Product Spotlight | Crosby Forged Sorting Hooks

Product Spotlight: Crosby Forged Sorting Hooks

Today, the Hercules SLR product spotlight is on Crosby forged sorting hooks. While sorting hooks may not be a piece of rigging equipment the everyday rigger reaches for every day, they are extremely handy when put to use in their intended capacity.

Sorting hooks are manufactured for use in sorting and laying out plates, pipes, cylindrical or tube shapes and other items that allow the full depth of the hook throat to be engaged. They are always used in multiple sling leg applications, in order to balance the load by engaging it on multiple ends.

Although many hooks used in overhead lifting are required to be equipped with a latch, sorting hooks are one of the few types of hooks designed not to use a latch as it would limit the practical use of the hook when lifting plates and cylindrical loads where full throat engagement of the hook is required.

Sorting hooks should be used at a 30° to 45° angle to get full engagement. Since the equipment functionally relies on its long throat being fully engaged, if you fail to do this, it will result in a significant reduction to the working load limit (WLL) of the hook. With this being said, you never want to concentrate your load on the last two inches of the hook tip, as this too would mean the full throat of the hook would not be properly engaged – and that section of the equipment is not made to support significate weight as it tapers off to being much thinner then the weight baring sections of the hook.

Crosby Forged Sorting Hooks are made of forged alloy steel that’s both quenched and tempered. One of Crosby’s many key attributes in that they full-cycle quench and temper heat treatment all of their equipment. In order to properly transform the microstructure of drop forgings (fancy right?!) products are re-heated after forging, then quenched and tempered* using tightly controlled processes and equipment. This heat treatment provides consistent temperature control and results in superior material properties.

*But what in the world is quenching and tempering? The process of quenching or “quench hardening” involves heating the material and then rapidly cooling it to set the components into place as quickly as possible. Tempering is achieved by heating the quenched material below the critical point for a set period of time, then allowing it to cool in still air.

10 Tips From Crosby to Keep In Mind When Using Sorting Hooks

  1. The sorting and laying out process includes moving these materials at a height close to the ground with the load and load connections visually observable by the crane operator throughout the entire load handling activity.
  2. The hooks must be attached in a manner that will maintain a level, balanced and stable condition throughout the entire process.
  3. If the load exhibits obvious bending, the lift must then be immediately stopped for analysis and evaluation to ensure safety.
  4. During the load handling activity, the slings with hooks at the load connections must remain under tension at all times to prevent any of the hooks from disengaging.
  5. Never concentrate loading on the last 2 inches of the hook tip.
  6. Never exceed 45 degrees “included angle” between two sling legs that are on the same side of the load. Exceeding 45 degrees may result in the slings slipping along the load surface.
  7. The recommended angle of loading when using sorting hooks is 30 to 45 degrees. These lower angles, although typically discouraged for most rigging applications, allows the load to more easily obtain full hook throat engagement. When the angle of loading is greater than 45 degrees, tip loading and failure to obtain full hook throat engagement is very much a concern.
  8. Sorting hooks are for straight in-line loading only. Sideloading applications are not allowed.
  9. Calculate the sling tension and know the loading in all connection points to ensure all rigging gear is sized appropriately.
  10. Never exceed the working load limit as stated on the sling identification tag. Remember, sorting hooks are used in multiples, such as two-, three-, or four-leg wire rope sling assemblies. All slings require proper identification including the capacity of the sling assembly.

Bonus Tip!

The real Pelican Hook

Sorting hooks are known as many things, such as lay out hooks, shake out hooks or pelican hooks. Though, if you refer to them as pelican hooks, be sure the person you’re speaking with truly knows what you mean because there is actually a different type of hook used in nautical and marine applications that’s really called a pelican hook. The real pelican hook is meant for securing ship anchors, life raft canisters or cargo gear and they are not rated to perform overhead lifts.

Pssstt…If you’re looking for an actual pelican hook, head on over to Hercules SLR’s sister company, Spartan Marine! Spartan Marine is your source for high-quality marine products and services, offering a wide range of solutions to those with industrial, commercial and recreational marine interests.


Crosby is one of the most recognizable names in the rigging industry and has been for over 100 years. Crosby makes over 2,000 rigging and lifting products to meet all your hoisting needs, and Hercules SLR is proud to be an Authorized Crosby Distributor and a Certified Crosby Repair Center.

Why shop around? When you buy Crosby rigging equipment from Hercules SLR, you don’t just get a shackle or an eye bolt—You get unparalleled asset management service (did we mention it’s free?), qualified inspection technicians for service & preventive maintenance and peace-of-mind knowing your equipment is safe to lift, hoist or move.

See your Crosby gear from purchase, all the way to service with Hercules SLR’s extensive product selection, inspection & service team, asset management, testing and more.


NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

Product Spotlight | Swivel Hoist Ring

Product Spotlight: Swivel Hoist Ring

What is a Swivel Hoist Ring?

A swivel hoist ring is a type of heavy-duty lifting ring that is used with a hoist to lift or lower a load. It is often the hardware of choice when the object being lifted has no clear attachment points, as the hoist ring is able to be screwed directly into the surface of the load. Once the swivel hoist ring is successfully installed, it essentially creates an attachment point for your hoist chain to attach to.

Swivel hoist rings are of a similar design and intended use to the eye bolt, a piece of hardware that has been around for a very long time in the rigging world. While standard eye bolts are effective when used properly for a suitable job, they often fail when put at any amount of angle. If the load shifts causing the direction of the load to be as much as 10 degrees off the line of force, you could have a bent eye bolt. This can result in a failed lift, causing damage to your load, property damage, and injury to workers.

Swivel hoist rings are designed to lift at any angle because they can swivel 360 degrees and pivot 180 degrees. A swivel hoist ring can rotate with the direction of force without loosing rated capacity, which gives increased safety and peace of mind. When a load is lifted or lowered, wind gusts may cause it to turn—This can result in the chain or rope getting twisted together with static hardware. Swivel hoist rings solve this problem by allowing the load to rotate back and forth as it needs without twisting the chain or rope.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Installing and Using Swivel Hoist Rings

DO:

  • Always read the safety precaution page prior to use or installation.
  • Inspect the hoist ring before each use – see below for what you should look out for when doing this! 
  • Choose a hoist ring with the proper load rating.
  • Only use hoist rings in materials that have a tensile strength of at least 80,000 psi.
  • Make sure the thread engagement is at least 1.5 times the diameter of the
    hoist ring screw.
  • When installing a hoist ring in a through­-hole with a nut and washer, make sure to use a Grade 8 nut that has full thread engagement.
  • Consider periodic load­-testing as an extra precaution.

DON’T:

  • Never exceed the rated load limit or apply shock load.
  • Never use a hoist ring that you believe may be damaged – it’s not worth the risk!
  • Never use a hoist ring that is not tightened to the recommended torque.
  • Never replace the components of the hoist ring.
  • Never use a hook larger than the diameter of the hoist ring opening.
  • Never shim or use washers between the hoist ring and surface of the object being
    lifted.

Swivel Hoist Ring Inspection and Maintenance

Always inspect the hoist ring before each use, make sure that:

  • The screw is tightened to the recommended torque using a torque wrench – If it’s not, the threads may be stripped on a vertical lift.
  • The bushing of the hoist ring is sitting flush against the object being lifted – This ensures that the hoist ring is able to reach its full 5:1 safety factor.
  • The hoist ring is free to swivel and pivot in every direction – If the hoist ring binds up in any direction, it should not be used.
  • There are no signs of corrosion – This can result in the hoist ring cracking or binding up.
  • There are no signs of wear or damage, especially on the screw, shoulder pins, and bail – Damage may be an indicator that the hoist ring is coming into contact with something during use. This should be avoided as such contact can cause binding and shock loads, which exceed the rating of the hoist ring.
  • The shoulder pins are secure and do not rotate or come loose – This can be checked by using pliers to try to rotate the shoulder pins by hand. If it does rotate, it should not be used as this could cause the hoist ring to come loose or break during use.

In need of an affordable and reliable swivel hoist ring? 

That’s where YOKE comes in—With YOKE you never have to sacrifice quality for price. Find YOKE swivel hoist rings at your local Hercules SLR. A YOKE Swivel hoist ring is innovative and meets all requirements of occupational health and safety. Due to its ball-bearing construction, YOKE hoist ring rotates freely 360 degrees – This free movement means it turns automatically in the direction of the load.

Main Features

  • Easy to install – needs only one tap hole.
  • Comes with both the bushing type and ball bearing inside.
  • Rotates 360º and pivots 180º.
  • Designed to a safety factor of 5:1.
  • 100% rated at 90º angle.
  • 100% magnaflux crack detection.
  • Proof load tested to 2.5 times W.L.L. and certified.
  • 20,000 cycle fatigue rated to 1.5 times W.L.L.
  • Each product has a batch code for material traceability and links to test certificate.
  • Drop forged Suspension Ring.
  • The bolt has a result of Charpy-V-test according to EN 10045, part 1 of at least 27 Joules at -20º C.
  • The bolt is UNC grade 8 per ASTM A 574 and Metric Grade 12.9 per DIN EN ISO 4762.
  • Multi-directional loading.
  • Self aligns in direction of load.
  • Avoids torsion forces to the suspension ring – Which means it’s safer!
  • No friction transferred to the bolt as it turns – Which means it will last longer!
  • The bolt is galvanized with an alternative phosphate treatment for increased corrosion protection.

Since 1985, YOKE manufactures durable, reliable & high-quality rigging hardware that keeps your load secure, and your team safe. They run a strict production facility, with a huge emphasis on quality control & safety at every stage of the manufacturing process—From raw materials to the finished product for the end-user, with facilities across the globe, in Canada, Los Angeles and China. To learn more about YOKE at Hercules SLR, click here.


NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

Product Spotlight | Hammerlock Coupling Links

Product Spotlight: Hammerlock Coupling Links

What is a Hammerlock Coupling Link?

Hammerlock coupling links are used for attaching chain to master links, eye type hooks, installing a new branch to a sling or just connecting components during chain sling fabrication.

Hammerlock coupling links should NEVER be used to repair hoist chain—No coupling hardware should ever be used to repair a damaged link of chain. This can present a number of safety hazards to the operator and possibly the overall hoist. In the case of hoist chain damage or ware, the chain needs to be replaced as one piece.

Hammerlocks are also not appropriate for lengthening chain. Once again, if you desire a longer chain, you need to seek out a chain that is fabricated to the correct length, using the correct links.

Assembly and Disassembly of Hammerlock Coupling Links

Hammerlock coupling links are a favorite of riggers because they can so easily be assembled and disassembles in the field using only a hammer and punch.

How to assemble a hammerlock link:

  1. Bring the two halves of the body together so the center connectors are aligned
  2. Position the bushing in the center of the hammerlock, aligned with the connectors
  3. Insert the load pin through the hammerlock as far as you can by hand
  4. Hammer the load pin the rest of the way in, until all material is flush on both ends

 

Did you know the bushing in the center is one of the most important parts of a hammer coupling link? Without the bushing, the load pin on its own will not hold the hammerlock coupling together at all – It actually moves quite freely within the body on its own. The load pin is tapered on the ends which allows the bushing to sit in place and hold the hardware securely together. The bushing contains a spring-like system that allows the pin to push through when hammered, but returns to an un-movable state once in place – Unless directly hammered again using a punch!

How to disassemble a hammerlock link:

  1. Place the hammerlock link on a raised surface, creating room for the load pin to exit the bottom
  2. Align a punch with the center-top of the load pin
  3. Hammer the punch forcing the load pin out from the center of the hammerlock
  4. Pull now loosened parts apart by hand – It’s that easy!

In need of an affordable and reliable hammerlock coupling link?

That’s where YOKE comes in—With YOKE you never have to sacrifice quality for price. Find YOKE Hammerlock Connecting Links for Grade-100 Chain at your local Hercules SLR. YOKE Hammerlock connecting links are made of alloy steel and are quenched and tempered for maximum strength, reliability, and durability with a working load limit of 8800 pounds.

Since 1985, YOKE manufactures durable, reliable & high-quality rigging hardware that keeps your load secure, and your team safe. They run a strict production facility, with a huge emphasis on quality control & safety at every stage of the manufacturing process—From raw materials to the finished product for the end-user, with facilities across the globe, in Canada, Los Angeles and China. To learn more about YOKE at Hercules SLR, click here.


NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.   

Product Spotlight: YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks

yoke swivel self-locking hooks blog header

Product Spotlight: YOKE Rigging Hardware 

Concerned about price, quality & reliability? Choose YOKE, and get all three without making a sacrifice. YOKE swivels are manufactured with the highest grade materials, and are zinc-plated for corrosion resistance and a long life.

WHY USE SWIVEL HOOKS?

Swivel hooks come in two varieties. These are:

  • Positioning Hooks allow the rigger to align the hook while connecting to the load. These hooks aren’t meant to rotate while under load, only to position the hook to the pick point.
  • True Swivel Hooks with Bushings allow the hook to rotate freely under the load, while the top coupling/fitting pivots to let the load rotate. This helps prevents your line twisting.

Swivels should be used when the lift deals with these issues:

  • Swivels reduce bending loads on rigging attachments to allow the load to position itself freely.
  • Swivels should be used in place of shackles during applications where the shackle might twist and might be haphazardly loaded.

FYI: Before you lift a load, make sure there are not cracks or defects in the hook or latch, and that the chain or wire rope is not worn, and in good working order. Not all hooks are meant to overhead lift and not all swivels are meant to swivel under-load—It’s important to know which application the one you use is meant for.

YOKE SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOKS yoke sorting hooks

Today, the Hercules SLR product spotlight is on YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks and some of the lifting products from them we like the best. Read on to learn more about YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hook specifications, tips for use and which applications to use swivel self-locking hooks for.

YOKE SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOK WITH BUSHING

YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks with Bronze Bushing(s) perform a full-swivel under-load. YOKE’s bronze bushings are a bearing consisting of a thin sleeve, used to help the hook rotate or swivel before you lift—Not while it supports a load.

Design factor of 4:1, proof-tested and certified. These hooks are meant for positioning devices, and are not meant to rotate while suspending a load.

Available for Grade 80 Lifting Chain in sizes: 7/32″, 1/4—5/16″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 5/8″, 3/4″, 7/8,” 1″ and Working Load Limits: 2,500lbs, 4,500lbs, 7,100lbs, 12,000lbs, 18,100lbs, 28,300lbs, 34,200lbs and 47,700lbs.

YOKE G-80 & G-100 SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOKS WITH BEARING 

YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hook with Bearing(s) are an excellent choice for lifting and perform a full swivel under-load. Designed with a 4:1 safety factor, and Working Load Limits: 7/32″, 1/4—5/16″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 5/8″, 3/4″, 7/8″ and 1″.

Available for Grade 80 Lifting Chain in sizes: 2,500lbs, 4,500lbs, 7,100lbs, 12,000lbs, 18,100lbs, 28,300lbs, 34,200lbs, 47,700lbs. Available for Grade 100 chain in sizes: 6, 7.8, 10, 13, 16, 20, 22, 26mm. Designed with a 4:1 safety factor, and for Working Load Limits: 1.4, 2.5, 4.0, 6.7, 10.0, 16.0, 19.0 and 26.5 tonnes.

YOKE G-80 SWIVEL EYE SELF-LOCKING HOOKS WITH BEARING 

YOKE Swivel Hooks are also available with an eye attachment. Available for Grade 80 Chain in sizes 7/32″, 1/4-5/16″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 5/8″, 3/4″, 7/8″, 1″ and 1-1/8″. Designed with a 4:1 safety factor, and for Working Load Limits: 2,500lbs, 4,500lbs, 7,100lbs, 12,000lbs, 18,100lbs, 28,300lbs, 34,200lbs, 47,700lbs.

WHICH INDUSTRIES USE YOKE SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOKS?

Swivel self-locking hooks should only be used to swivel under-load if they’re fit with a bearing and are approved by the manufacturer overhead lifting. Swivel self-locking hooks are generally known as positioning hooks, since they rotate which makes connecting the rigging to the load much easier.

Industries that use YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks, include:

  • Automotive
  • Construction
  • Mining
  • Manufacturing
  • Machining
  • Transportation

NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.   

Get Hooked: All About Clevis Grab & Slip Hooks, Eye Hooks & More

rigging hook title image

Get Hooked: All About Clevis Grab & Slip Hooks, Eye Hooks & More 

We’re hooked on hooks at Hercules SLR!

There are many different hooks used for towing, pulling, securing, lifting and rigging, and each type of hook comes with different openings, latches, sizes and more. Hooks are often used to create sling assemblies (particularly with chain), and are also used in various transport applications.

It can be difficult to remember them and what they’re used for, so Hercules SLR wants to make it easy—We’ve made this comprehensive hook guide to secure your hook know-all.

This hook guide will cover topics like what is a below-the-hook lifting device, some of the most often-used hooks for securing and rigging, including non-overhead hooks, overhead lifting hooks, transportation hooks, what the different hook & chain ‘grades’ mean, plus tips for maintenance, inspection, ASME hook standards, and more.

Ready to get hooked on rigging? Read on! 

What Exactly is a Below-the-Hook Lifting Device?

A below-the-hook lifting device is ‘any device used to connect a load to a hoist. The device may contain components such as slings, hooks, and rigging hardware…” A below-the-hook lifting device is a piece of equipment connected to a crane or other lifting device which grabs an item so it can be moved or secured to different place.

To that end, you might think that cranes and other lifting decides are known as “above-the-hook” lifting devices, however, they’re more often referred to as ‘overhead lifting devices’, and are rarely referred to as above-the-hook.

Clevis & Eye Hooks: What’s the Difference?

A clevis hook refers to a hook with a U-shaped attachment point or coupling with holes to thread a pin through and assemble your rigging—Many people like the removable pin to assemble and disassemble rigging quickly & easily. Clevis hooks are used for non-overhead applications.

You’ll likely hear the term ‘clevis’ used to describe other metal pieces of hardware with a clevis coupling. Hooks with clevis attachments can also be used for overhead lifts in many cases (Remember, they’ll be marked as Grade 80 or higher).

An eye hook (non-cradle grab & slip hook) is also used for non-overhead lifts, and is often used with tie-down equipment.

So, what’s the difference between eye hooks and clevis hooks? The attachment point/coupling. An eye hook has a rounded attachment point/coupling, unlike a clevis hook, which comes with a cotter pin to thread through the hole. Both can be used for overhead lifting, but are also often found alongside transportation securing and rigging set-ups. 

Rigger worker navigating with concrete slab lifted by crane hook at building site
Riggers securing a large crane hook onsite.

Non-Overhead Lifting

Transportation 

Grade 70 chain and hooks are typically used to secure loads for transportation applications. Grade 80 is being used more often, however Grade 70 continues to be a popular choice for securement.

Overhead Lifting

Securing, Lifting & Rigging

Rigging hardware is used to attach a load to the lifting point of a crane, and hooks are among some of the most popular rigging hardware.

EYE HOOK

  • There can be different kinds of eye hooks—Hooks typically are eye or clevis hooks, which refers to the hook’s point of attachment.

CLEVIS HOOK

  • A hook with a clevis coupling or attachment point (see above).

SWIVEL HOOK

  • A hook with a swiveling coupling or attachment point.

EYE/ EYE HOIST HOOK

  • Available in both carbon and alloy steel.

FOUNDRY HOOK

  • A foundry hook is a type of grab hook.

GRAB HOOK

  • A grab hook does not usually feature a safety latch. It’s important to note that like clevis and grab hooks, other types of hooks can be grab hooks. For example, foundry hooks are a type of grab hook.

SLIP HOOK

  • A slip hook has a wider throat than a grab hook, and does feature a safety latch.*

SORTING HOOKS

  • Sorting hooks have wide throat openings, which taper to a narrower basket. They have a slightly sharper tip than other hooks, and are used to quickly grab objects to lift. These are normally used in pairs, on steep angles.

* Safety latches are used to make sure the load stays connected under slack conditions. They’re not load-rated, and should never be placed under a Herculesload. Use hook latches unless unsafe to do so.

Hercules’ Hooks

We’ll help you rig it right. What are we hooked on at Hercules SLR? We carry:

  • EYE HOIST HOOKS
  • SWIVEL HOOKS
  • GRADE 80 WELD-ON BUCKET HOOKS
  • G-100 EYE SELF-LOCKING HOOK
  • G-100 CLEVIS SELF-LOCKING HOOK
  • G-100 SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOK WITH BRASS BUSHING
  • G-100 SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOK WITH BALL BEARING
  • G-100 CLEVIS SLING HOOK
  • G-100 EYE SLING HOOK
  • G-100 CLEVIS GRAB HOOK
  • G-100 ROUND SLING CONNECTOR
  • GRADE 100 ROUND SLING HOOK
  • G-100 GRAB HOOK
  • G-100 SWIVEL GRIP SELF-LOCKING HOOK
  • G-100 EYE FOUNDRY HOOK
  • ALLOY EYE HOIST HOOKS
  • ALLOY SWIVEL HOIST HOOK
  • …And, we have replacement load pin kits for Grade-100 Clevis Hooks. 

Hook Maintenance

When Should a Hook be Removed from Service?

According to ASME B30.10 standards, hooks should be removed from service when they are:

  • Missing/illegible hook manufacturer’s identification or secondary identification
  • Missing and/or illegible rated load identification
  • Excessive pitting or corrosion
  • Cracks, damage and/or gouges
  • Any wear that exceeds 10% (or as recommended by the manufacturer) of the original section dimension of the hook or its load pin
  • Any visible deformations—This includes any bends, twists or other abnormalities from the plane of the unbent hook
  • Any distortion that causes an increase in the throat opening of 5%, not to exceed 1/4″ (6mm), or as recommended by the manufacturer.
  •  Inability to lock or latch—If a hook has a safety latch, it must be able to close properly, or any self-locking hook that doesn’t lock.
  • Damage, missing or malfunctioning hook attachment and securing means

Hooks should be inspected before, during and after use by the user. Rigging hooks should also be inspected periodically, or as recommended by the manufacturer.

Non-destructive testing is often used to determine if there are defects, nicks, gouges or any other deformations in metal gear or hardware, like hooks.

Grade 70, 80, 100—What do they all mean?

When we talk about ‘grade’ in relation to hooks, we actually refer to the grade of the chain that will be used with the hook. Grade refers to the tensile or breaking strength of chain.

Sound good? Let’s get into it:

GRADE 70
Grade 70 chain
Grade 70 Chain.

NAME: Grade 70

PROPERTIES: Heat-treated carbon chain

INDUSTRIES: Transportation

APPLICATIONS: Use as a tie-down chain or transportation lashing.

DON’T DO THIS: Grade 70 chain is not meant for overhead lifting—Only use Grade 70 chain and hooks for tie-down and lashing applications.

FUN FACTS: You’ll likely hear Grade 70 chain called ‘trucker’s chain’. It usually has a gold-chromate coating that helps it resist corrosion, since their load is continuously exposed to the outdoor elements and things like salt from the highway also reduce their effectiveness. The gold colour also helps it remain visible for truckers.


GRADE 80

NAME: Grade 80

PROPERTIES: Heat-treated steel chain

INDUSTRIES: Rigging, material handling & some transportation.

APPLICATIONS: Grade 80 chain is the minimum grade for overhead lifts, and is also often used in applications like recovery, safety & towing. Grade 80 chain is also often used with hooks in transport for flat-bed trucking to secure heavy loads.

DON’T DO THIS: Don’t use Grade 80 chain and hooks that are specifically marked for tie-down application in an overhead lifting capacity. (Hercules SLR’s Overhead Lifting Chain is meant for overhead lifting applications).

FUN FACTS: Will have 8 or 800 to denote that it is a Grade 100 chain or hook. 


GRADE 100  

NAME: Grade 100

PROPERTIES: Alloy-steel chain

INDUSTRIES: Rigging & lifting—Mining, offshore, construction, material handling & maritime

APPLICATIONS: Sling component, popular for overhead lifts.

DON’T DO THIS: Use any hook to rig with—Use at least a Grade 100 hook with chain.

FUN FACTS: Will have 10 or 100 to denote that it is a Grade 100 chain or hook.


The More you Know

  • These are some of the most commonly-found hooks in rigging—Some unconventional, or less-commonly found hooks include foundry, claw, bucket, ‘S’ hooks, alloy-swivel, plate & sorting hooks. 
  • Lifting hooks are constructed with a minimum 5:1 safety factor.
  • Hooks should have a latch, or safety latch to connect the throat opening. This prevents load lines from disconnecting. Some overhead lifting devices may not have a safety latch or may have additional features that make using the latch impractical.
  • NDT or non-destructive testing is a good way to check for deformities and defects in metal gear like hooks. We can find abnormalities on the inside and the outside of your metal gear.
  • The load hook should be the weakest part of the lifting equipment.
  • The hook tip should point out, away from the load, with no slack present so the hook won’t tip-load.

FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

HERC HOW-TO: ASSEMBLE A CHAIN SLING

CROSBY QUIZ: CAN YOU PASS THIS HOOK INSPECTION QUIZ?

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION: 5 STEPS FOR IN-DEPTH INSPECTION FROM CM


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? DROP US A LINE, OR GIVE US A CALL!

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Out of the World Lifts: SLR Helps Radarsat Constellation Mission

radarstat constellation mission

Lifting Out of this World: Hercules SLR Helps RADARSAT Constellation Mission

Hercules SLR is committed to safety at every level—Even in outer space.

On Wednesday, June 12, SpaceX launched the RADARSAT Constellation Mission from Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

At 7:17 a.m. PDT (14:17 UTC), the Falcon 9 launched, which was the first of three RADARSAT satellites deployed about 54 minutes following launch.

After stage separation, the Falcon 9 returned to SpaceX’s Landing Zone 4 at the Air Force Base. The first stage for the RADARSAT Constellation mission previously supported Crew Dragon’s first demo mission in March 2019.

The RADARSAT Constellation Mission shows Canada’s excellence in Earth observation from Space. The RADARSAT Constellation Mission is made of three identical C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Earth observation satellites built by MDA, a Maxar Company.

The RADARSAT Constellation Mission will scan and collect daily revisits of Canada’s vast territory and maritime approaches, like the Arctic, up to four times per day. The three-satellite configuration can also access any point of 90% of the world’s surface.

The RADARSAT Constellation Mission supports the Government of Canada to deliver responsive and cost-effective services for fields like maritime surveillance, ecosystem and climate change observation.

For example, the RADARSAT Constellation Mission will:

  • Help create precise sea ice maps of Canada’s oceans and the Great Lakes to facilitate navigation and commercial maritime transportation. Each satellite also carries an Automatic Identification System receiver, allowing improved detection and tracking of vessels of interest.
  • Collect highly-accurate data that will let farmers maximize crop yields, while reducing energy consumption and use of potential pollutants.
  • Take and provide images of areas affected by disaster to help organize emergency response efforts and protect local population.

Hercules SLR is one of many proud Canadian suppliers to supply rigging equipment, hardware and safety training to make the RADARSAT Constellation Mission possible.  

Learn more about the mission and launch—Checkout the webcast from the SpaceX YouTube channel below. 

Video via SpaceX


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

HERC HOW-TO: ASSEMBLE A CHAIN SLING

GET TO KNOW YOUR LANGLEY NDE INSPECTOR, CHRIS DAVIES

DISCOVER LANGLEY: ADVANTAGES OF NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? DROP US A LINE, OR GIVE US A CALL!

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

CROSBY QUIZ: Can you Pass this Hook Inspection Quiz?

crosby quiz, hoist hook inspection at hercules slr

CROSBY HOOK HOIST INSPECTION

TAKE THE CROSBY QUIZ

So you think you know how to inspect a hoist hook? Prove it. Take the Crosby Quiz and find out if you’re a  pro at inspecting hooks for hoisting, or if you should get some more training. 

It’s important to know what makes a hook no longer safe to use – there are a number of factors that contribute to this, and aren’t always glaringly obvious like it being broken or crooked.

Hooks that don’t pass inspection can cause the load to release, and this can result in damaged materials, injured workers or legal consequences. It’s important to conduct inspections before you use the sling – each time

Take the Quiz from Crosby and find out if you’re a hook inspection pro, or if you have a bit more to learn. 

Wear in the area indicated is limited to _____?

The Crosby Group.®
Correct! Wrong!

Wear in the circled areas is limited to _____ of cross sectional area?

The Crosby Group.®
Correct! Wrong!

Wear in the areas indicated are limited to _____ of cross sectional area?

Per ASME B30.10, you should remove any hook from service with a throat opening that's increased by _____. Or, as the manufacturer recommends.

The Crosby Group.®
Correct! Wrong!

According to ASME B30.10, if a hook has _____ twist, remove the hook from service immediately.

Correct! Wrong!

This hook should be removed from service, because:

Correct! Wrong!

ASME B30.10 gives rejection criteria for hoist hooks - this includes:

Correct! Wrong!

CROSBY QUIZ: So you think you can Inspect a Hoist Hook?
100%
Wow, are you a LEEA certified inspector?! You know exactly when a hoist hook should be removed from service.
83%
Wow, you're good - almost an expert! A little hands-on experience will help make you even better.
67%
So close - you're almost there! A little rigging, and you'll be an expert in no time.
50%
Not quite a fail, but not quite a pass either... You definitely have some work to do! You definitely don't have your ASME B30 standards memorized, but with a little work and training, you'll get there.
33%
Yikes... Only 2 correct. Hopefully you're not responsible for rigging or inspecting hoists!
17%
Only 1 right... Please tell us you're not a rigger. Time for training!
0%
None right. Head back to rigging school!

Share your Results:


ASME STANDARDS

There are ASME Standards that apply to rigging, and more specifically, hooks for lifting. Although they’re not law themselves, these standards are important to know as they’re directly quoted in Canadian legislation. Be sure to check the manufacturer warnings, usage instructions and other recommendations that may apply to the equipment you’re using. 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION VIA THE CROSBY GROUP.

 

 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events. 

Crosby Guest Blog: Shackle Inspection & Care

crosby shackles

CROSBY SHACKLES 

Crosby shackles are a popular option for lifting applications. Time-tested and work proven, Crosby has made their mark in rigging—they’ve produced the first wire rope clip, quench and temper fittings (this makes performance more reliable) and were the first to fatigue-rate products. Their shackles are particularly popular – read on to learn more about Crosby shackles and how to use them safely, a handy interactive inspection checklist and more tips for best use. 

CROSBY SHACKLES: 3 MAIN SHACKLE TYPES

Round pin shackles can be used for lifting applications and others like tie down, towing or suspension applications when the load’s strictly applied in-line.

Screw pin shackles are used for pick and place applications. Pick and place applications are when a load is moved to its desired location, and the screw pin is tightened before each pick.

Bolt-type shackles can be used in any applications that round pin or screw pin shackles are used. They’re also great for long-term or permanent installations where the load may slide on the pin, which causes it to rotate. The other way to secure a shackle includes using a nut and cotter, which eliminates the need for you to tighten the pin before each lift or movement. 

CROSBY SHACKLES: USE THEM SAFELY  

Before you put your Crosby shackle in service, make sure your shackle’s in good condition. To do so, look for these conditions:

  • The shackle’s pin works freely and fits correctly. 
  • The pins are undamaged, have no considerable wear and fit properly from the opposite side of the shackle. 
  • The load line and jaw opening are aligned.
  • The pin is always seated and is ‘matched’ to the body.
  • The shackle is the right material, size and type for the proposed lift.
  • Shackles are stored in a dry, cool place.

CROSBY SHACKLES: INSPECTION 

It’s important to inspect your rigging equipment frequently. Ideally, this happens before use, during (check for points of stress or tension during use) and after use. Inspection is important to prevent equipment failure, which can lead to damaging the load entirely, or worse—injure or kill workers’. 

Check your shackle before use. If any of these conditions are present, remove your shackle from service and have it inspected, repaired or replaced. 

  • The shackle’s jaws or pins are distorted.
  • The shackle isn’t stamped with is safe-working load (SWL).
  • The shackle is home-made (never use homemade shackles).
  • The shackle’s pin does not work freely, or fit correctly in the shackle’s opening. 
  • The pins’ threads are damaged, worn down or don’t easily screw in from the opposite side of the shackle. 
  • The unthreaded hole is enlarged – a hole too big places unnecessary strain on the loaded shackle. 
  • The shackle has wear that’s reduced its diameter by more than 8% of its original diameter. To test for cracks that may be hidden, tap them with a hammer. A shackle in good-condition should ‘ring’ clearly.
  • The shackle’s pin has been replaced, especially if it’s been replaced with anything but a pin. 

CROSBY SHACKLES: USE THEM SAFELY OR NOT AT ALL 

There are a few things to keep in mind when using shackles for securing and lifting applications. 

  • When you use shackles in conjunction with multi-leg slings, you must give consideration to the angle between the legs of the sling. 
  • As the angle increases, so does the load in the sling leg, and as a consequence, any shackle attached to the leg. 
  • Try to avoid erratic loading of the shackle – to do this, place a loose spacer on either end of the shackle’s pin, or use a shackle with a smaller jaw. 
  • If using a shackle to secure the top block of a rope block set, the load on the shackle is increased by the value of the hoisting effort. 
  • Take care to make sure the shackle and assembly above the hook is the right capacity. 
  • It’s important that on shackles fitted with a nut and bolt pin, the length of the bolt’s plain portion will cause the nut to jam on the inner end of the thread, and not on the shackle’s eye. This leaves the bolt free to rotate.
  • Be sure the bolt and nut are cross-drilled for the fitting of a split cotter pin. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CROSBY PRODUCTS,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

CROSBY QUIZ: CAN YOU PASS THIS HOOK INSPECTION QUIZ?

GUEST BLOG: CROSBY TALKS FORGED WIRE ROPE CLIPS VS MALLEABLE CAST IRON CLIPS

RIGGING HARDWARE WE LOVE: CROSBY® 4-50 CLIP APPLICATIONS


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Have questions about Crosby products? Hercules SLR will lift you to the answers.

Click here to learn more about Crosby at Hercules SLR. 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events

NEW: Hercules SLR ‘Specials’ Page

specials at hercules slr

NEW from Hercules SLR – amazing specials and an easy place to find them. 

We released our Winter flyer in December – but the deals don’t stop there. Hercules SLR has launched a new page called ‘Specials’, so you can find all of our steals and deals in one convenient place. 

BROWSE OUR SPECIALS

Hercules SLR aims to provide securing, rigging and lifting equipment and services for all your needs. Find everything you need to push, pull, move, hull or hoist almost anything safely & smoothly. We stock a vast range of products to suit most needs, our specials page includes products you don’t see too often – all great product, at great prices. 

Find Hercules SLR Specials page here, or find it on our menu under ‘Products’ → ‘Specials’. 

The products displayed on our web site are used as part of a system employed to accomplish a task. Therefore, we only recommend using these products to accomplish the desired task within the specified Working Load Limit (WLL). Products are subject to wear, misuse, overloading, corrosion, deformation, intentional alteration and other usage factors which may necessitate a reduction in the product’s Working Load Limit (WLL) rating, or is cause to remove the product from service. 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Guest Blog: Crosby Talks Forged Wire Rope Clips VS. Malleable Cast Iron Clips

crosby wire rope clips at hercules slr

FORGED STEEL WIRE ROPE CLIPS VS. MALLEABLE CAST IRON CLIPS

What’s the difference between wire rope clips? Guest blogger Danny Bishop, Director of Training for Crosby stopped by Hercules SLR is here to share some information about the difference between malleable cast iron and forged U-Bolt clips.

Read on to discover his expert tips for rigging with U-Bolts. 

 

crosby rigging, hercules slr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U-Bolt style wire rope clips are one of the most commonly used accessories in the world of rigging. They can be found in many lifting and non-lifting applications.

Some common applications include winch lines, crane hoist lines, suspension cables, barrier cables, guy wires and many more applications. However, it is critical that the user know there are differences between a forged steel wire rope clip and a malleable cast iron clip.

The forged steel wire rope clip consists of a U-Bolt, two nuts and a forged steel base, which is sometimes called the saddle.

The malleable cast iron U-Bolt style wire rope clip consists of the same components as just mentioned except the clip base is NOT forged steel. In fact, it is a malleable cast iron, and that can make a big difference in the performance and reliability of the clip. The malleable cast iron base does not have the desirable material properties of steel, or the beneficial grain structure that a forged base provides. Although, malleable cast iron products have their place in industry, it is not the manufacturing process of choice for wire rope clip bases. This is especially true if the wire rope clip could be used in a critical application.

Notice that some standards do not allow the use of malleable cast iron clips in critical applications. One example would be ASME B30.5 which states that “Wire Rope Clips shall be drop-forged steel of single saddle (U-Bolt) or double saddle clip. Malleable cast iron clips shall not be used. “ASME B30.26 also states: “Saddles shall be forged steel.”

Additionally, shortcuts in the production process of the bases may also indicate there could be other shortcomings of the product. In some recent testing of malleable cast iron clips, it was found that U-Bolts fractured prior to achieving the recommended forged U-Bolt Clip torque, on 2/3 of the assemblies tested. (See picture of test mentioned).

Also consider:

  • Malleable Cast Iron Clip bases are significantly different from forged bases in size, shape and appearance. See figure 1 to compare a Crosby forged clip base and a Malleable Cast Iron clip, both for ½” wire rope. 
  • Malleable Cast Iron bases are inconsistent in strength, and can have hidden defects. 
  • Malleable Cast Iron clips should not be used for critical applications.
wire rope clips, hercules slr rigging services
Figure 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

crosby wire rope clips at hercules slr

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note the significant difference in size, shape and appearance even though both are 1/2″ diameter for wire rope. Also, the Crosby clip exceeds ASME B30.26 marking requirements. No readable markings were found on the malleable cast iron clip. 

HERCULES SLR: CROSBY BRAND


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.