Herc How-To: Assemble a Chain Sling

how-to-assemble-chain-sling

Herc How-To: assemble a chain sling

Chain is often used to tie down loads, for lifting applications and to tow loads – however, the rigging industry’s safety standards have developed in recent years, and chain used for lifting must meet certain specifications. Read on for our tips on how to assemble a chain sling.  

Chain slings are among some of the most popular options for to lift a load – they’re often used to lift spreader beams, for example. Chain slings are durable, ductile, can resist high temperatures, rips & tears and in certain applications, are adjustable – but how do you determine the best chain sling for your project needs?

Herc How-To: two kinds of chain assembly

Two types of chain slings are used to for rigging and lifting applications – mechanical assembly and welded assembly. Chain slings are made with a minimum safety or design factor of 4:1.

The most common chain slings used in rigging and lifting are mechanically assembled since they’re quick to produce and it can be done with basic tools. Chain slings are made by a variety of manufacturers and in many different configurations.

Herc How-To: mechanically assembled chain sling hardware

Construct a basic mechanically assembled chain sling with this hardware:

  • Master Link
  • Mechanical Jointing Device
  • Shortening Clutch (if required)
  • Chain
  • Hook (other fitting as required)
  • Tag

Herc How-To: welded assembly

Welded slings are less commonly used. They take more time to manufacture, since once they’re made they undergo a heat treatment so they’re safe to use in a lifting application. This takes days, versus the minutes it takes to together a mechanically assembled chain sling.

Construct a welded assembly chain sling with this hardware:

  • Master Link
  • Welded Intermediate Link
  • Welded Connecting Link
  • Chain
  • Hook (other fittings if required) ** not pictured
  • Tag

Herc How-To: assemble a chain sling with correct chain grades

The marking grade for chains is recognized by numbers which are found on the chain link. Chain grades for chain sling assembly start at Grade 80 – Grade 80, 100 and 120 are used for lifting applications. However, do not use chain grade marks to determine overhead lifting applications. Do not use grade 30, 40 or 70 chains for overhead lifting.

These grades are used for lifting as they’re ductile and can cope with “shock-loading” that can happen while rigging.

Herc How-To: find the right assembly for you

Follow these steps to assemble the best chain sling for your lifting needs.

  1. Determine the weight of the load to lift, it’s working load limit and any angles that will affect the lift – read our blog on how to calculate load weight for detailed steps.
  2. Head to the dimension/specification chart provided by the chain sling’s manufacturer. Find the chain sling configuration* that will suit your load and lift.
  3. Head to the assembly chart found in the catalogue or website of your respective distributer. Find the Working Load Limit (WLL) to lift at the top of the chart. Find the column that represents size/length, which will be donated in centimetres, inches or millimetres. Be sure to size up. Example: if your load’s WLL is 3,000lbs the chart may give you two options – a WLL of 2,650 and 4,500. Choose the chain length that corresponds with the WLL of 4,500lbs – it’s better to have too much capacity than not enough.
  4. Use the same instructions from Step 3 to choose hardware/fittings from the respective specification chart(s). Example: You’ve chose the DOG sling configuration – this means you must find an oblong shaped masterlink and a grab hook that corresponds to the WLL.
For example: Jim is planning to lift a load with a WLL of 3,000lbs and wants to assemble a chain sling.

Step 1) Jim finds the WLL column of his retailer.

Step 2) Find the WLL – since 3,000lbs isn’t on the chart, we choose the next one up which has a WLL of 4,500lbs.

Step 3) Jim needs chain with 1.79in. length.

how-to-assemble-chain-sling

 
* Chain Sling Configurations

Configurations are denoted by an acronym – the first letter represents the number of sling legs, the second letter represents the fitting at the top of the sling and the third letter represents the bottom fitting. Example: the “O” in DOG represents an “oblong shaped master link”.

Single-Leg 
     
COSingle chain sling with masterlink 
SOSSingle chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
SOGSingle chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
SOFSingle chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
SSSSingle chain sling with sling hook each end 
SGSSingle chain sling with grab hook and sling hook
ASOSAdjustable single chain with masterlink and sling hook 
ASOFAdjustable single chain with masterlink and foundry hook 
ASOGAdjustable single chain with masterlink and grab hook 
SOCHSingle chain sling with sliding choker  
SOSLSingle chain sling with with self locking hooks 
2-Leg
     
DOSDouble chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
DOGDouble chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
DOFDouble chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
ADOSAdjustable double chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
ADOGAdjustable double chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
DOCHDouble chain sling with masterlink and sliding choker 
DOSLDouble chain sling with with self locking hooks 
ADOSLAdjustable double chain sling with with self-locking hooks 
3-Leg
     
TOSTriple chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
TOGTriple chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
TOFTriple chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
TOSLTriple  chain sling with with self locking hooks 
4-Leg
     
QOSQuadruple chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
QOGQuadruple chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
QOFQuadruple chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
QOSLQuadruple chain sling with self-locking hooks 

 

Hercules SLR – Custom Chain Sling Assembly, Inspections, Repairs and more

We make custom slings to fit your needs, no matter the application. Damage found on chain slings can be inspected, repaired or replaced if needed – e-mail us at info@herculesslr.com to purchase a chain sling, find out more about how to assemble a chain sling or to have a chain sling repaired or inspected. 

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.