Risk Management: safety is every riggers’ business

risk-management-safety-is-every-riggers-business

Risk Management: what is it?

Risk management is the systematic process of assessing risk and acting in such a manner, or implementing policies and procedures in order to avoid or minimize loss associated with such risk. Essentially, risk management is a set of actions that reduces the risk of a problem, a failure, or an accident. The ISO 31000 defines risk management as “the effect of uncertainty on objectives”.

For the most part, risk management methods consist of the following methods:

  • Identify and characterize threats
  • Assess the vulnerability of critical assets to specific threats
  • Determine the risk (i.e. the expected likelihood and consequences of specific types of attacks on specific assets)
  • Identify ways to reduce those risks
  • Prioritize risk reduction measures based on strategy

Risk Management: know the definitions

Hazard: something with the likelihood to cause harm

Harm: physical injury or damage to health.

Risk: likelihood the hazard is realized – it happens

Severity: likelihood hazard or risk will occur, and the number of people affected and extent of consequences

Control Measures: the arrangements made to reduce risk

Risk Matrix

The purpose of the risk matrix is to determine the risk category. Once you have identified the project risks, review each risk in turn and assess both the likelihood of the risk happening and the severity of the impact on the project if the process doesn’t go as planned.

Consequences

risk-matrix

Risk Management: FLRA is more than just a funny word

Field Level Risk Assessment (FLRA) is a process used to assess the related hazards and their risks for a specific task or job.

A FLRA:
  • Helps reduce injury and to process loss
  • Is an industry standard
  • Is a requirement of most industrial establishment’s safety program
  • Is a requirement on most work sites

A FLRA should be completed:

  • At the start of each shift
  • Before re-starting work which has been stopped for a period of time
  • When site or work conditions change during a job
  • Before starting a new task or job for which there is no safe work procedure
  • Always check for specific requirements with onsite contact or employer
Who Can Conduct a FLRA?
  • Anyone can conduct a FLRA
  • All members of the work team need to participate
  • Sometimes other personnel on the work side need to be included
  • Sometimes a specialist or person familiar with the job and site needs to be involved

Risk Management: your basic rigging plan

Follow this basic rigging plan to manage risk and avoid potential hazards. When you plan each lift, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Has a competent rigger been assigned?
  • Has a risk assessment been conducted with all team members?
  • What is the communication plan?
  • Has the rigging been inspected? (Pre-lift and annually?)
  • Is the rigging fit for the load type and purpose? (I.E. WLL, material, size, etc.) 
  • What is the weight of the load?
  • Where is the load’s center of gravity?
  • What is the sling angle?
  • Will there be any side or angular loading?
  • Are wear pads required against corners, edges, protrusions or abrasive surfaces?
  • Have the applicable hitches been selected for load control and stability?
  • Will personnel be in the way of the load or lifting equipment?
  • Is there any possibility of snagging? (Vertical, horizontal, travel path)?
  • Are there environmental concerns? (I.E. wind, temperature, visibility, power lines)
  • Is a tag line required to control the load?

Risk Management: complete a pre-use check

Pre-use safety checks are required before a rigger uses any lifting equipment or accessories – follow the manufacturer instructions and applicable ASME standards.

This includes a basic physical check of the equipment, which can significantly reduce the risk of health and safety issues that may arise on site during everyday operations.

ASME Standards

ASME Standards state: ASME B30.9 requires that sling users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of environment, and rigging practices. Sling identification is required on all types of slings.

ASME B30.26 requires that rigging hardware users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of environment, and rigging practices. All rigging hardware to be identified by manufacturer with name or trademark of manufacturer.

References: https://www.iso.org/home.html

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Warehouse Safety: is your forklift holiday season ready?

warehouse-safety-forklift-training

Warehouse Safety: forklifts and lift trucks

Warehouse Safety—why is it important? Warehouse work presents various short and long term heath and safety issues – these range from musculoskeletal injuries from awkward bending and lifting positions, to chemical and biological hazards from chemicals and natural factors like dampness or mould.

Warehouses are also busy places—we live in an age where everyone wants things “now!”—but during the holiday season, warehouses tend to become even more crowded. Employees, heavy equipment & machinery and packages on the floor all create obstacles for forklift and lift truck operators. Warehouse safety is easy to overlook during busy periods, especially when employees rush to meet deadlines and fill orders.

Busy times enhance the need for warehouse safety, since this is when hazards are most likely to become injurious or fatal. We know warehouse safety can feel like a nuisance, but we assure you—it never is.

In this article on warehouse safety, the spotlight is on forklift and lift truck safety on the warehouse floor. Forklifts are great to lift and move almost anything, and have become essential to any warehouse operation. However, each year there are nearly 500,000 serious injuries from forklift accidents and 85 fatalities.

Read on for common dangers for a forklift found on the warehouse floor, and our tips to keep your forklift operating safely and smoothly.

Forklift & Lift Trucks: common warehouse incidents

As we previously mentioned, forklifts are a very common presence in most industries and are found in the majority of warehouses. Due to being found in so many places, one of the biggest dangers forklifts present is the assumption that they aren’t dangerous. Often, workers become “used” to operating a forklift and forget to follow certain operating procedures, which can result in accidents.

The Infrastructure Health & Safety Association (IHSA) says common forklift injuries and accidents involving workers include:

  • Forklifts being driven off loading docks;
  • Falling between a dock and an unsecured trailer;
  • A worker being struck by a forklift when it’s in reverse and the operator cannot see the worker;
  • A forklift tipping over and crushing an operator or worker;
  • The load on a lift truck isn’t secured or loaded properly and falls off the forks;
  • The operator not keeping their arms and legs inside the cab, which causes them to slip/fall when they get out of the cab.

It’s still a piece of heavy machinery that can cause escalating incidents, as we’ve seen from certain viral videos. This is why it’s important to train new employees and existing employees, to ensure they’re updated on current operating procedures and safety standards. Other common forklift accidents include racking and property damage—which can include anything from damage to other equipment or the building itself. The IHSA says these accidents are caused by three main factors:

  1. Insufficient training
  2. Little safety rule enforcement
  3. Lack of safe operating procedures

Warehouse Safety: inspect your forklift

warehouse-safety-forklift
Hands in? Check. PPE? Check. Looking ahead? Check.

When using a forklift under normal conditions, the CCOHS recommends inspecting forklifts both daily and every six months. A daily visual inspection should include looking for any visible defects or cracks, while a 6-month inspection should be done by a certified inspection technician.

To inspect your forklift, look for:
  • Exposed wires coming from any cables;
  • Worn, loose or dirty battery plug connections;
  • Clogged vent caps;
  • Leaks in the hydraulic system;
  • Damaged wheels;
  • Wear, bends or cracks in forks;
  • Broken or chipped carriage teeth;
  • Chain anchor pins that are worn, loose or bent;
  • Damp/dry spots that would indicate a leak;
  • Chipped paint or other marks indicating damage (thought it seems minor, this is essential for roll-over protection);
  • Securely held hoses that aren’t crimped or worn.
Before operating your forklift, make sure:
  • Air pressure is good in tires;
  • Positioning latches are in good working condition;
  • Engine oil, fuel and radiator water levels are good;
  • Battery is fully-charged and secured in place.
 Operational Inspection Checklist—make sure:
  • Horn works loud enough to be heard clearly in working environment;
  • Floor brake and pedal works—check pedal travel;
  • Parking brake holds against slight acceleration;
  • Deadman seat brake holds against slight acceleration;
  • Clutch and gearshift shifts smoothly with no jerks;
  • Lights and gauges work on dash control panel;
  • Steering is not “sticky” and works smoothly;
  • Lift mechanism operates smoothly (to check, raise forks to maximum height and lower completely);
  • Tilt mechanism moves smoothly and holds (to check, tilt mast all the way forward and back);
  • Mast and carriage don’t have any lose or missing bolts, chain tension or damage;
  • Cylinders and hoses aren’t leaking;
  • Your seatbelt is fastened;
  • Forklift does not make unusual sounds.

Your daily inspection should include not only the forklift, but the warehouse floor itself. On the warehouse floor, look for:

  • Misplaced items on the floor that will create an obstacle;
  • Overhead obstructions;
  • A registered fire extinguisher that’s able to use.

Warehouse Safety: operating & controlling your forklift

warehouse-safety-forklift
Don’t be a dummy—don’t overload your forks!

When you lift a load, be sure to not move or adjust any part of the load while it’s on the forks.

To load pallets, CCOHS suggests ensuring forks are:
  • Level;
  • High enough to stack the pallet;
  • Proper width to distribute weight evenly (otherwise they’ll become unstable);
  • Under the load completely and reaching two-thirds of the load length.
Driving with a Load 101

Support the load with the front wheels of the forklift, and be sure to turn with your back forklift wheels. Be sure to never overload your forks, as this makes it difficult to maintain control of the forklift—do not add a counterweight to fix this!

When travelling on an incline, keep forks pointed downwards when travelling without a load and keep them pointed upwards when travelling with a load. Do not turn until on level ground.

Tips to maintain control with pallets:
  • Carry load with front wheels;
  • Turn with rear wheels;
  • Don’t take sharp turns at high speeds;
  • Don’t overload or add extra weight.

Be sure to avoid any sudden stops and always look in the direction that you’re travelling, whether going forward or in reverse. When in reverse, go slowly, sound your horn before proceeding and stop if vision is limited or blocked. Sound your horn, and proceed with caution.

While driving the forklift, obey posted signs, keep forks as low to the floor as possible and tilted back, decrease speed at turns and sound the horn. Remember, when it comes to using your horn— it’s better to make too much noise than not enough.

While on the floor look, remember to look for:
  • Oil spots
  • Wet spots
  • Loose objects
  • Holes
  • Rough surfaces
  • People/vehicles on the floor or roadway

Forklift Safety at Hercules SLRwarehouse-safety-forklift

At Hercules SLR, we provide hands-on training with a focus on safety—it’s important for us to provide a lasting impression and knowledge you and your employees can take with them. Find more information on our Forklift Safety Training courses here.

Find more information on Hercules SLR inspection services here, so your forklifts remain in top condition—Plus, learn more about the benefits of our asset management tool CertTracker® for your forklifts and other heavy machinery and equipment.

References:- https://www.ihsa.ca/pdfs/magazine/volume_11_Issue_4/safety_talk_lift_trucks_warehouse.pdf- https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/safety_haz/forklift/control.html
- https://www.ccohs.ca/headlines/text16.html

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.