Sling Inspection Checklist: Hercules How-To

sling inspection checklist

SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Sling inspection is an important part of a rigger’s daily routine – here’s a sling inspection checklist to make life easier.

Check out our sling inspection checklist that includes removal criteria to know when your sling should be removed from service, and help keep your lifting equipment in good, working order. 

You’re welcome. 

SLING INSPECTION: ASME STANDARDS B30.9 

INITIAL INSPECTION 

  • Before use, all new, altered, modified or repaired slings shall be inspected by a designated person. 

FREQUENT INSPECTION

  • A visual inspection for damage shall be performed by the user or other designated person each day or shift the sling is used.

PERIODIC INSPECTION

  • A complete inspection for damage of the sling shall be periodically performed by a designated person.

ROUND SLINGS: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Remove your synthetic round sling for service if these conditions are present: 

  • Missing or illegible sling identification.
  • Acid/caustic burns.
  • Evidence of heat damage.
  • Holes, tears, cuts, abrasive wear or snags that expose the core yarns.
  • Broken or damaged core yarns.
  • Weld splatter that exposes core yarns.
  • Knots in the round sling,  except for core yarns inside the cover.
  • Fittings that are pitted, corroded, cracked, bent twisted, gouged, or broken.
  • For hooks, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.10.
  • For rigging hardware, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.26.
  • Other conditions, including visible damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling.

CHAIN SLINGS: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Remove your alloy chain sling from service if these conditions are present: 

  • Missing or illegible sling identification (see Section 9-1.7).
  • Cracks or breaks.
  • Excessive wear, nicks, or gouges. Minimum thickness on chain links must not be below the values listed in Table 1.
  • Stretched chain links or components.
  • Evidence of heat damage.
  • Excessive pitting or corrosion.
  • Lack of ability of chain or components to hinge (articulate) freely.
  • Weld splatter.
  • For hooks, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.10.
  • For rigging hardware, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.26.
  • Other conditions, including visible damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling.

SYNTHETIC WEB SLINGS: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Remove your synthetic web sling from service if the following conditions are present: 

  • Missing or illegible sling identification (see ASME Section 9-5.7).
  • Acid or caustic burns.
  • Melting or charring of any part of the sling.
  • Holes, tears, cuts or snags.
  • Broken or worn stitching in load bearing splices.
  • Excessive abrasive wear.
  • Knots in any part of the sling. Discoloration and brittle or stiff areas on any part of the sling, which may mean chemical or ultraviolet/sunlight damage.
  • Fittings that are pitted, corroded, cracked, bent, twisted, gouged, or broken.
  • For hooks, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.10.
  • For rigging hardware, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.26.
  • Other conditions, including visible damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling.

INSPECTION FREQUENCY

How often should you inspect your slings? Frequency is based on these factors: 

  • Frequency of use
  • Severity of service conditions
  • Nature of lifts being made
  • Experience gained on the service life of slings used in similar circumstances. 

NOTE ON SAFETY & REPAIRS

Slings must be repaired by the sling manufacturer, or a qualified person, per ASME B30.9. 

As mentioned above, a sling must be inspected by a designated competent person before it’s used to determine that the sling meets the manufacturer’s required specifications. 

Employers must take necessary measures to protect and ensure the health, safety and physical well-being of every worker. The employer must use methods and techniques intended for the identification, control and elimination of risks to their workers. The inspection of lifting equipment is required to satisfy this obligation.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

CM Guest Blog: 3 Safety Tips to Install your CM Trolley

cm-trolley-hercules-slr

Read on to discover tips from rigging and load securing experts at Columbus McKinnon – today, they’re sharing their top three safety tips to remember when you install your CM trolley.

Whether it’s a hoist, trolley or rigging equipment, proper use, inspection and maintenance is important to ensure operator safety at all times. Operators of material handling equipment should adhere to the manufacturer’s installation, inspection and maintenance requirements outlined in the product’s operation and maintenance manual (O&M manual).

Beam clamps and trolleys are critical components of a complete lifting system and demand the same attention to safety as hoists and below-the-hook rigging. The following three safety tips are important to consider when installing and inspecting a CM Series 633 Trolley.

1. CM Trolley Safety Tip: Consider the flange and shape of the I-beam to ensure proper fit and clearance. Measure the I-beam flange and check the distance between track wheel flanges. This distance should be 1/8 to 3/16 inch greater than the beam flange width for a straight runway. Additional clearance may be required for the trolley to negotiate track sections with curves. This clearance should be kept to a minimum to ensure the trolley operates properly on both the straight track sections and the curved track sections. See Figure 1.

cm-trolley-hercules-slr-rigging
Figure 1

2. CM Trolley Safety Tip: Ensure the equalizer pin nuts have been installed properly, in accordance with the O&M manual recommendations. The pins should be tight and locked position. Nuts should be regularly inspected to ensure they’re tight and secure during periodic inspections, which can be monthly or yearly – depending on service. Refer to your O&M manual, and/or ASME Standard B30.17.

3. CM Trolley Safety Tip: It is recommended that the trolley is mounted to the hoist prior to final installation onto the beam. Follow the washer and spacer instructions in your O&M manual to properly set the trolley based on the application’s beam flange width.

Please note: washer and spacer arrangement recommendations shown in the O&M manual are affected by structural variations. The accuracy of the final adjustment should be verified by the installer to ensure proper clearance is achieved between the trolley wheel flanges and the toe of the runway beam. See Figure 2.

cm-trolley-hercules-slr-rigging-services
Figure 2

Remember, any trolley installation should always be done in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or the recommendations of a qualified person. Improper installation can cause unequal loading on the trolley and side beam, and as a result can cause the trolley to fall from the beam. It’s also recommended that a load test is performed to 100-125% of the rated capacity of the crane after installation.

Want more CM? Visit our Columbus McKinnon brand page for more information on Hercules SLR’s CM offerings.

Reprinted with permission via Columbus McKinnon – original article here


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Rigging Services: 3 securing tips to lift you anywhere

rigging-services-hercules-slr

Rigging Services

So you’ve got a difficult load to move – whether it’s due to an awkward shape, uneven weight or hard to determine lift points, Hercules SLR rigging services will lift you where you need to be.

We don’t just sell slings at Hercules SLR – we provide inspections, repairs, training and expert advice to keep your projects safe and efficient.

In addition to calculating the load’s weight, there are a few other tips to planning, rigging and executing a successful lift – read on for tips from our expert riggers to secure your hard-to-manage load and accomplish your next lift with ease.

rigging-services-hercules-slr
Crane lifting electric generator

Rigging Services: 3 tips to move an “awkward” load

One

We can’t stress this enough – inspect your equipment! Says rigger Dwayne Fader, Sales Manager at Hercules SLR “Once the equipment is broken, it’s already too late – maintenance and regular inspection is the key to prevention.”

Check the manufacturer instructions or manual for suggested and required inspection times – Unless you want to damage that expensive part, package or material, which costs WAY more over time than simply investing some time and money into inspections.

An informal inspection should be done before each lift, and official inspections should be done according to manufacturer and/or provincial regulations.  

Two

Bigger isn’t always better. Sometimes, you might look at a large object like a vehicle and just think, “well I’ll grab a bigger shackle or sling.” But you’d be surprised at how much support a smaller sling and/or hardware does have.

“Most people are surprised to learn that a small, 2 1/2″ shackle is strong enough to lift a car – bigger shackles are available, but why go bigger when you don’t need to? Often, the smaller piece of equipment will be safer and better suited to the application as it’s meant to support a specific amount of weight.” says Fader.

Using slings which are too big and create bunching are a safety issue, and so is using a shackle which is too big that a sling may slide around in.

Three

Preventative maintenance is a pain, but important. The longer a piece of equipment isn’t inspected or small repairs are ignored, the worse the outcome typically is. A small build-up of issues can eventually lead to large, more expensive repairs. Neglecting preventative maintenance will increase both cost and the risk of injury or death.

Rigging Services: your reading list

Want more? Find more rigging tips and information on our blog – try these:


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Chain Sling Wear and Stretch: Are They the Same?

chain-sling-wear-stretch-difference-Chain Sling Wear and Stretch: Are They the Same?-hercules-slr

Read on to learn the difference between chain sling wear and stretch, from our guest bloggers CM.

Chain Sling Wear & Stretch: what’s the difference?

Frédéric, a mechanical engineer who works for a Canadian public utility company, in the auxiliary equipment department asks CM:

“You said a sling should be removed from service if it stretches. But, you also said that 10% of wear is permissible. Does this mean that a stretch of 5 to 10% should be ok, because wear will make the sling stretch (the reach will increase)?”

Henry Brozyna, CMCO trainer & safety webinar presenter answers:

Chain sling wear and stretch are two different things and both will make the sling length increase. So, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate between the two.

Chain Sling Wear and Stretch: Are They the Same?
Unacceptable Chain Wear

Wear will show itself at the bearing points of the links and can exhibit itself in the bearing points of the chain as a groove. A certain amount of wear is permissible and that will happen over time. Check with the manufacturer to see how much wear they allow.

Stretch or elongation are clear signs of overloading. As such, ASME B30.9 Slings lists stretched chain links or components as one of the reasons a chain sling shall be removed from service. The word “shall” in a standard resolves any doubt.  No stretch or elongation is allowable.

Chain Sling Wear and Stretch: Are They the Same?-hercules-slr
Stretched, elongated chain
CM Chain Sling Inspection Webinar

Read the original article here via CM Works Blog


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Herc How-To: Assemble a Chain Sling

how-to-assemble-chain-sling

Herc How-To: assemble a chain sling

Chain is often used to tie down loads, for lifting applications and to tow loads – however, the rigging industry’s safety standards have developed in recent years, and chain used for lifting must meet certain specifications. Read on for our tips on how to assemble a chain sling.  

Chain slings are among some of the most popular options for to lift a load – they’re often used to lift spreader beams, for example. Chain slings are durable, ductile, can resist high temperatures, rips & tears and in certain applications, are adjustable – but how do you determine the best chain sling for your project needs?

Herc How-To: two kinds of chain assembly

Two types of chain slings are used to for rigging and lifting applications – mechanical assembly and welded assembly. Chain slings are made with a minimum safety or design factor of 4:1.

The most common chain slings used in rigging and lifting are mechanically assembled since they’re quick to produce and it can be done with basic tools. Chain slings are made by a variety of manufacturers and in many different configurations.

Herc How-To: mechanically assembled chain sling hardware

Construct a basic mechanically assembled chain sling with this hardware:

  • Master Link
  • Mechanical Jointing Device
  • Shortening Clutch (if required)
  • Chain
  • Hook (other fitting as required)
  • Tag

Herc How-To: welded assembly

Welded slings are less commonly used. They take more time to manufacture, since once they’re made they undergo a heat treatment so they’re safe to use in a lifting application. This takes days, versus the minutes it takes to together a mechanically assembled chain sling.

Construct a welded assembly chain sling with this hardware:

  • Master Link
  • Welded Intermediate Link
  • Welded Connecting Link
  • Chain
  • Hook (other fittings if required) ** not pictured
  • Tag

Herc How-To: assemble a chain sling with correct chain grades

The marking grade for chains is recognized by numbers which are found on the chain link. Chain grades for chain sling assembly start at Grade 80 – Grade 80, 100 and 120 are used for lifting applications. However, do not use chain grade marks to determine overhead lifting applications. Do not use grade 30, 40 or 70 chains for overhead lifting.

These grades are used for lifting as they’re ductile and can cope with “shock-loading” that can happen while rigging.

Herc How-To: find the right assembly for you

Follow these steps to assemble the best chain sling for your lifting needs.

  1. Determine the weight of the load to lift, it’s working load limit and any angles that will affect the lift – read our blog on how to calculate load weight for detailed steps.
  2. Head to the dimension/specification chart provided by the chain sling’s manufacturer. Find the chain sling configuration* that will suit your load and lift.
  3. Head to the assembly chart found in the catalogue or website of your respective distributer. Find the Working Load Limit (WLL) to lift at the top of the chart. Find the column that represents size/length, which will be donated in centimetres, inches or millimetres. Be sure to size up. Example: if your load’s WLL is 3,000lbs the chart may give you two options – a WLL of 2,650 and 4,500. Choose the chain length that corresponds with the WLL of 4,500lbs – it’s better to have too much capacity than not enough.
  4. Use the same instructions from Step 3 to choose hardware/fittings from the respective specification chart(s). Example: You’ve chose the DOG sling configuration – this means you must find an oblong shaped masterlink and a grab hook that corresponds to the WLL.
For example: Jim is planning to lift a load with a WLL of 3,000lbs and wants to assemble a chain sling.

Step 1) Jim finds the WLL column of his retailer.

Step 2) Find the WLL – since 3,000lbs isn’t on the chart, we choose the next one up which has a WLL of 4,500lbs.

Step 3) Jim needs chain with 1.79in. length.

how-to-assemble-chain-sling

 
* Chain Sling Configurations

Configurations are denoted by an acronym – the first letter represents the number of sling legs, the second letter represents the fitting at the top of the sling and the third letter represents the bottom fitting. Example: the “O” in DOG represents an “oblong shaped master link”.

Single-Leg 
         
CO Single chain sling with masterlink  
SOS Single chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
SOG Single chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
SOF Single chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
SSS Single chain sling with sling hook each end 
SGS Single chain sling with grab hook and sling hook
ASOS Adjustable single chain with masterlink and sling hook 
ASOF Adjustable single chain with masterlink and foundry hook 
ASOG Adjustable single chain with masterlink and grab hook 
SOCH Single chain sling with sliding choker   
SOSL Single chain sling with with self locking hooks 
2-Leg
         
DOS Double chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
DOG Double chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
DOF Double chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
ADOS Adjustable double chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
ADOG Adjustable double chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
DOCH Double chain sling with masterlink and sliding choker 
DOSL Double chain sling with with self locking hooks 
ADOSL Adjustable double chain sling with with self-locking hooks 
3-Leg
         
TOS Triple chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
TOG Triple chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
TOF Triple chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
TOSL Triple  chain sling with with self locking hooks 
4-Leg
         
QOS Quadruple chain sling with masterlink and sling hook
QOG Quadruple chain sling with masterlink and grab hook
QOF Quadruple chain sling with masterlink and foundry hook
QOSL Quadruple chain sling with self-locking hooks 

 

Hercules SLR – Custom Chain Sling Assembly, Inspections, Repairs and more

We make custom slings to fit your needs, no matter the application. Damage found on chain slings can be inspected, repaired or replaced if needed – e-mail us at info@herculesslr.com to purchase a chain sling, find out more about how to assemble a chain sling or to have a chain sling repaired or inspected. 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Herc How-To: Calculate Load Weight

Herc-How-To-calculate load weight

How-To Calculate Load Weight: the basics

An important aspect of rigging is measurement – there are a number of important things to determine and consider before you calculate load weight and proceed with the lift.

Read on for basic tips from our Hercules SLR experts and learn how to properly calculate a load’s weight.

The lifting equipment used to raise your load should not only support the object’s weight, but it’s volume, height, centre of gravity and any other aspects of the load that could make lifting awkward. Read on to discover the best way to calculate load weight.

Estimation is important—you must be able to accurately guess a load’s weight and centre of gravity. Inaccurate estimations can lead to severe consequences.

Evaluate the load you will lift. Evaluation must include the load’s weight, centre of gravity location, balance, stability and nature should be reasonably determined before you proceed with the lift. NEVER guess the weight of a load.

How-To Calculate Load Weight: method to establish load weight

  • Inspect the load for any identification or mark that indicates weight. If found, check that it’s the weight of the entire load, not just a single component of an assembly;
  • Check supporting documentation or load weight;
  • Check any drawings/diagrams that accompany the load for it’s weight listing;
  • If the load is still on the transport vehicle, determine the load’s weight via a weighbridge;
  • Estimate the load’s weight with available technical data, like tables or weights.

 

How-To Calculate Load Weight: total weight on angular lifts

how-to-calculate-load-weight-rigging-hercules-slr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How-To Calculate Load Weight: example 1—steel sheet/block

how-to-calculate-load-weight-hercules-slr

Figure 1
  • Calculate the weight of a steel plate (shown in figure 1) 2ft wide X 5ftlong X 1inch (0.0833ft) thick.
  • Use the formula:
  • Volume = Length X Width X Height
  • Unit weight of steel is 490 lbs/ft³ 
  • Volume = 5ft X 2ft X 0.0833ft X 490 lbs/ft³
  • Weight = 408.3 lbs

 

How-To Calculate Load Weight: calculate force in slings

It’s important to understand the different angles that will impact the load to lift. The included angle is the angle created between opposite sling legs (ex. 0-90°). Using the included angle is known as the Trigonometric rating.

The vertical angle is the angle created by one sling leg from the vertical (ex. 0-45°). This is called the Uniform Method of rating. All new slings must use this method.

The horizontal sling angle is the angle that forms between the sling leg and surface of the load.

how-to-calculate-load-weight
Figure 2
Determine Vertical Share

When the centre of gravity is equal between pick points, the sling and fittings will carry an equal share of the load.

Centre of Gravity and Sling Loading
how-to-calculate-load-weight
Figure 3

When the centre of gravity isn’t equal between pick points, the sling and fittings won’t carry an equal share of the load.

The sling attached to the closest to the centre of gravity will carry the greatest share of the load.

In this example, Sling B will be carrying more than Sling A.

As you can see from the image, ‘Sling B’ carries more weight than ‘Sling A’.

 

 

 

 

 

How-To Calculate Load Weight: additional loading

Before you rig a load to lift, consider these factors that may affect the load, in addition to its weight:

  • Wind blowing against the load;
  • Shock loading;
  • Additional below-the-hook lifting devices;
  • Loads frozen to the ground;
  • Loads snagging;
  • Water, snow or ice accumulation on load;
  • Dynamic side-to-side movements;
  • Extreme temperatures.

HERC HOW-TO BLOGS

Herc How-To: Assemble a Chain Sling 

Herc How-To: Avoid These Common Rigging Mistakes 

Shackles: A Hercules Hardware How-To 


Need a lift? Call Hercules SLR

Have a heavy object that needs a lift? Don’t want to do all of this math on your own? We understand.

Hercules SLR creates custom rigging solutions for our clients’ specific needs (check out this custom sling we made for the Town of Oakville Marina!) and the service doesn’t end there—We provide inspections, repairs and service for:

  • Wire Rope
  • Fall Protection
  • Lifting Equipment/Gear
  • Rigging Hardware
  • Hoists & Cranes
  • Winches & Hydraulics

Don’t see your gear on the list or have more questions? Give us a call and our experts will match you with the right service or product for your needs.

Interested in learning more? We offer training courses at the Hercules Training Academy for these, and more:

  • Chain Saw Safety
  • Confined Space Entrant & Attendant
  • Fundamentals of Rigging (With Practical)
  • Fundamentals of Overhead Cranes
  • Offshore Rigger Banksman

Drop a line at info@herculesslr.com or training@herculesslr.com for more information on inspections, repairs or to sign-up for a training course.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.