Crane Equipment: Chains, Cranes & Automobiles?!

crane equipment, hercules slr, rigging services

Cranes have been used since the first century – in that time, they were powered by humans or animals to lift heavy loads. Cranes have adapted and come a long way since – they now use an assortment of crane equipment and hardware to lift, lower and even sometimes move horizontally.

Read on to learn more about the modern variety of crane equipment available and Hercules SLR’s tips for using it.

CRANE EQUIPMENT: an overview

For rigging with cranes, different types of lifting equipment (also known as tackle) are used. These include:

  • Wire Rope Slings
  • Synthetic Slings
  • Shackles
  • Snatch Blocks
  • Hooks
  • Chain Hoists
  • Chain Pullers
  • Eye Bolts
  • Tirfors
  • Jacks
  • Lifting Beam
  • Spreader Beams
  • Beam Clamps
  • Plate Clamps

CRANE EQUIPMENT: wire rope slings

Pay special attention to wire rope slings as they are susceptible to servere wear, abrasion, impact loading, crushing, kinking and overloading – small changes in the slings’ angle affect the safe working load of the sling. Care should be taken around rough edges and wire rope slings – even an edge you might not consider ‘sharp’ can make considerable damage to your wire rope sling, making it unsafe and ineffective. Use sleeves, wear pads or corner protectors to protect your wire rope sling from damage.

Be sure to not drop a load or run a load over the sling – this will crush the sling. Also, don’t stop and start suddenly while you lift and lower with a wire rope sling, as this increases the slings’ stresses and increases possible failures.

WIRE ROPE SLING SPLICES

crane-equipment-hercules-slr-rigging

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIRE ROPE SLING IDENTIFICATION 

There are three ways to identify wire rope slings: the SWL, I.D. number and certificate number.

  1. Hard-stamped on ferrule
  2. A tag which has a wire running through the tag and eye of the sling
  3. Large metal washer where the wire of the sling is passed through when you make the eye of a sling

WIRE ROPE CONFIGURATIONS

There are three main wire rope sling configurations:

  1. Double-Choker Hitch
  2. Pair of Double Wrap Chokers
  3. Single Choker Hitch

Round slings’ are versatile – they’re strong, yet delicate to the load to lift. They’re light, flexible in many directions and malleable which is especially helpful when lifting an awkward or delicate load.

crane-equipment-hercules-slr
Synthetic Round Sling Label

CRANE EQUIPMENT: synthetic round slings 

Round slings’ are not easily damaged by sunlight, humidity, grease, dirt or seawater. Round slings’ are identified by the colour of the label, and also have the SWL on it.

CRANE EQUIPMENT: web slings 

Web slings are suited for particularly those that can be easily damaged. They’re easy to damage if you use them improperly – your web sling shouldn’t touch a sharp edge, heat or chemicals that will cause damage.


CRANE EQUIPMENT: hardware

SHACKLES

For crane lifting, two different shackles are typically used – bow and d-shackles. When using synthetic slings with a crane, two types of shackles are available, wide sling shackle and a round sling shackle. Web sling shackles are wider and bow out in the middle, and round sling shackles are narrow and sometimes have small valleys in the shackle bow, which supports the synthetic strands better.

These prevent the sling from bunching and pinching, which can be an issue with bow or d-shackles – it also reduces the SWL capacity of the sling.

To use shackles for crane lifting safely, follow these tips:

  • Don’t replace the shackle pin with a bolt – only the proper fitted pin should be used. Bolts aren’t meant to take the bend that a pin can handle.
  • Pins must be straight and all-screw pins must be completely seated
  • Cotter pins should be used with all round pin shackles
  • Shackles worn at the crown or pin by over 10% of original diameter should be removed from service and destroyed.
  • Don’t pull your shackle at an angle with a sling or hoist rope – this reduces the shackle’s capacity by 50%. Spacers can be used to centralize the load on the pins with spacers.
  • Don’t use screw pin shackles if the load can roll under load and unscrew

SHEAVE BLOCKS

A sheave block is a single, or multi-sheave block which opens on one side – this opening allows a rope to be pulled over the sheave and eliminates the need to be threaded through the block. When crane lifting with wire rope, sheave blocks can be purchased with configurations for hook, shackle, eye and swivel fittings.

  • Sheave blocks are normally used when it’s necessary to change the direction of pull on the line. When this happens, the stress on the sheave block is significantly greater than the angle between the lead and load lines. 
    crane equipment, rigging services, hercules slr, Crane Equipment: cranes, chains & automobiles
    Pulley with a sheave on a mobile lifting crane, with 25-ton lifting capability
  • When the lines are parallel, 1000lbs on the lead line results in double the weight on the block—2000lbs on block, hook and whatever the connection points are attached to. As the angle between lines increases, the stress on the block and hook is reduced.

HOOKS

Many different hooks are available for lifting and rigging operations – check with manufacturer instructions and warnings before using in a crane application.

When using hooks to lift with a crane, follow these tips:

  • Ensure hoisting hooks are fitted with safety latches (except grab and sorting hooks)
  • Inspect hooks often, looking for wear in the hook’s saddle – check for cracks, corrosion and if the hook’s body is twisted.
  • Inspect the shackle’s throat opening – if the hook’s been overloaded or is weak, the throat will open. If this is the case, remove from service and destroy so no one else attempts to use it.
  • Inspect for cracks in the hook’s saddle and neck
  • Be sure the hook is stamped with its SWL
  • Note that the SWL applies when the load is in the saddle of the hook, as this reduces the SWL.

TURNBUCKLES 

Turnbuckles are sometimes called rigging screws and can be supplied with eye end, jaw end, stub end fittings and/or a combination of these.

  • Use turnbuckles fabricated from alloy steel with weldless construction.
  • If turnbuckles have end fittings, ensure hooks are fit with safety latches.

CHAIN HOISTS / CHAIN BLOCKS 

Chain hoists are often used with cranes to move larger equipment and machinery. Chain hoists vary in size and length, and require little effort to execute a lift.

Chain hoists are durable, but can be damaged easily. To prevent damage, check:

  • The SWL is right for the application/load
  • The chain hoist has been inspected or certified by a third party
  • The hoist’s body is free of cracks or broken castings
  • The hook isn’t deformed and is fit with a safety latch
  • Anchor pins are in place correctly, and are the right type
  • Chain is in good working condition
  • SWL is clearly marked on the chain hoist block

A lever hoist is similar to a chain hoist, but operates slightly different with a lever to lift and lower the load – it can also be used to pull loads.

EYE BOLTS 

When lifting with a crane and eye bolts, ensure eye and ring bolts are made of alloy steel and have shoulders or collars.

Do not load eye bolts at an angle – angular loading reduces the weight of the load they can safely support.

TIRFOR

A tirfor is a mechanical device, equipped with a level handle to operate. They’re used to pull and add tension, and can also be used to lift if they have blocks.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Pleins feux sur le produit | Liens d’accouplement Hammerlock – Comment assembler

Pleins feux sur le produit : Liens d’accouplement Hammerlock

Qu’est-ce qu’un maillon d’accouplement Hammerlock?

Les maillons d’accouplement Hammerlock sont utilisés pour attacher la chaîne aux maillons maîtres, les crochets à oeillet, l’installation d’un nouveau
à une élingue ou simplement à des composants de connexion pendant la fabrication de l’élingue en chaîne.

Les maillons d’accouplement Hammerlock ne doivent JAMAIS être utilisés pour réparer la chaîne du palan – Aucun matériel d’accouplement ne doit jamais être utilisé pour réparer un maillon endommagé de la chaîne. Cela peut présenter un certain nombre de risques pour la sécurité de l’opérateur et, éventuellement, pour l’ensemble du palan. En cas d’endommagement de la chaîne du palan ou de la marchandise, la chaîne doit être remplacée en une seule pièce.

Les marteaux ne conviennent pas non plus à l’allongement des chaînes. Encore une fois, si vous désirez une chaîne plus longue, vous devez chercher une chaîne qui est fabriquée à la bonne longueur, en utilisant les bons maillons.

Montage et démontage des biellettes d’accouplement Hammerlock

Les maillons d’accouplement Hammerlock sont un favori des gréeurs parce qu’ils peuvent si facilement être assemblés et désassemblés sur le terrain en utilisant seulement un marteau et un poinçon.

Comment assembler un maillon hammerlock:

  1. Rassemblez les deux moitiés du corps de façon à ce que les connecteurs centraux soient alignés.
  2. Positionner la douille au centre du marteau, alignée avec les connecteurs.
  3. Insérer la goupille de charge dans le marteau aussi loin que possible à la main.
  4. Enfoncez la goupille de charge jusqu’à ce que tout le matériau soit au ras des deux extrémités.

Saviez-vous que la douille au centre est l’une des pièces les plus importantes d’un maillon d’accouplement à marteau ? Sans la douille, la goupille de charge ne maintiendra pas du tout l’accouplement hammerlock en place – elle se déplace tout à fait librement à l’intérieur du corps tout seule. La goupille de charge est conique aux extrémités, ce qui permet à la douille de s’asseoir en place et de maintenir la quincaillerie solidement en place. La douille contient un système en forme de ressort qui permet à la goupille de passer à travers lorsqu’elle est martelée, mais revient à un état immobile une fois en place – à moins qu’elle ne soit directement martelée à nouveau avec un poinçon!

Comment démonter un maillon hammerlock :

  1. Placer le maillon hammerlock sur une surface surélevée, créant ainsi de l’espace pour que la goupille de charge puisse sortir par le bas.
  2. Aligner un poinçon avec le centre-top de la goupille de charge.
  3. Marteler le poinçon en forçant la goupille de charge hors du centre du marteau.
  4. Tirez maintenant les pièces détachées à la main – C’est aussi simple que ça !

Vous avez besoin d’un maillon d’accouplement hammerlock abordable et fiable ?

C’est là qu’intervient YOKE – Avec YOKE, vous n’avez jamais à sacrifier la qualité pour le prix. Trouvez les maillons de connexion YOKE Hammerlock pour chaîne Grade-100 à votre Hercules SLR local. Les maillons de jonction YOKE Hammerlock sont fabriqués en acier allié et sont trempés et trempés pour une résistance, une fiabilité et une durabilité maximales avec une limite de charge nominale de 8800 livres.

Depuis 1985, YOKE fabrique du matériel de gréement durable, fiable et de haute qualité qui assure la sécurité de votre chargement et de votre équipe. Elle possède des installations de production rigoureuses qui mettent l’accent sur le contrôle de la qualité et la sécurité à chaque étape du processus de fabrication – des matières premières au produit fini pour l’utilisateur final, avec des installations partout dans le monde, au Canada, à Los Angeles et en Chine. Pour en savoir plus sur YOKE chez Hercules SLR, cliquez ici.

BESOIN D’UN DEVIS ? SOYEZ INSPECTÉ. SOYEZ EN SÉCURITÉ. VOUS AVEZ UNE QUESTION ? APPELEZ-NOUS – NOUS CONNAISSONS LES CÂBLES (EN FIL DE FER) ET TOUT CE QUI CONCERNE LE GRÉEMENT.      

Blog des Invités du CM | La Règle des Vingt Ans

CM SUR LA RÈGLE DES VINGT ANS

CM sait qu’il peut être facile de tomber dans le piège de la « règle des vingt ans », mais de quoi s’agit-il ? Lisez les conseils de Columbus McKinnon (CM) pour savoir pourquoi certaines règles sont faites pour être enfreintes.

Ses experts en gréement discutent de la sécurité, des inspections et de l’importance de maintenir votre formation à jour, quelle que soit la durée de votre formation.

Lors de notre formation sur la sécurité des ponts élévateurs, nous recevons toujours un commentaire sur les effets de cette formation,

« Nous le faisons de cette façon depuis plus de vingt ans. Nous n’avons jamais eu d’accident. Et maintenant, vous me dites que c’est mal ? »

Ce n’est pas parce que vous avez soulevé d’une certaine manière pendant les vingt dernières années et que vous n’avez jamais eu d’accident que vous avez eu de la chance. Lors de la formation à la sécurité, nous mettons l’accent sur toutes les normes et réglementations de sécurité applicables. Elles ont toutes un but.

Lors de la formation à la sécurité, nous mettons l’accent sur toutes les normes et réglementations de sécurité applicables. Elles ont toutes un but.

Les normes de sécurité ANSI/ASME B30 pour le levage aérien ont commencé en 1916 sous la forme d’un code de sécurité de huit pages – aujourd’hui âgé de 94 ans. Bien que l’ASME soit l’American Society of Mechanical Engineers, de nombreux organismes et équipements canadiens utilisés ici respectent leurs normes, ce qui mérite d’être souligné.

Au Canada, la norme CSA B167.08 a été créée en 1964, il y a 46 ans.

Enfin, n’oublions pas l’OSHA, qui a commencé en 1970, ce qui lui fait 40 ans, et qui applique deux réglementations fédérales pour le levage aérien :  CFR 1910.179 pour les grues et 1910.184 pour les élingues. Entre toutes ces organisations et les normes de sécurité, il y a un total de 355 ans d’expérience. 355 ans, c’est mieux que vos 20 ans, à chaque fois.

Ces organisations n’ont pas été mises en place pour vous rendre la vie misérable ! Vous ne pouvez pas prendre de raccourcis comme vous l’avez fait ces vingt dernières années. Ces organisations regroupent des personnes qui s’occupent de toutes les facettes du levage aérien, y compris les gréeurs et le personnel de production et de construction qui effectuent des levages aériens dans le cadre de leur travail. Ils veulent que vous soyez en sécurité dans vos habitudes et votre environnement de travail afin que vous puissiez rentrer chez vous à la fin de votre quart ou de votre journée de travail pour rejoindre votre famille.

Cet article de blog a été écrit par Larry Lynn, ancien formateur en produits pour Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

CM | COMBIEN SUFFIT-IL POUR L’INSPECTION ANNUELLE ?

Nous savons donc que les normes de formation, de test et d’inspection existent pour une raison, et il est important de maintenir vos connaissances en matière de formation et d’inspection à jour – CM en explique davantage. 

On a demandé à CM : « Comment effectuer l’entretien préventif annuel selon le manuel, à moins d’ouvrir la boîte de vitesses et d’inspecter les pièces internes ? Cette question est centrée sur la tâche d’inspection annuelle des « pièces porteuses ». 

Tom, un instructeur technique spécialisé dans les palans et les ponts roulants pour la Columbus McKinnon Corporation, explique :

Nous rencontrons fréquemment cette question dans les cours de formation à l’inspection et à la maintenance.

La norme ASME B30.16 définit les pièces porteuses de charge / de suspension de charge comme suit : « les pièces porteuses de charge du palan sont les moyens de suspension (crochet ou patte), la structure ou le boîtier qui supporte le tambour ou le pignon de charge, le tambour ou le pignon de charge, le câble ou la chaîne de charge, les poulies ou les pignons, et le bloc de charge ou le crochet ».

Les freins, la charge et le maintien, les engrenages, les moteurs, etc. sont des pièces mécaniques. Ils font partie de la chaîne cinématique.

La norme ASME B30.16-2.1.3(b) stipule que « les couvercles et autres éléments normalement fournis pour permettre l’inspection des composants doivent être ouverts ou retirés ».

L’ASME indique que les éléments d’inspection requis doivent être précédés de la mention « Evidence Of ».

Il existe plusieurs moyens indirects de vérifier et de détecter (trouver des « preuves de ») une usure excessive ou un fonctionnement anormal des pièces internes. Si l’huile de boîte de vitesses n’est pas dégradée, s’il n’y a pas de particules métalliques fixées au bouchon de vidange, si le palan monte et descend correctement (avec et sans charge) et s’il n’y a pas de bruits étranges ou anormaux provenant de la boîte de vitesses, il est peu probable que des problèmes graves existent. Si cette inspection suscite des soupçons, se référer à la norme ASME B30.16-2.1.3(c) « Une personne désignée doit déterminer si les conditions constatées lors de l’inspection constituent un danger et si un démontage est nécessaire ».


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CONTACTEZ NOUS OU CLIQUEZ CI-DESSOUS POUR EN SAVOIR PLUS SUR LES PALANS ET ÉQUIPEMENTS DE LEVAGE DE COLUMBUS MCKINNON À HERCULES SLR :  

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


Hercules SLR fait partie du groupe d’entreprises Hercules, avec des sites et des entreprises uniques d’un océan à l’autre. Nous fournissons des services d’arrimage, de levage et de gréement pour des secteurs au Canada et à l’étranger. Hercules SLR est au service des secteurs de l’énergie, du pétrole et du gaz, de la fabrication, de la construction, de l’aérospatiale, des infrastructures, des services publics, de l’exploitation minière et de la marine.

Le groupe de sociétés Hercules est composé de : Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial et Wire Rope Atlantic.

Nous avons la capacité de fournir toute solution de levage dont votre entreprise ou votre projet aura besoin. Appelez-nous dès aujourd’hui pour plus d’informations. 1-877-461-4876 ou envoyez un courriel à info@herculesslr.com 

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Tips for Taglines | Training Tuesday

riggers using taglines to control and secure a load

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES

Taglines — What are they, what are they used for and why do we rig with them? We’ll tell you — Welcome to the new series from Hercules SLR, called Training Tuesday. 

In this series, every Tuesday, we’ll bring you a new topic about rigging, hoisting, fall protection, heavy machinery, workplace safety and more.

We’ll cover why the issue is important, advice for safe-use, application pointers so you get the most from your gear and training tips for employers and employees. 

This week, our Training Tuesday topic will be Taglines—In this blog, we’ll cover:

  • What’s a tagline?
  • When to use a tagline? And how to do it safely 
  • What not to do when using a tagline to lift 
  • Tagline standards, rules and regulations 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHAT ARE TAGLINES? 

So, what’s a tagline? A tagline is a line (often constructed of synthetic materials, otherwise known as a ‘soft line’) that attaches to a load and provides control while minimizing movement of the object during lifting operations. Simply put, taglines are used to prevent line rotation when lifting with cranes. 

Using taglines may add potential hazards to personnel involved in the lifting operation. These hazards should be assessed before the lifting operation begins. So, when is it appropriate to use a tagline to help secure a load? There are a couple of conditions: 

  • The crane’s load will swing back and forth (etc. a load on an especially windy day) 
  • The load’s rotation will create hazards 
  • A load needs to be positioned or connected in a particular way when it lands 

Read on for more tips to use taglines safely, what you should never do when securing a load with taglines and more tips for best-use. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | SAFETY TIPS FOR TAGLINES

When rigging with taglines, make sure:
  • Tagline is free of knots 
  • Taglines should have sealed ends so they don’t fray
  • One rigger should be assigned to each tagline and be able to safely position themselves away from the load 
  • To secure long loads with taglines, attach them to the very ends 
  • Taglines should be long enough that the assigned rigger can be in a safe location for the duration of the lift
  • Taglines must be held so the rigger can easily release the line if the load swings—This is important since it prevents the rigger from being thrown off-balance and into a more dangerous position
  • Wear the proper protective gloves when you handle taglines 
  • You know the working-load limit of the tagline 
  • Taglines are fit according to your company’s procedures/regulations 
  • Taglines are attached at a spot where they can be easily removed 
  • The load rotation can be controlled with taglines (if it’s rotating/swiveling uncontrollably).
When rigging with a tagline, do not: 
  • Use taglines if they’ll create any sort of safety hazard
  • Use taglines to control a lift during inclement/adverse weather conditions 
  • Go near or beneath, or let another rigger go beneath a load to retrieve a tagline 
  • Detach the tagline from the load until the crane operator and banksman position the load in its final location, with no load on the lifting gear  
  • Loop the tagline around your wrist, or any other part of the body
  • Use taglines for routine back-loading of supply vessels
  • Temporarily or permanently attach, loop, twist or tie a tagline to adjacent structures or equipment in an attempt to control the load
  • Use a tagline if there’s not enough clearance-room for the rigger to move from any spots where the load could fall 
  • Operating the tagline will cause a handler to be near a pinch point (A pinch point is any area where personnel risks having their extremities caught by a machine or equipment)
  • Allow taglines to fall into rotors 
  • When ever possible, attach your hook to a load block to prevent twisting of the hoist line. 

« More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function. »

« More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function. In everyday operations, workers handle, transport and store materials. They may do so by hand, manually-operated materials handling equipment, or by power-operated equipment, » says the U.S. Department of Labour/OSHA Training Institute. 

This is why it’s important to eliminate risk whenever possible and ensure taglines provide more help than hazard to a lift—Remember when not to rig with taglines.

taglines rigging a load

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES & OSHA STANDARDS 

In Canada, each province has their own specific Occupational Health & Safety Laws, which are usually broken down into:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Acts 
  • Occupational Health & Safety Regulations/Codes 
  • Standards 
  • Industry Association Code of Practice 

Be sure to check with regulations and standards in your province for further details on how to use taglines. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHEN TO USE TAGLINES

It’s important to note that taglines only work in tension. The handler should be able to hold the tagline at waist or shoulder-level—When the tagline must be held higher than this, it’s less effective it is at controlling the load. 

Sometimes, if the rope’s not long-enough, the handler’s instinct will be to pull the rope down, and end up pulling down on the load. This makes the tagline non-effective, and creates a more likely scenario that the load will fall on the handler. 

Yes, we discuss how taglines can create pinch points, however they can also help prevent them in some cases. Sometimes a load can twist around the crane that’s lifting it, and cause the load to bounce off nearby equipment or other parts of the crane—this can create pinch points, so taglines can be an effective way to control this.

TRAINING TUESDAY | CONCLUSION 

Taglines provide extra security for positioning and landing difficult loads, particular in inclement weather—However, rigger’s should exercise caution before using taglines extraneously.

Using taglines when unnecessary can sometimes create more hazards on-site, like producing pinch points or obstacles that could injure workers—This is why a rigging plan is especially important before conducting any lift , to ensure taglines are the right securing equipment for the application at-hand.

Taglines should be used to control block rotation, secure the load’s landing or when inclement weather will cause the load to swing uncontrollably—But don’t use them if they create more hazardous conditions for the handlers, rigger’s and any other personnel on-site. Remember, preventing injury is the priority of any lift—Safety should always be #1. 


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Engineer (by Default) Emily Warren Roebling

Brooklyn bridge engineer

Emily Warren Roebling (September 23, 1843 – February 28, 1903) is known for her contribution to the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge after her husband Washington Roebling developed caisson disease (also known as decompression disease). Her husband was a civil engineer and the chief engineer during the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge. 

Emily Roebling

Emily, Engineer by Default: Early life

Emily was born in Cold Spring, New York on September, 23 1843 and was the second of 12 young children. She was interested in pursuing education, which her older brother Gouverneur K. Warren encouraged at the time.

During the Civil War in 1864, Emily visited her brother who head-quartered and commanded the Fifth Army Corps (also known as the V Corps). During the visit, she attended a soldier’s ball and met Washington Roebling, the son of John A. Roebling, a civil engineer that served on Gouverneur Warren’s staff—and would go on to design the Brooklyn Bridge. Emily and Washington hit it off, and Emily and Washington married on January 18, 1865 in Cold Spring.

John Roebling began his initial work on the Brooklyn Bridge, and newlyweds Emily and Washington headed to Europe to study caissons for the bridge. The couples first and only child was born on November 1867 in Germany.

Emily, Engineer by Default: Brooklyn Bridge

As Emily and Washington returned from their studies in Europe, Washington’s father John died of tetanus after an accident at the bridge’s construction site. Following this, Washington took charge of the Brooklyn Bridge construction and became the project’s Chief Engineer. During this project, Washington developed decompression sickness—known at the time as ‘caisson disease’, which made him so ill he became bed-ridden.

Emily was the only person that visited her husband during his illness. Since she was the only one to have contact with him, Emily was responsible to communicate with Washington and his assistants about the progress on the bridge project.

As a result, Emily learned a huge amount of the Brooklyn Bride project including the strength of materials, stress analysis, cable construction and calculating catenary curves (which Washington taught Emily in lessons). Unfortunately, her husband was ill—but fortunately, Emily was already interested in the bridge project, and this gave her a chance to flex her expertise and knowledge of everything she gained after her husband had been appointed to Chief Engineer. For 10 years after Washington was inflicted with decompression, Emily became dedicated to seeing the Brooklyn Bridge construction to its end. She took over most of the Chief Engineer’s duties, which included day-to-day supervision of the project and project management. Emily, with Washington’s help from his sick-bed, continued to plan and work on the bridge’s construction.

In 1882, Washington’s ‘Chief Engineer’ title was going to be stripped because of his sickness – even with his and Emily’s dedication to the project and it’s progress during his illness. To keep his job title, Emily went to great lengths for Washington and gathered engineers and politicians to defend her husband’s work. The Roebling’s were relieved – politicians agreed, and Washington remained Chief Engineer of the Brooklyn Bridge’s construction.

The Brooklyn Bridge’s construction was complete in 1883. Who was the first to cross the Brooklyn Bridge? Emily Roebling, in a carriage, carrying a rooster to signify her victory. Abram Stevens Hewitt honoured Emily with a speech at the Brooklyn Bridge’s official opening ceremony, who said the bridge was,

…an everlasting monument to the sacrificing devotion of a woman and of her capacity for that higher education from which she has been too long disbarred.

Emily, Engineer by Default: Later life

When her work on the Brooklyn Bridge was complete, the Roebling family moved to Trenton, New Jersey where Emily devoted her time to many different women’s causes. These included positions and work with the Committee on Statistics of the New Jersey Board of Lady Managers for the World’s Colombian Exposition, Committee of Sorosis, Daughters of the American Revolution, George Washington Memorial Association and Evelyn College; Emily was also a member of social organizations, like the Relief Society during the Spanish-American War. Emily’s work and recognition didn’t stop there – in 1896 she was presented to Queen Victoria and was in Russia for Tsar Nicholas II’s coronation. Emily didn’t stop learning, either and received her law certificate from New York University. 

Emily, Engineer by Default: Final Years 

In addition to her contributions to the Brooklyn Bridge, Emily Roebling’s known for an influential essay she wrote called ‘A Wife’s Disabilities’, which was well-received and earned her wide acclaim and awards. The essay argued for increased rights for women and spoke out against prejudiced practices towards women.

Emily enjoyed the company of her family, an active social life and was an avid and eager learner until her death on February 28, 1903.


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A BRIEF HISTORY OF ELEVATOR WIRE ROPE

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Columbus McKinnon Guest Blog: CM Experts Talk Load Securement

load securement columbus mckinnon at hercules slr

Columbus McKinnon (CM) creates popular, durable hoisting equipment for rigging like the Bandit, and Loadstar—Today, we have a two part piece by two rigging experts from CM on the Hercules SLR talking load securement, and the benefit of ratchet binders versus lever binders. 

Read on and learn load securement tips from Henry Brozyna, Corporate Trainer for CM to tie-down loads safely and securely.

In many cases, the importance of tying down a load on or in a truck is underestimated. It’s interesting to talk to trucking people and find out that they are very in tune with what is expected of them with regards to the vehicle they drive and the maintenance of that vehicle. But when it comes to tie downs and load securement, they usually fall short.load securement columbus mckinnon hercules slr

Securing loads in and on trucks is very important – not just to the driver, but to their customer and most importantly the general public. 

LOAD SECURMENT | Good tie downs go a long way to ensure cargo being hauled on a truck stays on the truck.

A pre-use inspection of the tie downs must be done to ensure the working load limit (WLL) of that tie down is intact. All tie downs have markings to indicate what grade they are or they will be marked with a working load limit. The higher the grade, the stronger the product – as you typically see with chain. Grade 30 is the lowest grade and is not as strong as say, grade 70 or grade 80.

During a roadside inspection by law enforcement, they will look for these markings. If they cannot find any, they will automatically rate the tie down as grade 30, the lowest option. This de-rating may cause him/her to take you and your vehicle out of service due to lack of adequate tie downs. Therefore, it may be helpful to conduct a pre-use inspection, per the manufacturer’s specifications, to ensure the proper type and number of chain tie downs is used.

LOAD SECURMENT | Straps need attention too.

The condition of synthetic straps is one of the most overlooked load securement items. When straps are purchased, the manufacturer assigns a working load limit. That WLL is for straps that are intact and undamaged. This is where a pre-use inspection is needed. Straps that have damage in excess of the manufacturer’s specifications must be removed from service.

LOAD SECURMENT | Take time to check your load securement equipment.

All too often we are in a hurry to get from one place to another. This is usually when we take chances and cut corners. This is also the time that an accident is most likely to happen. It is important to take extra time to make sure the equipment you want to use is in good condition and meets the requirements for use as a load securement device. 

Read on for part two from Columbus McKinnon expert Troy Raines, Chain & Rigging Product Engineering Manager and learn more about using ratchet binders and lever binders for securing loads, and the benefits of each.

LOAD SECUREMENT | People frequently ask, « What type of chain binder should I use? » 

Being an engineer gives my outlook on life an odd slant. I frequently think of things in terms of simple machines and how they can make my life better. Where am I going with this and how do simple machines relate to chain binder selection? Let me explain. 

LOAD SECURMENT | What is a chain binder?

Also known as a load binder, chain binders are tools used to tighten chain when securing a load for transport. There are two basic styles of chain binders – lever binders and ratchet binders. The method of tightening the binder is what differentiates the two.

Lever Binders

load securement lever binder, columbus mckinnon at hercules slr
Lever Binder

A lever binder is made up of a simple machine, a lever, with a tension hook on each end. The lever is used to increase the force applied to a tie down. The lever is hinged and takes up the slack by pulling on one end of the tension hook and will lock itself after a 180-degree rotation of the lever around the hinge. Some of the advantages of choosing a lever-type binder include:

  • Easy installation
  • Fewer moving parts
  • Quick means to secure and release

Ratchet Binders

load securement, ratchet binder by columbus mckinnon at hercules slr
Ratchet Binder

A ratchet binder uses two types of simple machines and has two tension hooks on each end and handle. The handle again serves as a lever plus there is the screw thread. Having both simple machines can multiply the force manually applied to the tie down assembly.

When using a ratchet binder, the lever and screw work together and increase the force manually applied to the tie-down assembly. The result is that it takes much less pulling force on the handle to apply tension than you would need with a lever binder.

Ratchets also allow for slower, steadier loading and unloading of forces. This reduces any undue stress or strain on your body. Since ratchet binders are designed with a gear, handle, pawl and end fittings, they will not store up as much energy in the handle as a lever binder will.

Another advantage of ratchet binders is that take-up is safer. The take-up distance of a ratchet binder is typically eight to ten inches – twice that of a lever binder. While take up with a ratchet binder may take a few extra minutes, it is more controlled and ultimately a safer process.

LOAD SECURMENT | In Conclusion

Both lever binders and ratchet binders work in a similar fashion and should be chosen based on the preference of the operator. As with any type of load securement gear, safe practices need to be followed, including:

  • Always wear gloves to maintain a good grip on the binder handle.
  • Never use cheater bars on the handle in an attempt to increase the tie down tension. Cheater bars can put excessive force on the tie down. This force can be enough to damage or even break the tie down. This energy may be further increased by shifting loads. The stored energy resulting from this force could injure you or someone nearby.
  • Ensure that the lever binder is fully locked and make sure the load doesn’t shift after it is applied.
  • When releasing lever binders, stay clear of the handle to avoid any potential kickback.
  • Specifically on ratchet binders, don’t rush the ratcheting process. Slow and steady is the best way to tension.

ARTICLE REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION VIA COLUMBUS MCKINNON—FIND HERE & HERE


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

What should you do before you use a hoist?—Hercules How-To

what should you do before you use a hoist

HERCULES HOW-TO: WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? 

What should you do before you use a hoist? If you’re a rigger, or have worked in construction, you’ve likely used some sort of hoist before. Hoists are mechanical devices use to lift, pull and hoist, and are equipped with a pulley. They’ve also been around for awhile—historians haven’t been able to pinpoint exactly when the first hoist was used, but even Leonardo da Vinci had a hoist design.

Since then, hoist technology has come a long way – hoists are available in manual, electric, hydraulic and even universal styles. They’re used in a number of different industries. Today, we cover more about hoists used for securing, lifting and rigging applications and what exactly you should do before you use one. 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? HAZARDS 

We talk a lot about hazards, how to avoid them and prevent them on a job site. There are a number of hazards that present themselves at work – both chemical and physical. When rigging with hoists, there are a number of hazards there.

Some of the most common hazards are: 

  • Falling equipment, materials, etc. 
  • Electrical issues 
  • Loading hoist beyond it’s WLL or SLL, known as overloading 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? TRAINING

It’s important that anyone using the hoist, or operating rigging equipment in general, has proper training in hoist safety and operating procedures. Hoists are often used in rigging, and are commonly-known as a component for cranes. Hercules’ highly-skilled trainers teach a variety of courses that will prepare you to rig with hoists.

The Hercules Training Academy courses include: 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? TYPES OF INSPECTION

According to the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), there are thee main types of inspection that rigger’s (or any end-user of hoisting equipment) have to do. 

PREOPERATION INSPECTION

Before each shift, have a qualified person inspect hoisting equipment for:

  • Ensure mechanisms operate properly – check for unusual sounds, and make adjustments as needed 
  • Hoist limit device, for electric or air-powered hoists without a load on its hook: The load block should inch on limit device, or run at a slow speed when on multi-speed or variable-speed hoists. Using travel-limiting clutches as a limit device? Follow inspection methods detailed in the travel-limiting clutch’s manual. 
  • Hoist’s braking system
  • Check lines, valves and other parts of air system for leakage
  • Check hooks & latches; ensure hooks are in accordance with ASME B30.10
  • Check hoist rope for gross damage, and these features that could cause immediate hazards, including:
    • Rope distortion: kinking, crushing, unstranding, bird-caging, main strand displacement and/or core protrusion
    • General corrosion
    • Broken or cut strands 
    • Number, distribution and type of broken wires (if visible)
  • Check load chain for gross damage, and any of these conditions which can be hazardous for work. These are: 
    • Gouges, nicks, weld splatter, corrosion and/or distorted links. 
    • Test the hoist with the load in lifting and lowering directions, and watch the operation of the chain and sprockets. The chain should feed smoothly with the sprockets. 

FREQUENT INSPECTION

Frequent inspections should happen continually, during use and rest periods. During frequent inspections, a qualified person will determine if issues found are hazards and whether the hoist should be removed from service temporarily, inspected further and repaired, or removed from service permanently and replaced. 

During frequent inspections, inspect:

  • Operating mechanisms for proper orientation, adjustment and unusual sounds
  • Braking system
  • Lines, valve and other parts of air systems for leakage
  • Check hooks & latches; ensure hooks are in accordance with ASME B30.10
  • Hoist limit device, for electric or air-powered hoists without a load on its hook: The load block should inch on limit device, or run at a slow speed when on multi-speed or variable-speed hoists. Using travel-limiting clutches as a limit device? Follow inspection methods detailed in the travel-limiting clutch’s manual. 
  • Check hoist rope for gross damage, and these features that could cause immediate hazards, including:
    • Rope distortion: kinking, crushing, unstranding, bird-caging, main strand displacement and/or core protrusion
    • General corrosion
    • Broken/cut strands 
    • Number, distribution and the kind of visible broken wires 
  • Check load chain for gross damage, and any of these conditions which can be hazardous for work. These are:
    • Gouges, nicks, weld splatter, corrosion and distorted links 
    • Test the hoist with the load in lifting and lowering directions, and watch the operation of the chain and sprockets. The chain should feed smoothly with the sprockets. 
    • Check rope/load chain reeving and make sure it complies with the manufacturer recommendation. 

PERIOD INSPECTION 

Periodic inspections can be conducted wherever your hoist is set up, as they don’t require the rigger to disassemble the hoist. 

  • Open or remove covers and other items to inspect components. 
  • A qualified, competent person will determine if conditions found during inspection make a hazard, or whether disassembly is required.
  • Inspect the following for wear, corrosion, cracks and distortion:
    • Ensure fasteners aren’t loose, or on the verge of coming loose 
    • Load blocks
    • Suspension housings 
    • Hand chain wheels 
    • Chain attachments 
    • Clevises
    • Yokes 
    • Suspension bolts
    • Shafts
    • Gears
    • Bearings 
    • Pins
    • Rollers
    • Locking and clamping devices 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? WHEN DO I INSPECT?

We’ve covered the three types of hoist inspection required in Canada, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME). This is when you should conduct each type of inspection.

1. PREOPERATION INSPECTION

A visual inspection should be conducted before each shift. This inspection does not have to be recorded, but a designated, competent person should inspect the hoisting equipment.

2. FREQUENT INSPECTION

Frequent inspections, like pre-operatation inspection, are visual and don’t need to be recorded but should be done by a designated, competent person. Just how often are ‘frequent’ inspections, you ask? 

A) Normal Service—Yearly

B) Heavy Service—Semiannually

C) Severe Service—Quarterly 

3. PERIOD INSPECTION

Visual, period inspections should be conducted by a competent person who makes records of external coded marks on the hoist. This is acceptable identification in lieu of records. Periodic inspections should be done: 

A) Normal Service—Yearly

B) Heavy Service—Semiannually

C) Severe Service—Quarterly 

Since this article is about what to do before using a hoist, we’re going to focus on what your preoperation – or, preuse inspection should include. 

  • The pre-use inspection should be performed during each shift before the hoist is used. 
  • A competent, qualified person will determine whether conditions found during inspection could create a hazard and, if a more detailed inspection is required. 
  • Inspect the following:
    • Operating mechanisms for proper operation, proper adjustment and unusual sounds.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? HAND SIGNALS

what should you do before you use a hoist? hercules slr
Hoisting hand signals.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? KNOW THE ROPES  

Before operating a hoist, it’s important to conduct an inspection before-hand. The inspection should consist of: 

Rope Type: Ensure you select the proper type of wire rope. The wire rope you select will depend on the hoist type and the features of the load you will lift. 

Are you familiar with the concept of rope stability before using that hoist? Hoists often use wire rope, which can kink, twist or become crushed if the wrong type or the wrong application is used. 

Drum crushing is a type of rope deterioration that can happen with multiple layers of wire rope on a drum. Whoever inspects the wire rope must evaluate the potential for wire rope crushing. Inspections should detect points where crushing is more likely to happen, and the level of deterioration and appropriate course of action (ex. repair or replacement) can be made. 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? YOUR CHECKLIST

Before rigging or lifting with a hoist, know: 

 

  • The hoisting devices capacity
  • The WLL of: the rope, slings and hardware, and the rigging hardware’s weight

Here are some basic tips from CCOHS for inspecting your hoist: 

  • Pre-Lift: Make sure both hooks (upper and lower) swivel, replace worn chain or wire rope and tag it so it can be removed from service.
  • Post the SLL (safe load limit) in the hoist. 
  • Daily: Inspect hooks, rope, brakes and limit switches for wear and damage.
  • Ensure swivels move freely and there are no cracks or breaks in the hook. 
  • Conduct periodic inspections according to manufacturer rules or legislation. 

NEED A LIFT?  

Hercules SLR offers everything you need for your hoist, crane or lifting project. We offer equipment inspections, repairs, maintenance and hoists from reliable, respected and durablebrands like Crosby, CM and Bronze & Blue


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR HOISTS & SERVICES,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

CROSBY QUIZ: CAN YOU PASS THIS HOOK INSPECTION QUIZ?

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING IN HAZARDOUS AREAS

HERCULES SLR AT THE SABLE STRATEGIC WORKSHOP


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Crosby Guest Blog: Shackle Inspection & Care

crosby shackles

CROSBY SHACKLES 

Crosby shackles are a popular option for lifting applications. Time-tested and work proven, Crosby has made their mark in rigging—they’ve produced the first wire rope clip, quench and temper fittings (this makes performance more reliable) and were the first to fatigue-rate products. Their shackles are particularly popular – read on to learn more about Crosby shackles and how to use them safely, a handy interactive inspection checklist and more tips for best use. 

CROSBY SHACKLES: 3 MAIN SHACKLE TYPES

Round pin shackles can be used for lifting applications and others like tie down, towing or suspension applications when the load’s strictly applied in-line.

Screw pin shackles are used for pick and place applications. Pick and place applications are when a load is moved to its desired location, and the screw pin is tightened before each pick.

Bolt-type shackles can be used in any applications that round pin or screw pin shackles are used. They’re also great for long-term or permanent installations where the load may slide on the pin, which causes it to rotate. The other way to secure a shackle includes using a nut and cotter, which eliminates the need for you to tighten the pin before each lift or movement. 

CROSBY SHACKLES: USE THEM SAFELY  

Before you put your Crosby shackle in service, make sure your shackle’s in good condition. To do so, look for these conditions:

  • The shackle’s pin works freely and fits correctly. 
  • The pins are undamaged, have no considerable wear and fit properly from the opposite side of the shackle. 
  • The load line and jaw opening are aligned.
  • The pin is always seated and is ‘matched’ to the body.
  • The shackle is the right material, size and type for the proposed lift.
  • Shackles are stored in a dry, cool place. 

CROSBY SHACKLES: INSPECTION 

It’s important to inspect your rigging equipment frequently. Ideally, this happens before use, during (check for points of stress or tension during use) and after use. Inspection is important to prevent equipment failure, which can lead to damaging the load entirely, or worse—injure or kill workers’. 

Check your shackle before use. If any of these conditions are present, remove your shackle from service and have it inspected, repaired or replaced. 

  • The shackle’s jaws or pins are distorted.
  • The shackle isn’t stamped with is safe-working load (SWL).
  • The shackle is home-made (never use homemade shackles).
  • The shackle’s pin does not work freely, or fit correctly in the shackle’s opening. 
  • The pins’ threads are damaged, worn down or don’t easily screw in from the opposite side of the shackle. 
  • The unthreaded hole is enlarged – a hole too big places unnecessary strain on the loaded shackle. 
  • The shackle has wear that’s reduced its diameter by more than 8% of its original diameter. To test for cracks that may be hidden, tap them with a hammer. A shackle in good-condition should ‘ring’ clearly.
  • The shackle’s pin has been replaced, especially if it’s been replaced with anything but a pin. 

CROSBY SHACKLES: USE THEM SAFELY OR NOT AT ALL 

There are a few things to keep in mind when using shackles for securing and lifting applications. 

  • When you use shackles in conjunction with multi-leg slings, you must give consideration to the angle between the legs of the sling. 
  • As the angle increases, so does the load in the sling leg, and as a consequence, any shackle attached to the leg. 
  • Try to avoid erratic loading of the shackle – to do this, place a loose spacer on either end of the shackle’s pin, or use a shackle with a smaller jaw. 
  • If using a shackle to secure the top block of a rope block set, the load on the shackle is increased by the value of the hoisting effort. 
  • Take care to make sure the shackle and assembly above the hook is the right capacity. 
  • It’s important that on shackles fitted with a nut and bolt pin, the length of the bolt’s plain portion will cause the nut to jam on the inner end of the thread, and not on the shackle’s eye. This leaves the bolt free to rotate.
  • Be sure the bolt and nut are cross-drilled for the fitting of a split cotter pin. 

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CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

NEW: Hercules SLR ‘Specials’ Page

specials at hercules slr

NEW from Hercules SLR – amazing specials and an easy place to find them. 

We released our Winter flyer in December – but the deals don’t stop there. Hercules SLR has launched a new page called ‘Specials’, so you can find all of our steals and deals in one convenient place. 

BROWSE OUR SPECIALS

Hercules SLR aims to provide securing, rigging and lifting equipment and services for all your needs. Find everything you need to push, pull, move, hull or hoist almost anything safely & smoothly. We stock a vast range of products to suit most needs, our specials page includes products you don’t see too often – all great product, at great prices. 

Find Hercules SLR Specials page here, or find it on our menu under ‘Products’ → ‘Specials’. 

The products displayed on our web site are used as part of a system employed to accomplish a task. Therefore, we only recommend using these products to accomplish the desired task within the specified Working Load Limit (WLL). Products are subject to wear, misuse, overloading, corrosion, deformation, intentional alteration and other usage factors which may necessitate a reduction in the product’s Working Load Limit (WLL) rating, or is cause to remove the product from service. 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Modular Construction Trending: Innovative Workspaces

modular construction project hercules slr

WHAT’S MODULAR CONSTRUCTION?

Modular construction allows significant portions of work to be completed, off-site and usually inside in a modular workspace. It doesn’t describe the building itself, but the way it’s built. 

Many think of a mobile home or re-locatable building when they think of prefabricated or relocatable buildings, but modular construction has become more modern and sophisticated in recent years, which has led to more modular working spaces. Modular construction can be used to build either residential or commercial buildings, although commercial is the most common. 

A modular working approach to construction tends to focus on manufacturing—Read on for an example.  

EXAMPLE: A construction crew builds an office building. Instead of assembling the entire project on-site, individual parts are manufactured indoors. The crew would assemble individual wall panels indoors, and these will later be put up on-site. 

Other parts of the project could be assembled here, too—think washrooms, pre-built wall panels, ped-ways, stairs, and even the roof. 

These parts are assembled in the modular workspace, transported and put together on-site as the construction project progresses—these prefabricated parts are put together with lifting equipment like cranes or aerial lift trucks.  

modular construction capabilities by hercules slr
Modular constructed apartment.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS?

Since modular workplaces are a bit different than traditional construction sites, they can also reduce some of the risk or hazards found on typical construction sites. Safety can be enhanced by modular construction:

  • Less work at height—for example, on many modular projects a roof is lifted to the top with a crane. 
  • Reduce garbage and waste—working off-site can limit the amount of extra material thrown away, and can be recycled for future use. 
  • Community disruption—modular construction and workspaces bring work off-site, making the area more quiet! For example, let’s say you’re building an office on a University campus. Modular construction frees the campus from common construction disruptions (loud machinery, dust, barricades, etc.). 
  • Time—they say time is money, and modular construction can save time compared to working on-site. Prefabrication often takes about half the time and many pieces can be made at once, which lets contractors take on multiple projects, schedules can be planned more ‘tightly’ and projects are finished quickly.  
  • Remote Locations—Modular construction allows work to be taken off-site, which can be a great benefit for more isolated locations. Think—a house in Northern Alberta is mainly assembled indoors, so workers can do less work in frigid, outdoor temperatures. 

MODULAR PROJECTS

One notable modular construction project is the 57-storey skyscraper built in China by entrepreneur Zhang Yue, in just 19 days—yes, you read that right, a whole skyscraper assembled in 19 days altogether. Specifically, the first 20 storeys were assembled in seven days, but various regulations held the project up for a year before the last 37-storeys were built in 12 working days. The final skyscraper has offices that fit 4,000 people, 800 apartments and 19 atriums. 

Zhang has built a number of other buildings using the same method. A skyscraper built using traditional, on-site construction takes about 2-3 years compared to the days Zhang’s projects take to complete.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Overall, modular construction reduces uncomfortable environmental conditions for workers and clients, increases productivity and can reduce harm and injuries.

Traditional construction sites will always have a place in the industry, but it’s an exciting innovation that’s sure to shake things up. 


NEED EQUIPMENT INSPECTIONS, REPAIRS & MAINTENCE? CALL HERCULES SLR.

Equipment needs regular maintenance like relevant inspections, repairs and proper employee training to operate properly, prevent damage or injuries and work efficiently—consider Hercules SLR your one-stop-shop. We’ll inspect, test & repair your equipment, and fully certify it to comply with national and provincial safety regulations. 

We’ll keep your modular workplace running smoothly and efficiently, so you can complete projects and keep your customers and employees happy. 

Hercules SLR inspects, repairs and certifies:  

  • Lifting Magnets 
  • Hoists & Cranes 
  • Lifting & Rigging Equipment & Hardware (EX. shackles, slings, beam clamps, pallet lifters, etc.)
  • Fall Protection 

Workplace safety is important in any construction setting—We offer training for: 


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON RIGGING AND CONSTRUCTION,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TIPS: SECURE YOUR WORKSITE
10 CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY TRENDS 2018/19
7 MAJOR TRENDS THAT WILL IMPACT THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.