Get to Know your Training Specialist – Jamie England

Jamie-Trainer

Jamie England is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.Jamie England

Tell us about your educational background?

Jamie: I graduated from Acadia University in 1996 with a degree in Education. Over the years I have added to my educational training by completing Adult Education Programs from Dalhousie University and Henson College. I have also collected specific accreditations for industry work such as Enform’s H2S Alive Instructor program, the “Train the Trainer” program from the Advanced Rescue Techniques School of Canada., and recently the LEEA Foundation Course (North American Version).

What made you decide to into this industry?

Jamie:  The rigging field is similar to some of my experiences conducting Technical Rope Rescue seminars across Canada, as well as work I have conducted at height across the Atlantic and Western provinces. It deals with inspections of gear, load calculations, proper rigging techniques and the lifting and lowering of equipment and personnel. It seemed like a logical progression from previous fields of experience while at the same time providing new challenges.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Jamie: Once I completed my University Degree I joined a local Nova Scotia company called Survival Systems Training Ltd. It was here that I spent a number of years conducting training in such varied fields as sea survival, Helicopter Underwater Egress Training (HUET), industrial firefighting, confined space entry and rescue, fall protection, and technical rope rescue. I was fortunate to be able to conduct these courses in Alaska, Scotland, Cuba, Egypt across Canada and the USA.

From SSTL I moved onto another local company, Frontline Safety Ltd where I began a career working offshore off the coasts of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Brazil as a H2S Safety Supervisor. During this time, I also spent 11 months as the permit coordinator for the construction and commissioning phase of the Erik Raude Drilling Vessel, as well being the Safety Health and Environment coordinator for the Sable Tier II commissioning program.

Eirik Raude Drilling Vessel
Eirik Raude Drilling Vessel

On top of this, it is safe to say I have spent considerable time managing safety related jobs in every pulp mill and refinery in Atlantic Canada and beyond allowing myself to build up a wealth of experience of the many different facets of work in heavy industry in this country.

What made you want to transition into training?

Jamie: training was always something I had a particular skill for. I studied at a university level and gained a degree in education. I spent a total of 8 years training at Survival Systems and another 8 at Frontline in which conducting adult education was a requirement of the job. It is something I enjoy and something I am particularly good at, so it was never really a transition, instead it was an evolution. Now I am happy to bring these skills and experiences to another local Nova Scotian company, HerculesSLR.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Jamie: Hercules SLR has always had a strong reputation in industry, and after having worked for companies run out of Alberta or America I am appreciative of the fact this is a local Nova Scotian company with Nova Scotian sensibilities…something that cannot be undervalued, in my opinion. It was also exciting knowing I was walking into a situation where Hercules was looking to expand their training footprint and was willing to commit the finances to do so properly. It’s exciting times with our new training school nearing completion. I am glad to be a part of it.

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

Jamie:  A great deal of the training that we deliver is based in the maritime provinces, but we can deliver training anywhere in Canada. The majority of the training I’ve delivered is mainly in Nova Scotia, but I’ve also delivered training in Newfoundland, PEI and New Brunswick as well.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training?

Jamie: in my career I still have great fondness for Brazil, Alaska and Scotland. Three very unique parts of the world with beautiful landscapes, interesting customs and vibrant people.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Jamie: I have pretty much seen all of Canada and most of the US during my work-related travels. I am always happy to travel to Europe, South America, Africa…so if there is any training to be done in any of these locals….I’m your man!

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Jamie: I am hoping to get more LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association) courses under my belt. I would like to become an expert in the field, and then to

LEEA Logo

provide that expertise all over the world. This will require a lot of work on my end, but this is, I believe, where my future lies.

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Get to Know Hercules Marketing Specialist Amanda White

Marketing Amanda White

Amanda White is our Hercules Marketing Specialist. We sat down with her to find out more about her and how she decided to choose Marketing as a career path.

Tell us about your background?

Amanda: I’m a British immigrant to Canada, and have been living in Nova Scotia for 8 years now. People often ask me “What made you move to Canada?” The answer is a pretty simple one. I first visited family friends in Toronto in 1992, and I was hooked from that moment on. In between various travels to other countries I kept returning and exploring other parts of Canada. In 2005 I visited Nova Scotia and fell in love with the scenery and the people. After returning from a second trip in 2006, my husband and I submitted our papers and waited patiently to have our application reviewed. We were accepted in 2009 and moved over in May 2010. It was, and still is, hard leaving family and friends behind, the process was stressful and leaving our jobs for the unknown was scary—but we knew it was something we just had to do. I am happy to say, we love our life here.

What made you decide to enter this industry?

Amanda: From leaving school I held various roles in many different industries. I guess you might call me somewhat of a floater. I really didn’t decide what I wanted to do career-wise until around 2000. It was at this time I was working in an admin role for a Mail Order firm that sold Movie Memorabilia. I decided I wanted to explore my creative side more and took an evening course in Graphic Design at Yeovil College. A year later I passed with distinction, and was head hunted by Thales Naval Division in the UK where I became their Principal Design Editor. I continued in this role for 7 years until I emigrated to Canada.

design ideas

What made you want to transition into Marketing?

Amanda: After moving to Nova Scotia, it was difficult at first to get established in the job market, but I found a home in a local printing company. I was once again back in an admin/customer service role, but due to changes within the company I was able to incorporate my design skills alongside my other duties. I stayed in that role for around 5 years, until cut-backs meant I was out of work and looking for something new. I then moved into a communications role for a Real Estate firm, it was a short contract which enabled me to design and expand my skills more into the marketing side of things. It was as that contract was coming to an end that I applied for the role of Marketing Coordinator at Hercules SLR. Because of my corporate background in a largely industrial/defense sector, I thought Hercules would be a good fit for me. Since working for the company I have learned so much more about marketing and after a year, my title changed to Marketing Specialist. My role is challenging and varied, from copy writing and graphic design, to managing website content and social media—there is never a dull moment. I love the people I work with. The firm is extremely diverse, and you get to meet people from all over the world.

Where have you traveled during your time as a Marketing Specialist for Hercules SLR?

Amanda: Being a ‘behind the scenes’ kind-of-girl (which is where I am happiest), I haven’t really traveled with the company. I have however, attended open days in at branches within the Province. If the opportunity arose I would most like to visit our locations out West.

Is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Amanda: In marketing you never stop learning. I intend to expand my knowledge, and plan on expanding my InDesign education next year.

Lastly, is there anything else you would like people to know about you?

Outside of work I am a keen photographer. There is nothing I love more than trawling the back roads and looking for interesting scenes and subjects. My passion is landscapes, but I also have a love of abandoned places. I have been published several times in the UK and been awarded for some of my work. I am also an accredited member of the Photographic Alliance of Great Britain.

My other love in life is traveling. I am lucky enough to have traveled extensively over the years, from India, Egypt and Thailand, to most of Europe, Dubai and Kenya. I am a cat lover and I once parachuted solo from 3,000 ft…Badly!

The Old Pontiac

Stonehenge

Stourhead

Waterfowl Park

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

.

 

What is a Rigger in Construction?

what is a rigger in construction, hercules slr

WHAT IS A RIGGER IN CONSTRUCTION?

What is a rigger? A rigger in construction is a person responsible for securing a load to lift, pull, hoist or move in general. They’re responsible in making sure the right equipment and hardware is used for a lift, the right methods are used to lift and the equipment used is operated properly, by a qualified professional. 

You might wonder, « Don’t all construction sites move and lift things? » And you’d be correct – functions of rigging are used on construction sites daily. However, a rigger’s responsibilities are a bit more specific. They may be brought onto a construction site to move the construction crew’s large machinery (think a skid steer or forklift) to another part of the site. Other roles a rigger might perform on, or for, a construction site are: 

  • Signal Person: This person is responsible to signal, with verbal or physical cues to workers’ who operate the lifting equipment, especially cranes.
  • Inspector/Fabricator: This person is involved in fabricating the equipment used to lift, and is also likely be used on the construction site to repair, inspect or certify rigging equipment and other lifting apparatus’ used on site. 
  • Controller: This person may be involved in operating the equipment used to lift, mechanical or otherwise. They could operate a crane, electric chain hoist or other moving gear and direct the path of hard-to-move loads. 
  • Assess and install: A rigger will determine the best equipment to be used for the load. 

WHAT IS A RIGGER IN CONSTRUCTION? HERCULES SLR EXPLAINS

As we mentioned, lots of rigging happens on a construction site daily. But a rigger may be called in to lift a load that requires specialized equipment to get the job done. Certain lifts, or equipment you need to complete those lifts, may be regulated or require certifications to operate them. In these circumstances, a rigger would be called in to complete the lift or to assess the load and determine which equipment should be applied. 

For example, one of our riggers’ was called to a site to move an excavator that had broken down. They needed the equipment moved so it could be repaired, and Hercules SLR was brought in to find the best methods and tools to lift and move it. 

WHAT IS A RIGGER IN CONSTRUCTION? THE HERCULES SLR EXAMPLE

Here’s an example.

The project manager wanted to use two synthetic round slings to lift the excavator by its tracks.

Before the move, Hercules SLR riggers’ discussed the clients’ needs and expectations. The two riggers’ on the job gave their recommendations and went beyond that by finding the excavator’s manual which detailed its lifting points, and which hardware was best to use. Then, our riggers’ calculated the excavator’s load weight – after collecting and calculating all relevant information, they found that synthetic round slings’ were specifically not recommended to lift this particular excavator. 

If the project manager had simply bought the equipment he thought best to lift the excavator, it’s very likely he would have damaged a $100,000+ piece of equipment – yikes. 

This is a common example of a rigger being called in to rig something for a construction project. 

WHAT IS A RIGGER IN CONSTRUCTION? SKILLS TO HAVE

Rigging involves the use of equipment like cranes, forklifts and large spreader-beams – this work often requires workers’ to be at heights. Working at heights is something a rigger should be comfortable with. 

Many rigger positions or construction positions with rigging as their primary role will offer some on-on-the-job and outside training, but that’s not say there aren’t useful skills to have. 

Some of the skills a rigger should have, are: 

  • Math & Science: Physics and other calculations are an everyday part of securing and rigging a load. Determining an objects’ centre of gravity, for example, is an essential skill. 
  • Operating Machinery: If you’ve skipped over the first part of this article, or it just didn’t sink in yet – operating machinery is another everyday part of rigging. Much of this machinery is electric, but manual pulley’s and hoists are used, too. If you have an interest in mechanics and problem-solving, construction rigging could be a great path for you. 
  • Adaptability: Typically, a rigger in construction will have to travel to different sites for work. Depending on the type of rigging done, a riggers’ travels can take you to faraway destinations – some of the places Hercules SLR’s riggers have gone to include Sable Island, Mexico and offshore destinations, which can be particularly isolated. 
  • Risk Management, Communication & Planning: Imagine this – you’re working with a construction crew, and you’re responsible to help build a commercial kitchen. You’ve rigged part of a large industrial walk-in refrigerator, but forgot to assess the hazardous risk for chemical refrigerants. The load’s weight hasn’t been distributed evenly and the load sways and crashes against an obstacle, damaging the container and causing it to leak. Many refrigerants contain harmful, environment-damaging chemicals and now, you’re the rigger responsible for damage to the environment, people and the equipment. Situations like this can have harmful financial, legal and fatal consequences for the rigger and everyone else involved. This is why it’s important to understand the machinery, physics and the risks associated with securing and lifting various loads – planning and being able to communicate with all involved on the job site is crucial to manage risk. 

Some of the things taught on a rigging course are:

  • Regulations/Standards
  • Rigging Planning
  • Rigging Triangle
  • Load Control
  • Sling angles
  • Rigging Equipment (slings, hitches, hardware, hooks)
  • Pre-use Inspection
  • Communications (radio and hand signals)
  • Practical Application of the equipment and principles 

WHAT IS A RIGGER IN CONSTRUCTION? THEIR (MANY) JOB TITLES

As we explored in this article, a rigger performs many different duties, functions and must be responsible for many different aspects of a lift. Industrial trades, like construction are often associated with rigging, but riggers’ are found across nearly every industry. They might not be called a rigger, either – someone who rigs might also have these job titles: 

Boat/Ship/Marine Rigger

Crane Erector

Crane Operator

Crane Rigger

Entertainment/Stage/Theatrical Rigger

Gear Repairer

Gripper/Stage Grip

Hook Tender

Labourer

Loft Rigger

Machinery Mover

Material Handler

Offshore Inspection Technician

Offshore Rigger

Parachute Rigger

Rigging Foreman

Rig Worker

Scaffolder

Slinger/Ring

Warehouse Associate 

 

WHAT IS A RIGGER IN CONSTRUCTION? CONCLUSION

A lot’s been covered in this blog post – and we’ve only scratched the surface of some the roles a rigger plays in construction. Riggers’ in construction are often found working as crane operators, inspectors, transport truckers or millwrights.

For more information on what a rigger in construction is, check out our blogs below or e-mail info@herculesslr.com to learn how Hercules SLR’s services can assist your construction crew.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON RIGGING,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

WELCOME TO ONTARIO: BRAMPTON RIGGERS TALK CHAIN HOIST SAFETY 

RISK MANAGEMENT: SAFETY IS EVERY RIGGERS’ BUSINESS

BECOME A RIGGER: YOUR CAREER MAP


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Is a career in rigging right for you? Hercules SLR will lift you there.

Click here to learn more about career opportunities across Canada with Hercules SLR. 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Quality Assurance & Safety Specialist – James Golemiec

Quality Assurance

Get to know your Quality Assurance & Safety Specialist – James Golemiec

James Golemiec CRSP is our Health, Safety, Environment and Quality Assurance Specialist. We asked him some questions about himself and how he decided to choose this career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

James: I have a B.Sc. in biology and two separate, two-year university diplomas: one in Engineering and one in Education. I also recently completed a Diploma in OHS (3-years studying at nights and on weekends) and I passed the exam for Canadian Registered Safety Representative (CRSP).

What made you decide to go into this industry?

James:  I have a background in the wire rope business as a sales development rep. for a competing firm. I knew nothing about wire rope when I made the decision to join the industry, but I had experience in steel making and several years’ experience selling to industry, so I took a chance.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

James: I was a science/ industrial arts teacher before going into engineering sales. Later I spent years selling high technology products for companies based in Toronto and in Chicago.

What made you want to transition into Quality Assurance and Safety?

Quality-Assurance

James: Working for Maritime companies involves wearing various ‘hats’. When I started in engineering sales, one of my ‘additionally assigned tasks’ was to manage my company’s quality system, when one of our engineers quit. I dealt aerospace and electronics clients for injection molded plastics parts that we manufactured for them. I am detail-oriented, and a problem-solver, so managing a quality system came easily to me. My occupational health and safety role started 7 years ago, when I was hired by Hercules.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

James: I already had the background in quality assurance and in the wire rope industry. At Hercules I have ‘internal customers’ and I still occasionally get to use my teaching skills.

Where have you traveled during your time as a Quality and Safety specialist for Hercules SLR?

James: In my first two years at Hercules, one of my tasks was to install and inspect life lines. This work sent me to natural gas plants in Alberta, where I climbed 60- foot external ladders. I also traveled to power generating stations in New Brunswick, to install life lines in hot, dust-filled coal storage silos. These are jobs that our inspectors do; it is varied work and a lot of the time… it’s just plain fun!

Now, I occasionally travel across Canada to conduct the annual internal quality audits and to accompany our external auditor during the annual ISO9001 surveillance audits.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for your job at Hercules?

James: We have branches in small towns in northern New Brunswick and large cities like Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver. I enjoy travelling in all provinces to perform audits at our branches. Every region is unique and our staff at each branch are always friendly and accommodating to me.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?
James: I haven’t been to some of the outlying branches in Ontario and it’s been a
James-Gwhile since I’ve been in New Brunswick and PEI.  I would enjoy going to those areas.

Is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

James: As companies like Hercules grow, their quality assurance and safety staff are generally expanded, to create improvements in product and service delivery and to improve their safety cultures.

The next step for someone in my position is to guide those improvements.

I also see Hercules performing external safety consulting for other companies, which is another profitable and growing area.  I look forward to being in that more senior role, in the next few years.

 

Lastly, is there anything about you that most people would not know?

James: I’m a licensed pilot; I’ve owned many motorcycles over the years and I enjoy oil painting (My life goal is to be ‘passable’ at portraits).


Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses we can tailor make courses to suit your specific requirements, at our facility or yours. To find out more about our course and how we can help you raise the bar in safety training email us at: training@herculesslr.com

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Become a Rigger: Your Career Map

"become a rigger"-become-a-rigger-hercules-slr-rigging-careers

BECOME A RIGGER.

BECOME A RIGGER: YOUR CAREER MAP

                                    

BECOME A RIGGER: TRAINING & EDUCATION                                                                               

 

 

So you want to become a rigger?

A rigger’s main responsibility is to lift, lower, hoist and pull objects using machinery and lifting equipment like synthetic, chain and wire rope slings, hoists and cranes.

They are responsible to make and determine the best configurations and equipment to lift a load, be knowledgeable about safety & operating procedures and know how to fabricate, repair, inspect, install and service rigging and lifting equipment – lifting equipment can range from synthetic slings, wire rope, lifting magnets or cranes and aerial lifting trucks. 

Certain industries, or niche industries (particularly those that require you to use and operate heavy machinery and equipment like cranes and lifting trucks) will require a specific certification to operate them. 

A rigger can provide these services: 

  •  Inspections, on-site or in-shop
  •  Load tests 
  •  Crane repair, sales, inspection and installation
  •  Training
  • Sales and services 

BECOME A RIGGER: TRAINING AND CERTIFICATIONS                                                                

 

 

Many industries that use riggers or rig technician’s don’t require formal training, but do require and/or provide on-the-job learning, training courses and certifications.

However, it may be beneficial to complete a college or technical diploma, which can improve your chances of getting a job or apprenticeship.  

At Hercules SLR, our riggers have a combination of LEEA certifications and on-the-job training from our certified trainers and inspectors.  

Some of these include:

  • Lifting Certifications from LEEA
  • Training Courses 
  • College Diploma 

You also have the option to become a rig technician, which is a Red Seal Trade in Canada. According to the NSAA, a rig technician: 

  • Operates drawworks, rotary equipment and pumps 
  • Inspects rigs 
  • Maintains records of drilling operations
  • Oversees rig mobilization and demobilization 

You don’t need formal education to become a red seal technician, but must complete 9,000 apprentice hours to qualify to complete the rig technician red seal exam. A rig technician is responsible for the above duties, but also operating tools, wearing and ensuring the proper PPE is used and must operate lifting and hoisting equipment. 

become a rigger, "become a rigger"
Cranes, chains & cargo – a glimpse at common items and equipment found in rigging industry 

BECOME A RIGGER: ESSENTIAL SKILLS                                                                                              

 

                                                                                                 You might wonder— »This sounds nice, but what should I be good at to be a rigger? » A career as a rigger may be right for you if you’re:  

  • Mechanically inclined;
  • Comfortable with math and physics; 
  • Interested in a balance of both physical and administrative work, comfortable using technology;
  • A strong, effective communicator;  
  • An eye for detail and quick decision-making; 
  • Comfortable in harsh climate conditions, rigging often involves working in the extreme heat or       cold.  

BECOME A RIGGER: INDUSTRIES YOU COULD WORK IN                                                           

 

 

  • Entertainment (set and stunt rigging) & Theatre (stage rigging) 
  • Maritime, marine & fishing – sailboat rigging included 
  • Airline 
  • Construction  
  • Offshore Drilling/Oil and Gas 
  • Mining 
  • Manufacturing
  • Forestry
  • Transportation
  • Utilities 
  • Shipping/Receiving and Material Handling 

BECOME A RIGGER: LIKE THE SOUND OF THESE JOB TITLES?                                                   

 

 

If you become a rigger, you could have one of these job titles: 

  • Slinger
  • Parachute Rigger
  • Sailboat/Ship Rigger
  • Gantry Rigger
  • Machinery Mover
  • Hook Tender
  • Wire Rigger
  • Yacht Rigger
  • Grip
  • Crane Rigger
  • Acrobatic Rigger
  • Theatrical Rigger

BLOGS                                                                                                                                                             

 
 
 
 
Interested to learn more about rigging, becoming a rig technician and rigging and lifting equipment? Check out our blogs below:
 

HERCULES TRAINING ACADEMY

TRAINING COURSES

References: https://www.nscc.ca/Learning_Programs/Programs/PlanDescr.aspx?prg=MIRG&pln=MARINDRIG, https://nsapprenticeship.ca/trades#accordion58, https://www.myplan.com/careers/riggers/description-49-9096.00.html, http://www.red-seal.ca/trades/rigtech/2012n.4.1_.4v.2rv.3.2w-eng.htmlhttps://www.jobhero.com/how-to-become-rigger/, https://www.myplan.com/careers/riggers/description-49-9096.00.html
 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Shackles: A Hercules Hardware How-To

shackles-rigging-services-hercules

Shackles are typically used as connection points for lifting equipment in many securing and rigging applications.

The type of shackle you use will depend on the lifting operation—Each has a slightly different design to suit them to various functions. There are three main types of shackles typically used for lifting applications:

  1. Dee
  2. Bow (commonly known as an anchor shackle)
  3. Screw Pin (commonly known as a grab)
    shackles-d-shackle-hercules-rigging
    D-Shackle
Dee Shackle
shackles-screw-pin-shackle
Screw pin shackle with cotter/split pin

Dee shackles are mostly used for single-point lifting.

Bow Shackle
shackles-bow-shackle
Bow Shackle

Bow Shackles are designed to be used to carry out multi-point lifts.

Screw Pin/Grab Shackle

Screw Pin or Grab Shackles are used when the shackle is required to pass through an opening, like a pipe or over an object. It is designed with a countersunk pin to facilitate this.

  • Used where a shackle is removed on a regular basis
  • When fitted, the pin must engage with the shackle body and tighten fully
  • Screw pins can be moussed in place for long-term applications, or when there’s a risk of the pin backing out due to vibration, etc. Confirm with your supervisor to make sure this is accepted on your worksite.
Bolt Types: Nut, Bolt and Cotter Pins
  • The bolt type pin (bolt, nut or cotter) is used when a load is permanent or semi-permanent.
  • This requires the rigger to insert a split pin, which captivates the nut on the pin.
  • If fitted correctly, the pin will rotate freely within the shackle body.
Round Pins

The round pin is commonly use for tie-down, suspension, towing and straight line lifting only. Don’t use round pins with multiple slings or where side loading may occur.

Pin Sizing
  • A shackle will be sized from the diameter of the bow, not pin.
  • A pin of a shackle is usually one size larger than the bow to achieve the strength of the bow. Consider this when you order a shackle for specific jobs, like a lifting lug.
Pin Replacement

Never replace a shackle’s pin with:

  • A bolt
  • A differently branded pin
  • An incorrect pin size

Angular Loading

  • Do not exceed included angle of 120° when rigging with shackles and multiple slings.
  • Apply reductions in WLL when you use shackles loaded at angles

Specialty Shackles

Round and web sling shackles that are used with synthetic slings look slightly different.

  • Wide body shackles have a larger D/d ratio for the sling, and improve the life and efficiency of the sling.
  • ROV or remotely operated vehicle shackles are painted bright yellow or white so they are visible in dark waters, the pin is also easier to access with a ROV.
  • Web sling shackles are wider and bow out in the middle
  • Round sling shackles are narrow and sometimes have tiny valleys in the bow of the shackle so the strands are better supported.

How-To: Your Pre-Use Check

Before you use your shackle, you must inspect the following on all shackles:

  • Markings are present, correct and legible including: manufacturer, working load limit (WLL), size, grade/material type
  • The correct pin is fitted
  • No visible signs of damage to the body or pin like nicks, gouges, deformations, stretch, bends, corrosion, etc.
  • No evidence of misuse

In addition to your pre-use check, be sure to avoid swing loading and shock loading, secure sling legs not in use, never leave a load suspended—or walk under it.

How it’s Made

Lifting shackles are manufactured using the drop-forge process.

The drop forge process involves a steel rod hammered with a large ‘drop’ hammer, and a die is fitted to it. This die has the upper impression of a shackle cut into it and this shape imprints on the steel rod. A fixed die has the lower impression of the shackle.

The forged shackle is heated then treated—this ensures a uniform structure and gives the shackle it’s desired uniform thickness.


Blogs

For more on shackles, check out our blogs below:


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Happy New Year from Hercules SLR

happy-new-year

Happy New Year from Hercules SLR!

We want to thank our hard-working team, partners, clients and customers for a wonderful 2018 – we can’t wait to move forward in 2019 with our team and exciting new projects.

We were pretty busy in 2018—we’ve done some eventful things, like:

Thank you again for helping us have a great 2018 – we wish you safe celebrations and a healthy, prosperous and happy new year.

Here’s to a wonderful 2018 and an even better 2019! 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Rigging Services: 3 securing tips to lift you anywhere

rigging-services-hercules-slr

Rigging Services

So you’ve got a difficult load to move – whether it’s due to an awkward shape, uneven weight or hard to determine lift points, Hercules SLR rigging services will lift you where you need to be.

We don’t just sell slings at Hercules SLR – we provide inspections, repairs, training and expert advice to keep your projects safe and efficient.

In addition to calculating the load’s weight, there are a few other tips to planning, rigging and executing a successful lift – read on for tips from our expert riggers to secure your hard-to-manage load and accomplish your next lift with ease.

rigging-services-hercules-slr
Crane lifting electric generator

Rigging Services: 3 tips to move an « awkward » load

One)

We can’t stress this enough – inspect your equipment! Says rigger Dwayne Fader, Sales Manager at Hercules SLR « Once the equipment is broken, it’s already too late – maintenance and regular inspection is the key to prevention. »

Check the manufacturer instructions or manual for suggested and required inspection times – Unless you want to damage that expensive part, package or material, which costs WAY more over time than simply investing some time and money into inspections.

An informal inspection should be done before each lift, and official inspections should be done according to manufacturer and/or provincial regulations.

Two)

Bigger isn’t always better. Sometimes, you might look at a large object like a vehicle and just think, « well I’ll grab a bigger shackle or sling. » But you’d be surprised at how much support a smaller sling and/or hardware does have.

« Most people are surprised to learn that a small, 2 1/2″ shackle is strong enough to lift a car – bigger shackles are available, but why go bigger when you don’t need to? Often, the smaller piece of equipment will be safer and better suited to the application as it’s meant to support a specific amount of weight. » says Fader.

Using slings which are too big and create bunching are a safety issue, and so is using a shackle which is too big that a sling may slide around in.

Three)

Preventative maintenance is a pain, but important. The longer a piece of equipment isn’t inspected or small repairs are ignored, the worse the outcome typically is. A small build-up of issues can eventually lead to large, more expensive repairs. Neglecting preventative maintenance will increase both cost and the risk of injury or death.

Rigging Services: reading list

Want more? Find more rigging tips and information on our blog – try these:


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Poly-What?! All About Synthetic Slings

what-are-synthetic-slings

Synthetic slings are generally available in two varieties – flat-woven web slings and round slings. Textile slings should perform in accordance with ASME standards B30.9-5.

Synthetic Slings: flat-woven web sling (or webbing sling)

Synthetic flat-woven web slings are usually made with woven polyester, polyamide (which is a fancy word for nylon) or polypropylene, and have an eye (basically, a loop) stitched at each end. They are available in Simplex (one layer) or Duplex (two layers).

Web slings are made with a safety factor of at least 5:1 – although other industries may require a higher safety factor.

Synthetic Slings: round slings

Round slings (also known as ’roundslings’) are made from load-bearing fibres with a protective, abrasion-resistant outer later. Their round form is known as ‘endless construction’, and are available in different lengths and capacities.

Synthetic Slings: beat the heat

Consider the temperature of both your surroundings and the load you will lift – synthetic materials have selective resistance to heat, which will effect which sling you choose.

Synthetic sling heat ranges are:

  • Polyester and polyamide: -40°C to 100°C
  • Polypropylene: -40°C to 80°C

These synthetic materials protect against a variety of chemicals, however – they offer different levels of protection against chemicals like acids. Synthetic sling chemical resistance is:

  • Polyamide (Nylon): Resistant to the effects of alkalis, but is attacked by acids.
  • Polyester: Resistant to acids, but damaged by alkalis.
  • Polypropylene: Shows little affect from acids or alkalis. Sustains damage from solvents and paint.
Synthetic Slings: colour codes

Synthetic material in slings are colour coded, in order to identify them properly. The label will be a specific colour, and may also have the type of material written as an abbreviation.

The colour codes are:

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Figure 1: Synthetic Sling Labels
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synthetic Slings: eye formations
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Figure 2: web sling types

The loop at the end of the web sling is called an eye formation – there are various formations to suit different applications.

There are six different types of web sling types – see figure 2. The six names for these slings are:

  • Type 1—Choker
  • Type 2—Basket
  • Type 3—Eye & Eye
  • Type 4—Twisted Eye
  • Type 5—Endless
  • Type 6—Reversed Eye
Synthetic Sling: round slings

These are made with multiple, high-tenacity yarns, which are covered with a protective sleeve. These are usually made from polyester – but, polyamide (nylon) and polypropylene are available too.

To identify these slings, an identification label is sewn into the cover which details user information and traceability requirements.

They are flexible, light-weight and very flexible.

Synthetic Sling: pre-use inspection

Follow these steps before using your synthetic sling each time – this will ensure you and coworkers will stay safe, and eliminates potential of the sling breaking and damaging the load.

If you find damage on your synthetic sling, it should be removed from service immediately – refer it to a competent person to have it inspected and repaired if necessary.

During your pre-use check, you should:

  • Check the sling label is present and legible and includes manufacturer, rated load for at least one hitch, material type, number of legs (if more than one) and the manufacturers code/stock number.
  • Check that the sling body has no signs of tears, cuts or severe abrasion
  • Check formed eyes for damaged stitching
  • Verify end fittings (where present) function correctly and are undamaged.
  • Check for signs of chemical damage.
  • Check that sling has undergone its periodic thorough inspection.
  • No knots in sling.
Synthetic Slings: shackles, hooks n’ hardware

When you attach a sling to hooks or shackles, take care to ensure the slings don’t bunch around the accessory. Bunching can cause damage since only a portion of the webbing supports the load.

When securing a load with webbing slings, don’t be concerned with the d/d ratio (diameter around the bent sling divided by the body diameter of the sling) – but you must consider the width of the webbing. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations when you lift with synthetic web slings.

what-are-synthetic-slings
Note: the sling that lies in the shackle fits perfectly – there’s no bunching or a sling that protrudes from the shackle pin.

 

Hercules SLR – Custom Rigging and Lifting Solutions

Hercules SLR offers custom lifting solutions. We’ll match you with the best equipment and hardware for your project needs, and we’ll customize equipment to meet your specifications.

Need a lift? Drop us a line at info@herculesslr.com to speak with one of our rigging experts – we’ll take you where you need to be.

Need proof? Read about the Frankensling we made for The Town of Oakville Marina, our rigging fundamentals course that Hercules staff from across Canada completed at the Hercules Training Academy, keep your synthetic round slings in good working order with our Free Downloadable Synthetic Round Sling Inspection Guide or read our blog on how to prevent synthetic round sling damage.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

A Happy Holiday from Hercules SLR

Seasons greetings and a happy holiday from Hercules SLR, your Canadian rigging team!

As the new year approaches, we want to extend warm wishes and a big thank you to our clients, partners, our team & their families this holiday season. This year, we’ve worked on Sable Island, launched our Training Academy, partnered with CNIB’s Phone It Forward Campaign, had our inspectors LEEA trained, made Frankenslings’, ventured to the isolated Voisey mine in NFLD and said good-bye to long-time employees—we can’t wait to do even more in 2019.

We look forward to lifting you into the new year! We hope 2019 and the holiday bring you warm tidings, safety and happiness.

« May you never be too grown up to search the skies on Christmas Eve. » – Unknown

Want more? Find our Winter catalogue here and discover the lifting equipment, products, rentals and services we love this season.

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Meilleurs voeux de la part de Hercules SLR, votre équipe Canadienne de gréage.

À l’approche de la nouvelle année, nous tenons à offrir nos meilleurs vœux et un grand merci à nos clients, à nos partenaires, à notre équipe et à leurs familles en cette période des Fêtes. Cette année, nous avons travaillé à l’île de Sable, nous avons lancé notre Académie de Formation, nous nous sommes associés à la campagne Phone It Forward CNIB, ont fait certifier nos inspecteurs LEEA, nous avons fait construire la mine Frankenslings, nous nous sommes aventurés à la mine Voisey à Terre-Neuve et nous avons dit au revoir aux employés de longue date.

Nous nous réjouissons de vous accueillir dans la nouvelle année ! Nous espérons que 2019 vous apportera des nouvelles chaleureuses, la sécurité et le bonheur.

« Puissiez-vous ne jamais être trop grand pour fouiller le ciel la veille de Noël. » – Inconnu

Vous en voulez plus ? Retrouvez notre catalogue Hiver ici et découvrez les équipements de levage, produits, locations et services que nous aimons cette saison.

 

 

 

 

 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.