NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

rigging training course in hamilton, ontario

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

Learn the skills to life safely, securely & efficiently at the Rigging Fundamentals course at Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario on July 15 and 16 from 8:30am to 4:30pm. 

Join our all-day, LEEA-accredited course with lifting & rigging expert Trainer Steve Hache and learn the fundamental skills of rigging to perform work in the marine, entertainment, construction, oil or transportation industry. 

Rigging is an excellent career or skill if you’re interested in mechanics & how things work, working in a variety of different locations on different machinery and keeping others safe & secure. 

At the Hercules SLR ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ Training Course, you’ll learn:  

  • Regulations and standards relevant in Canada & North America 
  • Risk assessment & management 
  • How to create and execute a rigging plan 
  • How to calculate load weight 
  • What is the rigging triangle
  • How to find the centre of gravity and calculate sling angles 
  • Pre-use inspection
  • How to communicate on a rigging site (I.E. radio, hand signals, etc.) 
  • Learn about and how to use rigging equipment like slings, hitches, hardware and hooks

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU EXPECT AT THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE?

fundamentals of rigging in hamilton, ontario
Couse outline—Click here. 

GET TO KNOW YOUR HERUCLES SLR TRAINER:

MEET STEVE HACHE, CD


TRAIN WITH THE BEST!

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SIGN-UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE CALL OR EMAIL SHERRY BOHM, CSR: 

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

How to Handle a Workplace Emergency

workplace emergency toy responder

How-to Handle a Workplace Emergency

We’ve discussed Emergency Preparedness Week earlier this week on the blog – But what about how to handle a workplace emergency? Emergency Preparedness Week is held for one week each year, and this week it’s May 5-11.

To celebrate, we’re sharing some of our best tips for emergency preparedness. 

Emergencies don’t wait until you’re home. We’ve covered general emergency preparedness, like what your emergency plan & kit should include, and that you should keep a version of both an emergency plan and kit in your workplace. 

It’s smart to be prepared for emergency situations no matter where you are. Many tips for emergency preparedness in the home apply to the workplace, but there are a few other situations and procedures unique to work that are worth being prepared for. (It’s also an essential part of any Occupational Health & Safety program). 

Emergencies you could encounter at work are:

  • Fires/Structural failures 
  • Medical emergencies
  • Attacks (Shootings, active assailants, etc.) 
  • Industrial accidents (Ex. hazardous chemical spills, burns, etc.) 

How can you prepare for emergencies in the workplace? We recommend: 

  • Conduct a workplace risk assessment
  • Hold emergency drills at least once a year 
  • Have an emergency kit in your office or workplace (Consider where the highest risk is, the amount of people and gather materials like blankets, food & water accordingly) 
  • Have a rescue procedure for falls, slips and other accidents relevant that are relevant to your workplace 
Four elements of a workplace emergency management program are:
  1. Prevention: Policies and procedures that minimize emergencies 
  2. Preparation: Hold drills and activities to make sure personnel is familiar with the procedure 
  3. Response: Action to take when emergency occurs 
  4. Recovery: Practices to resume normal business operations 
Here are six steps to plan for a workplace emergency: 
  1. Establish a planning team. The team should include representatives from different departments including senior management. 
  2. Assess the risks and how the company can respond.
  3. Develop an emergency response plan.
  4. Implement the plan—Get supplies, communicate & train others 
  5. Test the plan—Hold drills or exercises 
  6. Improve the plan continuously. Revisit the plan at least once a year.

So, what should you include in step 3? Here are some things you should include in your written workplace emergency response plan: 

  • Scope and outline potential emergencies 
  • Alarms and other methods of initiating a response 
  • Site-specific response procedures 
  • Command structure, roles & responsibilities 
  • How to shut down power & relevant machinery 
  • How to evacuate the premises
  • Communication systems and protocols 
  • Emergency contact lists 
  • Resource list 

Extra Workplace Emergency Tips  

  • Hold random emergency drills now and then—It can be worthwhile to show employees what a perceived threat is like, and how to ‘jump into action’ when you’re unprepared, and the hazard or incident is unplanned. 
  • Don’t forget about visitors—If you have customers, clients or other personnel that are likely to be in the workplace, don’t forget to include provisions for them in your plan 
  • Have accessible emergency information available—Having accessible emergency information includes posters and training videos 

We hope this gives you an idea of what to include in your workplace emergency plan. This is a loose guideline for handling workplace emergencies, as we mention at the beginning of the article it’s wise to prepare for emergencies that are relevant to your workplace—For example, if you work at heights often, an emergency plan for workers who have arrested a fall will be a necessary emergency plan to have. 


DEALING WITH A WORKPLACE EMERGENCY? CHECK OUT THESE BLOGS: 

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK | WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

STUCK IN A TIGHT SPOT? WHAT TO KNOW IN A CONFINED SPACE


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES REPAIRS, INSPECTIONS & MAINTENANCE FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876  


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

National Emergency Preparedness Week | What you Need to Know

national emergency preparedness week header

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK

Since 1996, National Emergency Preparedness week happens each year in Canada for one week. This year, it’s being held from May 5-11. 

This is a national awareness campaign and is a collaboration between the provinces, emergency organizations and other groups across the country. It’s a great time to make sure your workplace, and your home is equipped with an emergency plan and kit to stay safe if an emergency happens. 

National Emergency Preparedness Week is meant to showcase the importance of being prepared for a range of emergencies—These three steps are recommended to prepare: 

  • Know the risks 
  • Make a plan 
  • Get an emergency kit 

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 1) KNOW THE RISKS 

One of the most useful (yet simple) things you can do to be prepared for an emergency is to understand the region you live in. Natural disasters are a risk in Canada, and they can vary depending on which region you live in. 

There are some risks other than natural disaster that are important to prepare for—These can include technological hazards, industrial or transportation accidents or power outages. 

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 2) MAKE A PLAN 

It’s important to have a plan in-case of an emergency. You can have an emergency plan that works for a variety of different circumstances. 

They plans might be different depending on your family, location and other factors. It doesn’t take long to create an emergency preparedness kit either—20 minutes is all it takes to ensure you, your workplace and family is safe in case of an emergency situation. 

Some important things to keep in mind when creating your emergency plan are: 

  • Be familiar/Have copies of your provincial emergency response plan. 
  • Plan how your family/workforce will communicate with each other if an emergency happens and you’re not together 
  • Plan for specific risks like earthquakes, power outages and severe storms 
  • Keep people from your neighbourhood in mind that may need extra help during an emergency, for example, an elderly neighbour, and assign ‘block buddies’ for those who require one. 

GET YOUR DOWNLOADABLE EMERGENCY PLAN CHECKLIST HERE

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 3) GET AN EMERGENCY KIT 

Emergency kits can be bought from places like Red Cross First Aid, the Salvation Army, or you can create you own. 

We recommend looking at your emergency kit each year and be sure to replace the food inside. 

GET YOUR DOWNLOADABLE EMERGENCY KIT CHECKLIST HERE

Here are some additional items you might want to keep in your emergency kit (beyond the basic items found on the checklist above). 

In your car:

  • Blanket 
  • Candle & matches 
  • Spare clothes and shoes 
  • First aid kit with seatbelt cutter 
  • Flashlight (crank or battery-powered)—Replace batteries once a year 
  • Non-perishable food 
  • Contact information
  • Radio—Replace batteries once a year 
  • Small shovel, scraper and snowbrush
  • Warning light or road flares 
  • Water 
  • Whistle
  • Antifreeze, windshield washer fluid
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Road maps
  • Sand, salt or cat litter (non-clumping)
  • Tow rope and jumper cables 

FAST FACTS:

  • Around 5,000 earthquakes happen in Canada each year.
  • The Saguenay flood of 1996 was Canada’s first billion-dollar disaster and caused mud, rocks, water and trees to become dislodged and 12,000 people had to evacuate their homes.
  • Only 40% of Canadians have an emergency kit prepared, yet 85% of Canadians say it’s important to have one. 
  • Hailstones range in size—They can be the size of peas or baseballs.
  • Hurricanes can cause more widespread damage than tornadoes—Their damage can hit over 1,000 kilometres.
  • In storms, power lines, ice or branches can fall even hours after the storm has ended. 
  • One of the worst storms in Canadian history was an ice storm on the East Coast in 1998—Power outages lasted up to 4 weeks, and restoration efforts cost nearly $3billion. 
  • In 2007, 410 severe weather events plagued the prairie provinces—This is almost double their nearly average of 221 severe weather events.
  • The cost of natural disasters worldwide has increased by $7billion over the past decade. 
  • The biggest landslide in Canadian history saw a 40-metre deep scar that covered 80 city blocks in 1894 at Saint-Alban, Quebec. 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS INSTRUCTIONS 

We’ve given you a lot of tips about what you should include in your emergency preparedness kit. Here are more steps you can take for an emergency plan: 

In an emergency

  • Follow your emergency plan
  • Get your emergency kit 
  • Make sure you’re safe before assisting others 
  • Listen to the radio or television for information from authorities—Local officials might advise you to stay where you are. Follow their instructions! 
  • Stay where you are until it’s safe to evacuate. 

Evacuation orders

  • NOTE: Authorities won’t ask you to leave home unless they have a reason to believe you’re in danger 
  • If ordered to evacuate, take your emergency kit, wallet, personal identification for each family member and copies of essential family documents with you. Bring a celluar phone and spare battery or charger with you, if you have one. Use travel routes specified by local authorities. 
  • If you have time, call or e-mail your out-of-town contact (Here’s a printable list you can use to write down contact information) 
  • If there’s time, leave a note that tells others when you left and what you’ve shut off. If officials give the direction, shut off water and electricity. 
  • If you have a natural gas service, leave it on unless officials tell you to turn it off. If you do turn off the gas, the gas company will have to reconnect it—Note that in a major emergency, it could take weeks for a professional to respond in a major emergency. 
  • If you have them, take pets with you. Lock your home and follow instructions from authorities. 
  • If you go to an evacuation centre, register personal information at the registration desk—Leave only when authorities advise it’s safe. 

FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOG:

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: BUILDING A SAFETY CULTURE AT HERCULES SLR

FALL PROTECTION SAFETY: WHAT’S YOUR IQ?


SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT—HERCULES SLR PROVIDES WORKPLACE SAFETY TRAINING, INSPECTIONS & MORE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

April 28, Day of Mourning: Fight for the Living, Mourn for the Dead

blue, white and yellow hard hats for day of mourning

APRIL 28, DAY OF MOURNING | ABOUT

Every year in Canada, April 28 is the Day of Mourning. This is to commemorate workers who have lost their life, been injured or made ill at work.

The Day of Mourning has grown to include more than 120 countries around the world. In many of these places, it’s known as the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, or Worker’s Memorial Day. 

The purpose of this day is to not only remember and honour those lost to workplace accidents, but to inform and educate workers about workplace accidents and talk about how we can prevent these tragedies. 

APRIL 28, DAY OF MOURNING | FAST FACTS ON WORKPLACE INJURY

  • In 1984, the Canadian Labour congress created the National Day of Mourning in Canada 
  • In 1991, the Parliament of Canada passed the Workers Mourning Day Act to recognize April 28 as an official date of mourning 
  • Young worker’s aged 18-24 are most likely to be injured on the job. 
  • In 2017, 951 workplace fatalities were recorded in Canada—46 more than 2016. 23 of these deaths were workers aged 15-24. 
  • 251,508 accepted claims from workplace injury (An increase of 10,000 accepted claims from 2016) for lost time due to a work-related injury or disease. 
  • Canadian flags on Parliament fly at half-mast 
  • To show respect for others who have lost their life, people wear yellow ribbons, black, light candles and/or observe a moment of silence at 11am. 

APRIL 28, DAY OF MOURNING | WHAT YOU CAN DO

On the Day of Mourning, there are a few things you can do at your workplace to commemorate the day, pay respects and commit to safety. Here are a few ideas: 

  • Have a health & safety meeting covering safety-related topics like PPE 
  • Have your team share stories about different safety-related situations or issues they’ve dealt with
  • Brainstorm ideas to make your workplace safer with your team

We remember those who died, were injured or made ill from their work. We commit to protecting workers and preventing further workplace tragedies. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

POLY-WHAT?! ALL ABOUT SYNTHETIC SLINGS

SYNTHETIC ROUNDSLING—FREE INSPECTION DOWNLOAD GUIDE

HERCULES HOW-TO: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Fall Protection Safety: What’s your IQ?

fall protection safety quiz hercules securing, lifting and rigging

Think you know how to stay safe at heights? Maybe you’ve read our fall protection glossary and think you’re an expert? Now’s your time to prove it—Take our fall protection safety quiz and find out if you have a high IQ, or if you have a little more training to do. 

Think you have what it takes? Find out below! 

FALL PROTECTION SAFETY | TAKE THE QUIZ

0%

How many injuries occur each year in Canada due to dropped objects?

Correct! Wrong!

Over 27,000 injuries occur due to falling objects each year in Canada—These are just the reported incidents.

True or false? You only need fall protection equipment if you're working at exceptional heights, like on a bridge or skyscraper.

Correct! Wrong!

Fall protection equipment, particularly fall protection for tools is required for work at heights of 3-metres or more.

The term 'arresting force' means:

Correct! Wrong!

Arresting force means the force transferred to the body when a fall is arrested—this is also known as fall arrest force. You can reduce arresting force by using energy absorbers if your lanyard could injure you.

Safety harnesses should always be tried on before purchasing

Correct! Wrong!

You should always try on your safety harness before you purchase. It should fit well, be comfortable and meet provincial regulations.

A safety harness is still safe to use if the webbing is torn a little bit, as long as it's not around the D-ring.

Correct! Wrong!

Webbing varies from harness to harness, however, make sure to choose a harness with sturdily-constructed webbing—If the harness has any burns, tears, holes or frayed webbing. The material should slide through hardware without catching/snagging. If it does, take your harness out of service. Safety harnesses are meant to be used in

How should padding on your safety harness fit?

Correct! Wrong!

Like you probably learned from earlier questions, comfort is important when it comes to fall protection equipment. Padding on a safety harness should be easy to handle, pliable and easily adjustable. Padding must also be able to withstand harsh weather and corrosive conditions, so it's important to select padding that's both breathable and durable.

ALL safety harnesses should come with instructions for best-use.

Correct! Wrong!

Thought it might sound common-sense, all safety harnesses should include tips for applications, instructions and guidelines for using accessories and hardware. Be sure it meets CSA guidelines for your intended application.

How many CSA classifications are there for full-body harnesses?

Correct! Wrong!

There are 5 CSA (Canadian Standards Association) standards for full-body harnesses. These are: Class A, Class AD Suspension and Controlled Descent, Class AE Limited Access, Class AL Ladder Climbing and Class AP Work Positioning.

Items only usually fall from heights when they're unsecured.

Correct! Wrong!

Tools and other items are dropped from heights for a number of reasons—While inadequately-stored or secured tools are the third leading cause of dropped tools from heights, inadequate risk assessment and human factors (poor behaviour, complacency) are the top 2 causes.

Nobody actually dies from falling at work

Correct! Wrong!

VERY false—Over 14,000 Canadian workers are injured each year from falls, and over 40 each year are killed from falls at heights.

What's your Fall Protection Safety IQ?
50%—You've got some work to do!
You're halfway there, but you've got some work to do—Hopefully you're not planning to work at heights anytime soon!
0-10%—Yikes, please don't work at heights anytime soon.
You're not quite there—At all. If you work at heights, we recommend taking some fall protection training to learn more.
20-40%—Close, but no cigar.
You know a small bit, but your fall protection I.Q. isn't what it should be yet—Especially if you're working with or around people at heights.
60-70%—Hey, that's pretty good!
Your fall protection I.Q. is high, but it could be better. Have you ever considered taking some more training? To brush up your fall protection knowledge, check out our fall protection blogs for more info.
80-90%—You're almost a fall protection genius.
You're pretty much there. A little brushing up on your fall protection knowledge and you'll be a fall protection genius in no-time.
100%—You're fall protection I.Q. is off the charts!
You're a fall protection genius—You answered them all correctly. Where do we sign up to take your training course?

Share your Results:


FALL PROTECTION SAFETY

Fall protection is not a waste of time—It’s often seen as a burden, but safety equipment exists to help workers, not hurt them. The right fall protection PPE lets you go home safely each day.

You have the right to stay alive at work—Which is worth it, if you ask us.  

To learn more about fall protection and what you need to stay safe, book a free fall protection demo with your local Hercules SLR branch. They’ll show you how harnesses, SRL’s and tool fall prevention equipment works, how it feels and what is best for you. 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT

FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR FALL PROTECTION SAFETY SERVICES & PRODUCTS 

 


FOR MORE ARTICLES ON FALL PROTECTION SAFETY

VISIT OUR BLOG:

FALL ARREST SYSTEM: DON’T FOOL WITH YOUR TOOLS

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and YouTube for more news and upcoming events.

Under Construction: Building Safety Culture at Hercules SLR

safety culture at hercules slr

Hercules SLR has been building a safety culture for over 45 years—Yes, we literally got here by playing it safe.

When it comes to rigging, Hercules SLR does it all, and we does it safely. How do we build a safety culture? Read on to learn how we make safety cool, (really). 

SAFETY CULTURE | why we’re proud 

We approach safety with everything we do, from how we inspect cranes to how we pull into our parking lot each morning (It’s true, we back in—It’s the safest way).  

It’s important to lead by example. Behaviour-based safety training has long-been used as a framework to build a safety culture. This approach says that human-behaviour is the main cause of workplace accidents, and to prevent workplace accidents, employees should tell supervisors and managers when unsafe behaviours take place, and discipline or reward them—And yes, while human error is up there on the list of reasons why, it’s also been proven that discipline alone and placing blame doesn’t actually make a workplace safer.

It’s much more effective to lead by example, ingrain safety in your daily actions and get feedback from coworkers and employees on the safety culture at your organization. To us, it’s important to know why employees work safe—Why do you want to go home at the end of each day? Whether it’s to spend time with family, play hockey or go ATVing, our safety culture lets us do what we love outside of work. 

SAFETY CULTURE | leading by example

We provide training and on-going learning opportunities for our employees—These include:

  • Support and training for all branches across Canada by our in-house trainer, Lisa Barkhouse  
  • Rich online resource library (powerpoints, manuals & video)
  • Opportunities for external training and certifications 
  • The Hercules Training Academy—our cutting-edge training academy is equipped with a crane that supports 10-tonnes, smaller gantry cranes and materials to lift and rig you’ll actually encounter on-site

Overall, Canadian workplaces lack on-the-job training, and Hercules SLR is passionate about providing on-the-job training. We know it’s important to give our employees the skills they need to be safe.

SAFETY CULTURE | health, safety & life at Hercules SLR

Health and safety go hand-in-hand. How does Hercules SLR make sure we support a healthy lifestyle? We: 

  • Offer incentives for employees to get out and get moving
  • Benefits comparable to industry standards
  • Social outings and team-building activities 

We’re also proud of our diverse workforce. We have staff hailing from China to England—And Canada, of course. 

What else is great about work at Herc? There’s:

  • Strong sense of teamwork 
  • Management team that recognizes individual achievements you reach and exceed
  • Bonuses and sales incentives for our team of Customer Service Representative’s (CSR’s) and salespeople 
  • Exciting growth opportunities for those who are eager to learn—For example, of one our inspectors expressed interest in gaining more certification, and we made it happen for her. 

SAFETY CULTURE | is work at Hercules SLR right for you?

Is #HercAtWork right for you? If you’re:

  • Engaged
  • Motivated
  • A self-advocate
  • Excited to learn

You’ll fit right in. Find information on current career openings below. 


WORK WITH HERC

VIEW & APPLY FOR POSITIONS AT HERCULES SLR BELOW

HR@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR RELATED READING

VISIT OUR BLOG:

MEET YOUR HERCULES SLR INSPECTOR, QUINCY WARNER

MEET QUALITY ASSURANCE & SAFETY SPECIALIST, JAMES GOLEMIC

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

PPE-volution – How the Golden Gate Bridge Inspired PPE

Brooklyn bridge workers

America’s Industrial Revolution and ingenuity brought about many important advances in worker safety and PPE (Personal Protection Equipment).

At the start of the American Industrial Revolution, worker safety and health were nowhere near the priority they are today. As manufacturing grew, so too did worker injuries and deaths. The idea of safe work grew slowly from a small glimmer to a bright flame inside the collective consciousness of the American workforce.

Although the creation of OSHA regulations was many decades away, the evolution of PPE progressed on its own with the creation of new types of protective devices and advancements in pre-existing devices. Much of this early PPE had a major influence on worker safety’s advancement and will continue to do so.

Hard-Headed PPE Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, built in 1933, is an excellent early example of PPE’s influence on safety. Constructing a cable-suspension bridge that was 4,200 feet long was a task that had not been attempted before, one that presented many hazards. The project’s chief engineer, Joseph Strauss, was committed to making its construction as safe as possible.

The bridge’s construction played a particularly significant role in the successful development of one form PPE: It was the first major project that required all of its workers to wear hard hats. Although the hard hat was in its infancy at the time, head protection wasn’t new; gold miners had learned long before the importance of taking steps to protect against falling debris. Michael Lloyd, head protection manager at Bullard – a company in business since 1898, said many early miners wore bowler hats, which were hard felt hats with rounded crowns. Often dubbed « Iron Hats, » these were stuffed with cotton to create a cushioning barrier against blows.

Inspired by the design of his « doughboy » Army helmet, Edward Bullard returned home from World War I and began designing what was to become known as the « hard-boiled hat. » The hat was made of layered canvas that was steamed to impregnate it with resin, sewn together, and varnished into its molded shape. Bullard was awarded the patent in 1919. Later that year, the Navy approached Bullard with a request for some sort of head protection for its shipyard workers. The hat’s first internal suspension was added to increase its effectiveness, and the product’s use quickly spread to lumber workers, utility workers, and construction workers. By the time of the Hoover Dam’s construction in 1931, many workers were voluntarily wearing the headgear. Soon after, the Golden Gate Bridge construction provided a true test of the hard hat’s protective capability because falling rivets were one of the major dangers during the project.

Other innovations came in the form of different materials. In 1938, Bullard released the first aluminum hard hat. It was more durable and comfortable, but it conducted electricity and did not hold up well to the elements. In the ’40s, phenolic hats became available as a predecessor to fiberglass hats. Thermoplastics became the preferred material a decade later for many head protection products; it’s still used by many manufacturers today.
PPE-Hard-hats
From Left to right: Vintage Bullard Miners hats, Vintage Bullard Hard Boiled Hard Hat 1930’s (Used on the Golden Gate Bridge Project, Hard Boiled aluminum Safety hard hat w/Liner and a current day hard hat

In 1953, Bullard introduced the process of injection-molded hats. « Before, [thermoplastic] was kind of laid out on a mold. In the injection-mold process you actually have a closed mold that you pump into. It makes a more consistent helmet and a higher-quality product, which in the long run is also going to be the same thickness all the way through. It’s going to be a safer helmet, » Lloyd said.

Despite the hard hat’s effectiveness and relatively low cost, its use wasn’t officially required at most job sites until the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1970. OSHA’s head protection standard, 1910.135, obligated employees to protect workers and instructed manufacturers and employers to turn to the American National Standards Institute’s Z89.1 standard for the appropriate usage guidelines.

Many new materials have since been created, such as the use of General Electric’s high-heat-resistant polyphthalate-carbonate resin in firefighters’ helmets. New hard hats have been designed that provide side protection, which are designated type 2 hats in ANSI Z89.1. « A hard hat was originally designed to protect if something falls from that sky and hits you in the head, » Lloyd said. « But what happens if you run into something? What happens if you bend over and something hits your helmet? »

Because hard hats are a mature market, except for the development of other materials, most innovations will be comfort features and technologies enabling them to withstand different temperature extremes, Lloyd predicted. Easier-to-use designs are appearing that allow users to adjust a hard hat’s suspension with one hand. In the last couple of years, manufacturers have come up with different types of vented helmets designed to help workers keep cool. Hats are accessorized with attachable face shields, visors, and ear muffs, and some have perspiration-absorbing liners. Some come with AM/FM radios, walkie-talkies, and camcorders.

Netting a Safe Return
Although primitive by today’s standards, the solution for the problem of falls also was addressed during construction of the Golden Gate Bridge. Three years into the construction, delays had convinced Strauss to invest more than $130,000 (these were Depression-era dollars, remember) on a vast net similar to those used in a circus. Suspended under the bridge, it extended 10 feet wider and 15 feet farther than the bridge itself. This gave workers the confidence to move quickly across the slippery steel construction. There were reports of workers being threatened with immediate dismissal if found purposely diving into the net.

Strauss’ net was heralded as a huge success until the morning of Feb. 16, 1937, when the west side of a stripping platform bearing a crew of 11 men broke free from its moorings. After tilting precariously for a moment, the other side broke free and the platform collapsed into the net, which contained two other crew members who were scraping away debris. One platform worker, Tom Casey, managed to jump and grab a bridge beam before the platform fell; he hung there until rescued. The net held the platform and the others for a few seconds before it ripped and fell into the water. Two of the 12 men who fell survived.

Read the original article here.

At Hercules SLR we provide a wide range of PPE solutions, from Lanyards and harnesses, to hard hats and rescue equipment.  We also repair, service and certify PPE equipment. We stock leading industry brands and can provide you with expert advise on your PPE options depending on your project. Call us on 1-877-461-4876 for more information.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Protection Contre les Chutes des PPE en Amérique du Nord

Abseiling

Protection contre les chutes des EPI : la longe précoce

Au début du 20e siècle, de nombreux professionnels utilisaient des dispositifs de protection contre les chutes, mais ils utilisaient des cordes en fibres naturelles, comme le chanvre de Manille, et de simples ceintures corporelles sans propriétés d’absorption des chocs. Clarence W. Rose-qui au début de sa carrière était un laveur de vitres-est devenu un pionnier de la protection contre les chutes lorsqu’il a créé la Rose Mfg. Co. en 1934 et a commencé à produire des ceintures de sécurité et des cordons pour laveurs de vitres. Le 24 novembre 1959, Rose a obtenu un brevet pour un connecteur de câble facile à utiliser pour les ceintures de sécurité qui avait également certaines propriétés d’absorption des chocs (brevet américain 2,914,139). Le brevet mentionnait que le connecteur pouvait, entre autres, « être adapté pour glisser en réponse à une secousse soudaine, comme lorsque la corde de sécurité contrôle la chute d’un porteur et atténue ainsi le choc subi par le porteur en contrôlant la chute ».

PPE Fall Protection
Nettoyeur de vitres sur Madison Avenue

Protection contre les chutes des PPE : un grand pas en avant dans l’absorption des chocs

Joseph Feldstein, directeur des services techniques de la MSA, qui a acheté la Rose Mfg. Co. en 1996, a déclaré que l’idée d’un amortisseur était un grand pas en avant dans la protection contre les grandes forces de freinage générées lors des chutes d’arrêt, surtout à l’époque de Rose.

« Si vous pouvez imaginer, les travailleurs avec une simple ceinture et une longe qui étaient communes jusqu’à ce point seraient exposés à une chute qui pourrait non seulement les endommager intérieurement en raison des forces exercées sur les tissus mous de l’abdomen autour de la ceinture, mais aussi vous pourriez générer de telles forces que vous pourriez séparer la longe, » a-t-il dit.

Rose a continué à développer son concept d’absorption des chocs et a obtenu plusieurs brevets pour des amortisseurs plus récents et plus performants. En fin de compte, ses conceptions ont influencé la création de l’amortisseur moderne. Rose a également reçu de nombreux autres brevets liés d’une manière ou d’une autre à la prévention ou à la protection des travailleurs contre les chutes. Un exemple est le brevet pour un des premiers systèmes de harnais « Ladder Climber » (brevet américain 2,886,227) qui contient deux longes à crochets qui sont toutes deux attachées à un harnais. En montant ou en descendant, un travailleur saisit un crochet dans chaque main et les fixe sur des barreaux d’échelle alternés.

Des décennies plus tard, l’industrie a vu l’émergence des mousquetons à verrouillage et des harnais complets, qui ont tous deux été beaucoup mieux acceptés dans les années 1980. En 1990, l’OSHA a promulgué le règlement 1910.66. Craig Firl, directeur du marketing des produits Hardgoods pour Capital Safety-USA, a déclaré que l’annexe C de ce règlement était la clé de la mise à jour de plusieurs domaines de la technologie de protection contre les chutes.

« Même si cette norme particulière à l’époque permettait d’utiliser des crochets non verrouillables dans un système de protection contre les chutes, ils ont recommandé le type de verrouillage à utiliser parce que ces crochets étaient plus sûrs et plus compatibles », a déclaré M. Firl.

Protection contre les chutes des EPI : plus de matériel que jamais

M. Feldstein est d’accord, ajoutant que l’acceptation du mousqueton de verrouillage a conduit à la création de toute une nouvelle série de systèmes d’ancrage de connexion : sangles, anneaux en D, et plus encore. « Et cela a continué à évoluer jusqu’à son état actuel, où nous avons maintenant des connecteurs d’ancrage personnalisés pour presque toutes les applications, que ce soit dans la construction de bâtiments ou dans l’industrie en général », a-t-il déclaré. Même si les ceintures de sécurité sont toujours autorisées, M. Feldstein a déclaré que l’annexe C reconnaissait que l’OSHA considérait les harnais complets comme une innovation majeure en matière d’antichute. « Les ceintures sont toujours autorisées en position, mais en cas de chute, vous voulez absolument être protégé par un harnais complet. Il répartit la charge sur votre poitrine et la masse osseuse de votre hanche, là où votre corps est le plus capable d’absorber un coup, et il protège les tissus mous de l’abdomen », a déclaré M. Feldstein.

Deux ans après l’arrivée de 1910.66, le comité ANSI a publié la norme Z359.1, la principale norme de protection contre les chutes en vigueur aujourd’hui. Elle exigeait notamment l’utilisation de harnais complets et de mousquetons autobloquants. Firl a déclaré que cette norme de conformité volontaire a fait pression sur l’OSHA pour qu’elle reconnaisse que sa norme existante avait besoin d’être mise à jour et a encouragé l’achèvement d’une autre norme de protection contre les chutes pour l’industrie de la construction, la sous-partie M, en 1995. Selon cette norme, à partir du 1er janvier 1998, l’utilisation de ceintures de sécurité et de mousquetons non verrouillables a été interdite.

Au cours des années 80, les longes auto-rétractables (SRL) ont gagné en développement et en utilisation. Elles avaient été développées dans les années 50 pour la production pétrolière offshore en mer du Nord, mais sont rapidement devenues un élément commun des systèmes de protection contre les chutes dans le monde entier. Selon M. Feldstein, les LRS sont devenues si précieuses parce qu’elles permettaient de protéger les travailleurs sur une plus grande longueur de trajet, augmentant ainsi la productivité sans sacrifier la sécurité. Il a décrit un scénario pour les travailleurs des wagons de chemin de fer :

« Les travailleurs pouvaient être protégés depuis le niveau du sol et jusqu’au sommet du wagon pendant qu’ils travaillaient sur la longueur du train, car le SRL pouvait être monté de manière mobile au-dessus de la tête. Cela a donc permis d’offrir un nouveau type de protection à tous les types de travailleurs du secteur des transports, qu’il s’agisse de wagons, de camions ou d’avions ».

En ce qui concerne l’avenir de la protection contre les chutes, Firl et Feldstein ont déclaré qu’ils pensent que le confort continuera à progresser. Firl prévoit également des avancées dans les marchés de niche avec des matériaux et des composants spécialisés, similaires à la progression des ancrages à vide dans l’industrie aérienne pour les travaux de maintenance des avions, dont les surfaces ne peuvent pas être pénétrées avec des ancrages de type traditionnel.

« Dans le passé, un harnais était un harnais. Peu importait que ce soit pour la construction, les travaux publics ou l’entreposage, c’était un harnais », a-t-il déclaré. « Maintenant, vous commencez à voir des équipements plus spécialisés . .  Par exemple, dans le secteur des services publics, on utilise beaucoup de matériaux résistants aux flammes… parce qu’ils sont préoccupés par la résistance à la chaleur, ils sont préoccupés par la résistance à l’arc électrique, etc.

Chez Hercules SLR, nous avons en stock les PPE et les produits de protection contre les chutes de MSA, 3M et Honeywell Miller, afin de vous fournir une gamme complète et de haute qualité de produits de protection contre les chutes. Nos experts internes vous conseilleront sur l’équipement le mieux adapté à votre projet. Lorsque vient le moment de vos inspections et de votre entretien annuel, nos techniciens peuvent inspecter, réparer et certifier votre équipement. Pour plus d’informations sur nos produits et services de protection contre les chutes, veuillez nous appeler : 1-877-461-4876.

References
https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2007/01/01/PPEvolution.aspx?Page=4

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INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4877


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Hercules SLR fait partie du groupe d’entreprises Hercules, avec des sites et des entreprises uniques d’un océan à l’autre. Nous fournissons des services d’arrimage, de levage et de gréement pour des secteurs au Canada et à l’étranger. Hercules SLR est au service des secteurs de l’énergie, du pétrole et du gaz, de la fabrication, de la construction, de l’aérospatiale, des infrastructures, des services publics, de l’exploitation minière et de la marine.

Le groupe de sociétés Hercules est composé de : Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial et Wire Rope Atlantic.

Nous avons la capacité de fournir toute solution de levage dont votre entreprise ou votre projet aura besoin. Appelez-nous dès aujourd’hui pour plus d’informations. 1-877-461-4876 ou envoyez un courriel à info@herculesslr.com