Welcome to Hamilton, Ontario: Meet Jim Case, Rigger

rigger doing repair at hercules slr

RIGGING WITH OVER 15 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE: JIM CASE INTERVIEW

There’s so much experience to be found at Hercules SLR – today, we sit down with Associate Rigger Jim Case (he has over 15 years’ experience!) to discuss some cool projects he’s rigged, his path at Hercules SLR and some career tips for new workers starting out. 

Read on to learn more about Jim Case, and his job as a Rigger at Hercules SLR in Hamilton, Ontario. 

Tell us about your background as a Rigger, Jim: 

I started working in the rigging industry when I was 20 years old. I worked in a rope shop for 5 years and spliced rope. The company I worked for was bought, then switched hands a few times – I ended up making slings which, at the time, were more popular for us than rope. 

During my career, I’ve spliced a lot of wire rope for communication towers, steel mills, and have done a lot of work to drive belts. I’ve also had the chance to complete some projects for the US Military, specifically catapult ropes. And, I’ve done a bit of testing here in Hamilton, which is always fun! 

Nowadays, it’s easier to find a focus and not move around so much – workers will typically find their niche and grown within that. Examples of these niches could be circus rigging or offshore rigging.  

Now, I’m a rigger with Hercules SLR and fabricating synthetic slings – I enjoy work and keeping busy! 

Why did you decide to work in this industry?

Well, to be honest – I was 20 and needed a job! I put applications in, and I ended up really liking the industry. I’m doing the same job I was then, but now with Hercules SLR! 

I started working in the rigging industry in the late ’70’s – during the early 1980’s, many company owners were streamlining their business and selling off anything that wasn’t related to steel. This means I moved around a little bit! 

There’s a joke I always like to make – I’ve been bought and sold so many times, I don’t know if everyone or nobody wanted me! But, I’m very happy to have ended up with Hercules SLR. 

What’s something you’re most proud to have accomplished in your career at Hercules SLR?

Honestly, I’m proud of my attendance. I’m a loyal employee, and I never miss work.

Tell us about an exciting or cool project you’ve worked on during your time at Hercules SLR:

One of the coolest projects (that’s pretty notable too!) I worked on was preparing rope to temporarily open the roof of The O Stadium in Montreal, where they held the 1976 Olympics.

The O Stadium’s roof was originally intended to be retractable, but (infamously) a tower meant to support it wasn’t completed in time. This meant they needed a way to temporarily hold it open for the Olympic games, and I got to work on that project.

rigger, olympic stadium ropes, hercules slr
Aerial view of The O Stadium during the 1976 Olympics, with ropes installed by Jim

 For the O Stadium roof, we used gelded, 2inch rope and a special lubrication. This took us 2 weeks and we had a 12-guy crew! 

On a day-to-day basis, I really enjoy splicing rope. Even though it can be repetitive sometimes, it’s different everyday. Most of the orders take 1-2 hours to finish, so I can work on a few different types of projects throughout the day which is a nice variety. 

You’ve worked in the rigging industry for many years – tell us why it’s important to service your equipment and gear:

The main reason? Safety. Over the years, I’ve seen workers take a lot of shortcuts, which can lead to a lot of mistakes. Sometimes, workers can be resistant to change  – which is sometimes why they keep taking these shortcuts that might not be a safe procedure.

For example, I splice differently than some of the riggers in Brampton, but the end-product performs the same function. Some riggers stop splicing the rope on the left, right or vice versa. When you make things according to specified standards, you can sometimes take more liberties – like I said, as long as it performs.  

Tell us about a mistake you see made often in the industry:

The biggest mistake has got to be rigging equipment used improperly. When Hercules SLR receives a complaint that a product isn’t working like it’s supposed to, we have to see the equipment being used to remedy any issues they’re having.

In my personal experience, 90% of the time when this happens the equipment isn’t being used correctly – which is why it isn’t working correctly! 

What advice do you have for a new rigger, or someone just entering this industry?

A  big piece of advice I have for new workers in any industry really, is to plan your daily schedule at the beginning of your day – this makes it easier to deal with the flow of the day. 

For rigging, specifically, do the job right the first time! Earlier, you asked me about mistakes I see in the industry – rigging equipment passes through many different phases. It’s manufactured, used to lift various things and as I mentioned, is often used improperly. When rigging equipment fails, expensive loads can be damaged, companies can be shut down and people can be injured, or worse – killed. 

It’s important a rigger understands the consequences of cutting corners – and doesn’t do it. 

Any other helpful tips?

To select the right equipment for a lift, a big tip is to talk to someone who knows their stuff, and the end-user – whoever will be using the equipment. In a company, it can be helpful to talk to the sales team to learn more about this. 

For example, who will lift the rope? Do they have the capability to lift an 800-pound rope, or a 20-pound rope? They may want to select grommet-type or cradle-rope, which is usually smaller and more flexible. It’s important to make sure whoever’s at the end of the line can handle it. 

What’s something people might be surprised to learn about rigging?

Material and fabrication are surprising! People are astounded at the strength of nylon round slings! Sometimes, synthetic slings can be stronger and more flexible than other types of rope, like wire rope. For example, there used to be a rope made of Kevlar rope (this is what bulletproof vests are made of. FYI) that could float, but was heavier than steel – I haven’t seen it used recently, but it was used to pull huge barges. 

Finally, what do you like most about being a rigger at Hercules SLR? 

Our team. We have a great group of people here in Hamilton, Ontario. We’re like friends, but we actually get stuff done. 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Star Struck in Hamilton: Kevin Richardson from Heavy Rescue 401

heavy rescue 401 visits hercules

The Hercules SLR branch in Hamilton, Ontario had a special visitor stop by – Kevin Richardson from the hit Discovery Channel show, Heavy Rescue 401. Read on to find out what he and the Hamilton branch in Hercules SLR got up to during his visit

HERCULES SLR MEETS HEAVY RESCUE 401

heavy rescue 401 at hercules slr
Kevin Richardson of Heavy Rescue 401 and Hamilton, Hercules SLR Branch Manager Brian Moniz

Hercules SLR was excited to have Kevin Richardson at the shop – a name and face you might recognize from hauling wreckage from accidents on the 401. 

Heavy Rescue 401 is a Discover Channel show that focuses on the first responders, tow and rigging companies that clean up accidents on Ontario’s busiest highway. Kevin worked for Metro Towing on the show, and is now with Ken’s Towing. 

Being responsible to clean up accidents in a timely manner on the busiest highway requires the best lifting equipment and service – an 18-wheeler tipped over on the 401 could back up traffic for eight hours, so people like Kevin need to remove the accident, and do it quickly. There’s no one-size fits all method to remove accident wreckage, so people like Kevin need to use different methods and equipment to get the job done.

Kevin came in to pick up a purchase and learn more about how Hercules SLR can help him do his job at Ken’s Towing, safely and effectively.

Brian Moniz, Hamilton Hercules SLR Branch Manager says, “It was really exciting to have Kevin walk in our doors. I’ve actually been watching the show with my family recently, and it’s been a great chance to show them what I do for work! On Heavy Rescue 401, they’ll use wire rope assemblies to lift cars, or rope to tow a truck from the ditch, and I get to show my family the things we work on, sell and what they help people do. Personally, I’m a fan of the show and I really like that I get to see different ways rigging and lifting equipment are applied by the end-user.

HERCULES SLR HELPS HEAVY RESCUE 401’S KEVIN RICHARDSON

Kevin came to Hercules SLR after placing an order with a local competitor. He went to their shop and the order wasn’t complete, or even processed, even though he had placed the order one-month earlier and was promised a one-month turnaround.

Unhappy with the order’s outcome, Kevin stopped by the Hamilton Hercules SLR branch, to see if they could fix his issue.

Our Hamilton branch not only placed his order during the busy holiday season, but promised and delivered a two-week turnaround  compared to the one-month lead time promised to him by the competitor. 

We were especially thrilled to accomplish this during our busy holiday season – typically, turnaround times in Hamilton are actually shorter than two weeks.

heavy rescue 401, ken's towing at hercules slr
Ken’s Towing & Recovery – Kevin’s truck

LEADING WITH SERVICE: HOW HERCULES SLR GOES ABOVE & BEYOND

After waiting the two weeks promised for his order, Kevin came to the Hamilton branch to pick it up and take a short tour.

We know service means more than simply being handed the product  our Hamilton team told Kevin about Hercules SLR’s services he could use, like: 

  •  Hercules SLR custom sling-making services (specifically, we talked about a custom 30ft X 12″ web sling);
  •  Inspection services, which can be delivered on-site or in our shop;
  •  Our exclusive asset management tool CertTracker, which will allow Kevin and the Heavy Rescue 401 crew to pull certifications on the road or straight at a worksite and notify them of upcoming inspection dates. 
Kevin was impressed with the value, timely delivery and personalized service from the Hamilton branch – we hope to see Kevin on the next season of Heavy Rescue 401! 
 
For more information on services at Hercules SLR, check out our blogs: 

SERVICES AT HERCULES SLR


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events. 

Rigging Glossary: ABC’s of rigging, ‘A’ to ‘Crane’

rigging-terms-rigging-glossary

Hercules SLR knows rigging, A through Z!

There are many terms and regulating bodies to know and remember when it comes to securing, lifting and rigging—some commonly used in the industry, some not.

Hercules SLR is here to help you keep up with the rigging industry and its jargon.

We’ve put together a guide of rigging terms that you should know, starting with A, B and C.

Rigging Terms: A-C

‘A’

Acceleration Stress: Additional stress created by increase in load velocity.

Aggregate Strength: Wire rope strength found by total individual breaking strength of the element of strand or rope.

AISE: Association of Iron and Steel Institute

AISI: American Iron and Steel Institute

Alternate Lay: Lay of wire rope in which strands alternate between regular lay and lang lay.

Angle of Loading, or Angle Loading: The inclination of a sling’s leg or branch measured from the horizontal and vertical plane. The angle of loading should be five degrees or less from the vertical plane.

ANSI: American National Standards Institute

API: American Petroleum Instituterigging-lifting-hoisting

Armoured Rope: Steel-clad rope

ASME: American Society of Mechanical Engineers

ASTM: American Society for Testing Materials

AWS: American Welding Society

‘B’

Bail: U-shaped member of bucket, load or socket, usually used as a lift point. Can also be other fitting used on wire rope, or a swivel hoist ring’s attachment point.

Barrel: Lagging/body part of a rope drum in a drum hoist.

Base: Mounting flanges or feet, used to attach a hoist to its supporting structure or foundation.

Basket Hitch: A sling set-up where the sling is passed under the load and has both ends, end attachments, eyes or handles on a hook, or single master link.

Bearing Life (or Rated Life): The number of revolutions or hours, that an identical group of bearings used at a 90% constant speed will finish or exceed before the first signs of wear or fatigue develops. Essentially, 10 of 100 bearings will fail before their rated life. Minimum Life and L10 also mean Rated Life.

Becket: A wedge socket type of wire rope end termination.

Becket Line: Part of rope in a multi-ply reeving system that’s dead-ended on one of the blocks.

Becket Loop: A loop or a strand of small rope attached to the end of a large wire rope to facilitate installation.

Bird Cage: A common term used to describe the look of wire rope that’s been forced into compression. The outer strand forms a ‘cage’, and at times can displace the core.

Bleeding Line: Caused when the wire rope is overloaded. This squeezes the lubricant from the cable out and  makes it run excessively.

Block: A term applied to a wire rope sheave (pulley) inside plates. It’s fitted with an attachment like a shackle or hook.

Braided Wire Rope: Wire rope formed by plaiting component wire ropes.

Brake: Device used for slow or stopping motion with friction or power.

Brake, Eddy Current: Device for controlling speed in hoisting or lowering direction, done by putting a supplementary load on the motor. Interaction of magnetic fields creates an adjustable or variable direct current in stator coils, this starts currents in the rotor, which is how this loading happens.

Brake, Holding or Parking: Brake that automatically sets and prevents motion when power is off.

Brake, Mechanical Load: Friction device used for multiple discs or shoes, used to control load speed in only the lowering direction. The brake stops the load from overhauling the motor.

Braking, counter torque: See counter torque. 

Breaking Strength: Measured tensile load needed to make cable, chain, wire rope or any other load-bearing element break.

Breaking Strength/Ultimate Strength: Average force at which a product, like a roundsling, (in the condition it would leave manufacturing) has been found by testing to break when growing force is applied, at a uniform rate of speed on a standard pull testing machine.

Bridge Travel: Crane travelling horizontally and parallel with bridge runway rails.

Bridge Trucks: Assembly made up of wheels, bearings, axles and structural framework that supports the end reactions of bridge girders.

Bridle Sling: Sling made of multiple wire rope legs with a fitting that attaches to the lifting hook.

Bright Rope: Wire rope made of wires that aren’t coated with zinc or tin.

Brooming: Unlaying and making wire ropes’ strands and wires straight at the end while installing a wire rope socket.

Bull Ring: The main, large ring of a sling where the sling’s legs are attached. This is also called the master link.

Bulldog Clip: Wire rope cable clamp, or clip.

Bumper or Buffer: Energy-absorbing device that reduces impact when two moving cranes or trolleys meet, or when they meet the end of its travel.

Cab: The operator’s compartment on a crane.

Cable: Term used to refer to wire ropes, wire strand and electrical conductors.

Cable Crowd Rope: Wire rope used to force the bucket of a power shovel into material being handled.

Cable-Laid Wire Rope: Wire rope made up of several individual wire ropes wrapped around a wire rope core or fiber.

Cable Laid Grommet-Hand Tucked: An endless wire rope sling made from one length of rope, wrapped around the core by hand, six times. The ends of the rope tuck inside the six wraps.

Cable Laid Rope: Wire rope made of six wire ropes wrapped around a fiber or core. hercules-slr-securing-lifting-rigging

Cable Laid Rope Sling: This mechanical joint is made via a wire rope sling from a cable laid rope. It has eyes fabricated by pressing, or swaging one or more metal sleeves over the rope junction.

Cableway, Aerial: Conveying system for transporting single loads along a suspended track cable.

Camber: The slight curve given to beams and girders to compensate for deflections caused by loading.

Cheek Plate(s): Stationary plate that supports the pin (axle) of a sheave or load when rigging.

Cheek Weights: Overhauling weights attached to side plates of a lower load block.

Chinese Finger: Wire mesh pulling grip. Normally, a line is inserted through the wire rope, and it tightens around the line when pulling force is applied.

Choker Sling: Wire rope with eyes spliced on each end. Used to lift the load.

Choker Hitch: Sling set-up with one end of the sling passing under the load and through an end attachment, handle or eye on the other end of the sling.

Clearance: The horizontal or vertical distance from any part of the crane to a point of the nearest obstruction (the area you can ‘clear’).

Clevis: U-shaped fitting with holes in each end where a pin or bolt is run through.

Clip: Fitting to clamp two parts of wire rope.

Closed Socket: Wire rope end fitting made of basket and bail.

Closing line: Wire rope that closes a clamshell or orange-peel bucket, and then operates as a hoisting rope.

CMAA: Crane Manufacturers Association of America

CMV: Commercial Motor Vehicle

Coil: Circular bundle of wire or fiber rope not packed on a reel.

Collector: Contact device that mounts on bridge or trolley to collect current from the conductor system.

Come-along: Lever-operated chain or wire rope devices designed for pulling, not lifting; also called pullers. Unlike hoists, the tension is held by a releasable ratchet. They are smaller and lighter than hoists of equal capacity, and aren’t meant to lift, but meant for activities like skidding machinery.

Conductors (Bridge or Runway): Electrical conductors located along the bridge girder, or runway that provide power and/or control circuits to the crane and trolley.

Conical Drum: Grooved hoisting drum of tapering diameter.

Continuous Bend: Reeving of wire rope over sheaves and drums so that it bends in one direction, as opposed to reverse bend.

Control Braking: A method of controlling hoisting or lowering speed of the load by removing energy from the moving load or by imparting energy in the opposite direction.

Controller: A device or group of devices that serve to govern, in some predetermined manner, the power delivered to the motor to which it is connected.

Controller (Spring Return): A controller which, when released, will return automatically to a neutral position.

Control Panel: An assembly of magnetic or static electrical components that govern the flow of power to, or from a motor. These respond to signals from a master switch, push-button station, or remote control.

Core: Member of wire rope round which the strands are laid. This could be fiber, a wire strand, or an independent wire rope.

Corrosion: Chemical decomposition caused by exposure to moisture, acids or alkalis.

Corrugated: A term used to describe the grooves of a sheave or drum when worn so as to show the impression of a wire rope.

Cover plate: The top or bottom plate of a box girder or junction box.

Crane: A machine for lifting and lowering a load vertically and moving it horizontally; the hoisting mechanism is an integral part of the machine. The term applies to fixed , mobile, powered or manually-driven machines.

Cranes are another group of definitions entirely! Really—click here to read our ‘Cranes’ Glossary.

Hercules SLR will continue our ‘Rigging Glossary’ with rigging terms in the alphabet D-Z—check our ‘Blog’ page for future rigging glossaries, and to read our ‘Crane Glossary’.

Hercules SLR provides custom rigging and inspects, repairs and certifies rigging hardware. Head to our  ‘Inspections & Repairs’ page for more information, or e-mail sales@herculesSLR.com.

Original article here: https://riggingcanada.ca/articles/rigging-terms-glossary/

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

The Frankensling – Custom Solutions for Rigging Dilemmas

Frankensling


The Town of Oakville Marina in Ontario had a reoccurring problem raising and lowering the masts and sails of the vessels as they handled the boats. Due the large volume of craft, the variations in size and space, they needed something that could do more than one mast or sail at a time. Enter Hercules SLR and ‘The Frankensling!

Frakensling Marina Crew
The Marina Crew

The solution they used to use was to manipulate each mast and sail individually, but this was time consuming, inefficient work. Moving multiple masts caused problems as the weight shifted as they were manipulated, became unstable and were in danger of damage. They needed something that was weight loaded to distribute an even application for the multiple height level adjusting of masts/sail raising and lowering.

The Marina came up with the solution of using slings looped together. This did not solve the whole problem, but made it more the process more efficient. There was still the strong possibility of damage as multiple slings were harder to control. The marina came to Hercules with the problem, looking for something that was efficient, robust and easy to use. Together we created what is now penned as the Frakensling.

Frakensling
The Frakensling at the Town of Oakville Marina

The sling gets attached to the mast or sail of the boat, which allows for a securing point every 12”. This Frankensling is 24ft, but it can be made to any size of specification as needed. At every 12” mark there is a loop to which a line or rigging part can be attached to ensure an even balanced load point at every stage of the moving procedure. The sling can be used at any height and the pattern modified for any type of craft or Marina.

The Frankensling
The Frakensling in Action

This is a great multi stage variable height sling. It’s a perfect for masts that have more than 1 spreader on them. The current sling for the Town of Oakville Marina is 2” wide and 24FT long. They are looking to refine the design by shifting from 2” wide to 1” wide.

The Frankensling
Securing loops every 12 in

It was pleasure to work with the Town of Oakville Marina, and Hercules SLR once again pulled out all the stops to custom make something that made the day to day work of our customers easier.

Doesn’t every Marina need a Frakensling?

Sherry Bohm
Customer Service Representative

Sherry Bohm has worked in the industrial sector for about 20 years, and has recently joined Hercules to increase her skills and share them with her growing customer (fan!) base.  She loves dealing with customers and providing them with exactly what they need as sometimes they don’t know what is the best solution, so Sherry utilizes her experience and background to assist in getting them the correct product(s) or pointing them into the right direction. Her hard work and dedication has resulted in a very close working relationship with the Canadian Coast Guards Ships and Ontario’s Marina’s. Sherry currently works out of her hometown branch of Hamilton Ontario.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.