • The location of the confined space and the job being conducted inside;
  • Identify the rescuer, competent person to be on hand, emergency contact and methods to keep in contact with those in the confined space and anyone involved if a rescue becomes necessary;
  • Layout all pre-work tasks;
  • Catalog all the rescue equipment available for use and where they can be located – include a checklist for thorough inspection that evaluates if it’s in good working order;
  • List all the critical rescue factors, include any hazards present;
  • Record the response procedure, include how to:
    • notify the emergency contact
    • make a medical assessment of the person stuck inside
    • if possible, how to have the trapped employee perform a self-rescue, or other crucial steps if that’s not possible.

You can model your emergency response plan after the NFPA 350 best practice guide. Determine appropriate means for rescue before the start of any confined space entry activities. The procedures set up at your work or job site for emergency rescue for each specific confined space should to be suitable and sufficient.

The detailed rescue plan should be documented, reviewed and in place before anyone attempts to enter or begins work in a confined space. The rescue plan for each confined space should be reviewed by all involved in the entry each time the space is going to be entered, just like a hazard assessment should be conducted before entry into a confined space. These plans should be practiced as part of training so everyone knows what to do if a rescue/retrieval situation does arise.

No plan in place to enter a confined space? You should speak up, and not enter the confined space without a plan in place for how to react if a rescue and retrieval becomes necessary.

MAKE SURE YOU’RE PROPERLY TRAINED TO RESCUE

Before any access is granted to a confined space, you should evaluate the needs of a rescue team and what training is required for the team (or individual) to perform a rescue operation. Tailor training to specific roles required – you should include:

  • Confined space competent person who is responsible for the evaluation of confined spaces on the job site
  • Confined space supervisor who approves the work inside that’s being done
  • Confined space attendant and entrant for those who are responsible for the work inside
  • Confined space entry rescuer who may have to enter and assist in a rescue/retrieval

All confined space rescuers, per the requirements of OSHA general industry and construction regulations are required to receive annual refresher training. This must include utilizing similar spaces and techniques anticipated at the job site.

You’ll find, rescue training covers a wide range of information related to hazardous conditions and all types of rescue equipment. Rescuers will also require training to prepare for tasks involved with accessing confined spaces, such as descent control, secondary systems, patient packaging methods, dismantling techniques, proper storage of equipment, selection, and use of suitable anchors, as well as the common hazards that pertain to the system and components.

For rescues requiring entry:

  • All members of the team must be specially trained in confined space rescue work
  • The team must have at least one member certified in CPR and first aid
  • All members of the team must be trained in the techniques and equipment for specific confined spaces
  • The members who are going to assist with the rescue should be well-versed in the rescue plan for that confined space and review both the risk and hazard assessments that have been conducted for that specific space

According to current U.S. regulations and industry standards, an identified rescuer, whether in-house or an outside rescue service is used, must have the ability to respond to a permit space rescue request in a timely manner, considering the hazards identified.

TYPES OF RETRIEVAL AND RESCUE

There are different types of rescue/retrievals that can be conducted, depending on the situation you and your team are facing.

SELF-RESCUE

Self-rescue is exactly what it sounds like. This is when you can rescue yourself with your own means and you can use equipment that is suited for self-rescue that will allow you to climb out of the space safely. Self-rescue requires the entrant to stop what they are doing and safely exit the space as quickly as possible.

Self-rescue should be implemented whenever an entrant or attendant determines there is a problem within the space. This may include a potentially hazardous change in atmospheric conditions within the space or when signs or symptoms of an exposure are noted. Self-rescue may also occur if the entrant realizes that PPE is faulty, communication with the attendant is severed, or some other hazard presents itself that may put the entrant in danger.

NON-ENTRY RESCUE

If self-rescue is not an option, the next consideration should be if a non-entry rescue can be carried out. Non-entry rescue occurs when a worker outside the space does not have to enter to help a worker exit a confined space safely. This type of rescue often requires an attendant or non-entry rescue team. A non-entry retrieval option is required at all times unless the retrieval equipment would increase the risk to the worker or not contribute to the rescue.

The person or people helping the worker out of the confined space will often require the use of a retrieval system comprised of the following components:

  1. Anchor systems such as a davit, pole hoist or tripod
  2. Body harness, worn by the entrant
  3. Connection devices such as a winch or retrieval SRL

This type of rescue is only effective in simple vertical or horizontal spaces. The opening must be able to accommodate the anchor system, and the surface around the opening must support the weight of it in addition to the attached entrant. If the entrant is injured or cannot perform a self-rescue, the attendant can remove the entrant using the retrieval system. This is where a retrieval system with a mechanical advantage becomes very helpful.

If neither self-rescue or non-entry rescue is possible, an entry rescue will be required. If you have a properly trained rescue and retrieval team, they will need to be called upon to help perform getting the entrants out.

ENTRY RESCUE

An entry rescue is required when someone cannot get out on their own and requires not just a team on the outside to assist, but someone who will enter the space to assist any entrants who cannot exit the space on their own. These teams can be comprised of company personnel, including externally hired services or a local emergency response team. Because there needs to be a prompt response in these situations, OSHA specifically addresses the requirements of the entrant’s employer to fully evaluate the capabilities of these rescue teams.

POST-RESCUE REVIEW

Once a rescue is complete, it is important to review how the rescue went and what can be learned from the experience. Do changes need to be made to the rescue plan if the confined space is going to be accessed in the future? Does your PPE need to be checked and should any of it be decommissioned and different or should new PPE ordered?

PPE AND OTHER EQUIPMENT

As part of a rescue plan and the hazard assessment conducted for each confined space entry, make sure you have identified what PPE and other equipment, such as air monitoring/gas detection instruments, are needed. Also, be sure everything is available in stock on the premises, the location is known, the equipment is clean and is in good working order before commencing any access work.

When it comes to considering the equipment for a rescue start with understanding the ABC’s of confined space:

  • Anchorage systems such as davits, pole hoists, tripods

  • Body support, which means full body harnesses, and in some cases, boatswain (bosun) chairs

  • Connecting devices such as self-retracting lifelines and retrievals

  • Detection for air monitoring of gases, vapors, particulates, fumes and other hazardous substances

  • Education courses that help teach proper techniques

  • Full body coverage for employees who should be protected from head to toe based on hazards identified in the risk assessment, including hard hats, safety glasses, hearing protection, advanced communication devices, respiratory protection, clothing that protects the body against chemicals, fires and other hazards such as coveralls, as well as gloves and safety shoes that protect the hands and feet

ARE YOU READY IF A RESCUE OR RETRIEVAL BECOMES NECESSARY?

Proactively identifying a proper rescue plan, seeking out appropriate training and identifying the right equipment long before any rescue is ever attempted is crucial. You must be prepared so if you’re faced with saving someone who’s stuck, has collapsed, or has ceased to respond from inside a confined space, you are ready for the situation.

3M knows there’s a lot to consider when it comes to planning for, working in and rescuing someone from inside a confined space. Explore resources available at 3m.com/confinedspace. 


ORIGINAL ARTICLE REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION VIA 3Mconfined space rescue 3m from hercules slr

Incidents that prevent workers from self-rescue can occur in confined spaces due to ill-conceived attempts to rescue and retrieve others, but planning for a rescue can help prevent tragic results.                              

Proper rescue and retrieval plans aren’t often created for confined spaces – over 100 deaths occur annually inside confined spaces in the United States according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics1. In almost all of these incidents, investigations reveal no rescue plans were in place. Before entry or work begins, OSHA requires you have a defined and documented rescue and retrieval plan that’s specific to your confined space – whether a tunnel, storage tank, manhole, elevator shaft, reaction vessel, ductwork or even wastewater treatment facility.

But a detailed rescue and retrieval plan is only one critical step of preparation (one of the four elements 3M talks about here). Rescue and retrieval needs to be performed by a competent person, who’s completed proper training. They must also understand how to select, wear and use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and other tools or equipment that will be needed.

HAVE A RESCUE PLAN IN PLACE BEFORE ANY ENTRY OCCURS

There are many aspects of a robust rescue plan, but at minimum the rescue plan should include:

  • The location of the confined space and the job being conducted inside;             
  • Identify the rescuer, competent person to be on hand, emergency contact and methods to keep in contact with those in the confined space and anyone involved if a rescue becomes necessary;
  • Layout all pre-work tasks;
  • Catalog all the rescue equipment available for use and where they can be located – include a checklist for thorough inspection that evaluates if it’s in good working order;
  • List all the critical rescue factors, include any hazards present;
  • Record the response procedure, include how to:
    • notify the emergency contact
    • make a medical assessment of the person stuck inside
    • if possible, how to have the trapped employee perform a self-rescue, or other crucial steps if that’s not possible.                          

You can model your emergency response plan after the NFPA 350 best practice guide. Determine appropriate means for rescue before the start of any confined space entry activities. The procedures set up at your work or job site for emergency rescue for each specific confined space should to be suitable and sufficient.

The detailed rescue plan should be documented, reviewed and in place before anyone attempts to enter or begins work in a confined space. The rescue plan for each confined space should be reviewed by all involved in the entry each time the space is going to be entered, just like a hazard assessment should be conducted before entry into a confined space. These plans should be practiced as part of training so everyone knows what to do if a rescue/retrieval situation does arise.

No plan in place to enter a confined space? You should speak up, and not enter the confined space without a plan in place for how to react if a rescue and retrieval becomes necessary.

MAKE SURE YOU’RE PROPERLY TRAINED TO RESCUE

Before any access is granted to a confined space, you should evaluate the needs of a rescue team and what training is required for the team (or individual) to perform a rescue operation. Tailor training to specific roles required – you should include:

  • Confined space competent person who is responsible for the evaluation of confined spaces on the job site
  • Confined space supervisor who approves the work inside that’s being done
  • Confined space attendant and entrant for those who are responsible for the work inside
  • Confined space entry rescuer who may have to enter and assist in a rescue/retrieval

All confined space rescuers, per the requirements of OSHA general industry and construction regulations are required to receive annual refresher training. This must include utilizing similar spaces and techniques anticipated at the job site.

You’ll find, rescue training covers a wide range of information related to hazardous conditions and all types of rescue equipment. Rescuers will also require training to prepare for tasks involved with accessing confined spaces, such as descent control, secondary systems, patient packaging methods, dismantling techniques, proper storage of equipment, selection, and use of suitable anchors, as well as the common hazards that pertain to the system and components.

For rescues requiring entry:

  • All members of the team must be specially trained in confined space rescue work
  • The team must have at least one member certified in CPR and first aid
  • All members of the team must be trained in the techniques and equipment for specific confined spaces
  • The members who are going to assist with the rescue should be well-versed in the rescue plan for that confined space and review both the risk and hazard assessments that have been conducted for that specific space

According to current U.S. regulations and industry standards, an identified rescuer, whether in-house or an outside rescue service is used, must have the ability to respond to a permit space rescue request in a timely manner, considering the hazards identified.

confined space rescue by 3m
3M’s Protecta Confined Space System

TYPES OF RETRIEVAL AND RESCUE

There are different types of rescue/retrievals that can be conducted, depending on the situation you and your team are facing.

SELF-RESCUE

Self-rescue is exactly what it sounds like. This is when you can rescue yourself with your own means and you can use equipment that is suited for self-rescue that will allow you to climb out of the space safely. Self-rescue requires the entrant to stop what they are doing and safely exit the space as quickly as possible.

Self-rescue should be implemented whenever an entrant or attendant determines there is a problem within the space. This may include a potentially hazardous change in atmospheric conditions within the space or when signs or symptoms of an exposure are noted. Self-rescue may also occur if the entrant realizes that PPE is faulty, communication with the attendant is severed, or some other hazard presents itself that may put the entrant in danger.

NON-ENTRY RESCUE

If self-rescue is not an option, the next consideration should be if a non-entry rescue can be carried out. Non-entry rescue occurs when a worker outside the space does not have to enter to help a worker exit a confined space safely. This type of rescue often requires an attendant or non-entry rescue team. A non-entry retrieval option is required at all times unless the retrieval equipment would increase the risk to the worker or not contribute to the rescue.

The person or people helping the worker out of the confined space will often require the use of a retrieval system comprised of the following components:

  1. Anchor systems such as a davit, pole hoist or tripod
  2. Body harness, worn by the entrant
  3. Connection devices such as a winch or retrieval SRL

This type of rescue is only effective in simple vertical or horizontal spaces. The opening must be able to accommodate the anchor system, and the surface around the opening must support the weight of it in addition to the attached entrant. If the entrant is injured or cannot perform a self-rescue, the attendant can remove the entrant using the retrieval system. This is where a retrieval system with a mechanical advantage becomes very helpful.

If neither self-rescue or non-entry rescue is possible, an entry rescue will be required. If you have a properly trained rescue and retrieval team, they will need to be called upon to help perform getting the entrants out.

ENTRY RESCUE

An entry rescue is required when someone cannot get out on their own and requires not just a team on the outside to assist, but someone who will enter the space to assist any entrants who cannot exit the space on their own. These teams can be comprised of company personnel, including externally hired services or a local emergency response team. Because there needs to be a prompt response in these situations, OSHA specifically addresses the requirements of the entrant’s employer to fully evaluate the capabilities of these rescue teams.

POST-RESCUE REVIEW

Once a rescue is complete, it is important to review how the rescue went and what can be learned from the experience. Do changes need to be made to the rescue plan if the confined space is going to be accessed in the future? Does your PPE need to be checked and should any of it be decommissioned and different or should new PPE ordered?

PPE AND OTHER EQUIPMENT

As part of a rescue plan and the hazard assessment conducted for each confined space entry, make sure you have identified what PPE and other equipment, such as air monitoring/gas detection instruments, are needed. Also, be sure everything is available in stock on the premises, the location is known, the equipment is clean and is in good working order before commencing any access work.

When it comes to considering the equipment for a rescue start with understanding the ABC’s of confined space:

  • Anchorage systems such as davits, pole hoists, tripods

  • Body support, which means full body harnesses, and in some cases, boatswain (bosun) chairs

  • Connecting devices such as self-retracting lifelines and retrievals

  • Detection for air monitoring of gases, vapors, particulates, fumes and other hazardous substances

  • Education courses that help teach proper techniques

  • Full body coverage for employees who should be protected from head to toe based on hazards identified in the risk assessment, including hard hats, safety glasses, hearing protection, advanced communication devices, respiratory protection, clothing that protects the body against chemicals, fires and other hazards such as coveralls, as well as gloves and safety shoes that protect the hands and feet

ARE YOU READY IF A RESCUE OR RETRIEVAL BECOMES NECESSARY?

Proactively identifying a proper rescue plan, seeking out appropriate training and identifying the right equipment long before any rescue is ever attempted is crucial. You must be prepared so if you’re faced with saving someone who’s stuck, has collapsed, or has ceased to respond from inside a confined space, you are ready for the situation.

3M knows there’s a lot to consider when it comes to planning for, working in and rescuing someone from inside a confined space. Explore resources available at 3m.com/confinedspace. 


ORIGINAL ARTICLE REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION VIA 3Mconfined space rescue 3m from hercules slr

To browse Hercules SLR’s selection of 3M Fall Protection for confined spaces and more, click here

 


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.


  1. https://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0015.pdf

 


FOLLOW US

: facebook   : linkedin    : twitter  : instagram


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.


  1. https://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0015.pdf

NEW at Hercules: 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5lb Tool Retractor

Reduce Tangles

Keep your tools safe with the latest addition to the 3M™ DBI-SALA ® product line, their 5-lb Tool Retractor.

The 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb. (2.3 kg) Tool Retractor holds up to 5lbs (or 2.3kg) in weight, with a working range of 26.04-127 cm. It features a lightweight, compact housing with a high-strength Dyneema® retractor line. It also has a single leg with self-locking aluminum carabiner hooks at both ends.

hercules-slr-3m-dbi-sala-5lb-tool-protector
3M DBI-Sala 5lb Tool Retractor

This design helps minimize tool tangling, as well as minimizing job site tripping hazards and entanglements, while reducing weight on workers’ belts and harnesses.

3M DBI-Sala Tool Retractor Features
  • Retractable design minimizes tangling and tripping hazards

    Line stays comfortably taut while reaching and retracts when not in use, or it can be locked at desired length.

  • Secure tools up to 5 lbs. (2.3 kg)

    Strong Dyneema® retracting line is the same material used in a variety of personal Fall Protection products.

  • 10.25 in. to 50 in. working range (26.04 cm to 127cm)

    Working length of retractor line helps extend a worker’s reach, and when not in use stays out of the way.

  • Self-locking aluminum carabiners

    Both ends of device feature self-locking aluminum carabiners to help prevent accidental disconnection or carabiner rollout.

  • Lightweight and compact design

    Device adds less than a half a pound (165 g) to worker’s gear load at just 0.36 lbs.

  • Swiveling top housing connection

    Swivel rotates with worker’s motion to reduce line twisting.

  • Optional harness adaptor available (model 1500161)

    Add an attachment point for the retractable tool lanyard to your harness webbing.

Specifications
Capacity 5 lb. (2.3 kg)
Brand DBI-SALA®
Velocity Ship No
iSafe Equipped No
Length (stretched) 50 in. (127 cm)
Length (relaxed) 10.25 in. (26 cm)
Model 1500156
Physical Dimensions 10.00×2.75×1.12 (in)
Physical Weight 0.36 lbs (0.2kg)
Product Styles Tool Lanyard
Product Types Tool Lanyards/Tethers
Standards Capital Safety Gen. Mfg. Req.

 

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Hercules’ Tips: Is your Safety Harness Comfortable?

comfortable-safety-harness

A safety harness is a necessary evil for many workers, working across many different industrial trades. We understand—nobody likes to be uncomfortable during their work day.

However, proper equipment, like safety harnesses are key to getting the job one, reducing costs, injuries, and most importantly—getting home safely. Although necessary, heavy equipment can leave you sore, tired and less productive by the day’s end.

Lighter harnesses have been produced to reduce discomfort and give more mobility, however this hasn’t solved issues like injuries from fatigue, strain or repetitious movement. Workers must still carry heavy equipment, typically for 10+ hours a day—issues improper safety harnesses can exacerbate.

Check out this infographic to find out the real cost of injuries, wearing improper equipment (or wearing it improperly) and some of the biggest complaints surrounding safety harnesses. It also includes how to choose a safety harness that provides support and comfort, so you can remain productive and safe during your work day.

Find all your safety harness needs at Hercules SLR—including custom-fitted harnesses, fall protection training and more.

Are you Wearing a Comfortable Safety Harness?

safety-harness-fall-protection-ppe

Original article here: http://www.capitalsafety.com/caadmin/Pages/Rethinking-Productivity-and-Safety.aspx

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Quality Alert: Seat Sling for 3M Exofit ™ Harnesses

3m-dbi-sala-safety-harness-fall-protection-fall-arrest

The following affects select ExoFit ™ harnesses manufactured from June 2017 to the end of May 2018. 

3M Fall Protection has received reports that the aluminum reinforcement plate used in the seat sling on certain DBI-SALA ExoFit ™, ExoFit XP™ (inc. Arc Flash), and ExoFit NEX™ (inc. Arc Flash) harnesses can become dislodged from the webbing.

In a few instances, the aluminum seat plate has separated from the harness and fallen to the ground, creating a potential dropped object hazard. There have been no reports of injuries or accidents associated with this condition. The performance of the harnesses is unaffected by this issue—they will perform properly in all respects, including as body support for a personal fall arrest system in the event of a fall, even without the added comfort offered by the seat sling.

3M is offering a free warranty replacement of the seat sling for all DBI-SALA ExoFit™, ExoFit XP™ (inc. ArcFlash), and ExoFit NEX™ (inc. ArcFlash) harnesses with a seat sling, with a manufacture date of 17/06 (2017, June) through the end of 18/05 (2018, May) regardless of model number.

3m-exofit-harness-fall-protection
What to look for on your 3m ExoFit harness.

End-Users: Please inspect your harness, if you find a harness within the affected range with a seat sling, contact 3M Customer Service at 1-800-387-7484 (ext. 5908) or email us for your free replacement seat sling at 3MCAFPServiceAction@mmm.com. Please provide us with the model number and manufacture date when contacting us. After you receive your replacement seat sling, please remove your original sling from service and dispose of it.

Distributors: Upon receipt of this notice, please contact our Customer Service department at 800-3877484 (ext. 5908) or email at 3MCAFPServiceAction@mmm.com to obtain a listing of harnesses with seat slings that were sold to you with the affected lot numbers. If you have any of the affected parts in stock, you should return them to 3M Fall Protection for replacements. Please forward this Alert to any of your customers who have purchased affected products from you and provide any assistance requested by your customers to complete the process.

3M remains committed to providing quality products and services to our customers. We apologize for any inconvenience that this situation may cause you. We appreciate your continued support of 3M Fall Protection products and service.

Original News Release hereSeat Sling Service Action Notice_EN

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Cannabis: Beyond the Cultivating and Harvesting

marijuana-worker-header

Keeping you safe during cannabis manufacturing, growing and processing operations

With the legalization of cannabis manufacturing, growing and processing operations by the Canadian government, licensed operators and workers in cannabis manufacturing operations will need to obey relevant health and safety laws to protect themselves from exposure hazards that could cause immediate and long-term health effects. Do you know how to keep yourself safe from the occupational risks in cannabis-growing operations? 3M do.

3M primary_logo

That’s why they’ve spent decades supplying information that you need to spot potential risks while improving respiratory protection products that help keep you out of harm’s way.

Here’s an overview of what workers need to know to reduce their exposure and minimize immediate and long-term health effects associated with the growing, harvesting and manufacturing of cannabis.

What is cannabis?

Cannabis is a greenish-grey mixture of the dried flowers of the cannabis sativa plant. The main psychoactive chemical in cannabis is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is responsible for its intoxicating effects. This chemical is found in the resin produced by the leaves and buds of the cannabis plant. The plant also contains more than 500 other chemicals, including over 100 compounds that are chemically related to THC called cannabinoids.

Cannabis can be inhaled by smoking hand-rolled cigarettes called joints, in pipes or water pipes called bongs, or in blunts (cannabis rolled in cigar wraps). It can also be ingested through brewed tea or mixed into foods called edibles, such as brownies, cookies or candies.

Cannabis

How could it affect me?

The Canadian federal government introduced a suite of legislation on April 13, 2017, that, establishes a “strict legal framework” for the production, sale, distribution and possession of cannabis. Provinces, territories and municipalities will be able to tailor rules for their own jurisdictions and set their permits or licenses for growing, distributing and retail sales of cannabis. This legislation came into effect in October 2018.

This means that workers who take part in cannabis growing, harvesting and manufacturing could be exposed to numerous health and safety risks and would now be covered by the applicable occupational health and safety regulations.

When am I at risk?

Workers who take part in the growing, harvesting and manufacturing of cannabis have the potential to be exposed to the following

Health risks:

  • Mould exposures in indoor growing and harvesting operations
  • Drug exposure to THC while handling plant buds, which can occur through through inhalation, eye or dermal contact
  • Exposures to pesticides and fertilizers
  • Excessive carbon dioxide (CO₂) exposure in greenhouses with optimized growing environments, i.e., CO₂ is being added to the environment to promote plant growth
  • Accidental carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) exposure from CO₂ producing devices, i.e., in order to raise CO₂ concentrations some companies may direct products of incomplete combustion, which can include CO₂, into the plant grow areas
  • Excessive ultraviolet (UV) exposuret from grow lamps
  • Heat stress in outdoor growing operations

Other safety risks in cannabis-growing operations can include electrical shock and/or cuts, pinches and sprains suffered during harvesting or processing operations.

What can I do to protect myself?

Proper respiratory protection should be used during normal growing and harvesting operations to reduce potentially harmful exposure to mould, pesticides and other chemicals. Respiratory protection selection and use should be based on results of air monitoring, in compliance with the assigned protection factors (APFs) outlined in the CSA Z94.4 standard or other published selection document that the province follows (such as NIOSH & USA OSHA). Based on the employer’s exposure assessment, an N-95 or P-100 disposable respirator, or half-face piece or full-face piece respirator with a combination organic vapour cartridge/P100 filter, may provide appropriate protection.

Maintain proper ventilation
This will help avoid overexposure to gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxides as air purifying respirators will not provide protection against these three gases. Overexposure to these gases remains an acute concern if CO₂ producing devices are not monitored or maintained properly in the manufacturing operation.

Protect eyes from contact with THC, pesticides and other chemicals
Employers should consider the need for protective eyewear, protective eyewear with a face shield, or a full-facepiece respirator. If workers are not required to wear a full-facepiece respirator for pesticide spraying, we suggest indirect venting goggles (e.g. 3M™ Goggle Gear, 500-Series with Clear Scotchgard™ Anti-fog Lens).

Prevent skin contact with THC during cutting and harvesting operations
This will help reduce the risk of dermal exposure to THC, pesticides and fertilizers. Protective coveralls, lab coats, aprons, footwear, and especially gloves should be considered during cutting and harvesting operations, and during the application of pesticides or fertilizing chemicals. In outdoor operations, the potential for increased risk of heat stress should be considered when selecting worker
protective clothing.

References
1. Washington State Department of Labor & Industry. Cannabis Industry Safety & Health (Cannabis). Retrieved on October 19, 2017 from http://www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Topics/Industries/Marijuana/

2. Martyny, John; Van Dyke, Mike; Schaeffer, Josh; Serrano, Kate Health Effects Associated with Indoor Cannabis Grow Operations. Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO.

3. Koch, Thomas; Chamber, Carol-Lynn; Bucherl, Stacy; Martyny, John; Cotner, John; and Thomas, Stan. Colorado Environmental Health Association Conference, Steamboat Springs, CO., Hashing Out the Issues: IAQ and Health and Safety in the Cannabis Industry, September 26, 2014.

4. Clandestine Indoor Cannabis Grow Operations – Recognition, Assessment, and Remediation Guidance, AIHA. January 1, 2010.

5. 3M Personal Safety Division. Technical Data Bulletin #249: Legal Cannabis Growing Operations. September, 2016. Retrieved from multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/…/tdb-249-legal-Cannabis-growing-operations-pdf

6. Sun Media, Toronto Sun. What to expect from the Liberals’ Cannabis bill. April 13, 2017.

Read the original article here

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection for Tools

Fall-Protection-for-Tools

Taking gravity out of the equation with an expanded lineup of  3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection for Tools

With over 27,000 recorded incidents of people being struck by falling objects each year in Canada, dropped objects prevention planning helps prevent personal injury, equipment damage and tool loss.

Because we continually develop new products to increase worker health and safety, 3M has leveraged its technology to design ergonomic products that help prevent tools from being dropped by at-height workers including four brand new Fall Protection for Tools products.

Explore the New Fall Protection for Tools Lineup

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA Quick Wrap Tape II

Convenience and safety come together with the 3M™ DBI-SALA Quick Wrap Tape II. Compared to previous generations of our Quick Wrap Tape, this re-engineered tape has a longer shelf life, requires fewer wraps to secure tools (6 wraps vs. a previous 10 wraps for tools up to 2 lbs) and uses proprietary 3M material and adhesive to help resist tears even better than before.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb Tool Retractor

The 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb. Retractable Tool Lanyard features a lightweight, compact housing and a strong Dyneema® Retracting Line. This design helps reduce tangling—minimizing worksite tripping hazards and entanglements—while reducing weight on workers’ belts and harnesses.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Harness Adapter

Our new harness adapter is designed to be used with the new 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb. Retractable Tool Lanyard and can be used on selected products that feature a black and gold carabiner, including the Hook2Hook Coil Tether product lineup.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Hook2Hook Coil Tether with Swivel

Our patented Hook2Hook Coil Tether features a swivel hook, making tools like screwdrivers and wrenches easier to use. Suitable for use from holsters, belts, harnesses and tool pouches alike, the Hook2Hook Coil Tether is a versatile solution that is both resistant to heat and to sharp objects.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Large 35’ Tape Measure Sleeve

Creating a secure attachment point for use at height, Tape Measure Sleeves are now available in two sizes: Medium (for most tape measures up to 7.62 m / 25 ft) and Large (for most tape measures up to 10.6 m / 35 ft). Featuring an integrated D-ring, the 3M™ DBI-SALA® Tape Measure Sleeve can be tethered in a variety of ways to help protect it from accidental drops.

Find out more about these products here
Order your 3M™ DBI-SALA® products from Hercules SLR, if we don’t have it in stock we can get it for you.

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

3M™ DBI-SALA® Smart Lock Self-Retracting Lifelines

smart lock

Magnetic intelligence. Smarter retraction, smoother reaction.
3M™ DBI-SALA® Smart Lock Self-Retracting Lifelines

Unlock your productivity. From reducing unintentional lockups,*  to simplifying inspections, every detail of the new 3M™ DBI-SALA® Smart Lock Self-Retracting Lifelines is designed to help increase your productivity and convenience.

Feature-packed SRLs for horizontal or vertical applications (Horizonal) Leading Edge features below:

Swiveling anchorage & carabiner included
Magnetic retraction control
The lifeline rewinds at an evenly controlled pace, helping reduce the possibility for harm to people or equipment (compared to solutions with gear-based retraction).

Patent-pending dual label system

An extra label stored in the bumper on the
smart lock 2lifeline allows users to easily access critical
asset information and keeps it protected from
damage to help reduce cost of ownership.

Ergonomic handle

Designed for easy transport and support
during overhead installation.
420 lb (190 kg) weight capacity
1,350 lb (612 kg) Maximum
Arresting Force (MAF)
Highly visible orange
energy-absorber cover
Identifies product as meeting leading edge
standards and allows you to more easily confirm
that workers are tied off (horizontal models).

3M Smart lock pic_Page_2

3M’s Science of Safety at work.

How did we create an SRL that reduces unintentional lockups? Using advanced motion capture technology, 3M studied the way users work, move and interact with SRLs on a typical job site. This data helped us engineer an arrest mechanism designed to better accommodate your natural work motions—resulting in fewer unintentional lockups.*

For ordering information or more details on this or any other fall Protection product call us today at: 1-877-461-4876.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.