Inspection Notice: MSA PFL/SRL Rivets—2.4m & 2.7 m V-Edge™ Cable PFL , 6m V-Edge™ Cable SRL

industrial workers wearing msa safety ppe

Inspection Notice: MSA PFL/SRL Rivets  

MSA is issuing an Inspection Notice to inform you they have identified isolated instances of unflared top eyelet rivets in MSA V-Edge 2.4m Twin Leg Cable PFL. MSA has not received any reports of injuries associated with this condition.  However, we are requesting that you perform the inspection outlined in this notice.

An unflared top eyelet rivet may eventually begin to dislodge from the PFL. If the rivet begins to dislodge from the PFL, the PFL may not arrest a fall.

In a review of all riveted connections on PFLs and SRLs, MSA has identified that the field inspections in the following table are to be performed.

Product (See Appendix A* for Part Number list)

Rivet(s) to Inspect (See “Inspection Instructions” section for inspection details)Number of Rivets per PFL/SRL Assembly (See Appendix B* for Figures showing Rivet Locations) 
2.4m V-Edge Twin Leg Cable PFLTop Eyelet2 
2.4m V-Edge Twin Leg Cable PFLCasing8 
2.4m V-Edge Single Leg Cable PFLTop Eyelet1 
2.4m V-Edge Single Leg Cable PFLCasing4 
2.7m V-Edge Twin Leg Cable PFLTop Eyelet2 
2.7m V-Edge Twin Leg Cable PFLCasing8 
2.7m V-Edge Single Leg Cable PFLTop Eyelet1 
2.7m V-Edge Single Leg Cable PFLCasing4 
6m V-Edge Cable SRLShock Pack2 

* Appendix A and Appendix B can be found in the attached Inspection Notice.

MSA is committed to safety and quality and has implemented increased inspection and quality controls to prevent this condition in the future.

MSA is advising all customers to inspect the rivets listed in Table 1.  Inspect per the Instructions in this Notice.  Remove from service any PFL or SRL that does not pass the inspection.

Inspection Instructions

Perform the following inspection to determine whether your PFL or SRL needs to be taken out of service.  Please reference Appendix B in the attached Inspection Notice for assistance in locating each type of rivet.

Top Eyelet Rivets

  1. Place the PFL on a flat surface so that there is not a load on the top eyelet rivet.
  2. Attempt to remove the top eyelet rivet from the eyelet by pushing the rivet.
  3. Attempt to remove the top eyelet rivet from the eyelet by pulling on the rivet.

Casing Rivets

  1. Hold or suspend the PFL such it does not make contact with a surface that would prevent movement of the casing rivets.
  2. Attempt to remove the casing rivets by pushing the rivets.
  3. Attempt to remove the casing rivets by pulling on the rivets.

Shock Pack Rivets

  1. Hold the SRL shock pack such that the shock pack does not make contact with a surface that would prevent movement of the shock pack rivets.
  2. Attempt to remove the shock pack rivets by pushing the rivets.
  3. Attempt to remove the shock pack rivets by pulling on the rivets.

Some small back and forth movement of the rivets is to be expected while pushing or pulling. If any of the rivets are able to be removed from the PFL/SRL, remove the PFL/SRL from service.

Note: If there is a green dot on your PFL/SRL box label or there is a green dot on the end of your rivets, it has already been inspected by MSA and has been determined to be acceptable. No further inspection on your part is necessary.

Replacing Affected PFLs and SRLs

If there is any question about the results of the inspection, remove the PFL/SRL from service and contact Hercules SLR for a replacement PFL and/or SRL.


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? GIVE US A CALL, OR DROP US A LINE.

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Why confined space training?

why confined space training is important in sewers

Why confined space training? 

Why confined space training? Taking training courses before you enter, exit or work around a confined space has many benefits—The main benefit is having the knowledge to keep yourself and others safe.

Why is training to enter a confined space so important? What’s so deadly about a confined space that’s different from other types of dangerous, hazardous workplaces?

A lot, actually. 

We’ve talked about the dangers of confined spaces on the Hercules SLR blog before—But why should you train for them? You’re about to find out. 

In this blog, we’ll cover: 

  • What is confined space training? 
  • Why is confined space training important?
  • What are the OSHA/CCOHS standards for confined space training? 
  • How often is confined space training required?
  • What are the four main dangers of a confined space?  
  • Who can enter a confined space? 
  • Confined spaces & restricted spaces—What’s the difference?

WHAT IS CONFINED SPACE TRAINING?

Confined space training involves teaching workers who work in or around confined spaces the hazards, risks and dangers involved with them. It’s important that even people who aren’t planning to enter the space are trained on proper confined space entry and exit, since nearly 60% of confined space deaths happen to people who try to rescue others

What’s the difference between a hazard and a risk

WHY IS CONFINED SPACE TRAINING IMPORTANT?

Why confined space training? Confined space training is important because it helps workers and nearby personnel manage risk associated with work in confined spaces, which in-turn, helps reduce injuries & fatalities. How can you know what to do, look for and how to rescue yourself and others if no one tells you? 

This is where confined space training comes in. 

Like we mention in the paragraph above, almost 60% of confined space deaths happen to people who try to rescue those who are trapped or in danger—But there are other reasons why training to work in or around a confined space is absolutely necessary. 

Many hazards found in confined spaces are found in other, open work spaces, but become more dangerous, or even deadly when you encounter them in confined spaces. 

This is because there’s little room for error for work in a confined space. Physical hazards are more dangerous in a confined space, materials & chemicals can interact unpredictably and of course, they’re harder to get in and out of. 

Some of these include: 

  • Low air quality: Low, or poor air quality might happen from a toxic substance in the air (see ‘Aspyxiant hazards’ below) or from a lack of oxygen, and/or natural ventilation. 
  • Asphyxiant hazards: These are gases that become concentrated in a confined space and displace oxygen in the air, which leads to nausea, convulsion, coma, and eventually, this atmosphere becomes fatal. Asphyxiants are gases like argon, nitrogen and/or carbon monoxide. 
  • Exposure to harmful chemicals.
  • Fire hazards, like chemicals that could ignite if a spark is used in the space.
  • Physical hazards like noise, extreme heat or cold, radiation, vehicle & pedestrian traffic and even poor visibility. 

All of these hazards are amplified when you work in a confined space. We can’t stress the speed at which these hazards become fatal. Picture this:

You’re working on a water waste lift station (which controls waste water/sewage travel). Your co-worker has descended into a confined space to diagnose an issue, but the diagnosis should have been complete long ago—As in 45 minutes ago. “I’m gonna go check on him,” your co-worker shouts to you. Before you can tell him to stop, he enters the confined space. You call 911—Neither can be revived. Your co-worker who simply went to check on someone died instantly. You will never underestimate just how fast a confined space can take a life again. 

We don’t mean to be obscene, but this is a reality than unfortunately, happens more than it should, even with all  the knowledge available on confined space entry & exit. Hazards found in typical workplaces become much more hazardous when they’re confined, which is just one reason why confined space training is so important. 

WHAT ARE THE REGULATIONS FOR CONFINED SPACE TRAINING?

In Canada, provincial standards regarding confined space differ. Your organization may have also have requirements for confined space work specific to them, so take these as a general guideline.

There is some legislation that involves training and confined spaces in Canada—The Canadian Occupational Health & Safety Standard 11.5 on emergency procedures says:

  1. Where conditions in a confined space or the nature of the work to be performed in a confined space is such that the specifications set out in paragraph 1.4(1)(a) cannot be compiled with during all times that a person is in the confined space, the employer shall 

a) In consultation with the work place committee or the health and safety representative, establish emergency procedures to be followed in the event of an accident or other emergency in or near the confined space, which procedures shall specify the date on which they are established and provide for the immediate evacuation of the confined space when

i) an alarm is activated, or

ii) there is any significant change in a concentration or percentage referred to in paragraph 11.4(1)(a) that would adversely affect the health or safety of a person in the confined space.

b) provide the protection equipment referred to in paragraphs 11.3(b), (c) and (d) for each person who is about to enter the confined space;

c) Ensure that a qualified person trained in the entry and emergency procedures established pursuant to paragraph 11.3(a) and paragraph (a) is 

i) in attendance outside the confined space, and 

ii) in communication with the person inside the confined space; 

d) Provide the qualified person referred to in paragraph (c) with a suitable alarm device for summoning assistance; and 

e) Ensure that two or more persons are in the immediate vicinity of the confined space to assist in the event of an accident or other emergency. 

2. One of the persons referred to in paragraph (1)(e) shall 

a) Is attached to a secure anchor outside the confined space,

b) be the holder of a basic first aid certificate; and 

c) be provided with the protection equipment and emergency equipment referred to in paragraph 11.3(d). 

3. The employer shall ensure that every person entering, exiting, or occupying a confined space referred to in subsection (1) wears an appropriate safety harness that is securely attached to a lifeline that

a) is attached to a secure anchor outside the confined space;

b) is controlled by the qualified person referred to in paragraph (1)(c);

c) protects the person from the hazard for which it is provided and does not itself create a hazard; and 

d) is, where reasonably practicable, equipped with a mechanical lifting device. 

HOW OFTEN IS CONFINED SPACE TRAINING NEEDED?

Anyone who is about to work in or around confined spaces should receive training—It’s often beneficial to train new employees on specific confined space entry, exit and rescue procedures for your organization even if they have training from previous work, since practices may be different. 

Confined space training should also be held when policies or regulations change. Training should also be held if policies and procedures are ignored. As we know, this can be deadly. 

The Canadian Occupational Health & Safety Standard 11.11 states: 

  1. The employer shall provide every employee who is likely to enter a confined space with instruction and training in,

a) the procedures established pursuant to paragraphs 11.3(a) and 11.5(1)(a); and

b) The use of the protection equipment referred to in paragraphs 11.3(b), (c) and (d).

2. The employer shall ensure that no person enters a confined space unless the person is instructed in,

a) the procedures to be followed in accordance with paragraphs 11.3(a) and 11.5(1)(a); and

b) The use of the protection equipment referred to in paragraphs 11.3(b), (c) and (d).

WHAT ARE THE 4 MAIN DANGERS OF WORK IN A CONFINED SPACE?

We’ve covered some of the main hazards to look for in a confined space, but as we know, they are magnified in a confined space—So it’s worth going over again.  

The four main dangers of work in a confined space are: 4 main confined space hazards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT ARE SOME TYPES OF CONFINED SPACES? 

It’s easy to think of confined spaces as work spaces that you descend (go down) to, but confined spaces can be nearly anywhere, above or below ground.

So, why confined space training? Because it’s likely many workers in industrial jobs will work in one of these spaces at least once. 

By definition, a confined space:

  • Is not meant to be occupied by humans (Especially long-term)
  • Has limited entries and/or exits, or a layout that could hinder emergency responders, or movement from humans or machines. 
  • Represents a risk to health & safety because of:
    • The design, construction, location or atmosphere of the space
    • Materials or substances found/used in the space 
    • Any other conditions that contribute to safety risk or hazards. 

Types of confined spaces include: 

  • Sub-cellars
  • Tanks
  • Culverts
  • Silos
  • Vaults
  • Open Ditch  

why confined space training is important

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TIPS FOR TAGLINES | TRAINING TUESDAY

STUCK IN A TIGHT SPOT? WHAT TO KNOW IN A CONFINED SPACE

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY SAFE IN & AROUND CONFINED SPACES.

GIVE US A CALL, DROP US A LINE OR COME ON IN TO LEARN ABOUT UPCOMING CONFINED SPACE TRAINING COURSES AT THE HERCULES TRAINING ACADEMY:

TRAINING@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Confined Space Hazards | Training Tuesday

man entering confined space

4 CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS | TRAINING TUESDAY

Welcome to Training Tuesday! This week, the focus is on confined space hazards and the top 5 hazards you should know about before you enter, exit, or just work around them.  

This article will cover

  • How to define a confined space 
  • 4 specific confined space hazards 
  • What needs to happen before you enter a confined space 

We’ve covered what a confined space is on the blog before—But what specific hazards should you be on the lookout for?

Confined spaces pose hazards by their very definition—The Canadian Occupational Safety and Health Regulations define a confined space as ‘a partially or enclosed space, that may become hazardous to an employee who enters it due to’: 

  • Its design, construction, location or atmosphere 
  • The materials or substances in it, or
  • Any other conditions relating to it. 

4 CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS

When investigating accidents that occur in confined spaces, reports show they occur because worker’s aren’t well-trained or informed on the potential hazards when they enter confined spaces.

Oxygen deficiency causes about 50% of confined space deaths, and often, no testing is done before these accidents. Over 50% of confined space deaths are from rescue attempts by other workers. 

Four specific hazards workers face in confined spaces are: 

  1. Oxygen deficiency and oxygen enrichment
  2. Fire and/or explosion
  3. Toxicity
  4. Drowning in liquids and/or entrapment in free-flowing solids. 

Why are these things so hazardous in confined spaces? Read on to find out. 

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS | OXYGEN DEFICIENCY—AND THE OPPOSITE

Lack of oxygen is the first hazard facing workers who must enter a confined space. Before entry (and if your risk assessment calls for it) you must test the space for oxygen with an oxygen monitor. You may also need to test the air while you work in the space.

Oxygen deficiency is caused by:

  1. Gases like nitrogen that displace flammable gases   
  2. Oxygen is taken by: 
  • Combustion of flammable substances, like in-welding and other ‘hot work’ 
  • Explosions or fires (Oxygen levels can be dangerously low after a fire is out, since oxygen replaces the products of combustion) 
  • Chemical reactions like metal rust
  • People who work in the space and use available oxygen as they breathe 

Normal air has 21% oxygen by volume—These are the effects of reduced oxygen levels: 

  • 16% Oxygen: Judgement and breathing become impaired—You become quickly exhausted
  • 12% Oxygen: Worker becomes unconscious, and will die unless taken to fresh air
  • 6% Oxygen: Breathing difficulty—This level of oxygen is fatal immediately 

OXYGEN ENRICHMENT—THE OPPOSITE

Too much oxygen is just as bad as not enough oxygen. An oxygen-enriched atmosphere has more than 23% oxygen by volume. 

What’s the risk of too much oxygen? Flammable materials like clothing and hair will burn immediately. Do not use pure oxygen to ventilate a confined space—This is a fire and explosion hazard.  

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS FIRE AND EXPLOSION

Combustible gases have an explosive range with a lower explosive limit (LEL), and an upper explosive limit (UEL). If the fuel and air mixture is below the LEL or over the UEL, ignition won’t take place—Gas is combustible between its LEL or UEL. 

What else contributes to explosions or fires?

  • Chemicals
  • Poor ventilation 
  • Static electricity 
  • Machinery 

WHAT’S HOT WORK? 

Hot work is considered work that can produce an ignition. It’s important to 

Hot work can be:

  • Welding
  • Cutting
  • Grinding
  • Work with non-explosion proof electrical equipment 

Before you perform hot work in a confined space, you should:

  • Purge/ventilate the area to reduce combustible concentration of airborne dust or mist to a safe level 
  • If ventilation or purging can’t reduce combustible dust, the space must be made inert—This is done by adding an inert gas to alter oxygen levels. The space must be monitored continuously to make sure the atmosphere stays inert. 
  • Wear proper respiratory personal protective equipment, and have the right gear on-hand to rescue or let nearby personnel enter (Like we mention, over 50% of confined space deaths happen to people who try to rescue others, so this is very important). 
  • Make sure the space is purged and consistently ventilated to maintain an atmosphere of less than 5% the LEL
  • Make sure the space is purged and consistently ventilated to maintain an oxygen concentration under 23% 
  • Continuously monitor atmosphere levels in the space
  • Have an entry permit that includes provisions for hot work and includes the appropriate measures to take. 

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS TOXICITY

There are two huge risks posed by toxic gas in confined spaces. 

  • Chemical asphyxiation 
  • Irritation to respiratory system, skin or eyes 

Especially harmful toxic gases include: 

  • Hydrogen sulphide (H2S): Hydrogen sulphide is a by-product of sewage treatment, petroleum and other industrial processes. Hydrogen sulphide is particularly dangerous as it has a noticeable smell in small concentrations, but hydrogen sulphide gas takes away your sense of smell too, which can make a worker think they’re safe or the smell has dissipated, when in reality, it still lurks. It’s important to note that hydrogen sulphide collects in low areas since it’s heavier than air. 
  • Methane (CH4): Highly explosive. Methane is a by-product of sewage that leaks from gas lines, and can be found in coal mines. Methane displaces oxygen, which can smother workers.  
  • Sulphur dioxide (SO2): Colourless with a strong smell, sulphur dioxide is poisonous in small amounts. 
  • Carbon monoxide (CO): Colourless, odourless, tasteless and fatal in very small concentrations. It comes from incomplete combustion. Being overexposed to carbon monoxide can cause ears to ring, nausea, headache and sleepiness. 

TEST CAREFULLY FOR TOXICITY BEFORE PERSONNEL ENTERS A CONFINED SPACE.

CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS | DROWNING IN LIQUIDS AND/OR ENTRAPMENT IN FREE-FLOWING SOLIDS 

This one is pretty self-explanatory, but in confined spaces where liquids or flowing solids are present (and they often are) there’s always risk of these substances drowning, suffocation, burns or other injuries.

Some of these substances include: 

  • Water (in a tank, for example) 
  • Grain (in a silo) 
  • Materials, like soil, that fall into an excavation or trench 

AVOID CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS—DO THIS BEFORE YOU ENTER: 

Before a worker enters a confined space, these steps must be followed: 

1) Identify the confined space 
2) A plan for entry and work is in place
3) Training is given to all employees who work in or near the space
4) Entrant training
5) Attendant training
6) Training in the use of Personal Protective Equipment
7) Provide the PPE
8) Air Monitoring Protocols, which include possible purging or inerting of the space and then ventilation

HERE ARE SOME MORE TIPS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU ENTER OR WORK IN A CONFINED SPACE:

worker descends into confined space

GOOD RULE TO FOLLOW: IF YOU CAN’T TEST, IF YOU CAN’T VENTILATE, IF YOU DON’T HAVE BREATHING APPARATUS, IF YOU DON’T HAVE AN ENTRY PROCEDURE DON’T GO IN. 


VISIT OUR BLOG FOR RELATED READING:

CONFINED SPACES: HERCULES’ SAFETY TIPS

STUCK IN A TIGHT SPOT? WHAT TO KNOW IN A CONFINED SPACE

CONFINED SPACE: RESCUE & RETRIEVAL—3M GUEST BLOG


NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES WIRE ROPE SLING INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

IMPORTANT | Inspection Notice – 3M™ DBI-SALA® ExoFit NEX™ Harnesses

3m dbi-sala and protecta logo

3M Fall Protection Logo

 

 

3M INSPECTION NOTICE

Read on for an important 3M Fall Protection inspection notice – 3M Fall Protection has learned of the possibility of a manufacturing defect in a dorsal d-ring of ExoFit NEX™ harnesses manufactured between January 2016 and December 2018. Although there have been no reported incidents involving this condition, a dorsal d-ring with this defect will not support the load in a fall arrest event which could result in serious injury or death. Harnesses manufactured only within this date range require immediate inspection for lot number 09P1 stamped into a dorsal d-ring. We believe that only one harness was manufactured with a defective D-ring, but we urge inspection of all potentially affected harnesses out of an abundance of caution in the interests of worker safety.

End Users: Upon receipt of this inspection Notice, immediately inspect your harness following the steps below:

3M INSPECTION NOTICE STEP 1: Locate the label pack on the harness to identify the manufacturing date. If the harness has a manufacturing date of 16/01 (2016, January) through the end of 18/12 (2018, December), continue to step 2. If the harness is not in this range, the unit is not impacted by this notice. If the harness is within this date range, continue to step 2.

3M INSPECTION NOTICE STEP 2: Locate the D-ring on the back of the harness to inspect for a stamped lot date of 09P1. If you find a D-ring with code 09P1 and the harness has a manufactured date within the affected date range, take the harness out of service immediately. If the D-ring is not stamped with code 09P1, you may continue using your harness.

Please note that both the manufactured date range (2016, January through 2018, December) on the harness label AND the lot number code 09P1 stamped on the D-ring must be present on the same harness for the harness to be considered suspect and removed from service. All other harness/d-ring combinations are acceptable for use.

End-users: If you find an affected harness, take the unit out of service immediately. You can contact us at 3M Customer Service at 1833-998-2243 or at 3MCAFPServiceAction@mmm.com to return your harness and a replacement harness will be provided free of charge.

Distributors: Please contact our Customer Service department at 1-833-998-2243 or email at 3MCAFPServiceAction@mmm.com to obtain a listing of harnesses sold to you with the affected manufacturing date range. If after inspection you discover you have an affected product in stock, please return the harnesses to 3M Fall Protection immediately for replacement. Please immediately forward this Inspection Notice to any of your customers who have purchased ExoFit NEX product within the affected manufacturing date range from you and provide any assistance requested by your customers to complete the process.

3M remains committed to providing quality products and services to our customers. We apologize for any inconvenience that this situation may cause you or your customers. We appreciate your continued support of 3M Fall Protection products and services.


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Don’t Believe Us—Just Watch: Book your 3M Fall Protection Demo

3m fall protection gear for tools

NEW! 3M Fall Protection Demo Bag 

Hercules SLR knows the value of fall prevention—That’s why we’ve put together kits with some of our favourite 3M fall protection gear to show you the difference it makes. 

3M FALL PROTECTION | WHY IS FALL PREVENTION IMPORTANT? 

In Canada, every year over 14,000 workers are injured due to falls and over 27,000 workers are injured due to dropped objects like hammers, cell phones and work-radios—These are just the recorded incidents. 

Fall protection for all kinds of workers should include the right kind of PPE for the kind of work you do, but prevention plans, rescue & retrieval plans and tool fall protection equipment, plans and risk assessment measures. 

3M FALL PROTECTION FOR TOOLS | STOP THE DROP

It can be easy to underestimate the impact of slips and falls—It can be even easier to underestimate the impact of dropped tools and equipment, so it’s important to take preventative steps to eliminate the risk of injury. 

Often, tools fall from heights due to poor risk assessment & planning, human error, poorly stored tools and fixtures & fittings on-site that have failed. Since tools are often dropped by accident, focus should be on preventing these incidents from happening at all.

Tool fall protection normally focuses on secondary protective measures, like safety nets and toe boards, but it’s rare that tool fall protection plans employ a primary system to prevent drops. These precautions are often taken after an accident or injury occurs. 

WHAT KIND OF DAMAGE DOES A DROPPED TOOL DO? 

There are two main kinds of incidents when tools fall—These are direct impact and deflection. Direct impact injuries happen when the dropped object hits you directly on the head, and deflection happens when the tool bounces off another surface and strikes you. 

Let’s imagine a scenario—You’re working at heights, 200-feet (or 6-metres) above ground on scaffolding. You stop to check something, when your foot nudges the tape measure and it slides out and falls to the ground. 200-feet below. Even though the tape measure only weighs about 1.5lbs, it hits with a force of 3,750lbs. To put that in perspective, a hippo’s average weight is 3,300-4000lbs. 

This happened to a worker in New Jersey, who was delivering sheet metal to a work site when he was killed by a falling tape measure. Falling objects pose risk to the worker who drops it too, since the knee-jerk reaction is often to reach out and try to catch it which could cause you to slip and fall. 

Fall protection protects you from falls, while tool fall protection is designed to save others. We’ve covered comfortable fall protection equipment on the blog before and that it’s important to remember a safety harness isn’t a one-size fits all solution. Tool fall protection is the same.

Many workers find tool fall protection distractive and obtrusive—This is why it’s important to select a drop prevention system that’s comfortable and reasonable for workers to use. 

WHAT SHOULD MY PLAN INCLUDE? 

Your fall prevention plan should consider and plan to account for: 

  • Tool size & fit
  • Tool form & function
  • Attachment points for each tool (great starting point for tool protection) 
  • Drop-tests with attachment points, before used on the worksite 

3M FALL PROTECTION DEMO BAG | WHAT’S INSIDE?

3M fall protection, protecta vest-style harness at hercules securing, lifting and rigging
The 3M Protecta® Vest-Style Harness has back D-rings, tongue-buckle rings and pass-thru chest connections that give maximum comfort and protection.

 

3m protecta rebel SRL
The Protecta® Rebel Self-Retracting Lifeline (SRL, web) is compact, lightweight and has a swiveling anchorage with self-locking snap-hooks and fast-acting speed-sending brake system. It also has thermoplastic housing for extra agility and protection.
 
3m fall protection shock-absorbing lanyard
The 3M Twin-Leg Shock-Absorbing Lanyard has double-leg loops for 100% tie-off with convenient snap-hook and flat, steel rebar hooks at leg ends to keep you balanced in case you fall. 
3m fall protection dbi-sala harness
The 3M DBI-SALA® Vest-Style Harness has back D-ring and tongue-buckle leg straps, quick-connect and pass-through buckles with detachable shoulder padding that give ultimate comfort. It has an industrial-strength magnet that secures your items, even when tipped upside down.
 

3M SAFE BUCKET

3m fall protection demo safe bucket

The 3M safe bucket is your best friend for preventing dropped tools. 

The 3M Safe Bucket (100lb Load Rated Drawstring Canvas) includes: 

  • Adjustable Radio Holster (1500089)
  • Hard Hat Tether (1500178) 
  • Tool Lanyard, Coil Ether, 5lb. (2.3kg) capacity—Single-leg with self-locking carabiner with hooks at both ends. (1500063)
  • Python Canvas pouch (1500119) 

3M FALL PROTECTION DEMO BAG | BOOK YOUR DEMO NOW 

What’s a Fall Protection Demo, you ask? Book a fall protection demo with your local Hercules SLR branch and a representative will: 

  • Share the features & benefits of the 3M Fall Protection Demo Bag Products 
  • Show you how to use the tool fall protection attachment points 
  • Discuss your unique PPE needs based on your employees and type of work 

BOOK YOUR FALL PROTECTION DEMO NOW

SHOW & TELL ISN’T JUST FOR KIDS—HERCULES SLR WILL SHOW YOU HOW 3M EQUIPMENT  WORKS AND KEEP YOU SAFE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK LINKEDIN TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Fall Protection Safety: What’s your IQ?

fall protection safety quiz

Think you know how to stay safe at heights? Maybe you’ve read our fall protection glossary and think you’re an expert? Now’s your time to prove it—Take our fall protection safety quiz and find out if you have a high IQ, or if you have a little more training to do. 

Think you have what it takes? Find out below! 

FALL PROTECTION SAFETY | TAKE THE QUIZ

0%

How many injuries occur each year in Canada due to dropped objects?

Correct! Wrong!

Over 27,000 injuries occur due to falling objects each year in Canada—These are just the reported incidents.

True or false? You only need fall protection equipment if you're working at exceptional heights, like on a bridge or skyscraper.

Correct! Wrong!

Fall protection equipment, particularly fall protection for tools is required for work at heights of 3-metres or more.

The term 'arresting force' means:

Correct! Wrong!

Arresting force means the force transferred to the body when a fall is arrested—this is also known as fall arrest force. You can reduce arresting force by using energy absorbers if your lanyard could injure you.

Safety harnesses should always be tried on before purchasing

Correct! Wrong!

You should always try on your safety harness before you purchase. It should fit well, be comfortable and meet provincial regulations.

A safety harness is still safe to use if the webbing is torn a little bit, as long as it's not around the D-ring.

Correct! Wrong!

Webbing varies from harness to harness, however, make sure to choose a harness with sturdily-constructed webbing—If the harness has any burns, tears, holes or frayed webbing. The material should slide through hardware without catching/snagging. If it does, take your harness out of service. Safety harnesses are meant to be used in

How should padding on your safety harness fit?

Correct! Wrong!

Like you probably learned from earlier questions, comfort is important when it comes to fall protection equipment. Padding on a safety harness should be easy to handle, pliable and easily adjustable. Padding must also be able to withstand harsh weather and corrosive conditions, so it's important to select padding that's both breathable and durable.

ALL safety harnesses should come with instructions for best-use.

Correct! Wrong!

Thought it might sound common-sense, all safety harnesses should include tips for applications, instructions and guidelines for using accessories and hardware. Be sure it meets CSA guidelines for your intended application.

How many CSA classifications are there for full-body harnesses?

Correct! Wrong!

There are 5 CSA (Canadian Standards Association) standards for full-body harnesses. These are: Class A, Class AD Suspension and Controlled Descent, Class AE Limited Access, Class AL Ladder Climbing and Class AP Work Positioning.

Items only usually fall from heights when they're unsecured.

Correct! Wrong!

Tools and other items are dropped from heights for a number of reasons—While inadequately-stored or secured tools are the third leading cause of dropped tools from heights, inadequate risk assessment and human factors (poor behaviour, complacency) are the top 2 causes.

Nobody actually dies from falling at work

Correct! Wrong!

VERY false—Over 14,000 Canadian workers are injured each year from falls, and over 40 each year are killed from falls at heights.

What's your Fall Protection Safety IQ?
50%—You've got some work to do!
You're halfway there, but you've got some work to do—Hopefully you're not planning to work at heights anytime soon!
0-10%—Yikes, please don't work at heights anytime soon.
You're not quite there—At all. If you work at heights, we recommend taking some fall protection training to learn more.
20-40%—Close, but no cigar.
You know a small bit, but your fall protection I.Q. isn't what it should be yet—Especially if you're working with or around people at heights.
60-70%—Hey, that's pretty good!
Your fall protection I.Q. is high, but it could be better. Have you ever considered taking some more training? To brush up your fall protection knowledge, check out our fall protection blogs for more info.
80-90%—You're almost a fall protection genius.
You're pretty much there. A little brushing up on your fall protection knowledge and you'll be a fall protection genius in no-time.
100%—You're fall protection I.Q. is off the charts!
You're a fall protection genius—You answered them all correctly. Where do we sign up to take your training course?

Share your Results:


FALL PROTECTION SAFETY

Fall protection is not a waste of time—It’s often seen as a burden, but safety equipment exists to help workers, not hurt them. The right fall protection PPE lets you go home safely each day.

You have the right to stay alive at work—Which is worth it, if you ask us.  

To learn more about fall protection and what you need to stay safe, book a free fall protection demo with your local Hercules SLR branch. They’ll show you how harnesses, SRL’s and tool fall prevention equipment works, how it feels and what is best for you. 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT

FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR FALL PROTECTION SAFETY SERVICES & PRODUCTS 

 


FOR MORE ARTICLES ON FALL PROTECTION SAFETY

VISIT OUR BLOG:

FALL ARREST SYSTEM: DON’T FOOL WITH YOUR TOOLS

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and YouTube for more news and upcoming events.

Suspension Trauma: 3 Must-Know Myths

suspension trauma myths to know

Suspension trauma has a few different names—Harness hang, harness-induced pathology and orthostatic intolerance (the medical term). Consequences can be fatal, and it’s important to be aware of symptoms and ways to prevent its onset.

Suspension trauma has its fair share of misconceptions—One of the biggest is that it’s a myth. 

In this article, we discuss three myths that surround suspension trauma you must know. 

MYTH #1: SUSPENSION TRAUMA ISN’T REAL

It is! Suspension trauma happens when a worker’s movement is vertically suspended, restricted and upright for an extended period of time and lose consciousness.

But why does this happen? Blood pools in the legs and makes them swell, while blood pressure drops. Typically, when orthostatic intolerance sets in the victim faints so blood will re-circulate through the body—A worker in restrictive fall arresting equipment can’t do this. 

It can be minor, too—A common example is people who are still for long periods of time and faint, or feel dizzy when they get up. 

Now, imagine you’ve arrested a fall, don’t have a rescue plan and first responders are still on the way. 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and now 25 minutes pass. You know that suspension trauma can set in after just 30 minutes. Time is ticking. You’re covered in sweat, you feel dizzy and terribly nauseous.

Finally, you’re cut down and pass out, unconscious. You’re in the hospital—There’s paperwork, lost-time and incident investigations to happen. Who knew a little slip could cause so much trouble?

Yes, you’re alive, but next time, you’ll definitely have a rescue plan. And suspension trauma is real.

MYTH #2: SAFETY HARNESSES MAKE SUSPENSION TRAUMA EXTINCT

Suspension trauma is still a reality. Yes, education, training and equipment reduce injuries and fatalities in industrial workplaces, but prevention is still a priority. Look at it this way—Vaccines exist for illness like the measles, but people still contract it when they don’t use preventative measures. 

Individual factors increase a worker’s risk to develop the trauma, and its effects are not easy to predict person-to-person. 

These factors include: 

  • Individual’s ability to manage anxiety/stress
  • Harness selection & fit
  • Poor training
  • Previous injury or illness 

This is why training is vital. It’s important to teach employees not only what happens when you use the wrong PPE, but psychological coping mechanisms to help a worker deal with a potential fall. Proper training will also emphasize the importance to continuously move your legs in specific ways to maintain circulation—It’s important The right safety harness and leg straps will allow the worker to move 

MYTH #3:  WHEN THE HARNESS IS OFF, IT’S OVER 

Okay, so when I take the safety harness off I’m fine, right? Wrong.  

Workers in vertical positions must receive medical attention immediately after release. In past suspension trauma cases, victims have died after the harness comes off—This is known as ‘rescue death’.

Some doctors think it’s caused when blood tries to circulate through the body at its normal pace, and can’t. Did you know leg muscles are one of your body’s auxiliary pumps? When legs hang, motionless and upright, it pinches the arteries and blood can’t flow to crucial parts of the body, like the heart and brain. 

  • Leg circulation
  • Heart circulation
  • Brain circulation 

Fortunately, like we mention above, industrial environments benefit with the right personal protective equipment (PPE) and training to prevent suspension trauma. Recorded injuries from suspension trauma are somewhat rare—But training and proper PPE are key to this.

A body harness that doesn’t fit properly, is fit with the wrong accessories or is uncomfortable, does more harm than good. Remember—Suspension trauma does exist, the right safety harness help prevent it and negative effects of suspension trauma can linger after the harness is off. It’s important to train yourself and workers (even those who may not be working at heights) of the risk and procedures to take before, during and after a fall.


START BEING SAFETY SMART

STAY SAFE AT WORK AND LEARN THE SKILLS TO GET THERE AT THE HERCULES TRAINING ACADEMY.

TRAINING@HERCULESSLR.COM 902-468-6827


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

HERCULES TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Don’t Slip Up: Fall Protection Glossary

fall protection glossary

Sometimes you just want a quick, simple definition without all the fluff, so we’ve created a fall protection glossary that does just that.

Do you use a fall arrest system? If you work at 10-feet or higher, you need it – no ifs, ands or buts. Fall protection is a combined system of plans and equipment workers use to protect themselves and their tools from slips or falls, prevent them happening in the first place and minimize worksite risk. 

Read on to discover our fall protection glossary, and stay up-to-date on important safety terms. 

Like our fall protection glossary? Check out our Rigging Glossaries One and Two, and our guide to Rigging Slang.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: A 

ANCHORAGE

A way to securely attach your fall arrest system to the rest of your equipment. 

ANCHORAGE CONNECTOR

A piece that connects and secures your fall arrest, prevention or protection system so it can withstand the forces of work and a potential fall. 

ATTACHMENT POINTS

Loops or d-rings that connect to the body, and allow the worker to attach other components of a fall protection system to it. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: B

BODY HARNESS 

A full-body harness is used to protect workers it does this by distributing the fall’s force throughout the entire body, and ensures the worker’s body remains upright, even after a fall occurs. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: C

CCOHS

The Candian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety is a federal department corporation, and Canada’s national resource for workplace health & safety information. They promote the well-being – physical, psychosocial and mental health – of Canadians by providing information, training, education, management systems and solutions that support health, safety and wellness programs.

CONFINED SPACE

A confined space is an (often enclosed) area not meant for long-term human occupation, with limited exits and entries. Although these spaces are not usually built for humans, work needs to be done there – Some examples of these confined spaces include sewers, aircraft wing (a great example of a confined space that’s not necessarily enclosed), tanks and silos. 

CONNECTOR

A piece of small equipment, or accessory that’s used to connect parts of a personal fall arrest system – These range from individual components, like a carabiner, or those of a larger system, like a d-ring on an absorbing lanyard.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: Dfall protection glossary by hercules slr

DBI-SALA

DBI-SALA® products are trusted for the past 75 years, to help them get the job done well and get home safely. DBI-SALA® delivers fall protection solutions that enable workers to do their best work safely and comfortably. 

DECELERATION DEVICE

Any device used to slow a fall, or absorb energy to lessen the impact of a fall.

DECELERATION DISTANCE

The additional distance between the location of an employee’s attachment point when the fall occurs, between the attachment point’s location when the worker’s fall stops.

DEFLECTION

What tools do when dropped from heights – dropped objects don’t fall straight down, they tend to deflect in another direction (and can often harm innocent bystanders metres away, who are unrelated to the worksite).

D-RING (ATTACHMENT POINT)

An attachment point (can be on the front or back) that lets a worker connect pther components to their fall protection system, like a lifeline or deceleration device. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: F

FALL ARREST 

Fall arrest is the range of fall protection that focuses on the safety of a person who has already fell. 

FALL DISTANCE

Fall distance, or free-fall distance is the term given to the vertical displacement of the fall arrest attachment point on the worker’s fall protection equipment. 

FALL PROTECTION

Refers to the systems and equipment that keep workers safe at heights.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: H

HOLSTERS

Attachment for tool belt to prevent dropping tools when working at heights.

HORIZONTAL LIFELINE

A line held by anchorages, and lets worker attach a lanyard, SRL or other component for horizontal travel. These can be configured to arrest a fall, or for total restraint.

HAZARDS

Any object, situation or act that could cause injury, ill-health or damage workers, the property and the environment – These aren’t always readily apparent, but many hazards can be managed or minimized. There are many different types of hazards, including:

  • Ergonomic
  • Physical
  • Mechanical
  • Chemical
  • Biological 
  • Psychosocial 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: I

IMPACT RESISTANCE

This is an object’s ability to withstand strong forces or shock applied  for example, a worker’s safety harness and lanyard must be able to withstand the wear and tear that regular work gives.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: K

KARABINER

A connector (see below), or coupling link used to secure ropes, harnesses or other components of a fall arrest system. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: L

LADDER

Device used to extend a worker’s reach and work at heights. Commonly-used across a variety of industries to ascend and descend. 

LANYARD

A lanyard is a connection point to your harness, and can be constructed of rope, webbing or cable.  

LEADING EDGE

A leading edge is an under-construction and unprotected side of a surface (think a roof). Its location normally changes as work changes. Leading edges are normally sharp, abrasive and present hazards that you can minimize with fall protection. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: O

OSHA

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration is a regulating US agency who’s responsible to make sure workplaces are safe, and work within the necessary regulations and safety standards.

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: P

PROTECTA

Protecta® Brand has comfortable features and fit, like shoulder pads, moisture-wicking back pads, and foam hip pads with mesh for extra breathability. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: R

RESCUE / RESCUE PLAN

Retrieval plan for worker’s at heights or in confined spaces – a rescue plan is an essential part of any fall prevention plan. 

RISK MANAGEMENT

Risk is present at nearly every jobsite, and risk management refers to the act of minimizing and managing those risks so hazards, injuries, fatalities and high financial consequences are prevented.

ROPE GRAB

A rope grab attaches to a safety harness, and typically is less costly than an SRL. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: S

SAFETY HARNESS

A safety harness (also see body harness) is used to protect a worker if they fall while working at height, or in a confined space by catching them as they fall. 

SHOCK-ABSORBER

Webbing device used to extend or lessen forces on the worker if a fall occurs.

SELF-RETRACTING LIFELINE/LANYARD

A self-retracting lifeline, or SRL is a deceleration device with a spring-loaded cable or line that will brake the worker if a fall occurs. They typically are a longer length, and are best applied when a standard shock-absorbing lanyard would not be able to stop the fall in time. 

FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY: T

TOTAL RESTRAINT

Refers to the control of a worker’s movement by the connection to an anchorage and restrictive equipment that doesn’t adjust, so a worker is completely stopped when a fall occurs. 


PAY ATTENTION TO FALL PREVENTION!

FIND MORE INFORMATION ON FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT, HOW TO CALCULATE FALL DISTANCE AND MORE ON OUR FAVOURITE SAFETY PRODUCTS FROM BRANDS LIKE 3M, MSA SAFETY AND HONEYWELL-MILLER BELOW.

3M DBI-SALA®

3M DBI-SALA® HARNESSES & LANYARDS

HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT HARNESS


FOR MORE ON FALL PROTECTION,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOG:

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT

FALL ARREST SYSTEM: DON’T FOOL WITH YOUR TOOLS


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Safety at Stake: New MSA V-SERIES™ Fall Protection

msa v-series

A BIG DAY FOR HARNESS WEARERS 

The MSA V-SERIES harness line is now available!  Introducing the V-FLEX™, V-FIT™, and V-FORM™—each designed for your comfort and safety needs.

Focus on your work instead of your harness. Why V-SERIES? We have three reasons:

1. Exclusive racing-style buckle eliminates the need for chest straps, creating a closer, more comfortable harness 

2. Athletic cut contours the harness to the body for increased upper torso mobility

3. Pull-down adjustment allows wearer to easily and quickly make adjustments to get the right fit

The safest fall protection harness is the one you’ll actually want to wear. Each V-Series harness delivers exceptional comfort – so you can focus on your work, not your harness.

SUPERIOR COMFORT

Exclusive racing-style buckle allows for a close, comfortable-fitting harness—Eliminating the need for bulky chest straps or cumbersome buckles.

 
INCREASED FLEXIBILITY

Racing-style buckle creates an athletic cut, contouring the harness to the body for improved upper torso movement on the job. 

 
ADJUSTABILITY

Pull-down adjustment allows you to quickly get the right fit that lasts throughout the work day.

 

 

 

So, what’s included in the MSA V-Series™? msa v-form series

MSA V-SERIES V-FORM™ SETTING THE STANDARD

Features: 

Racing-style buckle

Athletic cut

Pull-down adjustment

Easy-to-inspect stitch patterns 

msa v-series

MSA V-SERIES V-FIT™ RAISING EXPECTATIONS

Has all the benefits of V-Form™, plus:

Body-conforming shoulder pad 

Coated webbing

Horizontal leg straps

Dedicated attachment point for Personal Fall Limiters 

msa v-series

 

MSA V-SERIES V-FLEX™ RAISING EXPECTATIONS

Has all the benefits of the V-Fit™, plus: 

Thermoform shoulder pad designed for cooling

Leg padding

Swiveling hip juncture for mobility 

Integrated suspension 

 

MSA Safety Fall Protection Systems


WANT MORE MSA SAFETY?

CHECK OUT OUR BLOG:

MSA SAFETY: NEW V-SERIES ENERGY ABSORBING LANYARD

MSA PRESS RELEAS: NEW JET-STYLE FIREFIGHTER HELMET

NEW FROM MSA: SELF-CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

YOUTUBE   FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN   TWITTER  INSTAGRAM


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

What do Riggers do Offshore?

what do riggers do offshore

WHAT DO RIGGERS DO OFFSHORE?

What do riggers do offshore? If the first word that comes to mind when you think of the words ‘riggers’ or ‘rigs’ is ‘offshore’, you’re on the right track.

As we’ve covered in many of our blogs, riggers perform many different job duties, from stage rigging for plays to positions on construction projects that help move different equipment and materials. Although you’ve likely heard the term ‘offshore rigger’ or ‘rigging’ before, you still might not know everything about this job and its duties. 

Read on to and learn more about an offshore rigger’s job duties, responsibilities of the role and more about Hercules SLR’s work offshore. 

WHAT DO RIGGERS DO OFFSHORE? WHAT THE OFFSHORE INDUSTRY IS

When you hear the term ‘offshore’, it usually refers to the oil & gas and wind energy industries. In the oil and gas industries, a vessel is installed in specific areas to drill for oil or gas. This is important, since gas reservoirs can be found anywhere – including the ocean. To drill offshore, a drilling rig and pipe is installed to access reserves underground. This rig can be on a floating or fixed platform.

So, what do riggers do offshore? Offshore riggers’ manage and monitor all the different parts of a drilling vessel’s operation. To operate rigs, worker’s are required to operate the drilling, attach and operate machinery and deconstruct the machinery when drilling is complete. They also make sure that oil flows through the pipes properly and that oil is transported to the tanker efficiently, and the pipes don’t burst. A rigger is also responsible to make sure safety rules and regulations are followed – remember, emergency responders can’t access an offshore rig quickly or easily, so it’s essential that risk is minimized. 

A person who performs work on the offshore rig is often called a rigger, or a rig technician and there can be different positions, or levels of technicians who perform different duties based on their training, specialties or seniority.

There are often positions available that range from entry-level duties to roles that require experience or more specialized skill, like a derrickhand or welder, for example. Working hours on an offshore rig are much different than your typical 9-5 gigs – offshore work is usually accomplished in two-week (or longer) chunks. Often, riggers will work for a few weeks offshore, on the rig, and then will often have a few weeks off, back on-shore. Offshore rigging takes you away from land (if you didn’t catch that by the word ‘offshore‘), and as we mentioned, often for big chunks of time. 

what do riggers do offshore
A rig technician inspects a valve on an oil rig.

WHAT DO RIGGERS DO OFFSHORE? HOW HERCULES SLR SERVES OFFSHORE INDUSTRY

INSPECTIONS, TESTING & REPAIRS 

Hercules SLR has different technicians that work on offshore rigs with different issues, like broken equipment or machinery on the rig. Inspectors and other technicians will travel to offshore destinations to inspect, repair and if needed, certify equipment. This can happen when equipment fails or other issues are found that threaten safety – Hercules SLR can fix the issue until it’s safe to resume work.

Examples of inspection and repair issues Hercules SLR’s called to work on include:

  • Container inspections
  • Sling/equipment failure
  • Non-destructive testing,
  • Equipment failure
  • Incidents investigation (ex. A dropped load – dropped loads often cause injury, and can be fatal).
  • Fall protection products, inspections, repairs & trainings – a fall protection system is required when working at heights of 6-feet or more, so as you can imagine having a fall arrest system is crucial). 

Since an offshore rig is isolated and far from everyday amenities, it’s usually appropriate to have a rig technician for the entire project to ensure things run smoothly. Offshore rigging presents many safety risks, and it’s important to prevent and reduce any unnecessary harm to workers and the environment by making sure the rig runs properly. 

RIGGING 

Hercules SLR’s rigger’s will come to your offshore installation or project for nearly anything the operation needs. We can: 

  • Move or lift difficult loads to or from the offshore rig
  • Provide you with lifting equipment or equipment rentals for lifting/moving 
  • Identify methods or equipment needed to move particular loads
  • Create custom-rigging solutions to move awkward or difficult loads 
  • Provide riggers’ for your offshore installation 
TRAINING

The Hercules’ Training Academy offers different courses that are useful in offshore applications, like Fundamentals of Rigging with Practical.  

Hercules SLR’s training courses can be completed at the Hercules Training Academy, or, we can come to your offshore installation. Our Offshore Rigger Banksman course teaches students the fundamental skills to rig, lift, sling & release loads in an offshore environment. The course also includes: 

  • Regulations, standards and associations
  • Risk management
  • Rigging plan
  • Calculating load weight, centre of gravity and sling angles 
  • Load control
  • Rigging equipment how-to’s (slings, hitches, hardware and hooks) 
  • Pre-use inspection 
  • Duties and responsibilities of the rigger and banksman 
  • Communications (radio and hand signals)
  • Personnel transfer
  • Container inspection
  • Practical application of the equipment and principles 
what do riggers do offshore at hercules slr
Valves and pipes on an oil rig.

WHAT DO RIGGERS DO OFFSHORE? SAFETY TIPS FOR THE RIG

Safety is very important on offshore rigs not only to prevent injury, but to avoid costly delays in work. As we mentioned, making sure equipment is taken care of is essential, especially for a safe offshore operation. Not only does this make sure the drilling rig operates properly, but will help keep workers safe by preventing a hazard caused by equipment failure.

We can’t stress the importance of safety on the rigs – more safety tips for work on offshore rigs are:

  • House-keeping: Slippery surfaces lead to falls. Using proper PPE to avoid slips and keeping surfaces as dry and clean as possible will help manage risk.
  • Emergency Planning: It’s important to have thorough emergency plans for work on offshore rigs. A confined space entry and rescue plan, exit and first-aid response plans for emergency response are just a few plans it’s important to have before starting work offshore. 
  • Personal Protective Gear (PPE): This goes without saying, but making sure you have the proper PPE is important to stay safe. This should include proper fall protection for tools, non-slip shoes, safety glasses and even lighting for hard-to-see areas.

WHAT DO RIGGERS DO OFFSHORE? IS IT RIGHT FOR YOU 

Do you enjoy assembling and disassembling machinery? Like making equipment work? Have a passion for safety? If you don’t mind travelling, work as a rigger offshore might be perfect for you. 

Being an offshore rigger requires mechanical knowledge, common sense (not as common as you might think, and very important for a safe operation) and communication skills to keep yourself and others safe.

To learn more about offshore rigging, check out our blogs below or head to our career page to browse offshore rigger career opportunities.  


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OFFSHORE RIGGING,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

HERCULES SLR AT THE SABLE STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP WORKSHOP

RIGGING WITH OVER 15 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE

GET TO KNOW LANGLEY, BC NDE INSPECTOR CHRIS DAVIES

BECOME A RIGGER: YOUR CAREER MAP


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Need offshore rigging solutions? Hercules SLR will lift you there.

Click here to learn more about offshore rigging services at Hercules SLR, or e-mail us at info@herculesslr.com to find more information on how we can serve your next offshore project.   

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.