Women in Industry – Kim Reynolds Warehouse Associate

Kim

Kim Reynolds is our dedicated, hardworking shipper/receiver at our Dartmouth location. We sat down with her to find out more about her and how she decided a career in Shipping was her calling.

Tell us about yourself:

Kim: I was born in Windsor Nova Scotia but grew up in Centre Rawdon. I remember spending a lot of time visiting my grandparents who lived two houses up from us. It was lovely having family so close. We used to have a hobby farm with goats, chickens, pigs and ducks. We also were lucky enough to have two big gardens and a small strawberry patch. Back then money was tight, so we were self-sufficient and grew our own food and harvested our own milk from the goats.

When I turned 16 my parents sold the house and we moved to the Annapolis Valley. It was a shock to the system living in a town having been so used to country living.

I finished my final school years at Kingstec Community College, back then they had grade 10-12 mixed with the college. The year I graduated, was the last time they were mixed, and it reverted to being solely a Community College.

What was your work experience before Hercules?

My work experience is many and varied before joining Hercules. My parents were unable to assist with further education and not wanting to have a large student loan hanging over me I went to out to work full time and took evening and online courses.

I started working when I was 13 and that includes Babysitter, Farm Hand, House Cleaner, Bakery Assistant, Chicken Plant Worker, Infantry Woman and Shipper/Receiver.

What made you decided to work for Hercules?Kim-2

Kim: Having seen the job posting and knowing they were looking for a Warehouse Associate, I did some research on the company and decided it was a good fit, not only with my past work experience but with the company’s values and opportunities it offers for progression. The people are great and working at Hercules is like having an extended family.

Management are very supportive, especially during busy periods, if I need a hand, they roll their sleeves up and muck in, asking what they can do to help. This is the first job where I have ever experienced that happen. This really shows they care about their employees and is just one of the many reasons I enjoy working for Hercules. Everyone is part of the team, looking to play their part in the best way possible.

What challenges do you face on a daily basis?

Kim: Every day is different; in the warehouse we face many different challenges. Organization is key! With so many deliveries coming in, orders to be picked, making sure everything is shipped out on time and emails are answered, multitasking is a must.

Hercules is a safety company. How do you ensure you work safe?

Kim: Every morning I always ensure I wear my correct Personal Protection Equipment. I start the day by doing a forklift check to make sure it is safe to use. When I need to lift boxes that are too heavy I always ask for assistance.

What are your aspirations and goals within the company?

Kim: When I started with Hercules, I knew I wanted progress within the company. I really enjoy my current role but am looking to spread my wings and further my potential in other departments as and when the opportunity presents itself.

What are your passions outside of work?

Kim: When I am note at work you will find me cooking up a storm in the kitchen. I love to bake and enjoy the simple pleasures in life such as spending time with my family and making memories.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Risk Management: safety is every riggers’ business

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Risk Management: what is it?

Risk management is the systematic process of assessing risk and acting in such a manner, or implementing policies and procedures in order to avoid or minimize loss associated with such risk. Essentially, risk management is a set of actions that reduces the risk of a problem, a failure, or an accident. The ISO 31000 defines risk management as « the effect of uncertainty on objectives ».

For the most part, risk management methods consist of the following methods:

  • Identify and characterize threats
  • Assess the vulnerability of critical assets to specific threats
  • Determine the risk (i.e. the expected likelihood and consequences of specific types of attacks on specific assets)
  • Identify ways to reduce those risks
  • Prioritize risk reduction measures based on strategy

Risk Management: know the definitions

Hazard: something with the likelihood to cause harm

Harm: physical injury or damage to health.

Risk: likelihood the hazard is realized – it happens

Severity: likelihood hazard or risk will occur, and the number of people affected and extent of consequences

Control Measures: the arrangements made to reduce risk

Risk Matrix

The purpose of the risk matrix is to determine the risk category. Once you have identified the project risks, review each risk in turn and assess both the likelihood of the risk happening and the severity of the impact on the project if the process doesn’t go as planned.

Consequences

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Risk Management: FLRA is more than just a funny word

Field Level Risk Assessment (FLRA) is a process used to assess the related hazards and their risks for a specific task or job.

A FLRA:
  • Helps reduce injury and to process loss
  • Is an industry standard
  • Is a requirement of most industrial establishment’s safety program
  • Is a requirement on most work sites

A FLRA should be completed:

  • At the start of each shift
  • Before re-starting work which has been stopped for a period of time
  • When site or work conditions change during a job
  • Before starting a new task or job for which there is no safe work procedure
  • Always check for specific requirements with onsite contact or employer
Who Can Conduct a FLRA?
  • Anyone can conduct a FLRA
  • All members of the work team need to participate
  • Sometimes other personnel on the work side need to be included
  • Sometimes a specialist or person familiar with the job and site needs to be involved

Follow this basic rigging plan to manage risk and avoid potential hazards. When you plan each lift, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Has a competent rigger been assigned?
  • Has a risk assessment been conducted with all team members?
  • What is the communication plan?
  • Has the rigging been inspected? (Pre-lift and annually?)
  • Is the rigging fit for the load type and purpose? (I.E. WLL, material, size, etc.)
  • What is the weight of the load?
  • Where is the load’s center of gravity?
  • What is the sling angle?
  • Will there be any side or angular loading?
  • Are wear pads required against corners, edges, protrusions or abrasive surfaces?
  • Have the applicable hitches been selected for load control and stability?
  • Will personnel be in the way of the load or lifting equipment?
  • Is there any possibility of snagging? (Vertical, horizontal, travel path)?
  • Are there environmental concerns? (I.E. wind, temperature, visibility, power lines)
  • Is a tag line required to control the load?

Risk Management: complete a pre-use check

Pre-use safety checks are required before a rigger uses any lifting equipment or accessories – follow the manufacturer instructions and applicable ASME standards.

This includes a basic physical check of the equipment, which can significantly reduce the risk of health and safety issues that may arise on site during everyday operations.

ASME Standards

ASME Standards state: ASME B30.9 requires that sling users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of environment, and rigging practices. Sling identification is required on all types of slings.

ASME B30.26 requires that rigging hardware users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of environment, and rigging practices. All rigging hardware to be identified by manufacturer with name or trademark of manufacturer.

References: https://www.iso.org/home.html

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Herc How-To: avoid these common rigging mistakes

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The rigging trade serves many industries, however, there are many common rigging mistakes workers make daily.

Rigging is to set a load up to move, lift, secure, lower or hoist with the use of ropes, chains, slings, hoists and other materials. The load can range from materials on an offshore rig or even people – even Cirque de Solei rigs their performers (how do you think they’re lifted to perform gravity-defying stunts?!)

One of the most common rigging mistakes is a load being secured, rigged and lifted by anybody other than a competent person. A competent person is someone who:

  • Has knowledge of the task
  • Knowledge of the potential or actual hazards of the task
  • Knowledge of the Act’s and Regulations pertaining to the task
  • Has training and/or certifications to perform the task safely

However, there are quite a few common mistakes when it comes to rigging – read on for the most common mistakes people make when rigging and slinging:

  • Competent (trained) riggers not assigned
  • Use of improper hand signals
  • Not inspecting gear frequently enough
  • Not knowing what to inspect for
  • Slings missing tags or tags not legible
  • Capacity of rigging gear not known
  • Improperly made below the hook devices
  • Wire rope slings formed with clips
    commom-rigging-mistakes
    Rigger ensures the lift goes according to plan
  • Too small hardware connected to the sling eye
  • Too large hardware connected to the sling eye
  • Bunching or pinching of synthetic slings
  • Loose shackle pins or other connections
  • Missing latches on hoist hooks
  • Placing too many slings in hoist hook, shackle or other hardware
  • Side loading or misalignment of hardware
  • Beating down chocker hitch
  • Basket capacity used when not vertical
  • Basket hitch (wire rope) over small diameter
  • Capacity of bridle not adjusted for angle
  • Sling’s load not properly distributed
  • Use of horizontal sling angles smaller than 30°
  • Choker and basket hitches at a horizontal sling angle smaller than 60°
  • Bunching slings on accessories/hardware

There you have it – avoid these common rigging mistakes and you’ll slingin’ like a pro in no time.

For further training and certification, read more on our safety and training courses. Interested in what happens during courses at the Hercules Training Academy? Read our blog on the Rigging Fundamentals Course at the Hercules SLR Training Academy.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Rigging Glossary: ABC’s of rigging from C-D

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There are many terms and definitions when it comes to the rigging and lifting industry, so we decided to break it down for you with a rigging glossary series—the ABC’s of rigging!

On our last glossary we listed some common rigging terms from A-C and ended with ‘crane’—today, let’s continue where we left off. There are many different types of cranes—(more than 10!)—so we decided to continue with those rigging terms.

Keep reading our glossary to discover rigging terms from Crane-D. Stay tuned to our blog page for our next series of rigging terms from D to E.

C—’Crane’

Read on to discover rigging terms that begin with ‘C’.

Crane (automatic): A crane that operates through a preset cycle(s) when it operates.

Bridge crane: A crane with a single or multiple-girder movable bridge that carries a movable trolley or fixed hoisting mechanism. It travels on an overhead fixed runway structure.

Crawler crane: A crane with rotating power plant structure, operating machinery and mounted base—it also has crawler treads for travel. This crane hoists, lowers and swings loads at various radii.

Double-girder crane: Has two bridge girders supported, in-between the end trucks.

Floor-operated crane: A power-operated crane controlled by an operator from the floor or walkway located in the crane-way. It uses power control switches or buttons on a pendant.

Gantry crane: A crane similar to an overhead bridge crane, except the bridge that carries the trolley is supported on two or more legs that run on fixed rails or another runway—usually 3 meters (10 feet) or more below the bottom of the bridge.

rigging-terms-jib-crane
Jib crane

Jib crane: A fixed crane with a vertical rotating member supported at the bottom (some types have them on top), where an arm extends to carry the hoist trolley. Jib cranes are normally found on a vertical column as part of the jib crane or mounted on existing structures (ex. a wall-mounted jib crane).

Manually operated crane: A crane where the hoist mechanism is driven by pulling an endless chain, or whose travel mechanism is driven by manually moving the load.

Monorail crane: A crane or hoist attached to a trolley that runs on flanges of a structural beam.

Overhead crane: A crane with a single or multiple girder movable bridge, carrying a movable trolley or fixed hoisting mechanism, and traveling on an overhead fixed runway structure.

Power-operated crane: The mechanism is driven by electricity, air, hydraulic, or an internal combustion engine.

Remote-operated crane: A crane controlled by any method other than a pendant, rope, or attached cab.

Semi-gantry crane: Gantry cranes have one end of the bridge supported by leg(s) that run on a fixed rail or runway. The other end is supported by end trucks running on an elevated rail or runway.

Single-girder crane: A crane having one bridge girder mounted between the end trucks—it’s also supported from the end trucks.

Wall crane: A crane with a jib that’s supported from a side wall or line of columns of a building. It’s a traveling-type crane and operates on a runway attached to the side wall or line of columns.

Craneway:  Area (length and width) served by crane.

Creep speed: A slow and constant fixed rate of motion of the hoist, trolley, or bridge. This is typically at 1 to 10% of the normal full-load speed.

Critical diameter: Diameter of the smallest bend for a given wire rope that allows wires and strands to adjust themselves by relative movement while remaining in normal position.

Critical load/lift: A load or lift that creates difficult conditions—this can range from a delay, to anything that compromises the safety and operations of a facility, high levels of hazardous materials to anything that causes injury or illness.

Critical service: The use of equipment or tackle for hoisting, rigging, or handling of critical items, or other items in, around, or above spaces containing critical items.

Crossover points: These are points where the rope contacts the previous rope layer when spooling multi-layer rope on a drum.

Cross rod: Wire used to join metal mesh spirals into a complete fabric.

Crow’s foot: A wedge socket type wire rope end termination.

Cylindrical drum: Hoisting drum with uniform diameter.

‘D’

Read on to discover rigging terms that begin with ‘D’.

D.C.: Direct current.

D/d Ratio: A term regarding wire rope. D = Diameter of curvature where rope is bent. d = diameter of rope.

Dead end: Point to fasten one rope in a running rope system. The other end is fastened at the rope drum.

Deadman: An object or structure that exists or is built to be used as an anchor for a guy rope.

Deceleration stress: Additional stress imposed by decreased load velocity.

Deflection: The point where a load member sags cause by imposed live or dead loads—typically measured at mid-span as the distance along a straight line between supports. It can also mean any deviation from a straight, horizontal line.

A derrick

Derrick: A piece of equipment used to lift or lower loads. It’s made of a mast or equal member held at the head by braces or guys—it can be used with or without a boom, and is used with hoists and ropes.

Design Factor (sometimes referred to as safety factor): An industry term usually computed by dividing the catalog Breaking Strength by the catalog Working Load Limit and generally expressed as a ratio. For example: 4 to 1.

Diameter (wire rope): The measurement around the wire rope, space wire rope will contain.

Direct geared: A hoist with one or more drum geared directly to its power source.

Dog leg: Permanent short bend or kink in wire rope caused by improper use.

Dragline: Wire rope used to pull an excavating/drag bucket. It’s also used to express a particular type of

A dragline mining coal

mobile crane that uses a drag bucket during excavation.

Drifting: Pulling a suspended load laterally to change its horizontal position.

Drift point: Point on a travel motion controller that releases brake while the motor isn’t energized. This allows you to coast before the brake is set.

Drive: An assembly that consists of motors, couplings, gear, and gear case(s) used to propel a bridge, trolley, or hoist.

Drive girder: Girder where bridge drive, cross shaft, walk, railing, and operator’s cab are mounted.

Drum: The diameter of a barrel of a cylinder drum or tapered, conical drum. This is where cable is wound for use or storage. The drum may also refer to the cylindrical member where rope is wound to lift or lower the load.

Drum capacity (rope): Length of a specific diameter of rope that can be wound on a drum.

Drum hoist: A mechanism that uses one or more rope drums. This is also called a hoist, winch, or hoisting engine.

Dynamic loading: Loads fed into the machine/components by moving forces.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

PPE-volution – How the Golden Gate Bridge Inspired PPE

America’s Industrial Revolution and ingenuity brought about many important advances in worker safety and PPE (Personal Protection Equipment).

At the start of the American Industrial Revolution, worker safety and health were nowhere near the priority they are today. As manufacturing grew, so too did worker injuries and deaths. The idea of safe work grew slowly from a small glimmer to a bright flame inside the collective consciousness of the American workforce.

Although the creation of OSHA regulations was many decades away, the evolution of PPE progressed on its own with the creation of new types of protective devices and advancements in pre-existing devices. Much of this early PPE had a major influence on worker safety’s advancement and will continue to do so.

Hard-Headed PPE Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, built in 1933, is an excellent early example of PPE’s influence on safety. Constructing a cable-suspension bridge that was 4,200 feet long was a task that had not been attempted before, one that presented many hazards. The project’s chief engineer, Joseph Strauss, was committed to making its construction as safe as possible.

The bridge’s construction played a particularly significant role in the successful development of one form PPE: It was the first major project that required all of its workers to wear hard hats. Although the hard hat was in its infancy at the time, head protection wasn’t new; gold miners had learned long before the importance of taking steps to protect against falling debris. Michael Lloyd, head protection manager at Bullard – a company in business since 1898, said many early miners wore bowler hats, which were hard felt hats with rounded crowns. Often dubbed « Iron Hats, » these were stuffed with cotton to create a cushioning barrier against blows.

Inspired by the design of his « doughboy » Army helmet, Edward Bullard returned home from World War I and began designing what was to become known as the « hard-boiled hat. » The hat was made of layered canvas that was steamed to impregnate it with resin, sewn together, and varnished into its molded shape. Bullard was awarded the patent in 1919. Later that year, the Navy approached Bullard with a request for some sort of head protection for its shipyard workers. The hat’s first internal suspension was added to increase its effectiveness, and the product’s use quickly spread to lumber workers, utility workers, and construction workers. By the time of the Hoover Dam’s construction in 1931, many workers were voluntarily wearing the headgear. Soon after, the Golden Gate Bridge construction provided a true test of the hard hat’s protective capability because falling rivets were one of the major dangers during the project.

Other innovations came in the form of different materials. In 1938, Bullard released the first aluminum hard hat. It was more durable and comfortable, but it conducted electricity and did not hold up well to the elements. In the ’40s, phenolic hats became available as a predecessor to fiberglass hats. Thermoplastics became the preferred material a decade later for many head protection products; it’s still used by many manufacturers today.
PPE-Hard-hats
From Left to right: Vintage Bullard Miners hats, Vintage Bullard Hard Boiled Hard Hat 1930’s (Used on the Golden Gate Bridge Project, Hard Boiled aluminum Safety hard hat w/Liner and a current day hard hat

In 1953, Bullard introduced the process of injection-molded hats. « Before, [thermoplastic] was kind of laid out on a mold. In the injection-mold process you actually have a closed mold that you pump into. It makes a more consistent helmet and a higher-quality product, which in the long run is also going to be the same thickness all the way through. It’s going to be a safer helmet, » Lloyd said.

Despite the hard hat’s effectiveness and relatively low cost, its use wasn’t officially required at most job sites until the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1970. OSHA’s head protection standard, 1910.135, obligated employees to protect workers and instructed manufacturers and employers to turn to the American National Standards Institute’s Z89.1 standard for the appropriate usage guidelines.

Many new materials have since been created, such as the use of General Electric’s high-heat-resistant polyphthalate-carbonate resin in firefighters’ helmets. New hard hats have been designed that provide side protection, which are designated type 2 hats in ANSI Z89.1. « A hard hat was originally designed to protect if something falls from that sky and hits you in the head, » Lloyd said. « But what happens if you run into something? What happens if you bend over and something hits your helmet? »

Because hard hats are a mature market, except for the development of other materials, most innovations will be comfort features and technologies enabling them to withstand different temperature extremes, Lloyd predicted. Easier-to-use designs are appearing that allow users to adjust a hard hat’s suspension with one hand. In the last couple of years, manufacturers have come up with different types of vented helmets designed to help workers keep cool. Hats are accessorized with attachable face shields, visors, and ear muffs, and some have perspiration-absorbing liners. Some come with AM/FM radios, walkie-talkies, and camcorders.

Netting a Safe Return
Although primitive by today’s standards, the solution for the problem of falls also was addressed during construction of the Golden Gate Bridge. Three years into the construction, delays had convinced Strauss to invest more than $130,000 (these were Depression-era dollars, remember) on a vast net similar to those used in a circus. Suspended under the bridge, it extended 10 feet wider and 15 feet farther than the bridge itself. This gave workers the confidence to move quickly across the slippery steel construction. There were reports of workers being threatened with immediate dismissal if found purposely diving into the net.

Strauss’ net was heralded as a huge success until the morning of Feb. 16, 1937, when the west side of a stripping platform bearing a crew of 11 men broke free from its moorings. After tilting precariously for a moment, the other side broke free and the platform collapsed into the net, which contained two other crew members who were scraping away debris. One platform worker, Tom Casey, managed to jump and grab a bridge beam before the platform fell; he hung there until rescued. The net held the platform and the others for a few seconds before it ripped and fell into the water. Two of the 12 men who fell survived.

Read the original article here.

At Hercules SLR we provide a wide range of PPE solutions, from Lanyards and harnesses, to hard hats and rescue equipment.  We also repair, service and certify PPE equipment. We stock leading industry brands and can provide you with expert advise on your PPE options depending on your project. Call us on 1-877-461-4876 for more information.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Are the Technicians Inspecting your Gear Qualified?

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LEEA – Lifting Standards Worldwide™

Hercules Inspectors are LEEA trained nationally. LEEA, the Lifting Equipment Engineers Association is the respected and authoritative representative body for those who work in every aspect of the industry, from design, manufacture, refurbishment and repair, through to the hire, maintenance and use of lifting equipment.

The next time your equipment is due for inspection, make sure Hercules SLR is your first choice for expert advice and service.

Credentials

Established across the globe LEEA has over 1170 member companies based in 69 countries. Hercules SLR is proud to be one of them.

LEEA has played a key role in this specialized field for over seventy years, from training and standards setting through to health and safety, the provision of technical and legal advice, and the development of examination and licensing systems.

LEEA represents all its members at the highest levels across a range of both public and private bodies, including various government departments, as well as nationally and internationally recognized professional and technical institutions.

LEEA are ISO 9001:2015 registered and an Associate Member of DROPS (Dropped Objects Prevention Scheme).

LEEA is actively involved in all aspects of the industry, promoting the highest technical and safety standards and offering a wide range of services and support to their Members worldwide.

History of the Association

The origins of the Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA) can be traced back to wartime Britain in 1943; a small group of competing companies came together to address what they perceived as a serious threat to their livelihoods. On 3rd June, nine people representing eight chain testing houses met at the Great Eastern Hotel, near Liverpool Street Station, and the idea to form an association to take on the might of government was conceived. Several weeks later, a draft set of rules and regulations was drawn up. During that process, a decision was made that, regardless of size, all members should be considered equal, both in terms of influence and financial contribution and the annual subscription was set at £4 and 4 shillings (£4.20).
The London Chain Testers Association was the name chosen by the founding members and was a clear reflection of the nature and location of the businesses involved. However, evidence shows that as this small group quickly made headway in negotiations with the government, attention turned to other areas where it was felt that co-operative action could be of mutual benefit. These included exploring the potential for pricing agreements, block insurance, the use of collective purchasing to secure more favourable deals from manufacturers, and adherence to British Standards to improve quality and consistency within the industry.By 1946, the association’s geographical boundaries expanded. Members were now actively sought from across the country, a move highlighted by a change of name to The Chain Testers Association of Great Britain.With the immediate concerns of a wartime economy behind them, the following decades of the 20th century can be seen as a series of landmarks that would ultimately establish the association as an authority on safe lifting and the industry’s foremost provider of training and qualifications for the test, examination and maintenance of overhead lifting equipment. Milestones in this period included:

  • The publication of the Chain Testers’ Handbook in 1953. Predominantly the work of Mr. C H A McCaully of W&E Moore, this brought together for the first time all the essential information required by the ‘man at the bench’ – the chain tester.
  • In 1959 it was followed by the examination scheme for lifting equipment engineers. In 1981, the Code of Practice for the Safe Use of Lifting Equipment (COPSULE) was launched.
  • In 1983, training courses were introduced to prepare students for exams that are now sat by several hundred candidates around the world every year.

Towards the end of the 20th century, important developments took place within the association’s infrastructure, and the nature of member companies changed to include a far wider range of activities. Notable events include the set-up of the organisation’s first independent office in 1977, and a third name change—to the Lifting Equipment Engineers Association in 1988.

With the introduction of the Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations (LOLER) in 1998, LEEA’s training, qualifications and publications had to be fundamentally reworked to reflect this new legislation, and the association’s support and guidance became even more important to members obliged to comply with the requirements of the new legislation.

This legislative upheaval combined with the all-pervasive impact of globalisation, and an absence of sector-specific health and safety legislation—so, many companies who operated in these parts of the world began to adopt LOLER as best practice, which further enhanced the appeal of LEEA membership.

Since the turn of the century, LEEA’s development has reflected these trends and milestones have included:

Iran-Liftex-Exhibition-2018-Elevators-Industrial-Tehran-Iran

  • In 2006, The launch of the LiftEx trade show;
  • In 2007, the move to new headquarters and a purpose-built training centre, an ever increasing portfolio of practical courses to complement online distance learning provision;
  • In 2009, the introduction of the TEAM card registration and identity scheme for qualified engineers and technicians.

Perhaps the most striking is LEEA’s transformation into a truly international body. Regardless of where they are based, there is now no distinction between members – all are subject to the same technical audits prior to being granted full membership, with regular follow-up visits as long as they wish to remain part of the association. Dedicated local groups are now operating in the Middle East and Australia, and LEEA staff have become globetrotters, regularly meeting existing and potential members, as well as a host of other stakeholders, right across the world.

Learn more about LEEA on their website here.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Rigging Glossary: ABC’s of rigging, ‘A’ to ‘Crane’

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Hercules SLR knows rigging, A through Z.

There are many terms and regulating bodies to know and remember when it comes to securing, lifting and rigging—some commonly used in the industry, some not.

Hercules SLR is here to help you keep up with the rigging industry and its jargon.

We’ve put together a guide of rigging terms that you should know, starting with A, B and C.

Rigging Terms: A-C

‘A’

Acceleration Stress: Additional stress created by increase in load velocity.

Aggregate Strength: Wire rope strength found by total individual breaking strength of the element of strand or rope.

AISE: Association of Iron and Steel Institute

AISI: American Iron and Steel Institute

Alternate Lay: Lay of wire rope in which strands alternate between regular lay and lang lay.

Angle of Loading, or Angle Loading: The inclination of a sling’s leg or branch measured from the horizontal and vertical plane. The angle of loading should be five degrees or less from the vertical plane.

ANSI: American National Standards Institute

API: American Petroleum Instituterigging-lifting-hoisting

Armoured Rope: Steel-clad rope

ASME: American Society of Mechanical Engineers

ASTM: American Society for Testing Materials

AWS: American Welding Society

‘B’

Bail: U-shaped member of bucket, load or socket, usually used as a lift point. Can also be other fitting used on wire rope, or a swivel hoist ring’s attachment point.

Barrel: Lagging/body part of a rope drum in a drum hoist.

Base: Mounting flanges or feet, used to attach a hoist to its supporting structure or foundation.

Basket Hitch: A sling set-up where the sling is passed under the load and has both ends, end attachments, eyes or handles on a hook, or single master link.

Bearing Life (or Rated Life): The number of revolutions or hours, that an identical group of bearings used at a 90% constant speed will finish or exceed before the first signs of wear or fatigue develops. Essentially, 10 of 100 bearings will fail before their rated life. Minimum Life and L10 also mean Rated Life.

Becket: A wedge socket type of wire rope end termination.

Becket Line: Part of rope in a multi-ply reeving system that’s dead-ended on one of the blocks.

Becket Loop: A loop or a strand of small rope attached to the end of a large wire rope to facilitate installation.

Bird Cage: A common term used to describe the look of wire rope that’s been forced into compression. The outer strand forms a ‘cage’, and at times can displace the core.

Bleeding Line: Caused when the wire rope is overloaded. This squeezes the lubricant from the cable out and  makes it run excessively.

Block: A term applied to a wire rope sheave (pulley) inside plates. It’s fitted with an attachment like a shackle or hook.

Braided Wire Rope: Wire rope formed by plaiting component wire ropes.

Brake: Device used for slow or stopping motion with friction or power.

Brake, Eddy Current: Device for controlling speed in hoisting or lowering direction, done by putting a supplementary load on the motor. Interaction of magnetic fields creates an adjustable or variable direct current in stator coils, this starts currents in the rotor, which is how this loading happens.

Brake, Holding or Parking: Brake that automatically sets and prevents motion when power is off.

Brake, Mechanical Load: Friction device used for multiple discs or shoes, used to control load speed in only the lowering direction. The brake stops the load from overhauling the motor.

Braking, counter torque: See counter torque. 

Breaking Strength: Measured tensile load needed to make cable, chain, wire rope or any other load-bearing element break.

Breaking Strength/Ultimate Strength: Average force at which a product, like a roundsling, (in the condition it would leave manufacturing) has been found by testing to break when growing force is applied, at a uniform rate of speed on a standard pull testing machine.

Bridge Travel: Crane travelling horizontally and parallel with bridge runway rails.

Bridge Trucks: Assembly made up of wheels, bearings, axles and structural framework that supports the end reactions of bridge girders.

Bridle Sling: Sling made of multiple wire rope legs with a fitting that attaches to the lifting hook.

Bright Rope: Wire rope made of wires that aren’t coated with zinc or tin.

Brooming: Unlaying and making wire ropes’ strands and wires straight at the end while installing a wire rope socket.

Bull Ring: The main, large ring of a sling where the sling’s legs are attached. This is also called the master link.

Bulldog Clip: Wire rope cable clamp, or clip.

Bumper or Buffer: Energy-absorbing device that reduces impact when two moving cranes or trolleys meet, or when they meet the end of its travel.

Cab: The operator’s compartment on a crane.

Cable: Term used to refer to wire ropes, wire strand and electrical conductors.

Cable Crowd Rope: Wire rope used to force the bucket of a power shovel into material being handled.

Cable-Laid Wire Rope: Wire rope made up of several individual wire ropes wrapped around a wire rope core or fiber.

Cable Laid Grommet-Hand Tucked: An endless wire rope sling made from one length of rope, wrapped around the core by hand, six times. The ends of the rope tuck inside the six wraps.

Cable Laid Rope: Wire rope made of six wire ropes wrapped around a fiber or core.

Cable Laid Rope Sling: This mechanical joint is made via a wire rope sling from a cable laid rope. It has eyes fabricated by pressing, or swaging one or more metal sleeves over the rope junction.

Cableway, Aerial: Conveying system for transporting single loads along a suspended track cable.

Camber: The slight curve given to beams and girders to compensate for deflections caused by loading.

Cheek Plate(s): Stationary plate that supports the pin (axle) of a sheave or load when rigging.crane-inspector-securing-lifting-rigging-hoisting

Cheek Weights: Overhauling weights attached to side plates of a lower load block.

Chinese Finger: Wire mesh pulling grip. Normally, a line is inserted through the wire rope, and it tightens around the line when pulling force is applied.

Choker Sling: Wire rope with eyes spliced on each end. Used to lift the load.

Choker Hitch: Sling set-up with one end of the sling passing under the load and through an end attachment, handle or eye on the other end of the sling.

Clearance: The horizontal or vertical distance from any part of the crane to a point of the nearest obstruction (the area you can ‘clear’).

Clevis: U-shaped fitting with holes in each end where a pin or bolt is run through.

Clip: Fitting to clamp two parts of wire rope.

Closed Socket: Wire rope end fitting made of basket and bail.

Closing line: Wire rope that closes a clamshell or orange-peel bucket, and then operates as a hoisting rope.

CMAA: Crane Manufacturers Association of America

CMV: Commercial Motor Vehicle

Coil: Circular bundle of wire or fiber rope not packed on a reel.

Collector: Contact device that mounts on bridge or trolley to collect current from the conductor system.

Come-along: Lever-operated chain or wire rope devices designed for pulling, not lifting; also called pullers. Unlike hoists, the tension is held by a releasable ratchet. They are smaller and lighter than hoists of equal capacity, and aren’t meant to lift, but meant for activities like skidding machinery.

Conductors (Bridge or Runway): Electrical conductors located along the bridge girder, or runway that provide power and/or control circuits to the crane and trolley.

Conical Drum: Grooved hoisting drum of tapering diameter.

Continuous Bend: Reeving of wire rope over sheaves and drums so that it bends in one direction, as opposed to reverse bend.

Control Braking: A method of controlling hoisting or lowering speed of the load by removing energy from the moving load or by imparting energy in the opposite direction.

Controller: A device or group of devices that serve to govern, in some predetermined manner, the power delivered to the motor to which it is connected.

Controller (Spring Return): A controller which, when released, will return automatically to a neutral position.

Control Panel: An assembly of magnetic or static electrical components that govern the flow of power to, or from a motor. These respond to signals from a master switch, push-button station, or remote control.

Core: Member of wire rope round which the strands are laid. This could be fiber, a wire strand, or an independent wire rope.

Corrosion: Chemical decomposition caused by exposure to moisture, acids or alkalis.

Corrugated: A term used to describe the grooves of a sheave or drum when worn so as to show the impression of a wire rope.

Cover plate: The top or bottom plate of a box girder or junction box.

Crane: A machine for lifting and lowering a load vertically and moving it horizontally; the hoisting mechanism is an integral part of the machine. The term applies to fixed , mobile, powered or manually-driven machines.

Hercules SLR will continue our ‘Rigging Glossary’ with more rigging terms in the alphabet C-Z—check our ‘Blog’ page for future rigging glossaries.

Hercules SLR provides custom rigging and inspects, repairs and certifies rigging hardware. Head to our  ‘Inspections & Repairs’ page for more information, or e-mail sales@herculesSLR.com.

Original article here: https://riggingcanada.ca/articles/rigging-terms-glossary/

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Wire Rope: A Manufacturing & Transportation Pioneer

Wire-Rope-Pioneer
Early Life

Andrew Smith Hallidie was born Andrew Smith, later adopting the name Hallidie in honour of his uncle, Sir Andrew Hallidie. His birthplace is variously quoted as London in the United Kingdom. His father, Andrew Smith (a prolific inventor in his own right, responsible for inventing the first box door spring, a floor cramp and had an early patent for wire rope) had been born in Fleming, Dumfrieshire, Scotland, in 1798, and his mother, Julia Johnstone Smith, was from Lockerbie, Dumfriesshire.

Andrew_Smith_Hallidie
Andrew Smith Hallidie

The younger Smith was initially apprenticed to a machine shop and drawing office. In 1852 he and his father set sail for California, where the senior Mr. Smith had an interest in some gold mines in Mariposa County. The mines proved disappointing, and he returned to England in 1853. Andrew Smith Junior, however, remained in California, and became a gold miner whilst also working as a blacksmith, surveyor and builder of bridges.

Inventions

In 1855, young Hallidie built a wire suspension bridge and aqueduct 220 feet long at Horse Shoe Bar on the Middle Fork of the American River. During 1856, whilst working on the construction of a flume at a mine at American Bar, the now, Andrew Smith Hallidie was consulted over the rapid rate of wear on the ropes used to lower cars of rock from the mine to the mill. These ropes wore out in 75 days—unsatisfied with this, Hallidie manufactured rope for the project consisting of three spliced pieces one-eighth of an inch thick, 1200 feet long. These lasted for two years—a vast improvement from the previous 75 day standard.

Hallide invented the Hallidie Ropeway, a form of aerial tramway used for transporting ore and other material across mountainous districts in the west, which he successfully installed in a number of locations, and later patented. After a few years of drifting from camp to camp working claims, narrowly avoiding disasters both natural and man-made, and briefly running a restaurant at Michigan Bluff in the Mother Lode, he abandoned mining in 1857 and returned to San Francisco. Under the name of A. S. Hallidie & Co., he commenced the manufacture of wire rope in a building at Mason and Chestnut Streets, using the machinery from American Bar.

In addition to aerial tramways, his rope was used to build suspension bridges across creeks and rivers throughout northern California. He was often away from the City on his bridge projects until in 1865 he returned to San Francisco and focused his energies entirely on manufacturing and perfecting wire rope. The discovery of the Comstock Lode silver mines in Nevada increased the demand for wire rope.

The city became a major industrial center for mining operations in the 1860s and Hallidie prospered, becoming a leading entrepreneur, US citizen, husband to Martha Elizabeth Woods, and in 1868 President of the prestigious Mechanic’s Institute.

Hallidie’s ‘Endless Wire Ropeway’—Precursor to Cable Cars

It was about this time that Hallidie began to implement a scheme for urban transportation he had been considered for some time, based upon his use of wire rope for the aerial tramways. He worked on improving the tensile strength and flexibility of his wire to develop an “endless” wire rope that could be would around large pulleys, which could then provide continuous underground propulsion for a car that could be attached or released at will from the cable. Hallide took out a patent Endless Wire Rope Patentfor this “Endless Wire Ropeway” and for years it dominated the construction of tramway at mines throughout the West. However, it was the implementation of his Endless Wire Ropeway for moving streetcars in San Francisco that brought him lasting fame and a place in the history books.

It is here accounts differ as to exactly how involved Hallidie was in the inception of the first cable car at Clay Street Hill Railway. One version, has him taking over the promotion of the line when the original promoter, Benjamin Brooks, failed to raise the necessary capital.

In another version, Hallidie was the instigator, inspired by a desire to reduce the suffering incurred by the horses that hauled streetcars up Jackson Street, from Kearny to Stockton Street.

There is also doubt as to when exactly the first run of the cable car occurred. The franchise required the first run no later than August 1, 1873, however at least one source reports that the run took place a day late, on August 2, but that the city chose not to void the franchise. Some accounts say that the first gripman hired by Hallidie looked down the steep hill from Jones and refused to operate the car, so Hallidie took the grip himself and ran the car down the hill and up again without any problems.

The named engineer of the Clay Street line was William Eppelsheimer. Given Hallidie’s previous experience of cables and cable haulage systems, it seems likely that he contributed to the design of the system.

wire rope cable car

The Clay Street line started regular service on September 1, 1873, and was a financial success. In addition, Hallidie’s patents on the cable car design were stringently enforced on cable car promoters around the world and made him a rich man.

A. S. Hallidie & Co. became the California Wire Works in 1883 with Hallidie as president. In 1895, it was sold to Washburn and Moen Co., the oldest manufacturers of wire in the United States (established in 1831).

Hallidie died on April 24, 1900 at the age of 65 of heart disease at his San Francisco residence, but his name lives on. In San Francisco, Hallidie Plaza (near the Powell and Market Street cable car turntable) and the Hallidie Building (an office building in the city’s Financial District) are named after him.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Hercules’ Tips: Prevent Synthetic Round Sling Damage

roundsling

We’ve discussed what to look for when assessing your synthetic round sling for damage—but how do you prevent damage from happening in the first place?

Read on for essential tips to prolong the life of your synthetic round slings.

Round Sling

First and foremost, you should avoid activities that cause chemical burns, bunching, tears or exposed yarns. To prevent damage to your round sling, refrain from:

  • Dropping or dragging it along the ground or rough surfaces;
  • Pulling slings from under loads when load is resting on the sling—place blocks under load if possible;
  • Shortening or adjusting the sling using unapproved methods;
  • Twisting or knotting the sling;
  • Exposing sling to damaging alkali’s or acids;
  • Exposing sling to sources of heat damage or weld splatter;
  • Using slings or allowing exposure to temperatures above 194° (90°C) or below -40°F (-40°C).
  • « Tip Loading » a sling on a hook rather than centering it in base, or « bowl » of the hook;
  • Using hooks, shackles or other hardware that have edges or other rough surfaces which could damage the sling;
  •  Running/driving over sling with a vehicle or other equipment.

In addition to these factors, exposing synthetic slings to certain chemicals can cause minor or total degradation—time, temperature and concentration factors affect degradation. Consult your sling’s manufacturer for specific applications.

Sharp Edges and your Sling

One of the most crucial aspects of protecting your sling is ensuring it’s kept away from sharp edges. It’s important to note that edges or surfaces in contact with your sling don’t have to be « razor » sharp to cause sling failure. Slings can be damaged, worn down or even torn as tension between your sling, connection points and cargo develops.

Protect damage to your sling from corners, protrusions or contact with any edge that isn’t rounded or smooth. To do so, a qualified person will determine appropriate methods for protecting the sling in relation to the conditions it will be used in. The qualified person may use specially developed protectors like sleeves, wear pads or corner protectors to shield the sling from harsh edges.

Conducting lift tests (in a non-consequence setting) is recommended to test your safe-guarding methods—remember to inspect your sling after each lift test for damage and suitability.

Can my Sling Ever Touch Edges?

Avoid your sling directly contacting edges, unless the edge is:

  • Smooth and well-rounded;
  • The size of the radii is adequately large. Use the table below (Image 1) to determine the minimum edge radii suitable for contact with synthetic slings.
Image 1

Prevent further damage to your sling by storing it in a clean, dry and dark place. Use mild soap and water to wash your sling, and never place it in the washing machine. Avoid storing somewhere your sling may be exposed to acids or other harmful chemicals or splatters.

Overall, even when following every safeguard described above things may go wrong. Be sure to asses your load properly, never place any part of your body between yourself and the sling, and always ensure all personnel are clear from lifted or suspended loads.

Original Article here: https://riggingcanada.ca/articles/safe-usage-guides/round-sling-safety-bulletin/round-sling-safety-bulletin.pdf

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Hercules Training Academy: Securing, Lifting & Rigging

training-academy-group-shot

Hercules Training Academy: First Course Complete

The Hercules Training Academy is open for training—last week Hercules was thrilled to have eight employees hailing from across Canada participate in our first ever training program. Employees from CSR, sales and management gathered at Hercules’ new, purpose-built specialized Training Academy in Dartmouth, NS to learn the ins and outs (quite literally)—of securing, lifting and rigging in our first specialized training course.

Training Academy Facilities

What makes Hercules’ Training Academy ‘specialized’? Our equipment, for one. Our new custom crane is built into the warehouse floor and can lift up to 10 tonnes—pieces of concrete were actually torn up in order to fix the crane to the floor. This gives our employees experience working with larger, more realistic loads that one may commonly see on a job site.

hercules-training-academy-classroom--sling-chain

In addition to the large crane, we have two smaller, portable cranes—these can be used for activities outdoors or on the warehouse floor, and allow trainee’s to practice securing, lifting and rigging in various settings.

In addition to the rigging equipment available at the Training Academy, there are two new classroom spaces. Trainees spend a time in the classroom learning various details, features and differences between equipment like hoists, buckles and slings. Then, they take their knowledge to a practical setting.

This combination of practical and classroom experience is invaluable for our clients and customers.

« I’ve learned so much on the course that will help my understand my customers’ needs much better. I know what’s a workable solution, and how to interpret the needs of the clients’ project, » says Keyne, a CSR from Hamilton, Ontario.

One activity included Hercules’ employees hoisting and lifting objects up and through holes outdoors, which mimicked the challenges of rigging objects into the top of a larger structure, like a boat. Another required employees to secure, lift and rig irregular shaped objects into a shipping container. This showed our employees some of the challenges workers face onsite—things like balancing a large objects’ centre of gravity, evenly distributing a heavy load and properly securing misshapen objects.

Dwayne Fader, Business Development Manager (and former rigging technician!) at Hercules explained some of the common misconceptions and complications workers face with rigging a heavy load. « There is so much more math involved than you think—I’ve never used it more than when I worked in rigging. You have to make sure things are even, balanced and fit correctly—all more challenging than it seems. »

Commitment to Learning

Hercules truly believes that experience is the best teacher, which is why we developed the Training Academy. When we teach our employees how to work with the products we sell, and get a ‘taste’ of what the job is actually like, they gain a whole new insight towards issues our customers and clients face daily—and are able to offer practical solutions and advice. Simply put—our employees don’t just ‘talk the talk’, but can ‘walk the walk’, too.

TJ, a Sales Manager from  Langley, BC says « The Training Academy session was fantastic. I’ve learned more useful skills than I expected, and it’s been fun! The hands-on activities really helped me understand what I was learning. It made me realize what’s great in theory, and then what you actually need to do to make that theory workable. »

Hercules’ employees gained a lot from their time at the Training Academy, and many are excited to do again.

« If there’s a Rigging 2—I want to be on it! I learned stuff I never knew I needed to know, and it’s been FUN. »  says Quincy, an Inspector from Hamilton, Ontario. « Who ever thought I’d use ‘work’ and ‘fun’ in the same sentence? But I have—and it was! »

Hercules offers practical, hands-on learning programs designed to exceed minimum safety requirements. These courses can be customized to fit the specific needs of your workplace, and can be provide training on-site or at a Hercules facility.

We’ve always been committed to providing specialized training—see the table below to discover our available training courses.

Current Courses Offered:
Power Operated Work PlatformsChain Saw Safety

Confined Space Entrant & Attendant (CSEA)

Fall Protection

Fundamentals of Rigging with Practical

Forklift Safety (Narrow Aisle or Counterbalance)

Lock Out Tag Out

Red Cross Emergency First AidRed Cross Standard First Aid

Fall Rescue Systems

WHMIS 2015 with GHS

Fundamentals of Overhead Cranes

Fundamentals of Rigging

Offshore Rigger Banksman

Overhead Crane Operator

There really is no substitute for experience. All in all, Hercules’ employees had a similar takeaway. Marc, a Manager from Quebec, explains « This week has been amazing. I learned so much about the industry, and now I can understand the jobs as our clients do. I’ve actually already taken some material home for Rigging 2, and I’ve completed the math exercise! It’s great. »

More questions about training at Hercules? E-mail us at training@herculesslr.com.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.