Learn to Rig it Right in Hamilton, ON: Meet your Trainer, Steve Hache

hercuels slr rigging trainer steve hache

Meet your Hercules SLR Trainer, Steve Hache CD

Get ready for our first-ever two-day training course, ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ at Hercules SLR in Hamilton, Ontario.

Time to meet the teacher—Steve Hache, CD is one of our experience Training Specialists and will lead the Fundamentals of Rigging course. We sit down with Steve to talk more about his role and why he decided to enter training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background:

Steve: It was a dream of mine to pursue a career in the Canadian Armed Forces so, I joined the Royal Canadian Navy (RNC) when I was 19 years-old. I spent 21 years of dedicated service in the RCN, trained and became qualified in a number of technical aspects that range from complex seamanship evolutions, boarding operations, crane operations, forklift operation, small arms, to rigging and hoisting.

After this, I worked in the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC—One of the most recognized colleges in the East Coast) faculty and was introduced to the adult education field. I had an interest in safety, so I earned my diploma in Adult Education-Teaching, Learning and went on to complete the Construction Safety Supervisor certification through the Nova Scotia Construction Safety Association.

steve hache, hercules slr trainer
Steve Hache, CD.

In my professional career, I continue to learn—Some of the most memorable experiences were training in the United Arab Emirates in course design at HBI Learning Centers in Sydney, Australia and Adult Education & Assessment at the Global Maritime & Transportation School in New York, USA.  

What made you decide to go into this industry?

I was most accustomed to the safety, rigging & hoisting industries, since there were constant opportunities to operate cranes, forklifts or perform rigging & hoisting operations in the RCN.

Nearly everyday, we removed or replaced machinery from engineering spaces, load or unload missiles, torpedoes, stores and operate cranes—Rigging and hoisting was routine.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Steve: When I retired from the RCN, I accepted a job at an American security company in the United Arab Emirates. There, I was exposed to a new, exciting culture and got to train their Coast Guard in seamanship, basic boat operations, tactical boat operations and maritime law enforcement.

This was an extremely challenging and rewarding experience!

After a couple of years in the UAE, I came home—This was when I joined the faculty as NSCC. I took a temporary position at NSSC as faculty of the Marine-Industrial Rigging program. There, I turned a part-time program into a full-time program. The faculty and staff of NSCC were first-rate! I learned a great deal from each person.

When the temporary position ended, I worked as a training manager and Fall Protection Trainer where I learned & honed my training skills even more. Then came Hercules SLR—The rest is history!

What made you want to transition into training?

Steve: It wasn’t difficult for me to speak to large groups of people, since I’ve been doing it since I entered the workforce—In the military, I had to brief, command on and supervise complex seaman evolutions along with rigging & boat operations.

However, teaching and training didn’t always come naturally. My first role as a trainer in the RCN where I was posted to the Bedford Rifle Range as a small arms instructor. I was nervous at first, but I grew to love it—Who knew I enjoyed speaking in front of people?!

Since, my career has always involved speaking tolarge groups of people, which is a must-have skill for a trainer.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?LEEA Header

Steve: That’s easy – I have always appreciated the staff at Hercules SLR. When I was faculty at NSCC, they consistently treated myself and any student that I sent their way with the utmost respect and care. The program work terms that the students completed were extremely beneficial to them and also ended up with employment for a number of them. We developed and maintained a positive working relationship. 

Is there anything you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry? 

Steve: I hope to take more LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association) courses to further my knowledge —It’s important to never stop learning. However, my main focus is to continue to contribute to today’s safety culture.


FIND MORE INFORMATION ON THE ‘FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING’ COURSE AT HERCULES SLR IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO

LEARN TO RIG IT RIGHT


TRAIN WITH THE BEST AT HERCULES SLR. CONTACT SHERRY BOHM TO LEARN MORE OR SIGN UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

rigging course, fundamentals of rigging in hamilton ontario

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

Learn the skills to life safely, securely & efficiently at the Rigging Fundamentals course at Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario on July 15 and 16 from 8:30am to 4:30pm. 

Join our all-day, LEEA-accredited course with lifting & rigging expert Trainer Steve Hache and learn the fundamental skills of rigging to perform work in the marine, entertainment, construction, oil or transportation industry. 

Rigging is an excellent career or skill if you’re interested in mechanics & how things work, working in a variety of different locations on different machinery and keeping others safe & secure. 

At the Hercules SLR ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ Training Course, you’ll learn:  

  • Regulations and standards relevant in Canada & North America 
  • Risk assessment & management 
  • How to create and execute a rigging plan 
  • How to calculate load weight 
  • What is the rigging triangle
  • How to find the centre of gravity and calculate sling angles 
  • Pre-use inspection
  • How to communicate on a rigging site (I.E. radio, hand signals, etc.) 
  • Learn about and how to use rigging equipment like slings, hitches, hardware and hooks

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU EXPECT AT THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE?

fundamentals of rigging in hamilton, ontario
Couse outline—Click here. 

GET TO KNOW YOUR HERUCLES SLR TRAINER:

MEET STEVE HACHE, CD


TRAIN WITH THE BEST!

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SIGN-UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE CALL OR EMAIL SHERRY BOHM, CSR: 

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Why confined space training?

why confined space training is important in sewers

Why confined space training? 

Why confined space training? Taking training courses before you enter, exit or work around a confined space has many benefits—The main benefit is having the knowledge to keep yourself and others safe.

Why is training to enter a confined space so important? What’s so deadly about a confined space that’s different from other types of dangerous, hazardous workplaces?

A lot, actually. 

We’ve talked about the dangers of confined spaces on the Hercules SLR blog before—But why should you train for them? You’re about to find out. 

In this blog, we’ll cover: 

  • What is confined space training? 
  • Why is confined space training important?
  • What are the OSHA/CCOHS standards for confined space training? 
  • How often is confined space training required?
  • What are the four main dangers of a confined space?  
  • Who can enter a confined space? 
  • Confined spaces & restricted spaces—What’s the difference?

WHAT IS CONFINED SPACE TRAINING?

Confined space training involves teaching workers who work in or around confined spaces the hazards, risks and dangers involved with them. It’s important that even people who aren’t planning to enter the space are trained on proper confined space entry and exit, since nearly 60% of confined space deaths happen to people who try to rescue others

What’s the difference between a hazard and a risk

WHY IS CONFINED SPACE TRAINING IMPORTANT?

Why confined space training? Confined space training is important because it helps workers and nearby personnel manage risk associated with work in confined spaces, which in-turn, helps reduce injuries & fatalities. How can you know what to do, look for and how to rescue yourself and others if no one tells you? 

This is where confined space training comes in. 

Like we mention in the paragraph above, almost 60% of confined space deaths happen to people who try to rescue those who are trapped or in danger—But there are other reasons why training to work in or around a confined space is absolutely necessary. 

Many hazards found in confined spaces are found in other, open work spaces, but become more dangerous, or even deadly when you encounter them in confined spaces. 

This is because there’s little room for error for work in a confined space. Physical hazards are more dangerous in a confined space, materials & chemicals can interact unpredictably and of course, they’re harder to get in and out of. 

Some of these include: 

  • Low air quality: Low, or poor air quality might happen from a toxic substance in the air (see ‘Aspyxiant hazards’ below) or from a lack of oxygen, and/or natural ventilation. 
  • Asphyxiant hazards: These are gases that become concentrated in a confined space and displace oxygen in the air, which leads to nausea, convulsion, coma, and eventually, this atmosphere becomes fatal. Asphyxiants are gases like argon, nitrogen and/or carbon monoxide. 
  • Exposure to harmful chemicals.
  • Fire hazards, like chemicals that could ignite if a spark is used in the space.
  • Physical hazards like noise, extreme heat or cold, radiation, vehicle & pedestrian traffic and even poor visibility. 

All of these hazards are amplified when you work in a confined space. We can’t stress the speed at which these hazards become fatal. Picture this:

You’re working on a water waste lift station (which controls waste water/sewage travel). Your co-worker has descended into a confined space to diagnose an issue, but the diagnosis should have been complete long ago—As in 45 minutes ago. “I’m gonna go check on him,” your co-worker shouts to you. Before you can tell him to stop, he enters the confined space. You call 911—Neither can be revived. Your co-worker who simply went to check on someone died instantly. You will never underestimate just how fast a confined space can take a life again. 

We don’t mean to be obscene, but this is a reality than unfortunately, happens more than it should, even with all  the knowledge available on confined space entry & exit. Hazards found in typical workplaces become much more hazardous when they’re confined, which is just one reason why confined space training is so important. 

WHAT ARE THE REGULATIONS FOR CONFINED SPACE TRAINING?

In Canada, provincial standards regarding confined space differ. Your organization may have also have requirements for confined space work specific to them, so take these as a general guideline.

There is some legislation that involves training and confined spaces in Canada—The Canadian Occupational Health & Safety Standard 11.5 on emergency procedures says:

  1. Where conditions in a confined space or the nature of the work to be performed in a confined space is such that the specifications set out in paragraph 1.4(1)(a) cannot be compiled with during all times that a person is in the confined space, the employer shall 

a) In consultation with the work place committee or the health and safety representative, establish emergency procedures to be followed in the event of an accident or other emergency in or near the confined space, which procedures shall specify the date on which they are established and provide for the immediate evacuation of the confined space when

i) an alarm is activated, or

ii) there is any significant change in a concentration or percentage referred to in paragraph 11.4(1)(a) that would adversely affect the health or safety of a person in the confined space.

b) provide the protection equipment referred to in paragraphs 11.3(b), (c) and (d) for each person who is about to enter the confined space;

c) Ensure that a qualified person trained in the entry and emergency procedures established pursuant to paragraph 11.3(a) and paragraph (a) is 

i) in attendance outside the confined space, and 

ii) in communication with the person inside the confined space; 

d) Provide the qualified person referred to in paragraph (c) with a suitable alarm device for summoning assistance; and 

e) Ensure that two or more persons are in the immediate vicinity of the confined space to assist in the event of an accident or other emergency. 

2. One of the persons referred to in paragraph (1)(e) shall 

a) Is attached to a secure anchor outside the confined space,

b) be the holder of a basic first aid certificate; and 

c) be provided with the protection equipment and emergency equipment referred to in paragraph 11.3(d). 

3. The employer shall ensure that every person entering, exiting, or occupying a confined space referred to in subsection (1) wears an appropriate safety harness that is securely attached to a lifeline that

a) is attached to a secure anchor outside the confined space;

b) is controlled by the qualified person referred to in paragraph (1)(c);

c) protects the person from the hazard for which it is provided and does not itself create a hazard; and 

d) is, where reasonably practicable, equipped with a mechanical lifting device. 

HOW OFTEN IS CONFINED SPACE TRAINING NEEDED?

Anyone who is about to work in or around confined spaces should receive training—It’s often beneficial to train new employees on specific confined space entry, exit and rescue procedures for your organization even if they have training from previous work, since practices may be different. 

Confined space training should also be held when policies or regulations change. Training should also be held if policies and procedures are ignored. As we know, this can be deadly. 

The Canadian Occupational Health & Safety Standard 11.11 states: 

  1. The employer shall provide every employee who is likely to enter a confined space with instruction and training in,

a) the procedures established pursuant to paragraphs 11.3(a) and 11.5(1)(a); and

b) The use of the protection equipment referred to in paragraphs 11.3(b), (c) and (d).

2. The employer shall ensure that no person enters a confined space unless the person is instructed in,

a) the procedures to be followed in accordance with paragraphs 11.3(a) and 11.5(1)(a); and

b) The use of the protection equipment referred to in paragraphs 11.3(b), (c) and (d).

WHAT ARE THE 4 MAIN DANGERS OF WORK IN A CONFINED SPACE?

We’ve covered some of the main hazards to look for in a confined space, but as we know, they are magnified in a confined space—So it’s worth going over again.  

The four main dangers of work in a confined space are: 4 main confined space hazards

WHAT ARE SOME TYPES OF CONFINED SPACES? 

It’s easy to think of confined spaces as work spaces that you descend (go down) to, but confined spaces can be nearly anywhere, above or below ground.

So, why confined space training? Because it’s likely many workers in industrial jobs will work in one of these spaces at least once. 

By definition, a confined space:

  • Is not meant to be occupied by humans (Especially long-term)
  • Has limited entries and/or exits, or a layout that could hinder emergency responders, or movement from humans or machines. 
  • Represents a risk to health & safety because of:
    • The design, construction, location or atmosphere of the space
    • Materials or substances found/used in the space
    • Any other conditions that contribute to safety risk or hazards. 

Types of confined spaces include: 

  • Sub-cellars
  • Tanks
  • Culverts
  • Silos
  • Vaults
  • Open Ditch  

why confined space training is important

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TIPS FOR TAGLINES | TRAINING TUESDAY

STUCK IN A TIGHT SPOT? WHAT TO KNOW IN A CONFINED SPACE

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY SAFE IN & AROUND CONFINED SPACES.

GIVE US A CALL, DROP US A LINE OR COME ON IN TO LEARN ABOUT UPCOMING CONFINED SPACE TRAINING COURSES AT THE HERCULES TRAINING ACADEMY:

TRAINING@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Suspension Trauma: 3 Must-Know Myths

suspension trauma myths to know

Suspension trauma has a few different names—Harness hang, harness-induced pathology and orthostatic intolerance (the medical term). Consequences can be fatal, and it’s important to be aware of symptoms and ways to prevent its onset.

Suspension trauma has its fair share of misconceptions—One of the biggest is that it’s a myth. 

In this article, we discuss three myths that surround suspension trauma you must know. 

MYTH #1: SUSPENSION TRAUMA ISN’T REAL

It is! Suspension trauma happens when a worker’s movement is vertically suspended, restricted and upright for an extended period of time and lose consciousness.

But why does this happen? Blood pools in the legs and makes them swell, while blood pressure drops. Typically, when orthostatic intolerance sets in the victim faints so blood will re-circulate through the body—A worker in restrictive fall arresting equipment can’t do this. 

It can be minor, too—A common example is people who are still for long periods of time and faint, or feel dizzy when they get up. 

Now, imagine you’ve arrested a fall, don’t have a rescue plan and first responders are still on the way. 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and now 25 minutes pass. You know that suspension trauma can set in after just 30 minutes. Time is ticking. You’re covered in sweat, you feel dizzy and terribly nauseous.

Finally, you’re cut down and pass out, unconscious. You’re in the hospital—There’s paperwork, lost-time and incident investigations to happen. Who knew a little slip could cause so much trouble?

Yes, you’re alive, but next time, you’ll definitely have a rescue plan. And suspension trauma is real.

MYTH #2: SAFETY HARNESSES MAKE SUSPENSION TRAUMA EXTINCT

Suspension trauma is still a reality. Yes, education, training and equipment reduce injuries and fatalities in industrial workplaces, but prevention is still a priority. Look at it this way—Vaccines exist for illness like the measles, but people still contract it when they don’t use preventative measures. 

Individual factors increase a worker’s risk to develop the trauma, and its effects are not easy to predict person-to-person. 

These factors include: 

  • Individual’s ability to manage anxiety/stress
  • Harness selection & fit
  • Poor training
  • Previous injury or illness 

This is why training is vital. It’s important to teach employees not only what happens when you use the wrong PPE, but psychological coping mechanisms to help a worker deal with a potential fall. Proper training will also emphasize the importance to continuously move your legs in specific ways to maintain circulation—It’s important The right safety harness and leg straps will allow the worker to move 

MYTH #3:  WHEN THE HARNESS IS OFF, IT’S OVER 

Okay, so when I take the safety harness off I’m fine, right? Wrong.  

Workers in vertical positions must receive medical attention immediately after release. In past suspension trauma cases, victims have died after the harness comes off—This is known as ‘rescue death’.

Some doctors think it’s caused when blood tries to circulate through the body at its normal pace, and can’t. Did you know leg muscles are one of your body’s auxiliary pumps? When legs hang, motionless and upright, it pinches the arteries and blood can’t flow to crucial parts of the body, like the heart and brain. 

  • Leg circulation
  • Heart circulation
  • Brain circulation 

Fortunately, like we mention above, industrial environments benefit with the right personal protective equipment (PPE) and training to prevent suspension trauma. Recorded injuries from suspension trauma are somewhat rare—But training and proper PPE are key to this.

A body harness that doesn’t fit properly, is fit with the wrong accessories or is uncomfortable, does more harm than good. Remember—Suspension trauma does exist, the right safety harness help prevent it and negative effects of suspension trauma can linger after the harness is off. It’s important to train yourself and workers (even those who may not be working at heights) of the risk and procedures to take before, during and after a fall.


START BEING SAFETY SMART

STAY SAFE AT WORK AND LEARN THE SKILLS TO GET THERE AT THE HERCULES TRAINING ACADEMY.

TRAINING@HERCULESSLR.COM 902-468-6827


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

HERCULES TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Get to Know your Territory Manager, Marc-Antoine Nolin

training courses at hercules slr

Today, we sat down with Quebec Hercules SLR Territory Manager, Marc-Antoine Nolin. We’re proud to have managers with a wide-array of industry experience and hands-on training. Marc has worked in both the mechanical and financial industries, and works at Hercules SLR as a Territory Manager and Trainer—he spoke with us about his professional experience, training courses he’s completed and his role at Hercules SLR.

Tell us about your educational background?

In 2010, I graduated from automotive mechanics. I worked in this field for a few years, then returned to sales-consulting and representation studies—I then obtained my certificate from the Autorité des Marches Financiers (Authority of Financial Markets). After graduation, I worked as a financial security advisor for some time.

What made you decide to enter this industry?

I missed working in a field where the product is tangible and more technical. So I started looking for a new challenge, and by chance I came across a job offer from Hercules SLR. The safety and lifting field was unknown to me, so I took the opportunity to develop experience in a field that had a lot of opportunity.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

When I worked in the mechanic field, I developed my technical and logistical skills. I had to supervise the team of mechanics, so I had to communicate well. I also worked on telecommunication lines, where I trained for work at heights.

My years in financial services have helped me develop my communication skill and explain things well.

What made you want to transition into training and management?

I’ve always enjoyed gaining and sharing new knowledge. In my various jobs, I was often the person dedicated to training new employees. I like to talk in front of and interact with a group. When the opportunity to become a trainer presented itself, I immediately took my chance—I knew it was right for me.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

I applied at Hercules SLR to take up a new challenge. I’ve been lucky to work at Hercules for four years now. During these four great years, I’ve worked in almost every position in the company. I’ve developed a passion for the field and now I have the opportunity to share the knowledge I’ve gained.

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

I’ve traveled to local training courses in Quebec, and to Halifax to attend the first rigging fundamental training at the Hercules Training Academy.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel in the future with Hercules SLR?
training-courses-territory-manager
Hard hat? Check. Suit? Check. Managing is a balancing act!

I love discovering new cities, so no matter where my role as a trainer takes me, it will be a pleasure. I haven’t been to Western Canada for a long time, so I’d like to go back there!

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career at Hercules SLR?

I’m passionate about my job—the most important thing I want to accomplish through my job as a trainer is to share my knowledge and make sure people can work safely.

At the moment, I give one class—I’d like to eventually acquire the accreditations to give other courses. I’d also like to seek other LEEA certifications and training courses in the future.

Training Courses by Hercules SLR

Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses, we’ll tailor-make courses to suit your specific requirements—at our facility or yours. Find out how we’ll help you raise the bar in safety training.

To learn more about our courses, e-mail us at training@herculesslr.com.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Hercules Training Academy: Securing, Lifting & Rigging

training-academy-group-shot

Hercules Training Academy: First Course Complete

The Hercules Training Academy is open for training—last week Hercules was thrilled to have eight employees hailing from across Canada participate in our first ever training program. Employees from CSR, sales and management gathered at Hercules’ new, purpose-built specialized Training Academy in Dartmouth, NS to learn the ins and outs (quite literally)—of securing, lifting and rigging in our first specialized training course.

Training Academy Facilities

What makes Hercules’ Training Academy ‘specialized’? Our equipment, for one. Our new custom crane is built into the warehouse floor and can lift up to 10 tonnes—pieces of concrete were actually torn up in order to fix the crane to the floor. This gives our employees experience working with larger, more realistic loads that one may commonly see on a job site.

hercules-training-academy-classroom--sling-chain

In addition to the large crane, we have two smaller, portable cranes—these can be used for activities outdoors or on the warehouse floor, and allow trainee’s to practice securing, lifting and rigging in various settings.

In addition to the rigging equipment available at the Training Academy, there are two new classroom spaces. Trainees spend a time in the classroom learning various details, features and differences between equipment like hoists, buckles and slings. Then, they take their knowledge to a practical setting.

This combination of practical and classroom experience is invaluable for our clients and customers.

“I’ve learned so much on the course that will help my understand my customers’ needs much better. I know what’s a workable solution, and how to interpret the needs of the clients’ project,” says Keyne, a CSR from Hamilton, Ontario.

One activity included Hercules’ employees hoisting and lifting objects up and through holes outdoors, which mimicked the challenges of rigging objects into the top of a larger structure, like a boat. Another required employees to secure, lift and rig irregular shaped objects into a shipping container. This showed our employees some of the challenges workers face onsite—things like balancing a large objects’ centre of gravity, evenly distributing a heavy load and properly securing misshapen objects.

Dwayne Fader, Business Development Manager (and former rigging technician!) at Hercules explained some of the common misconceptions and complications workers face with rigging a heavy load. “There is so much more math involved than you think—I’ve never used it more than when I worked in rigging. You have to make sure things are even, balanced and fit correctly—all more challenging than it seems.”

Commitment to Learning

Hercules truly believes that experience is the best teacher, which is why we developed the Training Academy. When we teach our employees how to work with the products we sell, and get a ‘taste’ of what the job is actually like, they gain a whole new insight towards issues our customers and clients face daily—and are able to offer practical solutions and advice. Simply put—our employees don’t just ‘talk the talk’, but can ‘walk the walk’, too.

TJ, a Sales Manager from  Langley, BC says “The Training Academy session was fantastic. I’ve learned more useful skills than I expected, and it’s been fun! The hands-on activities really helped me understand what I was learning. It made me realize what’s great in theory, and then what you actually need to do to make that theory workable.”

Hercules’ employees gained a lot from their time at the Training Academy, and many are excited to do again.

“If there’s a Rigging 2—I want to be on it! I learned stuff I never knew I needed to know, and it’s been FUN.”  says Quincy, an Inspector from Hamilton, Ontario. “Who ever thought I’d use ‘work’ and ‘fun’ in the same sentence? But I have—and it was!”

Hercules offers practical, hands-on learning programs designed to exceed minimum safety requirements. These courses can be customized to fit the specific needs of your workplace, and can be provide training on-site or at a Hercules facility.

We’ve always been committed to providing specialized training—see the table below to discover our available training courses. 

Current Courses Offered:
Power Operated Work PlatformsChain Saw Safety

Confined Space Entrant & Attendant (CSEA)

Fall Protection

Fundamentals of Rigging with Practical

Forklift Safety (Narrow Aisle or Counterbalance)

Lock Out Tag Out

Red Cross Emergency First AidRed Cross Standard First Aid

Fall Rescue Systems

WHMIS 2015 with GHS

Fundamentals of Overhead Cranes

Fundamentals of Rigging

Offshore Rigger Banksman

Overhead Crane Operator

There really is no substitute for experience. All in all, Hercules’ employees had a similar takeaway. Marc, a Manager from Quebec, explains “This week has been amazing. I learned so much about the industry, and now I can understand the jobs as our clients do. I’ve actually already taken some material home for Rigging 2, and I’ve completed the math exercise! It’s great.”

More questions about training at Hercules? E-mail us at training@herculesslr.com.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.