We Pull Anything! ATV Towing Tips

atv towing tips

We Pull Anything! ATV Towing Tips

You’ve probably heard us mention that we lift anything, but we also pull anything. 

Many of us on the Hercules SLR team are enthusiastic ATV-ers—That’s all-terrain vehicles for all you newbies out there. 

There’s a couple additional things you’ll need before you hit the road, though—You have to get your ATV to the trail, woods or wherever you ride, and it’s illegal to use your ATV on public roads. There’s also a good chance you’ll get stuck in the mud, so it’s essential to have reliable chain, ropes & winches to haul yourself out of a rut. 

atv towing gear
Winch.

Often, ATV’s are transported in a trailer, sometimes a truck (however, most professional sources recommend a trailer to keep your vehicle secure) and a winch (a device used to pull or let a load out) to move your ATV for transport. Many ATV’s come with winches pre-installed, and aircraft cable is commonly used with them. However, some synthetic winch lines have started to appear and rise in popularity. 

ATV TIPS TO SECURE IT SAFELY

The job’s not done when it’s on the ramp—Now comes securing your ATV. 

You likely dropped a pretty penny on your ATV and don’t want it to come crashing down somewhere on the highway. This is why it’s so important to take the same approach with the tie-down process, equipment included. 

To secure your ATV, you’ll need:

  • Ramp and/or Trailer 
  • Webbed nylon tie-down straps/Ratchet Straps 
  • Metal hooks (Snap, wire, flat or delta hooks/rings if strap isn’t equipped with them)

Once your ATV is secure, it should look like it’s supporting a rider, and the wheels should be firmly placed against the trailer. 

It’s also important to make sure your trailer or towing vehicle has the proper rated-capacity to hold the ATV, it has an appropriate amount of tie-down points and your tie-down method complies with the owner’s manual. Take your time loading it onto the trailer, so you don’t over-shoot the trailer and ‘jump’ it, and be sure the trailer, and the ATV are aligned straight with your vehicle. 

Keep the length of your trailer in mind when driving on public roads, take it slow and try to avoid passing other cars if possible. 

ATV TIPS TO TOW IT SAFELY  

Here’s a few members of the Hercules SLR team having fun on their ATV’s.

Okay, so your ATV is secure and you’ve made it to your favourite muddy trail. What else would you possibly need?! 

Like we mention, many ATV’s do have winches, but this isn’t always enough if you’re truly stuck. Their reach might not be enough or they could fail. Some sort of towing line will be invaluable during these situations.

There are many benefits of using a synthetic strap—For example, synthetic strap snapback tends to be less severe & hazardous than say, chain snapback. It also tends to break less than rope, be more durable AND much easier to de-mud. There’s also less risk of cuts on the hand from handling chain or steel, versus synthetic rope, like AMSTEEL Blue.    

Here are some more safety tips for safe muddin’: 

  • NEVER ride alone 
  • Bring or wear at least one piece of hi-vis clothing. Why? Well, if something were to happen and you’re suited-up in camoflauge, it will be extremely difficult for first-responders or search parties to easily locate you. 
  • Keep the distribution of weight in-mind when towing your ATV to avoid tip-over 
  • We can’t repeat this enough—Bring a towing strap and don’t get stuck in the mud! 

What other equipment is beneficial to bring on your ATV rides? Here are some of our suggestions: 

  • Water 
  • Safety gloves
  • First-aid kit 
  • GPS/Phone/Compass 
  • Water-resistant gear (Jackets, ponchos, etc.) 
  • Tools for repair (Tire repair, etc.) 

TOWING EQUIPMENT AT HERCULES SLR:  

CHAIN

  • Standard chain
  • Grade-70 Transport Chain 

SYNTHETIC SLINGS

  • Standard Nylon & Polyester Round Slings
  • Polyester Round Slings 

SYNTHETIC ROPE

  • Amsteel Blue Rope 
  • Manila Synthetic Rope
  • Nylon Synthetic Rope 

TIE DOWN EQUIPMENT

  • Ratchet Straps 
  • Tie-down Cargo Strap with Ratchet
  • Tie-down Cargo Strap with Ratchet 
  • Rubber Tie-down 

WIRE ROPE

  • Aircraft Cable 
  • Standard Wire Rope 

FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

WHICH ROPE HAS THE GREATEST TENSION?

STOP THE SNAP: PREVENT ROPE SNAPBACK

SAMSON K-100 HOIST LINE: THE FIRST SYNTHETIC CRANE ROPE


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? GIVE US A CALL, OR DROP US A LINE.

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT | CM Hurricane 360 °

cm hurricane 360 hand chain hoist by columbus mckinnon

THE CM HURRICANE 360 TACKLES THE MOST CHALLENGING APPLICATIONS

One of the most versatile hand chain hoists yet is the CM Hurricane 360.

Unlike traditional hand chain hoists; the CM Hurricane 360° may be used in any direction due to its patented, one-of-a-kind hand chain cover that rotates 360°, which gives a convenient way to move loads without standing under or near the load.

The CM Hurricane 360 Hook-Mounted Hand Chain Hoist has a Weston-style brake system that gives superior load control and reliable performance, which makes it an excellent choice for challenging applications that require versatility. CM captured the flexibility of the CM Hurricane 360 to show you what a little hoist with big muscles can do for productivity and value. 

Have you ever dealt with these tough conditions when operating a hoist? Check out these videos and see for yourself how well the Hurricane handles the job.

https://youtu.be/79LrgcKAJ5k https://youtu.be/G8dMU5O0kp4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPAi-CHbvzY


FIND MORE COLUMBUS MCKINNON

VIEW CM PRODUCTS, SPECIFICATIONS & MORE FROM HERCULES SLR BELOW

#WheresYourCM?

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FOR READING RELATED TO THE CM HURRICANE 360,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING SAFETY | 12 TIPS FROM CM

3 TIPS TO INSTALL YOUR CM TROLLEY

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT IN HAZARDOUS AREAS


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Tips for Taglines | Training Tuesday

riggers using taglines to control and secure a load

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES

Taglines — What are they, what are they used for and why do we rig with them? We’ll tell you — Welcome to the new series from Hercules SLR, called Training Tuesday. 

In this series, every Tuesday, we’ll bring you a new topic about rigging, hoisting, fall protection, heavy machinery, workplace safety and more.

We’ll cover why the issue is important, advice for safe-use, application pointers so you get the most from your gear and training tips for employers and employees. 

This week, our Training Tuesday topic will be Taglines—In this blog, we’ll cover:

  • What’s a tagline?
  • When to use a tagline? And how to do it safely 
  • What not to do when using a tagline to lift 
  • Tagline standards, rules and regulations 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHAT ARE TAGLINES? 

So, what’s a tagline? A tagline is a line (often constructed of synthetic materials, otherwise known as a ‘soft line’) that attaches to a load and provides control while minimizing movement of the object during lifting operations. Simply put, taglines are used to prevent line rotation when lifting with cranes. 

Using taglines may add potential hazards to personnel involved in the lifting operation. These hazards should be assessed before the lifting operation begins. So, when is it appropriate to use a tagline to help secure a load? There are a couple of conditions: 

  • The crane’s load will swing back and forth (etc. a load on an especially windy day) 
  • The load’s rotation will create hazards 
  • A load needs to be positioned or connected in a particular way when it lands 

Read on for more tips to use taglines safely, what you should never do when securing a load with taglines and more tips for best-use. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | SAFETY TIPS FOR TAGLINES

When rigging with taglines, make sure:
  • Tagline is free of knots 
  • Taglines should have sealed ends so they don’t fray
  • One rigger should be assigned to each tagline and be able to safely position themselves away from the load 
  • To secure long loads with taglines, attach them to the very ends 
  • Taglines should be long enough that the assigned rigger can be in a safe location for the duration of the lift
  • Taglines must be held so the rigger can easily release the line if the load swings—This is important since it prevents the rigger from being thrown off-balance and into a more dangerous position
  • Wear the proper protective gloves when you handle taglines 
  • You know the working-load limit of the tagline 
  • Taglines are fit according to your company’s procedures/regulations 
  • Taglines are attached at a spot where they can be easily removed 
  • The load rotation can be controlled with taglines (if it’s rotating/swiveling uncontrollably).
When rigging with a tagline, do not
  • Use taglines if they’ll create any sort of safety hazard
  • Use taglines to control a lift during inclement/adverse weather conditions 
  • Go near or beneath, or let another rigger go beneath a load to retrieve a tagline 
  • Detach the tagline from the load until the crane operator and banksman position the load in its final location, with no load on the lifting gear  
  • Loop the tagline around your wrist, or any other part of the body
  • Use taglines for routine back-loading of supply vessels
  • Temporarily or permanently attach, loop, twist or tie a tagline to adjacent structures or equipment in an attempt to control the load
  • Use a tagline if there’s not enough clearance-room for the rigger to move from any spots where the load could fall 
  • Operating the tagline will cause a handler to be near a pinch point (A pinch point is any area where personnel risks having their extremities caught by a machine or equipment)
  • Allow taglines to fall into rotors 
  • When ever possible, attach your hook to a load block to prevent twisting of the hoist line. 

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function.”

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function. In everyday operations, workers handle, transport and store materials. They may do so by hand, manually-operated materials handling equipment, or by power-operated equipment,” says the U.S. Department of Labour/OSHA Training Institute. 

This is why it’s important to eliminate risk whenever possible and ensure taglines provide more help than hazard to a lift—Remember when not to rig with taglines.

taglines controlling a load

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES & OSHA STANDARDS 

In Canada, each province has their own specific Occupational Health & Safety Laws, which are usually broken down into:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Acts 
  • Occupational Health & Safety Regulations/Codes 
  • Standards 
  • Industry Association Code of Practice 

Be sure to check with regulations and standards in your province for further details on how to use taglines. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHEN TO USE TAGLINES

It’s important to note that taglines only work in tension. The handler should be able to hold the tagline at waist or shoulder-level—When the tagline must be held higher than this, it’s less effective it is at controlling the load. 

Sometimes, if the rope’s not long-enough, the handler’s instinct will be to pull the rope down, and end up pulling down on the load. This makes the tagline non-effective, and creates a more likely scenario that the load will fall on the handler. 

Yes, we discuss how taglines can create pinch points, however they can also help prevent them in some cases. Sometimes a load can twist around the crane that’s lifting it, and cause the load to bounce off nearby equipment or other parts of the crane—this can create pinch points, so taglines can be an effective way to control this.

TRAINING TUESDAY | CONCLUSION 

Taglines provide extra security for positioning and landing difficult loads, particular in inclement weather—However, rigger’s should exercise caution before using taglines extraneously.

Using taglines when unnecessary can sometimes create more hazards on-site, like producing pinch points or obstacles that could injure workers—This is why a rigging plan is especially important before conducting any lift , to ensure taglines are the right securing equipment for the application at-hand.

Taglines should be used to control block rotation, secure the load’s landing or when inclement weather will cause the load to swing uncontrollably—But don’t use them if they create more hazardous conditions for the handlers, rigger’s and any other personnel on-site. Remember, preventing injury is the priority of any lift—Safety should always be #1. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Entertainment Industry Rigging Safety | 12 Tips from CM

entertainment industry rigging, hercules securing, lifting and rigging

CM GUEST BLOG | SAFE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING 

Columbus McKinnon joins us on the Hercules SLR blog to share their best tips for safe entertainment industry rigging.

Read on & learn how to set-up and stay safe in the theatre, arena or wherever the lights, camera & action take you—What are you waiting for, check out CM’s entertainment industry rigging tips.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #1 | always check for damaged cablesentertainment industry rigging, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Before you plug it in or switch it on, always check for damaged cables. It only takes a few seconds to make sure things are safe, but it takes a lot longer to heal from electrical burns. Always assume there could be a hazard. 

 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #2 | help fight the good entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & riggingfight against rust & corrosion 

Keep up with frequent and periodic inspections of your rigging and hoists. You can find details on what is required for frequent and periodic inspections in your Lodestar Manual, as well as in the ANSI E1.6-2-2013 standard.

 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #3 | inspect your rigging before and after every useentertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Like many riggers, synthetic slings are super strong, but also very sensitive to being rubbed the wrong way. Always take a moment to inspect your rigging before and after use. The scuff mark on this sling was an indication to examine for other damage.

If you can see the core material, then it is time to retire the sling. Sling inspections are 50% visual and 50% tactile.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #4 | before getting into entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigginga high-reach, or any other aerial work platform, take a few minutes to do a pre-operational inspection of equipment

Working safely at height requires constant attention to detail.

Before getting into a high reach, or any type of aerial work platform, take a few minutes to do a pre-operational inspection of the equipment. Whether the damage in these pictures occurred from corrosion or a single incident, it is an indicator that there may be other unseen problems with this machine. 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #5 | look out for those who can’t do so for themselves entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Some days you never know what nature is going to put in your path. While our own safety is paramount, it is also important to look out for those who cannot do so for themselves. Be nice to our little furry and feathered friends. Find a gentle way to help these birds relocate to a more suitable home.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #6 | check compatibility between rigging attachments and their respective capacities  

Rigging to the low steel and need maximum trim height? Using a beam clamp is a more practical alternative than rigging with wire rope slings when you have to get tight up to that beam. Remember to check for compatibility between rigging attachments and their respective capacities.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #7 | hardware compatibility is critical to safe rigging applications entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Hooks are designed to take load in the “saddle” or “bowl”. The safe working load of a hook can be severely reduced when loads are applied to the tip. While this example may or may not lead to a failure, it still begs the question of what other shortcuts or missteps may have been taken during this installation? Will that loose piece of sash cord get sucked into the hoist? Safe rigging is all about attention to detail.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #8 | know your voltage setting 

Do you know which voltage setting your CM Lodestar is set for? It only takes a minute to pull the cap off and check. Most entertainment applications will use the low voltage option. Luckily, Lodestars are equipped for dual voltage options. 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #9 | consider using clove hitches  entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Using a clove hitch on the chain, 6-12 inches below the hook, can make it much easier to clip into your rigging point. With one hand (or foot) on the rope, the other is free to complete the attachment. Also, there is no chance for the rope to get pinched between the hook and shackle. Always remember to back up that clove hitch with a half hitch on top to prevent roll-out.

 

 

 

 

 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #10 | important truss tower safety considerationsentertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Portable truss towers have become very popular in recent years. They are easy to erect and can be installed quickly with a small crew. Three important safety considerations for these systems are:

  1. Evaluation by an engineer for site-specific considerations and high wind action plans.
  2. Maintaining weather monitoring systems, so prompt action can be taken should inclement weather occur.
  3. Securing the load from swinging with proper rigging hardware. The lever hoists, in this example, are also being used to focus the speakers. 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #11 | inspect your PPE before each use

The personal protective equipment we use is only effective if we inspect and care for it properly. Before putting on that harness or lanyard, take a moment to inspect all of the stitching, buckles, and attachments.

Make it a habit to do “buddy checks” with your co-workers too. A second set of eyes may see something yours did not. If it doesn’t look right, don’t use it.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #12 | make an effort to seek knowledge and personal growth

No matter how much you already know, there is always room for more training. The culture of our industry is more focused on training than ever these days. Whether you find that training online, on the job, or in a classroom, never be afraid to ask questions. The more knowledge we have, the safer we, and those around us, will be. entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging


FIND MORE COLUMBUS MCKINNON

VIEW CM PRODUCTS, SPECIFICATIONS & MORE FROM HERCULES SLR BELOW

#WheresYourCM?

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR RELATED READING

VISIT OUR BLOG:

MEET YOUR HERCULES SLR INSPECTOR, QUINCY WARNER

MEET QUALITY ASSURANCE & SAFETY SPECIALIST, JAMES GOLEMIC

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

What should you do before you use a hoist?—Hercules How-To

what should you do before you use a hoist

HERCULES HOW-TO: WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST?

What should you do before you use a hoist? If you’re a rigger, or have worked in construction, you’ve likely used some sort of hoist before. Hoists are mechanical devices use to lift, pull and hoist, and are equipped with a pulley. They’ve also been around for awhile—historians haven’t been able to pinpoint exactly when the first hoist was used, but even Leonardo da Vinci had a hoist design.

Since then, hoist technology has come a long way – hoists are available in manual, electric, hydraulic and even universal styles. They’re used in a number of different industries. Today, we cover more about hoists used for securing, lifting and rigging applications and what exactly you should do before you use one. 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? HAZARDS 

We talk a lot about hazards, how to avoid them and prevent them on a job site. There are a number of hazards that present themselves at work – both chemical and physical. When rigging with hoists, there are a number of hazards there.

Some of the most common hazards are: 

  • Falling equipment, materials, etc. 
  • Electrical issues 
  • Loading hoist beyond it’s WLL or SLL, known as overloading 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? TRAINING

It’s important that anyone using the hoist, or operating rigging equipment in general, has proper training in hoist safety and operating procedures. Hoists are often used in rigging, and are commonly-known as a component for cranes. Hercules’ highly-skilled trainers teach a variety of courses that will prepare you to rig with hoists.

The Hercules Training Academy courses include: 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? TYPES OF INSPECTION

According to the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), there are thee main types of inspection that rigger’s (or any end-user of hoisting equipment) have to do. 

PREOPERATION INSPECTION

Before each shift, have a qualified person inspect hoisting equipment for:

  • Ensure mechanisms operate properly – check for unusual sounds, and make adjustments as needed 
  • Hoist limit device, for electric or air-powered hoists without a load on its hook: The load block should inch on limit device, or run at a slow speed when on multi-speed or variable-speed hoists. Using travel-limiting clutches as a limit device? Follow inspection methods detailed in the travel-limiting clutch’s manual. 
  • Hoist’s braking system
  • Check lines, valves and other parts of air system for leakage
  • Check hooks & latches; ensure hooks are in accordance with ASME B30.10
  • Check hoist rope for gross damage, and these features that could cause immediate hazards, including:
    • Rope distortion: kinking, crushing, unstranding, bird-caging, main strand displacement and/or core protrusion
    • General corrosion
    • Broken or cut strands 
    • Number, distribution and type of broken wires (if visible)
  • Check load chain for gross damage, and any of these conditions which can be hazardous for work. These are: 
    • Gouges, nicks, weld splatter, corrosion and/or distorted links. 
    • Test the hoist with the load in lifting and lowering directions, and watch the operation of the chain and sprockets. The chain should feed smoothly with the sprockets. 

FREQUENT INSPECTION

Frequent inspections should happen continually, during use and rest periods. During frequent inspections, a qualified person will determine if issues found are hazards and whether the hoist should be removed from service temporarily, inspected further and repaired, or removed from service permanently and replaced. 

During frequent inspections, inspect:

  • Operating mechanisms for proper orientation, adjustment and unusual sounds
  • Braking system
  • Lines, valve and other parts of air systems for leakage
  • Check hooks & latches; ensure hooks are in accordance with ASME B30.10
  • Hoist limit device, for electric or air-powered hoists without a load on its hook: The load block should inch on limit device, or run at a slow speed when on multi-speed or variable-speed hoists. Using travel-limiting clutches as a limit device? Follow inspection methods detailed in the travel-limiting clutch’s manual. 
  • Check hoist rope for gross damage, and these features that could cause immediate hazards, including:
    • Rope distortion: kinking, crushing, unstranding, bird-caging, main strand displacement and/or core protrusion
    • General corrosion
    • Broken/cut strands 
    • Number, distribution and the kind of visible broken wires 
  • Check load chain for gross damage, and any of these conditions which can be hazardous for work. These are:
    • Gouges, nicks, weld splatter, corrosion and distorted links 
    • Test the hoist with the load in lifting and lowering directions, and watch the operation of the chain and sprockets. The chain should feed smoothly with the sprockets. 
    • Check rope/load chain reeving and make sure it complies with the manufacturer recommendation. 

PERIOD INSPECTION 

Periodic inspections can be conducted wherever your hoist is set up, as they don’t require the rigger to disassemble the hoist. 

  • Open or remove covers and other items to inspect components. 
  • A qualified, competent person will determine if conditions found during inspection make a hazard, or whether disassembly is required.
  • Inspect the following for wear, corrosion, cracks and distortion:
    • Ensure fasteners aren’t loose, or on the verge of coming loose 
    • Load blocks
    • Suspension housings 
    • Hand chain wheels 
    • Chain attachments 
    • Clevises
    • Yokes 
    • Suspension bolts
    • Shafts
    • Gears
    • Bearings 
    • Pins
    • Rollers
    • Locking and clamping devices 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? WHEN DO I INSPECT?

We’ve covered the three types of hoist inspection required in Canada, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME). This is when you should conduct each type of inspection.

1. PREOPERATION INSPECTION

A visual inspection should be conducted before each shift. This inspection does not have to be recorded, but a designated, competent person should inspect the hoisting equipment.

2. FREQUENT INSPECTION

Frequent inspections, like pre-operatation inspection, are visual and don’t need to be recorded but should be done by a designated, competent person. Just how often are ‘frequent’ inspections, you ask? 

A) Normal Service—Yearly

B) Heavy Service—Semiannually

C) Severe Service—Quarterly 

3. PERIOD INSPECTION

Visual, period inspections should be conducted by a competent person who makes records of external coded marks on the hoist. This is acceptable identification in lieu of records. Periodic inspections should be done: 

A) Normal Service—Yearly

B) Heavy Service—Semiannually

C) Severe Service—Quarterly 

Since this article is about what to do before using a hoist, we’re going to focus on what your preoperation – or, preuse inspection should include. 

  • The pre-use inspection should be performed during each shift before the hoist is used. 
  • A competent, qualified person will determine whether conditions found during inspection could create a hazard and, if a more detailed inspection is required. 
  • Inspect the following:
    • Operating mechanisms for proper operation, proper adjustment and unusual sounds.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? HAND SIGNALS

what should you do before you use a hoist? hercules slr
Hoisting hand signals.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? KNOW THE ROPES  

Before operating a hoist, it’s important to conduct an inspection before-hand. The inspection should consist of: 

Rope Type: Ensure you select the proper type of wire rope. The wire rope you select will depend on the hoist type and the features of the load you will lift. 

Are you familiar with the concept of rope stability before using that hoist? Hoists often use wire rope, which can kink, twist or become crushed if the wrong type or the wrong application is used. 

Drum crushing is a type of rope deterioration that can happen with multiple layers of wire rope on a drum. Whoever inspects the wire rope must evaluate the potential for wire rope crushing. Inspections should detect points where crushing is more likely to happen, and the level of deterioration and appropriate course of action (ex. repair or replacement) can be made. 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? YOUR CHECKLIST

Before rigging or lifting with a hoist, know: 

  • The hoisting devices capacity
  • The WLL of: the rope, slings and hardware, and the rigging hardware’s weight

Here are some basic tips from CCOHS for inspecting your hoist: 

  • Pre-Lift: Make sure both hooks (upper and lower) swivel, replace worn chain or wire rope and tag it so it can be removed from service.
  • Post the SLL (safe load limit) in the hoist. 
  • Daily: Inspect hooks, rope, brakes and limit switches for wear and damage.
  • Ensure swivels move freely and there are no cracks or breaks in the hook. 
  • Conduct periodic inspections according to manufacturer rules or legislation. 


NEED A LIFT?  

Hercules SLR offers everything you need for your hoist, crane or lifting project. We offer equipment inspections, repairs, maintenance and hoists from reliable, respected and durablebrands like Crosby, CM and Bronze & Blue


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR HOISTS & SERVICES,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

CROSBY QUIZ: CAN YOU PASS THIS HOOK INSPECTION QUIZ?

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING IN HAZARDOUS AREAS

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Need more information on rigging services? We’ll lift you there.

Click here to learn more about our rigging services at Hercules SLR. 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Important: Preventative Equipment Maintenance

Preventative Maintenance

Underestimating the importance of equipment maintenance could be taking a toll on your bottom line. The saying “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” is too often the way some view equipment maintenance. Why pay for service on your equipment if there’s nothing wrong with it? Believe it or not, there are several reasons. All equipment is an investment — one that requires time and money to keep in optimal shape.

BENEFITS OF MAINTENANCE

Preventative equipment maintenance is key to extending equipment life and ultimately saving you time and money. While your perception may be that paying for preventative maintenance is unnecessary spending, the reality is that without it, you’re often left with more expensive repairs. At Hercules SLR we believe in the importance of preventative maintenance, here are just some of the reasons why:

KEEP EQUIPMENT RUNNING EFFICIENTLY

When equipment runs efficiently, work get done on schedule, keeping that optimal condition is key to maintaining that level of equipment efficiency. If maintenance is overlooked, efficiency suffers and ultimately, your bottom line suffers as a result.

SMALL PROBLEMS BECOME BIGGER PROBLEMS OVER TIME

We’ve all seen it; something isn’t working exactly the way it used to, but it isn’t affecting the job, so we continue, sometimes even adjusting how we use the piece of equipment to keep things moving. While it may seem like this is the most efficient way to get the job done in the short term, it could cause you major problems long-term.

THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM, THE MORE THE EXPENSE

While it may seem like it makes no sense to spend the time and money to have your equipment inspected or repaired when you’re able to work around it, the reality is that waiting, is going to cost you even more. Bigger, more complex repairs come with a bigger price tag. Think of more than parts? yes, a more complex problem will likely come with having to replace more and/or larger parts that are expensive, but it doesn’t end there.

Larger problems often translate to more downtime, the more downtime means you’re suddenly behind schedule and/or unable to take on a new project. Employees scheduled to use that equipment need paying, so now you are paying for work that cannot be done during the downtime.

Don’t wait for the bigger problem — invest in the small one.

REDUCE INJURIES AND FATALITIES

Within the construction industry, 17% of fatal construction accidents are due to contact with objects and equipment. If your equipment isn’t being serviced on a regular basis, there’s a chance it isn’t working properly. If it isn’t working properly, you’re increasing your chances of workplace injury or death because of equipment failure.

Regardless of how much safety training you or your employees have been through, they don’t have control over equipment failure. Of course, there will always be unexpected breakdowns, but you can minimize them through being proactive about your equipment maintenance.

Workplace injuries and fatalities are tragic and expensive. Company morale suffers, and so does your bottom line. One of the benefits of maintenance doubles as a proactive step in reducing the number of injuries or fatalities you have on site. You can’t put a price on your team’s safety in the field.

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Service records and documentation answer many of these questions and put many of the concerns of the unknown to rest. At Hercules SLR all our customers have access to CertTracker®, our FREE online equipment management system.

CertTracker® delivers innovative solutions that streamline any inspection and maintenance process. Mobile computing, Radio Frequency (RFID) tagging and internet applications provide you with enhanced accuracy and operational efficiency. Not to mention eliminating most of the paperwork.

CertTracker Cycle

The CertTracker Advantage

 TRAIN OPERATORS AND TECHNICIANS

In conjunction with technology, there is no substitution for the human touch. It takes a trained operator to understand the problem and a trained technician to know how to fix it or to alert someone that it needs repairing. Educating your equipment operators and any technicians you have on staff is key to extending the life of your equipment, as they will be sure that small problems don’t turn in to big ones.

If training isn’t feasible, there needs to be a summary of best practices and an operation manual in place so you can ensure operators are using the equipment the way it was meant to be used. Always respect all weight limits and guidelines. An untrained equipment operator could unintentionally cause costly repairs, so make sure the best practices and expectations are outlined clearly and regularly.

SET AND STICK TO A MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE

Every piece of equipment is different. They all have their own intricacies and need a maintenance and repair schedule to match. Rather than waiting for parts to cause a problem, replace them when they are scheduled to be replaced.

How do you know when that is? The piece of equipment will have an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) maintenance recommendation. Commit to it. It may seem like by being proactive you’re attempting to fix something that isn’t broken, but trust us, neglecting to do this will result in expensive repairs.

CONDUCT REGULAR INSPECTIONS

No, inspections are not the same thing as maintenance schedules. equipment should be inspected every time it’s used. Trained operators should know what to look and listen for to ensure equipment is working properly. Checking for simple things, like signs of wear on equipment, can go a long way. The reality is equipment is often used with vibration, high temperatures and friction? all of which contribute to the wear and tear. Add age to the mix, and you have a recipe for deterioration.

This happens with all equipment, and the key to extending equipment life is to make sure you do something as simple as adding an operator visual inspection to your equipment use requirements. Noticing slight wear and tear may seem small, but these things can be identified through a visual inspection and fixed before they cause a larger problem.

HOW QUALIFIED ARE THE TECHNICIANS INSPECTING YOUR GEAR?

When it comes to inspections, testing, repairs and certification, you need to know that you and your equipment are in safe and experienced hands.

The Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA) is established across the globe as the leading representative body for all those involved in the lifting industry worldwide. They provide third party training and examination for technicians in the lifting equipment industry.

At Hercules our inspectors have undergone this internationally recognized training and some hold multiple diplomas.

OUR TECHNICIANS ARE:

  • Familiar with the most recent technology in the lifting industry
  • Skilled and confident in their inspection skills
  • Constantly learning and expanding their knowledge
  • LEEA Registered Technicians

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For all your maintenance requirements, let our experts help. If you need to book your equipment in for service or have any concerns, questions or call us Toll Free on:  1-877-461-4876.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

 

 

 

Hoisting in Downtown Toronto? Advance Planning is Key

toronto-downtown
When it comes to hoisting HVAC and other heavy rooftop components onto downtown Toronto office towers, the lifts themselves take just a day or two. What makes it all work, however, is months of planning.

A case in point: In late May, Amherst Crane Rentals placed mechanical equipment atop a 22-storey building on Yonge Street, between Adelaide and Richmond streets, in the heart of downtown Toronto’s business core. With a 15,000-lb. cooling tower the heaviest lift, and a relatively narrow area to work from, Amherst brought in one of its heavyweights — a 500-ton Liebherr LTM 1400 all-terrain crane.

“In this configuration we had 276 feet of luffer and around 220,000 pounds of counterweight with the [Liebherr TY guying] heavy-lift attachment,” Amherst Crane Rentals vice-president Mark Welstead explained.

Key to matching the LTM 1400 with this particular job was the fact the telescopic boom is attached and doesn’t need launching each time it’s needed.

“You have a great lifting capacity without having a major operation like launching a boom, so this speeds things up and makes the whole job more productive,” Welstead explained.

Because the LTM 1400 is versatile and can readily adapt to an eclectic mix of hoisting jobs, it isn’t sitting around if only smaller jobs come calling.

“Where it excels is in its capacities for all the work we do, whether it be for [erecting] tower cranes or for mechanical work like this,” Welstead said. “If we don’t have a 500-ton job for a few days we can rent it out as a 250, 300 or 400 with relatively ease. This gives us more productivity and use out of the crane. We can use it for smaller jobs very easily without a big cost.”

The truck-mounted crane’s compact nature makes it relatively easy to transport it from job to job. To travel to the Yonge Street site from its yard in the suburb of Brampton, Ont., the crane simply motored down major arterial routes, taking up a single lane, travelling at the city-approved 40 kilometre per hour speed limit and avoiding sensitive overpasses.

“The crane is permitted for the City of Toronto, but there’s lots of roads and bridges we’re not allo

Torontowed to go over,” Welstead said, singling out the Gardiner Expressway, which for much of its length is an overpass that is aging and showing signs of deterioration.

To reach its downtown destination, the crane and its convoy of support trucks drove down Highway 427 and then took Lakeshore Blvd. eastwards. While the set-up and job itself were fairly straightforward, the project itself required months of logistical planning. As soon as its customer came calling, Amherst contacted City of Toronto work zone coordinators and affected parties such as the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) to sort things out.

“It starts with the customer and what they require,” Welstead explained. “We figure out what kind of crane we need and how we’re going to do it, then we decide whether or not we need to shut a road down.”

Logistics are normally arranged months in advance. Transit routes can be affected, and while Toronto’s subway system is underground downtown, bus and streetcar routes are impacted by street closures. Just as motorists and pedestrians will be redirected for a job’s duration, the TTC also needs to plan alternate routes.

Because there are subway tunnels, hydro infrastructure and other amenities underneath Yonge Street, Amherst and city engineers needed to ensure the area where the crane was set up could tolerate the weight.

Crews set up on mats, with engineered heavy point loads calculated to accommodate the 190,000-lb. crane.

“We provided them with all the crane loadings and came to agreement as to where the crane could sit on the road,” Welstead said.

It also took time to arrange for permits, paid-duty police officers and other supports. With a significant amount of on-site staging work, and numerous components needing to be hoisted, Amherst avoided chaos by scheduling the project for the Victoria Day long weekend.

“We had to take some of the older equipment out and put up some steel and other components to accommodate the new equipment up there, so there were multiple smaller lifts as well as a heavy lift,” Welstead said. “We’d hoist stuff down, put new stuff up. Then they would be fabricating and we’d start working on other stuff — taking down older frames and things like that.”

On more modest jobs, crews might normally arrive on a Friday evening to assemble the crane so it’s ready to hoist Saturday morning, and then wrap up and leave midday on the Sunday. The extra day afforded by the long weekend offered wiggle room, though crews were gone by mid morning on the holiday Monday.

“If we’d had to interrupt traffic for a whole other weekend to finish, it wouldn’t be in the city’s best interests,” Welstead said.

While the customer brought in two other contractors to handle other components of the job, Amherst relied as much as possible on its own equipment and services, opting not to sub out anything it was responsible for.

“That way we can ensure being on time and everything’s working properly and we don’t get a let-down,” Welstead said.

This included trailers, secondary equipment and services, and a second crane — a Liebherr, LTM 1055 all-terrain machine — to set up and dismantle the main crane.

While severe weather can put best-planned timing in jeopardy, crews endured nothing more than light showers on the Saturday.

“High wind and lightning can be a challenge if we have all of this set up ahead of time,” Welstead said.

Graham Morrison, the crane operator Amherst assigned to the job who also served as site supervisor, said the lift had its challenges but was mostly straightforward.

“We had five different trades working all at the same time in the same confined space,” said Morrison, a member of the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) Local 793. “There were only three companies, but we were dealing with pipefitters, electricians, millwrights, welders and crane operators.”

Morrison described the rigging, which he oversaw, as standard, with nylon belts, steel chokers, steel beams and spreader bars used to help protect the load from potential damage. Morrison concurred with Welstead that the LTM 1400’s compact nature and its ability to avoid a boom-launching manoeuvre played a major role in getting the job done within a tight time frame.

“By 10 o’clock Monday morning we were gone and the street was reopened. We were right on schedule,” he said.

Article by By Saul Chernos Read the original article here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLR, Hercules Machining & Millwright Services, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.