Product Spotlight | Crosby Shackles

Product Spotlight | Crosby Shackles

Crosby is one of the most recognizable names in the rigging industry, and has been for over 100 years. Crosby makes over 2,000 rigging and lifting products to meet all your hoisting needs, and Hercules SLR is proud to be an Authorized Crosby Distributor and a Certified Crosby Repair Center.

Focusing today on Crosby shackles, as Crosby says, “there is no equal”. When you buy Crosby, you’re getting some attributes that are guaranteed when you buy their rigging and lifting equipment. The attributes that make Crosby shackles stand out from the rest include:

  • Design – Crosby carbon shackles have the highest design factor (6 to 1) in the industry. Crosby purchases only special bar forging quality steel with cleanliness and guaranteed hardenability. All material chemistry is independently verified prior to manufacturing to assure that strength, ductility and fatigue properties are met.
  • Closed Forged – Each shackle is closed die forged which allows for an increased cross-section that, when coupled with quenched and tempering, enhances strength and ductility. Close tolerance holes and concentric pins with good surface finishes are provided by Crosby and are proven to provide improved fatigue life in actual use. Crosby shackles are fatigue rated as well as load rated.
  • Quenched and Tempered – All Crosby shackle bows and pins are quenched and tempered, which enhances their performance under cold temperatures and adverse field conditions. Crosby’s Quenched and Tempered shackles provide the tensile strength, ductility, impact and fatigue properties that are essential if they are to perform time after time in adverse conditions. These properties assure that the inspection criteria set forth by ANSI will effectively monitor the ability of the shackles to continue in service.
  • Identification and Application Information – Crosby forges “Crosby” or “CG”, the Working Load Limit, and the Product Identification Code (PIC) into each bow and “Crosby” or “CG”, and the Product Identification Code (PIC) into each pin of its full line of screw pin, round pin, and bolt type
    anchor and chain shackles.

Crosby creates a variety of different shackles ranging in size, type, class, capacity and more to exceed the toughest demands of any industry, including land-based and offshore energy, construction and infrastructure, cargo handling and towing, marine, mining, and transportation. Below we take a bit of a closer look into a few of the key shackles in Crosby’s extensive library – But if you aren’t seeing something you’d like to know a bit more about, reach out! Our experts are always happy to help.

Anchor Shackles

An anchor shackle can be identified by it’s larger round “O” shaped bow. They are sometimes referred to as bow shackles, however, a bow shackle typically has a larger, more defined “bow” area than an anchor shackle. This “bow” we’re referring to allows for single or multiple leg slings to be collected in the bow, and for it to be sideloaded. This is an essential process used in a variety of material handling applications, making anchor shackles one of the most widely used of the shackle family.

Wide Body Shackles

You can pick out a wide-body shackle from it’s much larger bow cross-section. This wider shape provides an array of advantages, especially in heavy lifting applications. The significant gain in the sling bearing surface eliminates the need for a thimble and makes for an easier time dealing with synthetic Nylon and Polyester slings. It also increases the useable sling strength, which can greatly improve the overall life of wire rope slings.

Chain Shackles

Chain shackles are often known as D-shackles (or dee shackles) which refers to the “D” shape. This design is narrower than a bow or anchor shackle and generally has a threaded pin or pin close. Their design enables efficient movement of materials, particularly in compact lifting environments. Don’t be fooled by the name “chain shackle”—this type of shackle is used primarily with single-legged wire rope slings and various attachment points. The smaller loop is designed to take high loads primarily in line. Side and racking loads may twist or bend a D or chain shackle.

Theatrical Shackles

Theatrical shackles are specially designed for the entertainment industry. They are designed with all the strength and dependability of a standard shackle but have a black finish that allows it to blend in with the stage surroundings. This allows theatrical riggers (also known as grips) to rig in a safe and dependable way, using industry-standard equipment without distracting from the on-stage action.

Crosby supplies one of the most-used theatrical shackles in the entertainment industry which features a flat black baked-on powder coat finish which gives it the matte black, easy to blend in look you see in the photo.

Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Shackles

ROV shackles are a piece of equipment that is heavily relied on in the subsea industry. In the early days of subsea rigging, standard shackles were being used, but since work with these shackles are done completely by divers or remotely operated vehicles, standard shackle pins and nuts were far too difficult to work with. ROV shackles are specially designed with handles to allow for different robotic grips which make this far easier. They are also made with industry-standard colors to be highly visible which makes them much easier to locate under their conditions.

Shackle Variations

As you saw above, with the anchor shackles and chain shackles, we featured two different variations of that shackle – A screw pin shackle and a round pin shackle or bolt type shackle.

Screw pin shackles

Screw pin shackles feature a threaded pin that is inserted through the ears and tightened. These shackles are often the choice for applications where slings and other hardware are being changed out often, and they are not recommended for permanent or long-term use. Screw pin shackles can be used in multi-leg sling assemblies and where side-loading may occur, but the WLL must be accounted for.

Tip: Be cautious of a live line where the screw pin is being rotated, torqued, or twisted because it can cause the pin to unthread itself. This is also why it’s important to tighten the pin prior to each lift.

Round Pin shackles

Round pin shackles have a round unthreaded pin that is secured in its place by a cotter pin. This variation is the most popular in tie-down, towing, suspension or applications where the load is in a strict line. They are known for performing well under conditions in which they are subject to torque or twisting and are not recommending for overhead lifting. They are also not recommended for use in attaching multiple-leg slings or in any application where load sliding is a possibility.

Bolt Type Shackles

Bolt type shackles can look similar to a round pin shackles at first glance but are a more secure option. It features a combination of a bolt and nut along with the cotter pin. These shackles can be used in any applications appropriate for the round pin shackle or screw pin shackle – With the ability to handle rotation or torque. These are often the most popular choice for permanent or long-term installations because the nut and cotter pin combination eliminate the need to tighten the pin prior to each lift!

How to Choose a Shackle?

  • Refer to the manufacturer’s table for the safe working load limit (WLL) of the shackle. The rated capacity should always be printed on the shackle and be visible.
  • Shackles are sized according to the diameter of the bow section rather than the pin size – So never use a shackle if the distance between the eyes is greater than listed in the manufacturer’s table.
  • Always consult the manufacturer if you are using shackles in extreme conditions such as temperature higher then 204°C or lower than -40°C or exposure to corrosive fumes.

7 Quick Tips For Using Shackles

  1. Inspect shackles regularly and replace any that show any of the following:
    • Stretching and wear
    • Bending
    • Distortion, surface blemishes, wear, and fractures
  2. Never replace the shackle pin with a bolt or unidentified pin – You risk the bolt being bent by the load or possibly completely failing.
  3. Do not allow a shackle to be pulled at an angle, this will cause the legs to open. Avoid this by packing the pin with washers to center the shackle.
  4. Avoid using a screw pin shackle or fit pins in contact with moving parts if the pin can roll and unscrew. If the load shifts, the sling can unscrew the shackle pin.
  5. Do not use round pin shackles restrained by only a cotter pin for overhead lifting.
  6. Never force, hammer or wedge shackles into position.
  7. Never exceed a 120-degree lifting angle when using multiple-leg slings.

Why shop around? When you buy Crosby rigging equipment from Hercules SLR, you don’t just get a shackle or an eye bolt—You get unparalleled asset management service (did we mention it’s free?), qualified inspection technicians for service & preventive maintenance and peace-of-mind knowing your equipment is safe to lift, hoist or move.

See your Crosby gear from purchase, all the way to service with Hercules SLR’s extensive product selection, inspection & service team, asset management, testing and more.

NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

Revolutionary Rigging | The Spydercrane

Revolutionary Rigging | The Spydercrane

What’s a spydercrane? Although this spyder is a little bit too big to squish with your shoe… No need to worry arachnophobes, the only thing the Spydercrane and the actual creepy-crawly have in common are it’s 4 long legs which give it a spider-like appearance.

This new crane is much like a boom lift, but its small base and spyder legs or ‘outriggers’ makes it much more versatile than the typical boom lift.

The spydercrane was originally manufactured by Furukawa UNIC Corporation in Japan, and is called the Mini Crawler Crane. Roger Bassetti and Warren Wagoner from Phoenix-based Smiley Lift Solutions saw the crane while on a business trip to Japan and immediately knew that they needed to bring the mini crane technology to the North American Market. So, the Spydercranes we see around the US and Canada come from Smiley Lift Solutions!

What Makes the Sydercrane Special?

Here you see the Sypercrane easily wheeling through a doorway in travel mode

The key feature of the Spydercrane is that they offer a compact design that allows for operation in confined areas. The smaller models are able to travel through a standard width door frame when compact into their ‘travel position’ and the largest of the models are able to travel through a standard double-door.

Travel-mode in the larger Spydercrane models also includes a quick disassemble system that allows the outriggers, boom, and frame to be removed reducing the overall weight of the crane for transporting or hoisting.

You may be starting to get that “it’s too good to be true” ring in the back of your mind thinking it must be an absolute pain to get a crane from all tucked up in travel mode to a useable piece of equipment. However, you can easily set up a typical Spydercrane from travel mode to fully deployed and ready for action in less than 5 minutes! Don’t believe it? Check out this video from GLG Canada showing in real-time just how easy the Sydercrane set-up is!

Many of the models of Sypdercrane come with some other cutting-edge features that make the Sydercrane even more unique. Some of these include:

It’s patented Overturn Protection System: This is comprised of an on-board computer system that continually measures the ground pressure of each of the outriggers through an incorporated “load cell”. During a lift, if the system detects an outrigger is losing ground pressure, an alarm will sound and the crane will start to slow done all functions. If two outriggers start to lose ground pressure, the crane will automatically stop all functions that would put the crane closer to an unsafe position. With the alarm sounding and the crane at a safe stopped position, the operator is able to maneuver the crane back into a safe lifting position.

Variable Geometry Outriggers: The outriggers are designed to allow for lifts in tight spaces. It allows for the outriggers to be locked in numerous positions on the swing, knee, and inner box joints. This means the mini crane can be set up around obstacles, on a catwalk, or in a machinery room with very limited space.

Remote Control and Pressure Sensitive Controls: Unlike most cranes, the Spydercrane offers pressure-sensitive controls that will speed or slow the crane’s functions based on the amount of pressure input by the operator. Most models of the Spydercrane are also equipped with a wireless remote control so the operator themselves can be in the best vantage point for the lift, rather than needing to be on board running controls.

Superior Materials and Construction: The Spydercrane is designed with a hexagonal keeled boom instead of the standard square boom, which adds strength and reduces sway. This is made up of steel that is rated at 140,000 -- 160,000 yield (psi), which is the highest tinsel-yield steel making it thinner and lighter but still stronger than most conventional crane materials.

Spydercrane Models

090 Series

This series is made for job sites requiring a small crane with a boom length of 18 -- 28.4 ft and a maximum lifting capacity of 1,990 lbs. There are three models in this series, the URW094, URW095, and URW095S, which are all generally used in confined spaces where the typical crane would never fit.

090 series cranes can be configured around obstacles, can be set-up on uneven ground, or operated in confined spaces like hallways and up against walls.

200 Series

This series of the Spydercrane is deemed the most versatile and is therefore popular among many industries, On of the most popular uses of this crane is as a glazing tool to set glass and other materials. Three models are available within this series that range in boom length from 24.9 ft -- 28.4 ft and maximum lifting capacity of 5,800 lbs and 6,450 lbs. The geometric footprint of this model of the Spydercrane makes it suitable for use in hallways, balconies, or around obstacles.

All of the models within this series are equipped with the wireless radio remote control mentioned above, which frees the operator from being tethered to the crane.

300 Series

The 300 series Spyderceane is the perfect lifting solution for modern construction sites, as it’s a bit bigger than other models with an increased boom length of 47’10” and a maximum lifting capacity of 5,800 lbs and 6,680 lbs depending on the model.

Though it’s a larger ‘spyder’ when in use, it is only 52 inches wide when in travel mode, which will allow you to move it into any space through a standard double-door -- And it’s zero-emission power options allow for use in indoor construction projects with low ventilation.

500 Series

The 500 series Spydercrane is perfect for steel erection as it offers a lifting capacity of up to 8,920 lbs and a boom length of 8.0 ft. The 500 series Spydercrane is revolutionizing how buildings are built with its heavy-lifting capacity and ability to perform in confined spaces.

This crane is also able to move through a standard double-door when in travel mode and can be used in job sites with low ventilation thanks to its zero-emission power options. And to top it all off, it comes mounted on a dual rubber track with a quick disassemble system that allows the outriggers, boom, and frame to be removed reducing the overall weight of the crane for transporting or hoisting.

700 Series

You may have sensed a theme and can guess that the 700 series Spydercrane is the largest Spydercrane currently available in the North American market. While it is described as a “beast” it still keeps the key feature of the Spydercrane in being compactable down to 5.48′ wide. The 700 Series Spydercrane can really do it all with a lifting capacity of over 6 tons.

Coming jam-packed with all of the features mentioned before throughout smaller series of the crane, the URW706 model has the ability to rotate 360 degrees in places, making it a dream to maneuver through confined spaces. You can find this tarantula level super Spyder crane being used in almost any industrial industry!


No matter how unique and revolutionary your crane is, it’s always important to ensure you’re keeping up with mandatory maintenance and inspections.

Hercules SLR offers crane certifications & LEEA-certified inspections, repairs, predictive & preventive maintenance and crane parts & accessories like wire rope slings, hoists & whatever else you need to lift.

When you spend a long day lifting, hoisting and pulling, your body probably has some aches & pains. Did you know your crane is no different? Just like a weightlifter must take care of their body, watch what they eat and even ensure the palms of their hands are prepared to lift, your crane needs a similar level of care. (And, we know what happens when this level of care is overlooked).

Click here to discover what type of cranes Hercules SLR services, the equipment & products we service, sell & inspect and why looking after your crane benefits you in the long-run.


NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.

The Silent Killer: How Carbon Monoxide is Formed

working welding with welders mask

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: The Silent Killer

What’s odourless, colourless, tasteless and can kill you almost instantly? Carbon monoxide (CO).

Carbon monoxide poisoning is a reality for everyone, not just those who work in industrial trades.

Carbon monoxide poisoning can happen over time or in an instant, depending on the level of Carbon Monoxide in the air. Certain spaces are more prone to carbon monoxide poisoning than others, for example, confined spaces are more likely to pose a risk for CO poisoning. 

Carbon monoxide is made when you burn: 

  • Oil
  • Coal
  • Gas
  • Wood
  • Propane
  • Natural gas 

Like we touch on above, it’s particularly deadly when burnt in an enclosed space with little air-circulation or flow.   

In this blog, we’ll cover what exactly is carbon monoxide, how & if it can be treated, how you can prevent CO poisoning, what the symptoms are and steps employers & employees should take to minimize the risk of dangerous exposure.  

WHAT IS CARBON MONOXIDE?

Like we mention above, carbon monoxide is an odourless, tasteless & colourless flammable gas. Carbon monoxide is in many other substances, like the air we breathe—The amount of CO in the air is approximately 0.2 parts per million (ppm) which isn’t harmful to humans.

In increased levels (usually around 150ppm or higher), carbon monoxide becomes deadly.   

OK, SO WHAT IS CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING?

Carbon monoxide poisoning happens when CO is inhaled and builds up in the bloodstream.  

The body displaces the oxygen in your red blood cells with carbon monoxide. Your bloodstream can’t send  oxygen to vital organs like your brain, heart & nervous tissue so they can work. This leads to unconsciousness, and if it worsens, death. 

It’s important to note that carbon monoxide is poisonous to animals, too. 

CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING: WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Symptoms of CO poisoning can appear quickly, or slowly over time depending on the amount in the air, the size of the individual & their muscular activity and the amount of time they’re exposed to the CO.

Many signs of CO poisoning resemble the flu. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include:

  • Headache
  • Nausea/Vomiting 
  • Trouble breathing 
  • Dizziness 
  • Confusion 
  • Chest pain 
  • Stomach pain 

If someone is sleeping or intoxicated, they likely won’t display symptoms, but will still succumb to CO poisoning. Everyone exposed to CO poisoning will be effected, no matter individual health, size or gender—Although the time that symptoms and sickness appear may differ. 

Even cases of carbon dioxide poisoning that aren’t considered that serious can lead to long-lasting health effects. Some of these include:

  • Brain damage
  • Heart damage
  • Organ damage
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING: WHAT SORT OF WORK PRODUCES CARBON MONOXIDE? 

You probably know now that carbon monoxide poisoning can impact anyone—Whether you’re at work, home or school, all sorts of environments can produce CO.

One of the largest producers of carbon monoxide in the world are natural disasters/sources, like forest fires, but workers still need to be prepared for work that produces carbon monoxide, especially when it takes place in areas where air flow is restricted. Carbon monoxide burns well when it’s mixed with air, and this can be explosive in high-enough amounts. 

When it comes to carbon monoxide at work, there are a few different types of work that have the potential to produce harmful levels of carbon monoxide if not managed properly. 

Some jobs, or factors around jobs that can produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide include: 

  • Welding 
  • Work vehicles 
  • Portable generators 
  • Engines, (ex. Internal Combustion Engines) 
  • Gasoline-powered tools 
  • Fire/Explosions
  • Natural gas heaters 
  • Kilns, furnaces or boilers 
  • Cigarette smoke 
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING: PREVENTION

There are many steps you can take to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning at work. 

What does carbon monoxide do to the body over time? Take a look at the chart below: 

 
Employers can:
  • Install a ventilation system that removes carbon monoxide from work areas. 
  • Maintain water & space heaters, cooking ranges/gas stoves 
  • Use alternatives to gas-powered equipment 
  • Install and use a carbon monoxide detector—Choose a detector that will sound the alarm before carbon monoxide reaches dangerous levels. 
  • Don’t use gas-powered tools in areas with poor ventilation 
  • Regularly test the quality of air where carbon monoxide-producing work is performed 
  • Ensure employees are trained and are wearing appropriate PPE for the work and conditions 
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING: TREATMENT

If you suspect someone of experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning, call 911 immediately. Remove them from the carbon monoxide-affected area only if you’re wearing the appropriate PPE to protect yourself—Remember, nearly 60% of confined space deaths happen to worker’s trying to rescue others. 

First, a blood sample is taken to determine if you have carbon monoxide poisoning. 

In terms of treatment, there are different courses of action to take. DO NOT consider this a guide of what to do, but rather some potential things to expect from treatment from the hospital depending on your carbon monoxide levels. 

For treatment, they might: 

  • Have the poisoned person breath fresh air or pure oxygen 
  • Place the person in a high-pressure chamber that forces oxygen into the body  
KNOW YOUR PPE: RESPIRATORS 

Working in areas where you’ll be exposed to harmful gases, chemicals or air? A respirator might be just the PPE you need. 

Get to know the respirator, here: 

cartoon ppe respirator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want more tips to deal with Carbon Monoxide? Open the Hercules SLR Toolbox and find quizzes, infographics & video to make your next safety meeting one they’ll actually care about. 


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

WHY CONFINED SPACE TRAINING?

TRAINING TUESDAY | TOP 4 CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS

CANNABIS: BEYOND THE CULTIVATING AND HARVESTING


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? DROP US A LINE, OR GIVE US A CALL!

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Get to Know your Regional Sales Manager, Steve Hanes

rigger next to giant wire rope spool

Get to Know your Regional Sales Manager, Steve Hanes

Tell us about your educational/professional background:

I worked my way through school and was learning to become a computer technician and programmer. With some help from the economy and getting married, my path has taken me to sales.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

For over 19 years, I worked in the automotive industry—I started in the wash bay at a car dealership, worked my way up to Service Advisor, then Assistant Service Manager. I spent eight years as a Service Manager for Honda, Toyota and Saturn dealerships. After this, I spent three years as General Manager in aftermarket sales for import cars.

This was the stepping stone to learn outside sales, and how to operate in more than location. In 2006 I was hired by Unalloy IWRC and became a Technical Sales Representative, and this was when I finally became part of this great, ever-changing industry! 

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR? 

Hercules SLR presented me with an opportunity to move from Sales Manager at another branch to become Branch Manager at the newly-opened Hamilton, Ontario branch.

With responsibilities in both Operations and Sales, this was an excellent opportunity to grow in the rigging & lifting industry. 

Where have you traveled during your time at Hercules SLR, and where did you enjoy traveling to most?

With Hercules SLR, I’ve had various roles in our Ontario locations—Brampton, Hamilton, Sarnia and Sudbury, and several times to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia for meetings & training, which was the first time I’ve been to the East Coast.    

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

I hope to eventually visit all the branches and cities Hercules SLR has coast-to-coast! 

What’s something you’re most proud to have accomplished in your career at Hercules SLR?

Hercules SLR has helped me grow my career in operations, sales and travel. 

Did I mention when I was hired over 12 years ago as a Technical Sales Advisor, and had no technical experience in this industry? I had the drive to learn, train and ask for help, and now I’m confident in my title. 

Hercules SLR has also let me coach and lead other staff, which is so personally rewarding. I’m still learning to be the person I want to be at work, and most importantly, at home. 

What do you enjoy most about the securing, lifting and rigging industry?

I’ve been asked this several times and since I moved industries, what I’ve learned is it’s not about selling from a catalog or taking orders, it’s about making orders.

We have a sign that says ‘Value Added Service’ and it’s not just a poster on the wall. I’ve worked in the steel mill, marine, towers, quarries, forestry, windmills, assembly plants, mobile/tower cranes, construction sites, and they all need to move something, whether it’s building materials, furniture or parts.    

One thing I’ve enjoyed over the years is the customers and relationships I’ve built—They’re some of the most solid I can imagine. I’ve even kept in contact with some after they’ve retired! #notjustasalesguy. 

Give us some advice for people who work, or want to work in an industrial environment:

This industry has something for everyone, at every level, from work in the shop to manufacturing slings that move & lift the world, to inside sales, outside sales, rigger, inspector, trainer and operations. I could go on, but if someone wants to be a part of a team to help and partner with every other industry. 

Don’t miss out on rigging expertise at Hercules SLR—Join our Fundamentals of Rigging Course in Hamilton, Ontario and learn how to rig it right with Steve Hache and gain practical, hands-on experience. Learn more here, or e-mail sbohm@herculesslr.com or call (905) 790-3112


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TRAIN WITH THE BEST IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER, JIM CASE


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? DROP US A LINE, OR GIVE US A CALL!

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

EVENT: Rigger’s Rescue in Moncton & St. John NB

rigging clinic in new brunswick

THE DOCTOR IS IN: Rigger’s Rescue Clinic in New Brunswickrigging clinic with shackle

 

 

 

 

 

We’re spreading Rigger’s Rescue all over! Rigger’s Rescue is heading to St. John & Moncton, New Brunswick on July 17 and 18, from 10AM to 1PM—And the best part? It’s free.

Hercules SLR knows equipment, and we want to help you know yours! What can you expect at our Rigger’s Rescue events in New Brunswick? You will:

  • Learn if your equipment is safe to use
  • Learn how to accomplish difficult lifts & the equipment you’ll need to get it done
  • Have your all your equipment questions answered
  • Get help & advice with hoists, slings, hardware & more! 

Join our inspection experts and keep your equipment hard-working, healthy & ready to get you home safe.

Rigger’s Rescue is a drop-by event, so feel free to stop by anytime between 10am-1pm. 


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

WHAT DO RIGGERS DO OFFSHORE?

RISK MANAGEMENT: SAFETY IS EVERY RIGGER’S BUSINESS

WELCOME TO ONTARIO! BRAMPTON RIGGERS TALK CHAIN HOIST SAFETY


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? DROP US A LINE, OR GIVE US A CALL!

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Get Hooked: All About Clevis Grab & Slip Hooks, Eye Hooks & More

rigging hook title image

Get Hooked: All About Clevis Grab & Slip Hooks, Eye Hooks & More 

We’re hooked on hooks at Hercules SLR!

There are many different hooks used for towing, pulling, securing, lifting and rigging, and each type of hook comes with different openings, latches, sizes and more. Hooks are often used to create sling assemblies (particularly with chain), and are also used in various transport applications.

It can be difficult to remember them and what they’re used for, so Hercules SLR wants to make it easy—We’ve made this comprehensive hook guide to secure your hook know-all.

This hook guide will cover topics like what is a below-the-hook lifting device, some of the most often-used hooks for securing and rigging, including non-overhead hooks, overhead lifting hooks, transportation hooks, what the different hook & chain ‘grades’ mean, plus tips for maintenance, inspection, ASME hook standards, and more.

Ready to get hooked on rigging? Read on! 

What Exactly is a Below-the-Hook Lifting Device?

A below-the-hook lifting device is ‘any device used to connect a load to a hoist. The device may contain components such as slings, hooks, and rigging hardware…” A below-the-hook lifting device is a piece of equipment connected to a crane or other lifting device which grabs an item so it can be moved or secured to different place.

To that end, you might think that cranes and other lifting decides are known as “above-the-hook” lifting devices, however, they’re more often referred to as ‘overhead lifting devices’, and are rarely referred to as above-the-hook.

Clevis & Eye Hooks: What’s the Difference?

A clevis hook refers to a hook with a U-shaped attachment point or coupling with holes to thread a pin through and assemble your rigging—Many people like the removable pin to assemble and disassemble rigging quickly & easily. Clevis hooks are used for non-overhead applications.

You’ll likely hear the term ‘clevis’ used to describe other metal pieces of hardware with a clevis coupling. Hooks with clevis attachments can also be used for overhead lifts in many cases (Remember, they’ll be marked as Grade 80 or higher).

An eye hook (non-cradle grab & slip hook) is also used for non-overhead lifts, and is often used with tie-down equipment.

So, what’s the difference between eye hooks and clevis hooks? The attachment point/coupling. An eye hook has a rounded attachment point/coupling, unlike a clevis hook, which comes with a cotter pin to thread through the hole. Both can be used for overhead lifting, but are also often found alongside transportation securing and rigging set-ups. 

Rigger worker navigating with concrete slab lifted by crane hook at building site
Riggers securing a large crane hook onsite.

Non-Overhead Lifting

Transportation 

Grade 70 chain and hooks are typically used to secure loads for transportation applications. Grade 80 is being used more often, however Grade 70 continues to be a popular choice for securement.

Overhead Lifting

Securing, Lifting & Rigging

Rigging hardware is used to attach a load to the lifting point of a crane, and hooks are among some of the most popular rigging hardware.

EYE HOOK

  • There can be different kinds of eye hooks—Hooks typically are eye or clevis hooks, which refers to the hook’s point of attachment.

CLEVIS HOOK

  • A hook with a clevis coupling or attachment point (see above).

SWIVEL HOOK

  • A hook with a swiveling coupling or attachment point.

EYE/ EYE HOIST HOOK

  • Available in both carbon and alloy steel.

FOUNDRY HOOK

  • A foundry hook is a type of grab hook.

GRAB HOOK

  • A grab hook does not usually feature a safety latch. It’s important to note that like clevis and grab hooks, other types of hooks can be grab hooks. For example, foundry hooks are a type of grab hook.

SLIP HOOK

  • A slip hook has a wider throat than a grab hook, and does feature a safety latch.*

SORTING HOOKS

  • Sorting hooks have wide throat openings, which taper to a narrower basket. They have a slightly sharper tip than other hooks, and are used to quickly grab objects to lift. These are normally used in pairs, on steep angles.

* Safety latches are used to make sure the load stays connected under slack conditions. They’re not load-rated, and should never be placed under a Herculesload. Use hook latches unless unsafe to do so.

Hercules’ Hooks

We’ll help you rig it right. What are we hooked on at Hercules SLR? We carry:

  • EYE HOIST HOOKS
  • SWIVEL HOOKS
  • GRADE 80 WELD-ON BUCKET HOOKS
  • G-100 EYE SELF-LOCKING HOOK
  • G-100 CLEVIS SELF-LOCKING HOOK
  • G-100 SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOK WITH BRASS BUSHING
  • G-100 SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOK WITH BALL BEARING
  • G-100 CLEVIS SLING HOOK
  • G-100 EYE SLING HOOK
  • G-100 CLEVIS GRAB HOOK
  • G-100 ROUND SLING CONNECTOR
  • GRADE 100 ROUND SLING HOOK
  • G-100 GRAB HOOK
  • G-100 SWIVEL GRIP SELF-LOCKING HOOK
  • G-100 EYE FOUNDRY HOOK
  • ALLOY EYE HOIST HOOKS
  • ALLOY SWIVEL HOIST HOOK
  • …And, we have replacement load pin kits for Grade-100 Clevis Hooks. 

Hook Maintenance

When Should a Hook be Removed from Service?

According to ASME B30.10 standards, hooks should be removed from service when they are:

  • Missing/illegible hook manufacturer’s identification or secondary identification
  • Missing and/or illegible rated load identification
  • Excessive pitting or corrosion
  • Cracks, damage and/or gouges
  • Any wear that exceeds 10% (or as recommended by the manufacturer) of the original section dimension of the hook or its load pin
  • Any visible deformations—This includes any bends, twists or other abnormalities from the plane of the unbent hook
  • Any distortion that causes an increase in the throat opening of 5%, not to exceed 1/4″ (6mm), or as recommended by the manufacturer.
  •  Inability to lock or latch—If a hook has a safety latch, it must be able to close properly, or any self-locking hook that doesn’t lock.
  • Damage, missing or malfunctioning hook attachment and securing means

Hooks should be inspected before, during and after use by the user. Rigging hooks should also be inspected periodically, or as recommended by the manufacturer.

Non-destructive testing is often used to determine if there are defects, nicks, gouges or any other deformations in metal gear or hardware, like hooks.

Grade 70, 80, 100—What do they all mean?

When we talk about ‘grade’ in relation to hooks, we actually refer to the grade of the chain that will be used with the hook. Grade refers to the tensile or breaking strength of chain.

Sound good? Let’s get into it:

GRADE 70
Grade 70 chain
Grade 70 Chain.

NAME: Grade 70

PROPERTIES: Heat-treated carbon chain

INDUSTRIES: Transportation

APPLICATIONS: Use as a tie-down chain or transportation lashing.

DON’T DO THIS: Grade 70 chain is not meant for overhead lifting—Only use Grade 70 chain and hooks for tie-down and lashing applications.

FUN FACTS: You’ll likely hear Grade 70 chain called ‘trucker’s chain’. It usually has a gold-chromate coating that helps it resist corrosion, since their load is continuously exposed to the outdoor elements and things like salt from the highway also reduce their effectiveness. The gold colour also helps it remain visible for truckers.


GRADE 80

NAME: Grade 80

PROPERTIES: Heat-treated steel chain

INDUSTRIES: Rigging, material handling & some transportation.

APPLICATIONS: Grade 80 chain is the minimum grade for overhead lifts, and is also often used in applications like recovery, safety & towing. Grade 80 chain is also often used with hooks in transport for flat-bed trucking to secure heavy loads.

DON’T DO THIS: Don’t use Grade 80 chain and hooks that are specifically marked for tie-down application in an overhead lifting capacity. (Hercules SLR’s Overhead Lifting Chain is meant for overhead lifting applications).

FUN FACTS: Will have 8 or 800 to denote that it is a Grade 100 chain or hook. 


GRADE 100  

NAME: Grade 100

PROPERTIES: Alloy-steel chain

INDUSTRIES: Rigging & lifting—Mining, offshore, construction, material handling & maritime

APPLICATIONS: Sling component, popular for overhead lifts.

DON’T DO THIS: Use any hook to rig with—Use at least a Grade 100 hook with chain.

FUN FACTS: Will have 10 or 100 to denote that it is a Grade 100 chain or hook.


The More you Know

  • These are some of the most commonly-found hooks in rigging—Some unconventional, or less-commonly found hooks include foundry, claw, bucket, ‘S’ hooks, alloy-swivel, plate & sorting hooks. 
  • Lifting hooks are constructed with a minimum 5:1 safety factor.
  • Hooks should have a latch, or safety latch to connect the throat opening. This prevents load lines from disconnecting. Some overhead lifting devices may not have a safety latch or may have additional features that make using the latch impractical.
  • NDT or non-destructive testing is a good way to check for deformities and defects in metal gear like hooks. We can find abnormalities on the inside and the outside of your metal gear.
  • The load hook should be the weakest part of the lifting equipment.
  • The hook tip should point out, away from the load, with no slack present so the hook won’t tip-load.

FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

HERC HOW-TO: ASSEMBLE A CHAIN SLING

CROSBY QUIZ: CAN YOU PASS THIS HOOK INSPECTION QUIZ?

CHAIN SLING INSPECTION: 5 STEPS FOR IN-DEPTH INSPECTION FROM CM


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? DROP US A LINE, OR GIVE US A CALL!

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Learn to Rig it Right in Hamilton, ON: Meet Trainer Steve Hache

hercuels slr rigging trainer steve hache

Meet your Hercules SLR Trainer, Steve Hache CD

Get ready for our first-ever two-day training course, ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ at Hercules SLR in Hamilton, Ontario.

Time to meet the teacher—Steve Hache, CD is one of our experience Training Specialists and will lead the Fundamentals of Rigging course. We sit down with Steve to talk more about his role and why he decided to enter training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background:

Steve: It was a dream of mine to pursue a career in the Canadian Armed Forces so, I joined the Royal Canadian Navy (RNC) when I was 19 years-old. I spent 21 years of dedicated service in the RCN, trained and became qualified in a number of technical aspects that range from complex seamanship evolutions, boarding operations, crane operations, forklift operation, small arms, to rigging and hoisting.

After this, I worked in the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC—One of the most recognized colleges in the East Coast) faculty and was introduced to the adult education field. I had an interest in safety, so I earned my diploma in Adult Education-Teaching, Learning and went on to complete the Construction Safety Supervisor certification through the Nova Scotia Construction Safety Association.

steve hache, hercules slr trainer
Steve Hache, CD.

In my professional career, I continue to learn—Some of the most memorable experiences were training in the United Arab Emirates in course design at HBI Learning Centers in Sydney, Australia and Adult Education & Assessment at the Global Maritime & Transportation School in New York, USA.  

What made you decide to go into this industry?

I was most accustomed to the safety, rigging & hoisting industries, since there were constant opportunities to operate cranes, forklifts or perform rigging & hoisting operations in the RCN.

Nearly everyday, we removed or replaced machinery from engineering spaces, load or unload missiles, torpedoes, stores and operate cranes—Rigging and hoisting was routine.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Steve: When I retired from the RCN, I accepted a job at an American security company in the United Arab Emirates. There, I was exposed to a new, exciting culture and got to train their Coast Guard in seamanship, basic boat operations, tactical boat operations and maritime law enforcement.

This was an extremely challenging and rewarding experience!

After a couple of years in the UAE, I came home—This was when I joined the faculty as NSCC. I took a temporary position at NSSC as faculty of the Marine-Industrial Rigging program. There, I turned a part-time program into a full-time program. The faculty and staff of NSCC were first-rate! I learned a great deal from each person.

When the temporary position ended, I worked as a training manager and Fall Protection Trainer where I learned & honed my training skills even more. Then came Hercules SLR—The rest is history!

What made you want to transition into training?

Steve: It wasn’t difficult for me to speak to large groups of people, since I’ve been doing it since I entered the workforce—In the military, I had to brief, command on and supervise complex seaman evolutions along with rigging & boat operations.

However, teaching and training didn’t always come naturally. My first role as a trainer in the RCN where I was posted to the Bedford Rifle Range as a small arms instructor. I was nervous at first, but I grew to love it—Who knew I enjoyed speaking in front of people?!

Since, my career has always involved speaking tolarge groups of people, which is a must-have skill for a trainer.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?LEEA Header

Steve: That’s easy – I have always appreciated the staff at Hercules SLR. When I was faculty at NSCC, they consistently treated myself and any student that I sent their way with the utmost respect and care. The program work terms that the students completed were extremely beneficial to them and also ended up with employment for a number of them. We developed and maintained a positive working relationship. 

Is there anything you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry? 

Steve: I hope to take more LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association) courses to further my knowledge —It’s important to never stop learning. However, my main focus is to continue to contribute to today’s safety culture.


FIND MORE INFORMATION ON THE ‘FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING’ COURSE AT HERCULES SLR IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO

LEARN TO RIG IT RIGHT


TRAIN WITH THE BEST AT HERCULES SLR. CONTACT SHERRY BOHM TO LEARN MORE OR SIGN UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

rigging course, fundamentals of rigging in hamilton ontario

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

Learn the skills to life safely, securely & efficiently at the Rigging Fundamentals course at Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario on July 15 and 16 from 8:30am to 4:30pm. 

Join our all-day, LEEA-accredited course with lifting & rigging expert Trainer Steve Hache and learn the fundamental skills of rigging to perform work in the marine, entertainment, construction, oil or transportation industry. 

Rigging is an excellent career or skill if you’re interested in mechanics & how things work, working in a variety of different locations on different machinery and keeping others safe & secure. 

At the Hercules SLR ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ Training Course, you’ll learn:  

  • Regulations and standards relevant in Canada & North America 
  • Risk assessment & management 
  • How to create and execute a rigging plan 
  • How to calculate load weight 
  • What is the rigging triangle
  • How to find the centre of gravity and calculate sling angles 
  • Pre-use inspection
  • How to communicate on a rigging site (I.E. radio, hand signals, etc.) 
  • Learn about and how to use rigging equipment like slings, hitches, hardware and hooks

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU EXPECT AT THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE?

fundamentals of rigging in hamilton, ontario
Couse outline—Click here. 

GET TO KNOW YOUR HERUCLES SLR TRAINER:

MEET STEVE HACHE, CD


TRAIN WITH THE BEST!

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SIGN-UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE CALL OR EMAIL SHERRY BOHM, CSR: 

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

ISO and Road Vehicles

roads and transportation at night

ISO AND ROAD VEHICLES iso and road vehicles statistics

DID YOU KNOW? Anyone who has driven a road vehicle of almost any make, almost anywhere in the world, will have directly benefitted from ISO 2575, which specifies the familiar symbols for controls and indicators we are accustomed to seeing on the dashboard. 

Who benefits from ISO standards for road vehicles? 

We’ve discussed ISO and energy, construction, the supply chain and we’ve debunked some myths – But what about ISO and road vehicles? Read on to learn why ISO and your vehicle are so important. 

Consumers 

ISO standards make driving a vehicle simpler and safer, while protecting passengers (especially children) and pedestrians, and lower the cost of buying vehicles.

Regulators

ISO standards gives technical basis for regularly reviewed & improved legislation on things like safety and pollution. 

Manufacturers 

ISO Standards give specifications for safety, quality, performance and environmental impact. They set out harmonized requirements that enable outsourcing, fair competition, the participation of suppliers from developing countries and drive down costs as they facilitate competitive tendering. 

What do ISO Standards for road vehicles cover? 

iso and road vehicles

 

 

 

 

 

Much of the work in these areas is the focus of the ISO technical committee, called ISO/TC 22, Road Vehicles, which has developed more than 820 standards & updates worldwide. The committee’s made of 75 different participating and observing national standards bodies, as well as automotive-sector associations and international bodies such as the World Health Organization.

These standards aim to: 

  • Improve compatibility, interchangeability and safety
  • Specify the requirements for harmonized test procedures to evaluate performance.  

iso and road vehicles

Why do we need ISO standards for road vehicles?

why we need ISO standards for road vehicles

Electric Vehicles 

ISO/TC 22 Road vehicles has also developed a range of standards specifically for electric, hybrid and fuel-cell road vehicles. A number of these provide requirements for functional safety, test methods, on-board energy storage systems and measuring fuel consumption.

ISO 17409 Electrically Propelled road vehicles connection to an external electric power supply—Safety requirements 

ISO 234741, Hybrid-electric road vehicles exhaust emissions and fuel consumption measurements—Part 1: Non-externally charged vehicles. 

Intelligent Transport Systems 

Increasingly, road vehicles are being equipped with systems and networks based on information and communication technologies intended to improve safety, traffic control, navigation, fee collection and identification. Today’s communication capabilities give vehicles the potential to anticipate and avoid collisions, transmit their position to emergency services in case of an accident, navigate the quickest route to their destination, take advantage of up-to-the-minute traffic reports, identify the nearest available parking space, minimize their carbon emissions and provide multimedia communications.

ISO/TC 204,Intelligent transport systems focuses mainly on this area and has developed more than 220 standards*. 

*These include the ISO 15638 series on telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) and ISO 11067, which gives performance requirements and test procedures for curve speed warning systems (CSWS).

Tyres and Other Components 

ISO/TX 3, Tyres, rims and valves has developed 78 standards, including the ISO 4000 series on passenger car tyres and rims and the ISO 4249 series on motorcycle tyres and rims. 

Road Safety

ISO 39001, Road traffic safety (RTS) management systems—Requirements with guidance for use, developed by ISO/TC 241, road traffic safety managementis widely regarded as a major contribution to the United Nations’ Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. 

Future ISO 39002, Good practices for implementing commuting safety management, aims to reduce the amount of fatalities and severity of injuries caused by road accidents, by providing solutions and recommending measures that organizations can use to protect their staff.

 Road-safety-related standards are also developed by other ISO technical committees, for example to make crossing the street safer for disabled persons. 

Vehicle Safety

With the latest technological progress bringing us everything from advanced navigation systems to driverless cars, putting measures in place to spot potential risks across the whole vehicle lifespan is more important than ever.

ISO 26262 (series), Road vehicles—Functional safety, outlines an automotive-specific risk-based approach to help avoid any potential system failures. 

Looking Forward

Cyber Security 

A quick look at your dashboard will give you an idea of how connected vehicles are – and it is only increasing. From your GPS to other gauges and sensors telling you when your tyre pressure is low, there is constant interaction between in-vehicle embedded systems that communicate wirelessly. As this interconnectivity grows, so does the risk of cyber-attacks, threatening not only our safety but our personal information. Work has recently started on standards to address these issues by providing recommendations and solutions for building cyber security into vehicles

Hydrogen Vehicle Stations

If fuel-cell, electric and alternative-fuel vehicles are the future, there need to be adequate stations for refuelling them.

A new technical specification, ISO/TX 19880-1, Gaseous hydrogen—Fuelling stations—Part:1 General requirements, will contribute to the proliferation of hydrogen fuelling stations by providing important guidelines on their safety and performance. It covers everything from hydrogen production and delivery, to compression, storage and fuelling of a hydrogen vehicle, and provides a useful stepping stone to an International Standard in this area, due to be published in 2017.  

This article originally appears on iso.org


CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS FOR RELATED READING:

STUCK IN A TIGHT SPOT? WHAT TO KNOW IN A CONFINED SPACE

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK | WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES REPAIRS, INSPECTIONS & MAINTENANCE FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1 (877) 461-4876  


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Forklift Driving | Training Tuesday

forklift operator driving in warehouse

FORKLIFT DRIVING

Forklift driving takes a lot more than just lifting and moving materials – Forklift operators should have an understanding of safety & balance, to keep materials, themselves and others safe. One of the biggest risks forklift drivers face is tipping-over. According to OSHA, approximately 25% of forklift fatalities were from tip-over incidents. 

Yes, it might seem basic, but it’s important to recognize the forklift’s centre of gravity and stability triangle. In this blog, we’ll discuss tips to keep you balanced and everything else you need to know to stay safe in, out and around the forklift.

This Training Tuesday, we’ll cover:

  • Some of the biggest safety risks associated with balance and the most common type of forklift
  • Forklift centre of gravity & the stability triangle
  • Other factors that contribute to forklift accidents and tip-overs 
  • How to conduct visual & operational forklift inspections 
  • Safety tips to remain balanced & safe while driving a forklift

There are four main potential safety risks considering balance and forklift driving. These are:

  1. How likely the forklift is to tip-over forward;
  2. How likely the forklift is to tip-over on its side;
  3. Maximum braking-level (or stopping distance) the forklift can perform;
  4. Maximum level of reversed-acceleration the forklift can perform. 

In Canada, counter-balanced forklifts are one of the most often-seen types of forklift. 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

As we mentioned earlier, a counterbalance forklift has three ways it can tip—forward, or sideways, on the left or right

While driving a forklift, it’s important to maintain its centre of gravity. The centre of gravity lives within the stability triangle

Centre of gravity is defined as the point within the triangle where the bulk of the mass is located. Although we don’t recommend trying it out, the centre of gravity is also the point where the forklift could balance. Again—Take don’t try this one out, we recommend taking our word for it. 

Calculating the forklifts’ centre of gravity is complex (and unnecessary for daily use), but there are a few important things to understand in order to remain balanced as you operate the forklift. 

When the forklift is stationary, it won’t tip as the force is on the centre, but tilts forward when force is applied to the front tines (also called forks) or its back. It’s also worth noting that a forklift is more likely to tip sideways, than forwards. Therefore, adding a load to the front forks decreases the chance the forklift will tip on its side.   

Alternatively, lifting the forks on the truck with a load will cause the forklifts stability to decrease on all sides.

The diagram below shows the stability triangle. 

forklift driving stability triangle diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | WHAT ELSE CONTRIBUTES TO ACCIDENTS? 

Like we mentioned, some types of loads are more likely to cause your forklift to tip. Here are some features of a load that create hazards: 

  • Awkwardly stacked or piled in a way that causes instability
  • Unmaintained pallets 
  • Load is too heavy or blocks the operators vision 

Here are some of the features of a forklift that contribute to forklift accidents, like tip-overs:

  • Faulty steering, brakes, clutch, transmission or mast assembly 
  • Inadequate or malfunctioning safety devices
  • Forklift emissions
  • Poorly organized controls and displays on the forklift 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | SAFETY TIPS

To help maintain centre of gravity, here are a few tips to help you stay stable while operating a forklift with a load: 

  • Don’t distribute load unevenly on the forks, this will increase the frequency of sideways tip-over 
  • Don’t load the forklift beyond its WLL, this will make the forklift prone to tipping 
  • Be sure to move the load all the way to the back of the forks 

What are some risk factors of work design that contribute to forklift accidents?:

  • Stress or increased speed 
  • Not using the correct tools, attachments and/or hardware 
  • Incompetent operator, or improper forklift assigned
  • Badly serviced, unmaintained and/or aging forklift(s)
  • Lack of training for workers/operators 
  • Poor work layout for travel

Here are some risk factors while operating the forklift that contribute to accidents: 

  • Driving at high speeds
  • Driving with an elevated load 
  • Improper parking, reversal, turning, braking or acceleration with forklift  
  • Poor communication and/or warnings for nearby personnel
  • Blocking wheels on semi-trailers of railway car improperly 

If you’re operating a forklift, you should never

  • Drive a forklift without any capacity ratings listed
  • Travel in a forklift with a load raised more than 4inches 
  • Leave truck alone while running, or with a load 
  • Let unauthorized personnel operate a forklift (We’ve all seen the episode of The Office where Michael operates the forklift? Okay, good.) 
  • Attempt to adjust the load from the operating cab
  • Raise a load extending over the load backrest, unless no part of the load can slide back toward the operator 
  • Use pallets with forks as a make-shift elevated work platform (it’s more common than you think!) 
  • Let personnel stand/walk under any elevated part of the forklift 

It’s important to communicate potential hazards for everyone working in a space where forklifts are found, and use proper signals to keep yourself and others safe. Here are some more tips to help keep others safe while driving a forklift: 

  • Restrict access to areas where forklifts are used (and create procedures to keep work safe when they must enter spaces where forklifts operate) 
  • OR, create designated walkways or travelling paths to separate pedestrians from forklifts 
  • Pedestrians should always let the forklift driver know when they’re in the area—Eye contact is a simple way to make your presence know
  • Keep the area, particular the travelling path free from obstacles and ensure it’s well-lit 
  • Be careful when driving around sharp/blind corners, doorways and narrow aisles. Honk your forklift horn at intersections.
  •  Wear hi-vis clothing & PPE
  • Load the forks so your line of vision is clear
  • Avoid driving the forklift near people-heavy areas
  • Don’t walk under or near forks

FORKLIFT DRIVING | INSPECTION

A forklift operator should inspect their forklift daily, at the beginning of each shift and before each use. 

The operator should do a visual circle-check of the forklift (a walk-around) and an operational pre-use check. What do these involve?  

During a visual inspection before use, the operator should: 

  • General condition/cleanliness (this includes the forklift and surrounding floor & overhead work areas)
  • Ensure a charged fire extinguisher is nearby 
  • Make sure engine oil, fuel and radiator fluid levels are correct 
  • Establish that the propane tank’s fuel-tank mounting system, fuel-tank position pin, propane relief valves and hose are in good condition
  • Make sure the battery is fully-charged, there are no exposed wires, plug connections are in good condition, vent caps are clear, electrolyte levels in cells are acceptable and are in-place with hold-downs or brackets 
  • See that bolts, nuts, guards, chains or hydraulic hose reels are not damaged, disconnected or missing
  • Check for wear, damage and air-pressure (pneumatic tires) in wheels & tires 
  • Ensure forks/tines are not bent or chipped and are level & properly positioned—Also check that positioning latches and carriage teeth aren’t broken or worn 
  • Make sure chain anchor pins aren’t worn, loose or bent 
  • Make sure there are no fluid leaks, damp spots or drips 
  • Ensure hoses are secured and not loose, crimped or worn
  • Check for grease & debris in operator compartment
  • Make sure the seatbelt fastens & works properly
  • Guards: Ensure guards, overhead guards and roll-over protection structure (ROPS) are secure & undamaged 

During a pre-operational inspection, the forklift operator should check: 

  • FOOT & PARKING BRAKE: Ensure pedal holds & unit stops smoothly, and brake holds against slight acceleration
  • DEADMAN SEAT BRAKE: Make sure it holds when operator rises from seat
  • CLUTCH & GEARSHIFT: Make sure they shift smoothly, and don’t jump or snag
  • DASH CONTROL PANEL: Check that all lights & gauges are operational
  • HORN: Make sure the horn sounds loudly enough to be heard over work
  • BACK-UP: Make sure the reverse alarm and other warning devices work properly
  • LIGHTS: Ensure headlights and warning lights function properly
  • STEERING: Make sure the steering-wheel works smoothly
  • LIFT MECHANISM: Make sure they operate smoothly—You can check by lifting forks to their maximum height, then lowering them completely
  • TILT MECHANISM: Make sure the tilt mechanism works properly & holds the load—You can check by tilting the mast forward and backwards completely. 
  • CYLINDERS & HOSES: Check these last and make sure they’re not leaking after doing these checks.
  • BE SURE TO LISTEN FOR UNUSUAL SOUNDS/NOISES! 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CONCLUSION

There are many work-related issues that contribute to forklift driving, safety & general operation.

Ensure you conduct the three types of inspections we cover in this blog, be mindful of the forklift’s stability triangle & forks, keep travel slow, steady & free from obstacles to ensure your safety and others around you—And never let someone drive the forklift without proper training, or who hasn’t been designated.  


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES RIGGING EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR ARTICLES RELATED TO FORKLIFT DRIVING,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

FORKLIFT SAFETY: TOP TIPS FOR A SAFE WORKPLACE

WAREHOUSE WOW: HOW OUR DISTRIBUTION CENTRE LEADS THE INDUSTRY

WAREHOUSE SAFETY: 8 STEPS TO TAKE AFTER A RACKING ACCIDENT


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com