CM Guest Blog | The Twenty Year Rule

cm cranes and hoisting equipment

CM ON THE TWENTY YEAR RULE

CM knows it can be easy to fall into the ‘twenty year rule’ trap—but what is it? Read on for tips from Columbus McKinnon (CM) on why some rules actually are made to be broken. 

Their rigging experts discuss safety, inspections & why it’s important to keep your training up to date—No matter how long you’ve been doing it. 

While conducting our overhead lifting safety training it never fails that we get a comment to the effect of,

“We’ve been doing it this way for over twenty years. We never had an accident. And now, you’re telling me it’s wrong?” 

Just because you have been lifting a certain way for the past twenty years and never had an accident only means that you have been lucky. When performing safety training we emphasize all the safety standards and regulations that are applicable. They all serve a purpose.

When performing safety training we emphasize all the safety standards and regulations that are applicable. They all serve a purpose.

ANSI/ASME B30 Safety Standards for overhead lifting began in 1916 as an eight page safety code – now 94 years old. Although ASME is the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, many Canadian organizations and equipment used here observe their standards, so it’s worth noting. 

In Canada, the CSA standard B167.08 began in 1964—It’s 46 years old.

Finally, let us not forget OSHA, which began in 1970, making it 40 years old, who enforces two federal regulations for overhead lifting:  CFR 1910.179 for cranes and 1910.184 for slings. Between all these organizations and safety standards there is a total of 355 years of experience. 355 years trumps your 20 years, every time.

These organizations were not put together to make your life miserable! You can’t take short cuts the way you have been doing the past twenty years. These organizations include people that are involved in all facets of overhead lifting, including riggers and production and construction personnel that perform overhead lifting as part of their job. They want you to be safe in your work habits and environment so that you can go home at the end of your shift or work day to your family.

This blog post was written by Larry Lynn, former Product Trainer for Columbus McKinnon Corporation. 

CM | HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH WHEN IT COMES TO ANNUAL INSPECTION?

So, we know that standards for training, testing & inspections exist for a reason, and it’s important to keep your training and inspection knowledge up-to-date—CM explains more. 

CM was asked, “How do we complete the annual PM (preventative maintenance) per the manual unless we open up the gear box and inspect the internals?” This question is centered around the annual inspection task to inspect ‘Load Bearing Parts.'” 

Tom, a Technical Instructor who specializes in Hoists & Overhead Cranes for the Columbus McKinnon Corporation says: 

We encounter this question frequently in inspection and maintenance training classes. 

ASME Standard B30.16 defines load bearing / load suspension parts as follows; “the load suspension parts of the hoist are the means of suspension (hook or lug), the structure or housing that supports the drum or load sprocket, the drum or load sprocket, the rope or load chain, the sheaves or sprockets, and the load block or hook.”

Brakes, load and holding, gearing, motors, etc. are mechanical parts. They are part of the drive train.

ASME B30.16-2.1.3(b) states, “Covers and other items normally supplied to allow inspection of components should be opened or removed.”

ASME states that required inspection items be prefaced with “Evidence Of.” 

There are several indirect ways of checking for and detecting (finding “evidence of”) excessive wear or abnormal operation of internal parts. If gearbox oil is not degraded, there are no metallic particles attached to the drain plug, the hoist raises and lowers properly (with and without a load), and there are no strange or abnormal sounds from the gearbox, it is unlikely that serious problems exist. If this inspection causes suspicion, refer to ASME B30.16-2.1.3(c) “A designated person shall determine whether conditions found during inspection constitute a hazard and whether disassembly is required.”


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TIPS FOR TAGLINES | TRAINING TUESDAY

GET TO KNOW YOUR TRAINING SPECIALIST, JAMIE ENGLAND

GET TO KNOW HERCULES MARKETING SPECIALIST, AMANDA WHITE


WHERE’S YOUR CM?

CONTACT US OR CLICK BELOW TO LEARN MORE ABOUT COLUMBUS MCKINNON HOISTS & LIFTING EQUIPMENT AT HERCULES SLR: 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

LEEA Training at Hercules SLR: Teaching with an Edge

leea training with crane on skyscraper

Hercules SLR is a full LEEA member, and it’s important for us to stay up-to-date with industry trends, education and certifications, like LEEA training. 

LEEA TRAINING | WHAT’S LEEA?

So, what’s LEEA training? LEEA is the Lifting Equipment Engineer’s Association, and operates across the globe (they’re based in over 69 countries!) as a representative body for everyone involved in the lifting & hoisting industry. 

The association has played a key role in the specialized lifting field for over 70 years, from training & standards setting through to health and safety, the provision of technical and legal advice, and the development of examination and licensing systems.

LEEA TRAINING | AT HERCULES SLR

This month, Inspectors from our branches across Canada participated in LEEA Level-2 General Advanced training. This training covers broad lifting and hoisting principles for inspectors, and includes what to look for on equipment like chain slings, wire rope, shackles and eye bolts. 

Clint, an Inspector from Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario says, “LEEA training is great – It gives us a better understanding of how the equipment actually works, which makes it much easier to identify problems.” 

Clint, an Inspector from Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario says, “LEEA training is great – It gives us a better understanding of how the equipment actually works, which makes it much easier to identify problems.” 
 
 
 
 

 

“I love having the opportunity to learn more, and the training really helps us notice things that sometimes, aren’t blatantly obvious.”

During training, LEEA instructors are accessible and eager to answer questions. Students don’t feel rushed, and learn not just from a book, but from real-world applications that relate to topics in the book and lesson.

At Hercules SLR, we’re proud that all of our inspectors have the LEEA Lifting Equipment General Diploma, and all receive on-going training. LEEA Certification gives inspectors an edge – when you’re LEEA-certified, you receive a LEEA card you can show clients & customers on-site, so they know they’re in good hands. 

Another benefit Hercules SLR Inspectors say LEEA gives, is trust. “Sometimes, a company might not think your diagnosis is correct, or say ‘We’ve always done it this way, so it works’. But when you’re LEEA-certified, your opinion is automatically credible.” says Clint,  Hercules SLR Inspector.

LEEA TRAINING | WHAT’S NEXT? 

The next LEEA training topic on the Hercules SLR docket are manual hoists. What are our inspectors excited for? 

“I can’t wait to gain more insight into the equipment we inspect, especially manual hoists, which are up next. The courses become more niche as you go along, and the next training will be a 50/50 spilt – Time will be spent equally in the classroom and hands-on, with the gear.” says a Hercules SLR Inspector. 

LEEA Training teaches gives our Inspectors a detailed eye to keep your rigging, lifting and hoisting gear safe, durable and read-to-work. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES RIGGING EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

ARE THE TECHNICIANS INSPECTING YOUR GEAR QUALIFIED?

LEEA TRAINED INSPECTORS

INSPECTION TECHNICIAN CAREERS: HIRING IN BRAMPTON, ONTARIO


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT | CM Hurricane 360 °

cm hurricane 360 hand chain hoist by columbus mckinnon

THE CM HURRICANE 360 TACKLES THE MOST CHALLENGING APPLICATIONS

One of the most versatile hand chain hoists yet is the CM Hurricane 360.

Unlike traditional hand chain hoists; the CM Hurricane 360° may be used in any direction due to its patented, one-of-a-kind hand chain cover that rotates 360°, which gives a convenient way to move loads without standing under or near the load.

The CM Hurricane 360 Hook-Mounted Hand Chain Hoist has a Weston-style brake system that gives superior load control and reliable performance, which makes it an excellent choice for challenging applications that require versatility. CM captured the flexibility of the CM Hurricane 360 to show you what a little hoist with big muscles can do for productivity and value. 

Have you ever dealt with these tough conditions when operating a hoist? Check out these videos and see for yourself how well the Hurricane handles the job.

https://youtu.be/79LrgcKAJ5k https://youtu.be/G8dMU5O0kp4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPAi-CHbvzY


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FOR READING RELATED TO THE CM HURRICANE 360,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING SAFETY | 12 TIPS FROM CM

3 TIPS TO INSTALL YOUR CM TROLLEY

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT IN HAZARDOUS AREAS


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Tips for Taglines | Training Tuesday

riggers using taglines to control and secure a load

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES

Taglines — What are they, what are they used for and why do we rig with them? We’ll tell you — Welcome to the new series from Hercules SLR, called Training Tuesday. 

In this series, every Tuesday, we’ll bring you a new topic about rigging, hoisting, fall protection, heavy machinery, workplace safety and more.

We’ll cover why the issue is important, advice for safe-use, application pointers so you get the most from your gear and training tips for employers and employees. 

This week, our Training Tuesday topic will be Taglines—In this blog, we’ll cover:

  • What’s a tagline?
  • When to use a tagline? And how to do it safely 
  • What not to do when using a tagline to lift 
  • Tagline standards, rules and regulations 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHAT ARE TAGLINES? 

So, what’s a tagline? A tagline is a line (often constructed of synthetic materials, otherwise known as a ‘soft line’) that attaches to a load and provides control while minimizing movement of the object during lifting operations. Simply put, taglines are used to prevent line rotation when lifting with cranes. 

Using taglines may add potential hazards to personnel involved in the lifting operation. These hazards should be assessed before the lifting operation begins. So, when is it appropriate to use a tagline to help secure a load? There are a couple of conditions: 

  • The crane’s load will swing back and forth (etc. a load on an especially windy day) 
  • The load’s rotation will create hazards 
  • A load needs to be positioned or connected in a particular way when it lands 

Read on for more tips to use taglines safely, what you should never do when securing a load with taglines and more tips for best-use. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | SAFETY TIPS FOR TAGLINES

When rigging with taglines, make sure:
  • Tagline is free of knots 
  • Taglines should have sealed ends so they don’t fray
  • One rigger should be assigned to each tagline and be able to safely position themselves away from the load 
  • To secure long loads with taglines, attach them to the very ends 
  • Taglines should be long enough that the assigned rigger can be in a safe location for the duration of the lift
  • Taglines must be held so the rigger can easily release the line if the load swings—This is important since it prevents the rigger from being thrown off-balance and into a more dangerous position
  • Wear the proper protective gloves when you handle taglines 
  • You know the working-load limit of the tagline 
  • Taglines are fit according to your company’s procedures/regulations 
  • Taglines are attached at a spot where they can be easily removed 
  • The load rotation can be controlled with taglines (if it’s rotating/swiveling uncontrollably).
When rigging with a tagline, do not
  • Use taglines if they’ll create any sort of safety hazard
  • Use taglines to control a lift during inclement/adverse weather conditions 
  • Go near or beneath, or let another rigger go beneath a load to retrieve a tagline 
  • Detach the tagline from the load until the crane operator and banksman position the load in its final location, with no load on the lifting gear  
  • Loop the tagline around your wrist, or any other part of the body
  • Use taglines for routine back-loading of supply vessels
  • Temporarily or permanently attach, loop, twist or tie a tagline to adjacent structures or equipment in an attempt to control the load
  • Use a tagline if there’s not enough clearance-room for the rigger to move from any spots where the load could fall 
  • Operating the tagline will cause a handler to be near a pinch point (A pinch point is any area where personnel risks having their extremities caught by a machine or equipment)
  • Allow taglines to fall into rotors 
  • When ever possible, attach your hook to a load block to prevent twisting of the hoist line. 

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function.”

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function. In everyday operations, workers handle, transport and store materials. They may do so by hand, manually-operated materials handling equipment, or by power-operated equipment,” says the U.S. Department of Labour/OSHA Training Institute. 

This is why it’s important to eliminate risk whenever possible and ensure taglines provide more help than hazard to a lift—Remember when not to rig with taglines.

taglines controlling a load

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES & OSHA STANDARDS 

In Canada, each province has their own specific Occupational Health & Safety Laws, which are usually broken down into:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Acts 
  • Occupational Health & Safety Regulations/Codes 
  • Standards 
  • Industry Association Code of Practice 

Be sure to check with regulations and standards in your province for further details on how to use taglines. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHEN TO USE TAGLINES

It’s important to note that taglines only work in tension. The handler should be able to hold the tagline at waist or shoulder-level—When the tagline must be held higher than this, it’s less effective it is at controlling the load. 

Sometimes, if the rope’s not long-enough, the handler’s instinct will be to pull the rope down, and end up pulling down on the load. This makes the tagline non-effective, and creates a more likely scenario that the load will fall on the handler. 

Yes, we discuss how taglines can create pinch points, however they can also help prevent them in some cases. Sometimes a load can twist around the crane that’s lifting it, and cause the load to bounce off nearby equipment or other parts of the crane—this can create pinch points, so taglines can be an effective way to control this.

TRAINING TUESDAY | CONCLUSION 

Taglines provide extra security for positioning and landing difficult loads, particular in inclement weather—However, rigger’s should exercise caution before using taglines extraneously.

Using taglines when unnecessary can sometimes create more hazards on-site, like producing pinch points or obstacles that could injure workers—This is why a rigging plan is especially important before conducting any lift , to ensure taglines are the right securing equipment for the application at-hand.

Taglines should be used to control block rotation, secure the load’s landing or when inclement weather will cause the load to swing uncontrollably—But don’t use them if they create more hazardous conditions for the handlers, rigger’s and any other personnel on-site. Remember, preventing injury is the priority of any lift—Safety should always be #1. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Entertainment Industry Rigging Safety | 12 Tips from CM

entertainment industry rigging, hercules securing, lifting and rigging

CM GUEST BLOG | SAFE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING 

Columbus McKinnon joins us on the Hercules SLR blog to share their best tips for safe entertainment industry rigging.

Read on & learn how to set-up and stay safe in the theatre, arena or wherever the lights, camera & action take you—What are you waiting for, check out CM’s entertainment industry rigging tips.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #1 | always check for damaged cablesentertainment industry rigging, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Before you plug it in or switch it on, always check for damaged cables. It only takes a few seconds to make sure things are safe, but it takes a lot longer to heal from electrical burns. Always assume there could be a hazard. 

 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #2 | help fight the good entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & riggingfight against rust & corrosion 

Keep up with frequent and periodic inspections of your rigging and hoists. You can find details on what is required for frequent and periodic inspections in your Lodestar Manual, as well as in the ANSI E1.6-2-2013 standard.

 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #3 | inspect your rigging before and after every useentertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Like many riggers, synthetic slings are super strong, but also very sensitive to being rubbed the wrong way. Always take a moment to inspect your rigging before and after use. The scuff mark on this sling was an indication to examine for other damage.

If you can see the core material, then it is time to retire the sling. Sling inspections are 50% visual and 50% tactile.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #4 | before getting into entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigginga high-reach, or any other aerial work platform, take a few minutes to do a pre-operational inspection of equipment

Working safely at height requires constant attention to detail.

Before getting into a high reach, or any type of aerial work platform, take a few minutes to do a pre-operational inspection of the equipment. Whether the damage in these pictures occurred from corrosion or a single incident, it is an indicator that there may be other unseen problems with this machine. 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #5 | look out for those who can’t do so for themselves entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Some days you never know what nature is going to put in your path. While our own safety is paramount, it is also important to look out for those who cannot do so for themselves. Be nice to our little furry and feathered friends. Find a gentle way to help these birds relocate to a more suitable home.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #6 | check compatibility between rigging attachments and their respective capacities  

Rigging to the low steel and need maximum trim height? Using a beam clamp is a more practical alternative than rigging with wire rope slings when you have to get tight up to that beam. Remember to check for compatibility between rigging attachments and their respective capacities.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #7 | hardware compatibility is critical to safe rigging applications entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Hooks are designed to take load in the “saddle” or “bowl”. The safe working load of a hook can be severely reduced when loads are applied to the tip. While this example may or may not lead to a failure, it still begs the question of what other shortcuts or missteps may have been taken during this installation? Will that loose piece of sash cord get sucked into the hoist? Safe rigging is all about attention to detail.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #8 | know your voltage setting 

Do you know which voltage setting your CM Lodestar is set for? It only takes a minute to pull the cap off and check. Most entertainment applications will use the low voltage option. Luckily, Lodestars are equipped for dual voltage options. 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #9 | consider using clove hitches  entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Using a clove hitch on the chain, 6-12 inches below the hook, can make it much easier to clip into your rigging point. With one hand (or foot) on the rope, the other is free to complete the attachment. Also, there is no chance for the rope to get pinched between the hook and shackle. Always remember to back up that clove hitch with a half hitch on top to prevent roll-out.

 

 

 

 

 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #10 | important truss tower safety considerationsentertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging

Portable truss towers have become very popular in recent years. They are easy to erect and can be installed quickly with a small crew. Three important safety considerations for these systems are:

  1. Evaluation by an engineer for site-specific considerations and high wind action plans.
  2. Maintaining weather monitoring systems, so prompt action can be taken should inclement weather occur.
  3. Securing the load from swinging with proper rigging hardware. The lever hoists, in this example, are also being used to focus the speakers. 

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #11 | inspect your PPE before each use

The personal protective equipment we use is only effective if we inspect and care for it properly. Before putting on that harness or lanyard, take a moment to inspect all of the stitching, buckles, and attachments.

Make it a habit to do “buddy checks” with your co-workers too. A second set of eyes may see something yours did not. If it doesn’t look right, don’t use it.

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING TIP #12 | make an effort to seek knowledge and personal growth

No matter how much you already know, there is always room for more training. The culture of our industry is more focused on training than ever these days. Whether you find that training online, on the job, or in a classroom, never be afraid to ask questions. The more knowledge we have, the safer we, and those around us, will be. entertainment industry rigging safety, check cables, hercules securing, lifting & rigging


FIND MORE COLUMBUS MCKINNON

VIEW CM PRODUCTS, SPECIFICATIONS & MORE FROM HERCULES SLR BELOW

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INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


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MEET YOUR HERCULES SLR INSPECTOR, QUINCY WARNER

MEET QUALITY ASSURANCE & SAFETY SPECIALIST, JAMES GOLEMIC

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Crane Service: Lifting you in Sudbury, Ontario

crane service in sudbury ontario hercules slr, securing, lifting & rigging

What makes our crane service so special in Sudbury, Ontario? We do it all. 

Our team of crane technicians in Sudbury, Ontario grew from two to five within months, and business is boomin’—They’re a small team, with big goals.

Cranes are simple-enough machines, yet require specific, detailed and reliable service. There are approximately seven different kinds of cranes commonly-found on worksites—These include tower cranes, overhead cranes, boom cranes, rough-terrain cranes and telescopic cranes. 

At Hercules SLR in Sudbury, Ontario we service and provide equipment and service for all these, and more. Read on to learn details about our crane service in Sudbury, Ontario. 

CRANE SERVICE | WE OFFER

In Sudbury, Ontario, crane services include:

  • Inspections
  • Repairs
  • Maintenance, including preventative maintenance for cranes and their equipment 
  • With any of the above services, have access to our asset management service, CertTracker

CertTracker lets you: 

  • Easily store and track upcoming inspections and important maintenance dates
  • Store your equipment documentation in one, easy spot (which makes inspection a breeze)
  • View assets, documents and their status quickly and easily
  • Quickly & easily mark gear as failed and order new equipment 

CRANE SERVICE | PRODUCTS

Learn more about our current picks for durable, long-lasting and reliable crane equipment from some of our favourite bands. 

Need crane service, and something to sweeten the deal? You’ll receive 1 extra Air Miles® Bonus Miles for every $10.00 spent on the following crane equipment:

CM HURRICANE 360­° CHAIN HOISTS

Columbus McKinnon’s Hurricane 360° Chain Hoist is unlike any other chain hoist on the market. It features a one-of-a-kind hand chain cover, and is flexible and versatile enough to use for tough, awkward applications. 

What else do we love about CM’s Hurricane 360° Chain Hoist? 

  • Hook-mounted hand chain hoist has Weston-style braking system that provides positive load control and reliable performance 
  • Hook-mounted hand chain hoist has standard load-limiter provides simple, automatic overload protection that helps prevent injuries 
  • Available as army-type, integrated trolley hoist with standard lifts up to 30′ 
  • Allows you to position and lift from nearly any angle

Receive bonus Air Miles® Rewards Miles when you purchase any of these CM chain hoists from our Sudbury, Ontario branch: crane service in sudbury ontario from hercules slr

  • 1/2 ton capacity, 10′ lift 
  • 1/2 ton capacity, 12′ lift 
  • 1/2 ton capacity, 15′ lift 
  • 1/2 ton capacity, 20′ lift
  • 1 ton capacity, 10′ lift 
  • 1 ton capacity, 12′ lift
  • 1 ton capacity, 15′ lift
  • 1 ton capacity, 20′ lift
  • 2 ton capacity, 20′ lift

Air Miles® Bonus Miles are also available with any purchase of the following LoadLoc chain lifts:  

LOADLOC CHAIN LIFT:

  • 1/2 ton chain hoist, 10′ lift with load limiter 
  • 1/2 ton chain hoist, 20′ lift with load limiter 
  • 1 ton chain hoist, 10′ lift
  • 1 ton chain hoist, 10′ lift with load limiter  

Need a lift? What are you waiting for—Come see us in Sudbury! 


FOR SERVICE, QUESTIONS & QUOTES

FOR QUESTIONS, QUOTES OR TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CRANE SERVICES AT OUR SUDBURY, ONTARIO BRANCH, CONTACT US AT:

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 705-682-4167


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

WOMEN WITH SKILL: KELLY BAIRD-PESTELL TALKS RIGGING INDUSTRY & TEAMWORK

WORKPLACE MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS: HOW HERCULES SLR SUPPORTS STAFF

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: KIM REYNOLDS, WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

What should you do before you use a hoist?—Hercules How-To

what should you do before you use a hoist

HERCULES HOW-TO: WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST?

What should you do before you use a hoist? If you’re a rigger, or have worked in construction, you’ve likely used some sort of hoist before. Hoists are mechanical devices use to lift, pull and hoist, and are equipped with a pulley. They’ve also been around for awhile—historians haven’t been able to pinpoint exactly when the first hoist was used, but even Leonardo da Vinci had a hoist design.

Since then, hoist technology has come a long way – hoists are available in manual, electric, hydraulic and even universal styles. They’re used in a number of different industries. Today, we cover more about hoists used for securing, lifting and rigging applications and what exactly you should do before you use one. 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? HAZARDS 

We talk a lot about hazards, how to avoid them and prevent them on a job site. There are a number of hazards that present themselves at work – both chemical and physical. When rigging with hoists, there are a number of hazards there.

Some of the most common hazards are: 

  • Falling equipment, materials, etc. 
  • Electrical issues 
  • Loading hoist beyond it’s WLL or SLL, known as overloading 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? TRAINING

It’s important that anyone using the hoist, or operating rigging equipment in general, has proper training in hoist safety and operating procedures. Hoists are often used in rigging, and are commonly-known as a component for cranes. Hercules’ highly-skilled trainers teach a variety of courses that will prepare you to rig with hoists.

The Hercules Training Academy courses include: 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? TYPES OF INSPECTION

According to the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), there are thee main types of inspection that rigger’s (or any end-user of hoisting equipment) have to do. 

PREOPERATION INSPECTION

Before each shift, have a qualified person inspect hoisting equipment for:

  • Ensure mechanisms operate properly – check for unusual sounds, and make adjustments as needed 
  • Hoist limit device, for electric or air-powered hoists without a load on its hook: The load block should inch on limit device, or run at a slow speed when on multi-speed or variable-speed hoists. Using travel-limiting clutches as a limit device? Follow inspection methods detailed in the travel-limiting clutch’s manual. 
  • Hoist’s braking system
  • Check lines, valves and other parts of air system for leakage
  • Check hooks & latches; ensure hooks are in accordance with ASME B30.10
  • Check hoist rope for gross damage, and these features that could cause immediate hazards, including:
    • Rope distortion: kinking, crushing, unstranding, bird-caging, main strand displacement and/or core protrusion
    • General corrosion
    • Broken or cut strands 
    • Number, distribution and type of broken wires (if visible)
  • Check load chain for gross damage, and any of these conditions which can be hazardous for work. These are: 
    • Gouges, nicks, weld splatter, corrosion and/or distorted links. 
    • Test the hoist with the load in lifting and lowering directions, and watch the operation of the chain and sprockets. The chain should feed smoothly with the sprockets. 

FREQUENT INSPECTION

Frequent inspections should happen continually, during use and rest periods. During frequent inspections, a qualified person will determine if issues found are hazards and whether the hoist should be removed from service temporarily, inspected further and repaired, or removed from service permanently and replaced. 

During frequent inspections, inspect:

  • Operating mechanisms for proper orientation, adjustment and unusual sounds
  • Braking system
  • Lines, valve and other parts of air systems for leakage
  • Check hooks & latches; ensure hooks are in accordance with ASME B30.10
  • Hoist limit device, for electric or air-powered hoists without a load on its hook: The load block should inch on limit device, or run at a slow speed when on multi-speed or variable-speed hoists. Using travel-limiting clutches as a limit device? Follow inspection methods detailed in the travel-limiting clutch’s manual. 
  • Check hoist rope for gross damage, and these features that could cause immediate hazards, including:
    • Rope distortion: kinking, crushing, unstranding, bird-caging, main strand displacement and/or core protrusion
    • General corrosion
    • Broken/cut strands 
    • Number, distribution and the kind of visible broken wires 
  • Check load chain for gross damage, and any of these conditions which can be hazardous for work. These are:
    • Gouges, nicks, weld splatter, corrosion and distorted links 
    • Test the hoist with the load in lifting and lowering directions, and watch the operation of the chain and sprockets. The chain should feed smoothly with the sprockets. 
    • Check rope/load chain reeving and make sure it complies with the manufacturer recommendation. 

PERIOD INSPECTION 

Periodic inspections can be conducted wherever your hoist is set up, as they don’t require the rigger to disassemble the hoist. 

  • Open or remove covers and other items to inspect components. 
  • A qualified, competent person will determine if conditions found during inspection make a hazard, or whether disassembly is required.
  • Inspect the following for wear, corrosion, cracks and distortion:
    • Ensure fasteners aren’t loose, or on the verge of coming loose 
    • Load blocks
    • Suspension housings 
    • Hand chain wheels 
    • Chain attachments 
    • Clevises
    • Yokes 
    • Suspension bolts
    • Shafts
    • Gears
    • Bearings 
    • Pins
    • Rollers
    • Locking and clamping devices 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? WHEN DO I INSPECT?

We’ve covered the three types of hoist inspection required in Canada, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME). This is when you should conduct each type of inspection.

1. PREOPERATION INSPECTION

A visual inspection should be conducted before each shift. This inspection does not have to be recorded, but a designated, competent person should inspect the hoisting equipment.

2. FREQUENT INSPECTION

Frequent inspections, like pre-operatation inspection, are visual and don’t need to be recorded but should be done by a designated, competent person. Just how often are ‘frequent’ inspections, you ask? 

A) Normal Service—Yearly

B) Heavy Service—Semiannually

C) Severe Service—Quarterly 

3. PERIOD INSPECTION

Visual, period inspections should be conducted by a competent person who makes records of external coded marks on the hoist. This is acceptable identification in lieu of records. Periodic inspections should be done: 

A) Normal Service—Yearly

B) Heavy Service—Semiannually

C) Severe Service—Quarterly 

Since this article is about what to do before using a hoist, we’re going to focus on what your preoperation – or, preuse inspection should include. 

  • The pre-use inspection should be performed during each shift before the hoist is used. 
  • A competent, qualified person will determine whether conditions found during inspection could create a hazard and, if a more detailed inspection is required. 
  • Inspect the following:
    • Operating mechanisms for proper operation, proper adjustment and unusual sounds.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? HAND SIGNALS

what should you do before you use a hoist? hercules slr
Hoisting hand signals.

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? KNOW THE ROPES  

Before operating a hoist, it’s important to conduct an inspection before-hand. The inspection should consist of: 

Rope Type: Ensure you select the proper type of wire rope. The wire rope you select will depend on the hoist type and the features of the load you will lift. 

Are you familiar with the concept of rope stability before using that hoist? Hoists often use wire rope, which can kink, twist or become crushed if the wrong type or the wrong application is used. 

Drum crushing is a type of rope deterioration that can happen with multiple layers of wire rope on a drum. Whoever inspects the wire rope must evaluate the potential for wire rope crushing. Inspections should detect points where crushing is more likely to happen, and the level of deterioration and appropriate course of action (ex. repair or replacement) can be made. 

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO BEFORE YOU USE A HOIST? YOUR CHECKLIST

Before rigging or lifting with a hoist, know: 

  • The hoisting devices capacity
  • The WLL of: the rope, slings and hardware, and the rigging hardware’s weight

Here are some basic tips from CCOHS for inspecting your hoist: 

  • Pre-Lift: Make sure both hooks (upper and lower) swivel, replace worn chain or wire rope and tag it so it can be removed from service.
  • Post the SLL (safe load limit) in the hoist. 
  • Daily: Inspect hooks, rope, brakes and limit switches for wear and damage.
  • Ensure swivels move freely and there are no cracks or breaks in the hook. 
  • Conduct periodic inspections according to manufacturer rules or legislation. 


NEED A LIFT?  

Hercules SLR offers everything you need for your hoist, crane or lifting project. We offer equipment inspections, repairs, maintenance and hoists from reliable, respected and durablebrands like Crosby, CM and Bronze & Blue


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR HOISTS & SERVICES,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

CROSBY QUIZ: CAN YOU PASS THIS HOOK INSPECTION QUIZ?

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING IN HAZARDOUS AREAS

HERCULES SLR AT THE SABLE STRATEGIC WORKSHOP


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Need more information on rigging services? We’ll lift you there.

Click here to learn more about our rigging services at Hercules SLR. 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Warehouse Wow: How our Distribution Centre Leads the Industry

hercules distribution centre warehouse

WAREHOUSE WORSHIP: HOW OUR CENTRAL DISTRIBUTION CENTRE IS LEADING THE INDUSTRY

HERCULES CENTRAL DISTRIBUTION CENTRE: WHAT WE DO

You’re probably reading this on a computer or mobile phone that at one point, was probably sitting somewhere in a warehouse. In 2019, warehouses are a huge part of nearly every industry but we often don’t consider where our things live before they get to us, or exactly what goes into running a smooth, successful warehouse operation. We’re here to help. 

Hercules’ Central Distribution Centre (DC) in Long-Sault, Ontario has the largest inventory of securing, lifting and rigging equipment under one roof in Canada. We’re also the only Central Distribution Centre (DC) warehouse in the securing, lifting and rigging industry that supplies products on a national-scale to our 20+ branches and ship directly to customers. The Hercules DC is in Cornwall on the 401 highway, sandwiched right between Montreal and Toronto and close to a border-crossing into the United States, as well. 

So, what exactly does it take to operate our DC? Luckily, we know just the guy. Terry Bartlett, Hercules’ Central Distribution Manager shares what he’s learned over his career, and what how he and his team run our DC like a well-oiled machine.  

hercules central distribution warehouse staffHERCULES’ WAREHOUSE: TEAM PLAYERS 

Terry Bartlett has been in distribution and material handling industries for over 20 years. Terry started as a Rig Technician at Hercules SLR in Montreal, quickly moving into a leading roles first as a Production Supervisor, then to Floor Manager. When Hercules decided to open a distribution center 3 years ago, Terry practically leaped at the opportunity to help the team establish operations. Over the past 6 years, Terry’s used his knowledge of Hercules and his distribution experience to set-up, recruit and make operations ultra efficient as our Central Distribution Manager. 

Terry can’t do it all alone—A hard-working team is essential to a well-run DC. Tim Bingley, Nick O’Brien and Jamie Plumadore have been part of the DC warehouse team for two years. They help Terry with basically all aspects of running the DC warehouse, including creating and setting policies & procedures and creating a culture that can continuously improve, keep up and grow with industry trends. 

As our business grows, so does the DC team. The DC Warehouse has doubled their team in the past year. Phillipe Gatien, Adam Bartlett, Eric Nadeau and Eric Vanderwal have joined our team to help operations.  

hercules central distribution warehouse staff

HERCULES WAREHOUSE: 5 SAFETY TIPS FROM TERRY

1. KNOW THE RISKS

Be aware of hazardous risks associated with warehouse work. These include slips and fall (which are some of the most common injuries on any jobsite, even offices) but warehouses present even more issues. Racking accidents, musculoskeletal injuries from improper lifting methods and temperature fluctuations are all risk factors for hazards.

You can’t prevent accidents or expect warehouse personnel to avoid hazards if they aren’t aware of them. 

2. PREVENT FALLS, MAKE HOUSEKEEPING A PRIORITY

Like we mention above, slips and falls are some of the most common warehouse injuries, and can be particularly dangerous when lifting equipment is being used. In Ontario, nearly 20% of lost-time injury claims were due to falls. To prevent falls and trips, be sure to have guards installed in areas where there are large spaces between floors that personnel could fall through. Mop and clean up spills, slippery materials like sawdust, and be sure to store boxes properly – not on the warehouse floor where someone may trip over them.

Train and make personnel aware of any abnormalities that might cause them to trip, like cracks in the floor, uneven stairs or plugged-in cords; and also human error that easily contributes to falls, like tools or equipment placed on the floor for just a moment.   

3. KEEPING TRAINING CURRENT

Yes, maybe employees who have been hired years ago have been trained, but as new standards come out, personnel should be familiar with them. Be sure to give thorough training on any new technologies you bring in, like connective radios or tracking systems, hand signals & important communicative phrases, and make sure safety and equipment training is up-to-date – to do this, give personnel ‘refresher’ courses regularly and hold safety meetings with warehouse personnel. 

4. USE EQUIPMENT PROPERLY

Again, “Isn’t this common-sense?” you probably think. However, one of the top citations OSHA gives out each year are for equipment violations. Ever see this scene from ‘The Office’? Some people shouldn’t use the forklift.

Make sure personnel has the proper training and licenses to operate machinery like forklifts, aerial lift trucks and even fall protection. Safety harnesses can be used improperly, which can lead to accidents. For example, a Hercules SLR inspector was once called into a warehouse operation whose safety equipment was often breaking. When he entered the warehouse, he saw a worker swinging from side-to-side on various platforms with a safety harness and lanyard which were only supposed to be used vertically. This was improper use, which explained why their safety equipment was failing so frequently.

In 2018, three of OSHA’s most frequent citations in warehouses were for Fall Protection training & general requirements and industrial truck violations – invest in training for warehouse personnel, especially when fall protection is being used.

5. HAZARD COMMUNICATION 

Another citation OSHA often gives out is for hazard communication. Hazardous chemicals can cause corrosion, respiratory issues or become flammable, and should be labelled. Hazard communication includes proper labelling, education for employees about the risks involved and plans to control spills and proper disposal. 


FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WAREHOUSE WORK,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

WAREHOUSE SAFETY: 8 STEPS TO TAKE AFTER A RACKING ACCIDENT

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: MEET KIM REYNOLDS, WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE

WAREHOUSE SAFETY: IS YOUR FORKLIFT HOLIDAY SEASON READY?


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Have questions about our  rigging equipment or our Central Distribution Centre? Hercules SLR will lift you there.

E-mail us at info@herculesslr.com to learn more about Hercules SLR’s rigging equipment.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

CM’s Tips: Crane & Hoisting Equipment in Hazardous Areas

cm hoisting equipment at hercules slr

COLUMBUS MCKINNON GUEST BLOG: How to Use Hoists & Cranes in Hazardous Areas

This guest blog is reprinted with permission from the experts at Columbus McKinnon. Their specialists give you an overview of safe practices to follow to operate crane and hoisting equipment in hazardous environments. 

CRANE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT IN HAZARDOUS AREAS: THE NEED FOR SPARK RESISTANCE 

Among many industries that range from upstream oil and gas, refineries to agriculture and wood working, many potentially flammable atmospheres exist. These areas can present unique challenges for material handling equipment and can pose a serious threat to materials, equipment and most importantly, personnel.

In Canada, hazardous areas are defined and managed by a few different regulatory bodies, including the Canada Labour Code, the Canadian Standards Association and the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety, to name a few. 

FACTORS

It’s generally understood that friction between certain materials can cause sparks sufficient enough to ignite flammable gas or dust. A cigarette lighter or an antique flintlock musket are common examples of this. Obviously the type and concentration/dilution of gases in an area is one element that affects potential ignition from a mechanically generated source, but other key factors could include:

  • The type materials making contact
  • The speed/pressure with which the materials come into contact
  • Corrosion on one or more of the contacting surfaces
  • Lubrication

To address this potential risk, Columbus McKinnon uses materials such as copper, bronze, and austenitic stainless steel, which are generally considered non-sparking. These are used for coatings, or as material substitutions for enhanced spark resistance. Not only are these materials spark resistant, but they can also protect against corrosion. Since surface corrosion can increase friction between mating components, corrosion prevention is also important when using material handling products in hazardous environments.

CM crane and hoisting in hazardous areas, Hercules SLR

Columbus McKinnon engineers a variety of specialty products with spark-resistant components and finishes, including:

  • Solid bronze hooks, bottom blocks and trolley wheels
  • Bronze plated components
  • Stainless steel load and hand chain
  • Multi-coat epoxy finishes
  • Zinc-aluminum corrosion-resistant finish

CRANE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT IN HAZARDOUS AREAS: THE NEED FOR CORROSION RESISTANCE

hoisting equipment in hazardous areas by hercules slr
Offshore refinery, example of a hazardous environment. Photo courtesy of CM.

As we mentioned earlier, lifting equipment used in classified hazardous locations must be compliant with applicable standards. 

It’s important to make sure critical mechanical components are resistant to sparks – it’s equally important to make sure these parts are protected from corrosion. These parts include: 

  • Load blocks
  • Trolley wheels
  • Load brake
  • Lifting mediums
  • Chain
  • Wire rope

Many classified hazardous areas exist outdoors that expose lifting equipment to direct, and often harsh weather. These include offshore oil platforms, natural gas processing plants and refineries – to name a few. Specifically in offshore facilities, equipment may be exposed to splash zones, salt spray and the condensation of salt-laden air. In addition to harsh and corrosive weather conditions, sulfur, mineral acids and other corrosive agents are often present in the crude oil and natural gas that is being produced, processed and transported in these facilities, working to further corrode lifting equipment used in these environments.

CORROSION = $$$ cm hoisting equpment from hercules slr

The cost of corrosion can be tremendous, and can add up to billions of dollars each year in the oil and gas industries alone. In these industries, the cost to repair and replace corroded lifting equipment combined with unscheduled maintenance, downtime and lost production have a major impact on profitability. Corroded load blocks, hooks, chains and cables can result in catastrophic equipment failure. Not only can this cause costly damage to the equipment and the facility, but most importantly, can cause injury or be fatal to operators and other personnel in the facility. 

So – how do you protect lifting equipment from corrosion? It’s critical to use corrosion-resistant materials for load blocks, hooks, chains, cables and other components. Since surface corrosion can increase the friction between mating components, corrosion prevention is important to maintain mechanical spark resistance when using these products in a classified, hazardous environment. 

 

cm hoisting equpment from hercules slr
A corroded pipe in an offshore environment.

Columbus McKinnon offers a variety of solutions for these challenges, in the form of a wide range lifting products with spark and corrosion resistant materials and coatings. They also offer application engineering assistance to help determine the right solution for your application. Choose from specially engineered products with:

  • Solid bronze hooks, bottom blocks and trolley wheels
  • Lightweight aluminum housings
  • Stainless steel load and hand chain
  • Multi-coat epoxy finishes
  • Zinc-aluminum corrosion-resistant finish 
damaged hoisting equipment hercules slr
Corroded chain. Photo via CM.

In addition to corrosion-resistant materials and finishes, we also suggest proper hoist lubrication to prevent sparking. These measures, combined with a robust inspection and preventative maintenance program that includes pre-lift inspections, play a critical role to make sure equipment is dependable and safe in these harsh environments. 

Regardless of where you do business, CM has hoisting equipment and cranes to keep your people, materials and equipment safe in hazardous areas. 

 

CRANE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT IN HAZARDOUS AREAS: SPACE CONSTRAINT CHALLENGES & SOLUTIONS

Earlier in this article, CM discussed the need for mechanical spark resistance and corrosion-resistant measures, especially in hazardous environments. This section outlines challenges faced working with space constraints, how they can be increased in hazardous environments and solutions to potential problems.

SPACE CONSTRAINT CHALLENGES  

hoisting equipment in space constraints at hercules slr
Examples of a constrained space. Photo courtesy of CM.

 

 

 

 

 

Another example of a constrained space. Photo courtesy of CM.

Classified hazardous areas frequently exist within confined spaces, especially in the mining and oil & gas industries. In mining, tunnels often have low overhead clearance in areas where coal or other flammable dust may be present. In the oil and gas industry, designers of offshore facilities typically look to minimize the overall size of the structure, which can lead to low headroom between deck levels and tight clearances for monorails and crane runways.

In all of these situations, there is a need for overhead lifting equipment that is compact in design, including low headroom and short side clearances, as well as a short “end approach” to maximize the deck coverage area served by the monorail hoist or crane.

This need for compact hoists, trolleys and cranes is often complicated by the possibility that flammable gases or dust may be present in the areas where the equipment is used. Therefore, explosion-proof and spark-resistant features may be needed, each posing their own challenges given the space constraints. For example, explosion-proof electric motors and control enclosures are typically larger and heavier than those for non-hazardous areas. Spark-resistant bronze load blocks and hooks tend to be larger than carbon or alloy steel hooks and blocks with the same safe working load. Also, the use of spark-resistant stainless steel load chain or wire rope often requires the equipment capacity to be de-rated due to lower tensile strength of stainless versus alloy steel. This de-rating can sometimes result in larger, heavier and more costly hoists and cranes.

SOLUTIONS 

As you can see, there are many factors to consider when specifying or purchasing lifting equipment for hazardous locations with space limitations. When dimensional constraints within facilities and working environments compete with the need to comply with hazardous area requirements, the safety of personnel, equipment and facilities themselves must always take precedence in our decision making.

Fortunately, there are a variety of hoisting equipment options available, featuring spark- and corrosion-resistant materials and explosion-proof components, that can be used in confined areas. Low-headroom hoists are offered in both wire rope and chain varieties, including manual, electric and pneumatic models.

Wire rope hoists can typically provide higher capacities and faster lifting speeds, while chain hoists can offer smaller overall dimensional envelopes to optimize end approach and clearance. Solid bronze and stainless steel components can provide lasting protection against sparking and corrosion, but, in some applications, copper or nickel plating can be substituted to provide lower headroom dimensions and reduce the need for de-rating of safe working loads.

CM has solutions to many of these problems. Products that work in many different restricted areas for this purpose are: 

  • Ultra-low headroom hoist models 
  • Low-profile hoists 
  • Wire rope hoists/crane rope 

Hercules SLR carries Columbus McKinnon products, hoisting equipment and solutions to use cranes and hoists in hazardous areas—e-mail info@herculesslr.com to find out how we can support your next crane or hoisting operation with safety training, inspections or repairs.  


VISIT CM WORKS FOR MORE: 

PART 1: The Need for Spark Resistance
PART 2: The Need for Corrosion Resistance
PART 3: Space Constraint Challenges & Solutions 

FOR MORE COLUMBUS MCKINNON,

CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

CRANE & HOISTING SYSTEMS: THE DANGERS OF SIDE PULLING

CM GUEST BLOG: 3 SAFETY TIPS TO INSTALL YOUR CM TROLLEY

 CHAIN SLING WEAR AND STRETCH: ARE THEY THE SAME THING?


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Where’s your CM hoisting equipment? Hercules SLR will lift you there.

Click here to learn more about CM crane and hoist equipment at Hercules SLR. 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.  

Crane Equipment: cranes, chains & automobiles

crane equipment, hercules slr, rigging services

Cranes have been used since the first century – in that time, they were powered by humans or animals to lift heavy loads. Cranes have adapted and come a long way since – they now use an assortment of crane equipment and hardware to lift, lower and even sometimes move horizontally.

Read on to learn more about the modern variety of crane equipment available and Hercules SLR’s tips for using it.

CRANE EQUIPMENT: an overview

For rigging with cranes, different types of lifting equipment (also known as tackle) are used. These include:

  • Wire Rope Slings
  • Synthetic Slings
  • Shackles
  • Snatch Blocks
  • Hooks
  • Chain Hoists
  • Chain Pullers
  • Eye Bolts
  • Tirfors
  • Jacks
  • Lifting Beam
  • Spreader Beams
  • Beam Clamps
  • Plate Clamps

CRANE EQUIPMENT: wire rope slings

Pay special attention to wire rope slings as they are susceptible to servere wear, abrasion, impact loading, crushing, kinking and overloading – small changes in the slings’ angle affect the safe working load of the sling. Care should be taken around rough edges and wire rope slings – even an edge you might not consider ‘sharp’ can make considerable damage to your wire rope sling, making it unsafe and ineffective. Use sleeves, wear pads or corner protectors to protect your wire rope sling from damage.

Be sure to not drop a load or run a load over the sling – this will crush the sling. Also, don’t stop and start suddenly while you lift and lower with a wire rope sling, as this increases the slings’ stresses and increases possible failures.

WIRE ROPE SLING SPLICES

crane-equipment-hercules-slr-rigging

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WIRE ROPE SLING IDENTIFICATION 

There are three ways to identify wire rope slings: the SWL, I.D. number and certificate number.

  1. Hard-stamped on ferrule
  2. A tag which has a wire running through the tag and eye of the sling
  3. Large metal washer where the wire of the sling is passed through when you make the eye of a sling

WIRE ROPE CONFIGURATIONS

There are three main wire rope sling configurations:

  1. Double-Choker Hitch
  2. Pair of Double Wrap Chokers
  3. Single Choker Hitch

Round slings’ are versatile – they’re strong, yet delicate to the load to lift. They’re light, flexible in many directions and malleable which is especially helpful when lifting an awkward or delicate load.

crane-equipment-hercules-slr
Synthetic Round Sling Label

CRANE EQUIPMENT: synthetic round slings 

Round slings’ are not easily damaged by sunlight, humidity, grease, dirt or seawater. Round slings’ are identified by the colour of the label, and also have the SWL on it.

CRANE EQUIPMENT: web slings 

Web slings are suited for particularly those that can be easily damaged. They’re easy to damage if you use them improperly – your web sling shouldn’t touch a sharp edge, heat or chemicals that will cause damage.


CRANE EQUIPMENT: hardware

SHACKLES

For crane lifting, two different shackles are typically used – bow and d-shackles. When using synthetic slings with a crane, two types of shackles are available, wide sling shackle and a round sling shackle. Web sling shackles are wider and bow out in the middle, and round sling shackles are narrow and sometimes have small valleys in the shackle bow, which supports the synthetic strands better.

These prevent the sling from bunching and pinching, which can be an issue with bow or d-shackles – it also reduces the SWL capacity of the sling.

To use shackles for crane lifting safely, follow these tips:

  • Don’t replace the shackle pin with a bolt – only the proper fitted pin should be used. Bolts aren’t meant to take the bend that a pin can handle.
  • Pins must be straight and all-screw pins must be completely seated
  • Cotter pins should be used with all round pin shackles
  • Shackles worn at the crown or pin by over 10% of original diameter should be removed from service and destroyed.
  • Don’t pull your shackle at an angle with a sling or hoist rope – this reduces the shackle’s capacity by 50%. Spacers can be used to centralize the load on the pins with spacers.
  • Don’t use screw pin shackles if the load can roll under load and unscrew

SHEAVE BLOCKS

A sheave block is a single, or multi-sheave block which opens on one side – this opening allows a rope to be pulled over the sheave and eliminates the need to be threaded through the block. When crane lifting with wire rope, sheave blocks can be purchased with configurations for hook, shackle, eye and swivel fittings.

  • Sheave blocks are normally used when it’s necessary to change the direction of pull on the line. When this happens, the stress on the sheave block is significantly greater than the angle between the lead and load lines. 
    crane equipment, rigging services, hercules slr, Crane Equipment: cranes, chains & automobiles
    Pulley with a sheave on a mobile lifting crane, with 25-ton lifting capability
  • When the lines are parallel, 1000lbs on the lead line results in double the weight on the block—2000lbs on block, hook and whatever the connection points are attached to. As the angle between lines increases, the stress on the block and hook is reduced.

HOOKS

Many different hooks are available for lifting and rigging operations – check with manufacturer instructions and warnings before using in a crane application.

When using hooks to lift with a crane, follow these tips:

  • Ensure hoisting hooks are fitted with safety latches (except grab and sorting hooks)
  • Inspect hooks often, looking for wear in the hook’s saddle – check for cracks, corrosion and if the hook’s body is twisted.
  • Inspect the shackle’s throat opening – if the hook’s been overloaded or is weak, the throat will open. If this is the case, remove from service and destroy so no one else attempts to use it.
  • Inspect for cracks in the hook’s saddle and neck
  • Be sure the hook is stamped with its SWL
  • Note that the SWL applies when the load is in the saddle of the hook, as this reduces the SWL.

TURNBUCKLES 

Turnbuckles are sometimes called rigging screws and can be supplied with eye end, jaw end, stub end fittings and/or a combination of these.

  • Use turnbuckles fabricated from alloy steel with weldless construction.
  • If turnbuckles have end fittings, ensure hooks are fit with safety latches.

CHAIN HOISTS / CHAIN BLOCKS 

Chain hoists are often used with cranes to move larger equipment and machinery. Chain hoists vary in size and length, and require little effort to execute a lift.

Chain hoists are durable, but can be damaged easily. To prevent damage, check:

  • The SWL is right for the application/load
  • The chain hoist has been inspected or certified by a third party
  • The hoist’s body is free of cracks or broken castings
  • The hook isn’t deformed and is fit with a safety latch
  • Anchor pins are in place correctly, and are the right type
  • Chain is in good working condition
  • SWL is clearly marked on the chain hoist block

A lever hoist is similar to a chain hoist, but operates slightly different with a lever to lift and lower the load – it can also be used to pull loads.

EYE BOLTS 

When lifting with a crane and eye bolts, ensure eye and ring bolts are made of alloy steel and have shoulders or collars.

Do not load eye bolts at an angle – angular loading reduces the weight of the load they can safely support.

TIRFOR

A tirfor is a mechanical device, equipped with a level handle to operate. They’re used to pull and add tension, and can also be used to lift if they have blocks.


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