Product Spotlight: YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks

yoke swivel self-locking hooks blog header

Product Spotlight: YOKE Rigging Hardware 

Concerned about price, quality & reliability? Choose YOKE, and get all three without making a sacrifice. YOKE swivels are manufactured with the highest grade materials, and are zinc-plated for corrosion resistance and a long life.

WHY USE SWIVEL HOOKS?

Swivel hooks come in two varieties. These are:

  • Positioning Hooks allow the rigger to align the hook while connecting to the load. These hooks aren’t meant to rotate while under load, only to position the hook to the pick point.
  • True Swivel Hooks with Bushings allow the hook to rotate freely under the load, while the top coupling/fitting pivots to let the load rotate. This helps prevents your line twisting.

Swivels should be used when the lift deals with these issues:

  • Swivels reduce bending loads on rigging attachments to allow the load to position itself freely.
  • Swivels should be used in place of shackles during applications where the shackle might twist and might be haphazardly loaded.

FYI: Before you lift a load, make sure there are not cracks or defects in the hook or latch, and that the chain or wire rope is not worn, and in good working order. Not all hooks are meant to overhead lift and not all swivels are meant to swivel under-load—It’s important to know which application the one you use is meant for.

YOKE SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOKS yoke sorting hooks

Today, the Hercules SLR product spotlight is on YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks and some of the lifting products from them we like the best. Read on to learn more about YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hook specifications, tips for use and which applications to use swivel self-locking hooks for.

YOKE SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOK WITH BUSHING

YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks with Bronze Bushing(s) perform a full-swivel under-load. YOKE’s bronze bushings are a bearing consisting of a thin sleeve, used to help the hook rotate or swivel before you lift—Not while it supports a load.

Design factor of 4:1, proof-tested and certified. These hooks are meant for positioning devices, and are not meant to rotate while suspending a load.

Available for Grade 80 Lifting Chain in sizes: 7/32″, 1/4—5/16″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 5/8″, 3/4″, 7/8,” 1″ and Working Load Limits: 2,500lbs, 4,500lbs, 7,100lbs, 12,000lbs, 18,100lbs, 28,300lbs, 34,200lbs and 47,700lbs.

YOKE G-80 & G-100 SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOKS WITH BEARING 

YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hook with Bearing(s) are an excellent choice for lifting and perform a full swivel under-load. Designed with a 4:1 safety factor, and Working Load Limits: 7/32″, 1/4—5/16″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 5/8″, 3/4″, 7/8″ and 1″.

Available for Grade 80 Lifting Chain in sizes: 2,500lbs, 4,500lbs, 7,100lbs, 12,000lbs, 18,100lbs, 28,300lbs, 34,200lbs, 47,700lbs. Available for Grade 100 chain in sizes: 6, 7.8, 10, 13, 16, 20, 22, 26mm. Designed with a 4:1 safety factor, and for Working Load Limits: 1.4, 2.5, 4.0, 6.7, 10.0, 16.0, 19.0 and 26.5 tonnes.

YOKE G-80 SWIVEL EYE SELF-LOCKING HOOKS WITH BEARING 

YOKE Swivel Hooks are also available with an eye attachment. Available for Grade 80 Chain in sizes 7/32″, 1/4-5/16″, 3/8″, 1/2″, 5/8″, 3/4″, 7/8″, 1″ and 1-1/8″. Designed with a 4:1 safety factor, and for Working Load Limits: 2,500lbs, 4,500lbs, 7,100lbs, 12,000lbs, 18,100lbs, 28,300lbs, 34,200lbs, 47,700lbs.

WHICH INDUSTRIES USE YOKE SWIVEL SELF-LOCKING HOOKS?

Swivel self-locking hooks should only be used to swivel under-load if they’re fit with a bearing and are approved by the manufacturer overhead lifting. Swivel self-locking hooks are generally known as positioning hooks, since they rotate which makes connecting the rigging to the load much easier.

Industries that use YOKE Swivel Self-Locking Hooks, include:

  • Automotive
  • Construction
  • Mining
  • Manufacturing
  • Machining
  • Transportation

NEED A QUOTE? HAVE A QUESTION? CALL US—WE KNOW THE (WIRE) ROPES & EVERYTHING RIGGING-RELATED.   

Grip Safe Locking Hook by Yoke gets Safety Boost

yoke grip safe locking hook x-95x series

Product Feature: YOKE Grip Safe Locking Hook Offers Safe Rigging 

Feature found on X-950-10 and X-951-10 Yoke Grip-Safe Locking Hooks.

Riggers in the field instantly recognize the safety features of the YOKE Grip Safe hooks for hoisting and rigging applications.

What makes the Yoke Grip Safe Locking Hook so good? Its ergonomically-designed handle is meant specifically for bulky, gloved hands, and a smoother trigger design made complete with a simple push-button that opens the mechanism—This helps operators avoid any potential finger or hand injuries other hooks cause when used for overhead lifting operations.

The unique design handle of the Grip Safe hook maintains the integrity, warranty and certification that may not always be available from other retrofit designs. The handle is designed as part of the overall forging so requires no complicated or expensive retro fit by the operator.

Grip safe hooks come in range of designs and sizes, including:

  • Eye type
  • Clevis type
  • Swivel type
  • 10mm through 22mm (4t – 19t WLL).

When YOKE says, “Safety is our first priority”, they mean it. 


Hercules SLR provides any rigging or hoisting solution your business, project or facility needs.

For quotes, or to for more information on Yoke Grip Safe Locking Hooks, email us at info@herculesslr.com or call us at 1 (877) 461-4876


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. Hercules SLR provides securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining, marine industries and more.

Hercules Group of Companies is made of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

CROSBY QUIZ: Can you Pass this Hook Inspection Quiz?

crosby quiz, hoist hook inspection at hercules slr

CROSBY HOOK HOIST INSPECTION

TAKE THE CROSBY QUIZ

So you think you know how to inspect a hoist hook? Prove it. Take the Crosby Quiz and find out if you’re a  pro at inspecting hooks for hoisting, or if you should get some more training. 

It’s important to know what makes a hook no longer safe to use – there are a number of factors that contribute to this, and aren’t always glaringly obvious like it being broken or crooked.

Hooks that don’t pass inspection can cause the load to release, and this can result in damaged materials, injured workers or legal consequences. It’s important to conduct inspections before you use the sling – each time

Take the Quiz from Crosby and find out if you’re a hook inspection pro, or if you have a bit more to learn. 

Wear in the area indicated is limited to _____?

The Crosby Group.®
Correct! Wrong!

Wear in the circled areas is limited to _____ of cross sectional area?

The Crosby Group.®
Correct! Wrong!

Wear in the areas indicated are limited to _____ of cross sectional area?

Per ASME B30.10, you should remove any hook from service with a throat opening that's increased by _____. Or, as the manufacturer recommends.

The Crosby Group.®
Correct! Wrong!

According to ASME B30.10, if a hook has _____ twist, remove the hook from service immediately.

Correct! Wrong!

This hook should be removed from service, because:

Correct! Wrong!

ASME B30.10 gives rejection criteria for hoist hooks - this includes:

Correct! Wrong!

CROSBY QUIZ: So you think you can Inspect a Hoist Hook?
100%
Wow, are you a LEEA certified inspector?! You know exactly when a hoist hook should be removed from service.
83%
Wow, you're good - almost an expert! A little hands-on experience will help make you even better.
67%
So close - you're almost there! A little rigging, and you'll be an expert in no time.
50%
Not quite a fail, but not quite a pass either... You definitely have some work to do! You definitely don't have your ASME B30 standards memorized, but with a little work and training, you'll get there.
33%
Yikes... Only 2 correct. Hopefully you're not responsible for rigging or inspecting hoists!
17%
Only 1 right... Please tell us you're not a rigger. Time for training!
0%
None right. Head back to rigging school!

Share your Results:


ASME STANDARDS

There are ASME Standards that apply to rigging, and more specifically, hooks for lifting. Although they’re not law themselves, these standards are important to know as they’re directly quoted in Canadian legislation. Be sure to check the manufacturer warnings, usage instructions and other recommendations that may apply to the equipment you’re using. 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION VIA THE CROSBY GROUP.

 

 


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events. 

Guest Blog: Crosby Talks Forged Wire Rope Clips VS. Malleable Cast Iron Clips

crosby wire rope clips at hercules slr

FORGED STEEL WIRE ROPE CLIPS VS. MALLEABLE CAST IRON CLIPS

What’s the difference between wire rope clips? Guest blogger Danny Bishop, Director of Training for Crosby stopped by Hercules SLR is here to share some information about the difference between malleable cast iron and forged U-Bolt clips.

Read on to discover his expert tips for rigging with U-Bolts. 

 

crosby rigging, hercules slr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U-Bolt style wire rope clips are one of the most commonly used accessories in the world of rigging. They can be found in many lifting and non-lifting applications.

Some common applications include winch lines, crane hoist lines, suspension cables, barrier cables, guy wires and many more applications. However, it is critical that the user know there are differences between a forged steel wire rope clip and a malleable cast iron clip.

The forged steel wire rope clip consists of a U-Bolt, two nuts and a forged steel base, which is sometimes called the saddle.

The malleable cast iron U-Bolt style wire rope clip consists of the same components as just mentioned except the clip base is NOT forged steel. In fact, it is a malleable cast iron, and that can make a big difference in the performance and reliability of the clip. The malleable cast iron base does not have the desirable material properties of steel, or the beneficial grain structure that a forged base provides. Although, malleable cast iron products have their place in industry, it is not the manufacturing process of choice for wire rope clip bases. This is especially true if the wire rope clip could be used in a critical application.

Notice that some standards do not allow the use of malleable cast iron clips in critical applications. One example would be ASME B30.5 which states that “Wire Rope Clips shall be drop-forged steel of single saddle (U-Bolt) or double saddle clip. Malleable cast iron clips shall not be used. “ASME B30.26 also states: “Saddles shall be forged steel.”

Additionally, shortcuts in the production process of the bases may also indicate there could be other shortcomings of the product. In some recent testing of malleable cast iron clips, it was found that U-Bolts fractured prior to achieving the recommended forged U-Bolt Clip torque, on 2/3 of the assemblies tested. (See picture of test mentioned).

Also consider:

  • Malleable Cast Iron Clip bases are significantly different from forged bases in size, shape and appearance. See figure 1 to compare a Crosby forged clip base and a Malleable Cast Iron clip, both for ½” wire rope. 
  • Malleable Cast Iron bases are inconsistent in strength, and can have hidden defects. 
  • Malleable Cast Iron clips should not be used for critical applications.
wire rope clips, hercules slr rigging services
Figure 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

crosby wire rope clips at hercules slr

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note the significant difference in size, shape and appearance even though both are 1/2″ diameter for wire rope. Also, the Crosby clip exceeds ASME B30.26 marking requirements. No readable markings were found on the malleable cast iron clip. 

HERCULES SLR: CROSBY BRAND


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Shackles: A Hercules Hardware How-To

shackles-hercules-rigging

Shackles are typically used as connection points for lifting equipment in many securing and rigging applications.

The type of shackle you use will depend on the lifting operation—Each has a slightly different design to suit them to various functions. There are three main types of shackles typically used for lifting applications:

  1. Dee
  2. Bow (commonly known as an anchor shackle)
  3. Screw Pin (commonly known as a grab)
    shackles-d-shackle-hercules-rigging
    D-Shackle
Dee Shackle
shackles-screw-pin-shackle
Screw pin shackle with cotter/split pin

Dee shackles are mostly used for single-point lifting.

Bow Shackle
shackles-bow-shackle
Bow Shackle

Bow Shackles are designed to be used to carry out multi-point lifts.

Screw Pin/Grab Shackle

Screw Pin or Grab Shackles are used when the shackle is required to pass through an opening, like a pipe or over an object. It is designed with a countersunk pin to facilitate this.

  • Used where a shackle is removed on a regular basis
  • When fitted, the pin must engage with the shackle body and tighten fully
  • Screw pins can be moussed in place for long-term applications, or when there’s a risk of the pin backing out due to vibration, etc. Confirm with your supervisor to make sure this is accepted on your worksite.
Bolt Types: Nut, Bolt and Cotter Pins
  • The bolt type pin (bolt, nut or cotter) is used when a load is permanent or semi-permanent.
  • This requires the rigger to insert a split pin, which captivates the nut on the pin.
  • If fitted correctly, the pin will rotate freely within the shackle body.
Round Pins

The round pin is commonly use for tie-down, suspension, towing and straight line lifting only. Don’t use round pins with multiple slings or where side loading may occur.

Pin Sizing
  • A shackle will be sized from the diameter of the bow, not pin.
  • A pin of a shackle is usually one size larger than the bow to achieve the strength of the bow. Consider this when you order a shackle for specific jobs, like a lifting lug.
Pin Replacement

Never replace a shackle’s pin with:

  • A bolt
  • A differently branded pin
  • An incorrect pin size

Angular Loading

  • Do not exceed included angle of 120° when rigging with shackles and multiple slings.
  • Apply reductions in WLL when you use shackles loaded at angles

Specialty Shackles

Round and web sling shackles that are used with synthetic slings look slightly different.

  • Wide body shackles have a larger D/d ratio for the sling, and improve the life and efficiency of the sling.
  • ROV or remotely operated vehicle shackles are painted bright yellow or white so they are visible in dark waters, the pin is also easier to access with a ROV.
  • Web sling shackles are wider and bow out in the middle
  • Round sling shackles are narrow and sometimes have tiny valleys in the bow of the shackle so the strands are better supported.

How-To: Your Pre-Use Check

Before you use your shackle, you must inspect the following on all shackles:

  • Markings are present, correct and legible including: manufacturer, working load limit (WLL), size, grade/material type
  • The correct pin is fitted
  • No visible signs of damage to the body or pin like nicks, gouges, deformations, stretch, bends, corrosion, etc.
  • No evidence of misuse

In addition to your pre-use check, be sure to avoid swing loading and shock loading, secure sling legs not in use, never leave a load suspended—or walk under it.

How it’s Made

Lifting shackles are manufactured using the drop-forge process.

The drop forge process involves a steel rod hammered with a large ‘drop’ hammer, and a die is fitted to it. This die has the upper impression of a shackle cut into it and this shape imprints on the steel rod. A fixed die has the lower impression of the shackle.

The forged shackle is heated then treated—this ensures a uniform structure and gives the shackle it’s desired uniform thickness.


Blogs

For more on shackles, check out our blogs below:


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Beam Clamp Applications: safety tips from Brampton, ON

Rigging

Beam clamp applications provide support and better load control. Today, we spoke with rigging experts from Brampton, Ontario to learn more about the three main types of beam clamps—they spoke with us about safe tips for use and how to inspect your beam clamp before application.

Beam clamps: 3 different types

There are three different types of beam clamps:

  1. Scissor type
  2. Adjustable type with fixed jaw
  3. Adjustable type with swivel jaw

1. Beam clamps: scissor type

While not the most popular type of clamp, the scissor beam clamp is still one of the basic types of clamp, and is ideal for lifting applications. It uses scissor action to manipulate the weight of the load to apply clamping load. It’s clamping jaws are rougher, which helps to dig into the load and form a better grip.

Before use, be sure to check its condition—assess the pivot bolt, wear and deformation and check the SWL, identification and use of beam to be used on.

2. Beam Clamps: adjustable type (fixed jaw)

Before use, check the tommy bar, screw thread and screw spigot for wear and deformation. Check SWL and identification, and also check for general condition.

3. Beam Clamps: adjustable type (swivel jaw)

Before use, be sure to check the swivel jaws and ensure they move freely, check the SWL and identification and the tommy bar, screw thread and screw spigot for wear and deformation.

Beam clamp applications: inspect before use!

Before using your beam clamps, be sure to follow these pre-use inspection tips:

  1. Check SWL, Identification no. and colour code
  2. Check SWL of the clamp’s within the weight of the load to lift;
  3. Check the clamp is the correct size for the beam;
  4.  Thoroughly examine the clamp for wear, damage and deterioration—particularly at the hinge and shackle attachment points;
  5. Ensure the screw thread is in good condition—this means it’s not bent and rotates freely;
  6. Check the tommy handle for damage and distortion;
  7. Check jaws for damage, distortion and ensure the swivel type is free to rotate;
  8. Ensure screwed spigots aren’t damaged, distorted or worn excessively.
beam-clamp-applications-bronze-and-blue-hercules-slr
Hercules SLR Bronze & Blue Beam Clamp

Beam clamp applications: more tips for safe usage

  • Don’t exceed the SWL of beam clamp;
  • Don’t exceed SWL of beam that the clamp’s secured to;
  • Make sure the beam clamp is correctly and securely clamped to the beam and the centre line of the clamp suspension point is in alignment with the centre line of beam;
  • Contact the beam clamp supplier before replacing bolts—this could lead to the wrong screw being fitted and may cause damage to the beam clamp;
  • Ensure you’re using a certified beam clamp;
  • Ensure a competent person is applying the beam clamp—a “competent worker or person” is defined differently in each province according to OH&S rules. British Columbia and Quebec are the only two provinces which don’t formally define what a “competent worker/person” is. Click here for the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety’s definitions of “competent” in each province or territory.
  • If using two clamps in tandem, you may need to use ancillary equipment, like a spreader bar;
  • Use beam clamps for vertical lifts only. (See ‘side loading’ below).

Bronze & Blue Specifications

Beam clamp applications: side loading

Standard beam clamps are designed for in-line use only. If the ID plate says to use the clamp at 0° only, do not use side-loading—use the angle that’s permitted. Beam clamps that are suitable for side loading are fairly new to the lifting industry—the IPU10 and IPU10S by Crosby, for example are meant to lift in any direction. View the Crosby IPU10 flyer and its specs here.

Universal beam clamps can be used as an anchor point to lift and pull, load at any angle up to 90° without lateral and longitudinal de-rating and for low headroom use.

Is your hardware up-to-date? We inspect, repair & certify rigging equipment:

Have your beam clamps been inspected lately? Find more information on our repair, inspection and certification services here.

Don’t worry about tracking equipment inspections—our asset management tool, CertTracker™ is a virtual lifeline to safety—and the best part? It’s free for all customers when your inspection is done by Hercules SLR.

CertTracker™ reminds you of inspection dates and timelines, helps you stay compliant with provincial and national safety standards and overall, reduces the ownership cost of your equipment.

Browse Bronze & Blue here or e-mail us at info@herculesslr.com to rent a beam clamp for your next project.

References: 
- https://dimide.com/blogs/why-dimide/clamp-guide-what-clamp-should-you-use-for-each-job
- https://www.ccohs.ca/Oshanswers/legisl/competent.html

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Tips from our Brampton, ON Experts: Safe Rigging Practices

safe-rigging-practices-hercules-slr

Safe rigging practices are essential to get the job done and get home in one piece. Today, we spoke to our rigging experts from our Brampton, Ontario branch—some of their clients include IMAX, Siemens, GM and Bombardier. Read on to learn more about safe rigging practices to use when rigging with wire rope slings.

What is safe rigging—or even rigging in general?

Rigging, or safe rigging is simply the movement of a mass using mechanical application, like slings and/or lifting equipment. The term ‘rigging’ also includes figuring out what lifting appliances and slings should be used and fitted to control the load (never vice versa!), and where the load should be moved to.

Safe Rigging Practices: 4 steps
  1. Identify the load and find out its weight;
  2. Find best sling for the load and select lifting gear;
  3. Ensure the route your load will travel is clear and there are no hazards present;
  4. Prepare the area where you load will land, make sure there are no obstructions.

Safe Rigging Practices: lifting with wire rope slings

Okay, so you’ve decided wire rope slings are the best sling to lift your load—but wait! Before lifting with wire rope slings, determine these 3 things:

  1. Know or determine the weight of the load;
  2. Decide the sling arrangement—consider load control, type and means of attachment;
  3. Sling length—consider available headroom, leg angle.

When executing your lift with a wire rope sling, be sure to protect the load and sling from damage at sharp corners—padding the corners is recommended. Be sure to block as needed, examine your sling before each lift and use safe operating practices. This will also help prevent common wire rope sling damage.

While operating, make sure the following happens:

  • Sling is centered in bowl of hook;
  • Each leg supports part of the load so it’s under control;
  • Sling(s) are long enough that rated load angle is accurate;
  • If using multiple slings for different, specific angles, don’t load each leg with more than is permitted;
  • Stay alert for potential snags;
  • Balance basket hitches in choker hitches to prevent slip;
  • The load doesn’t exceed the rated load of sling or components and load is within rated load of sling (avoid shock-loading);
  • Stay clear of rigging equipment and especially a suspended load;
  • The load won’t collapse or change shape/form when in contact with bumps or jerk-movements;
  • After use, inspect and properly store the sling.

Multi-Leg Wire Rope Slings

If the load needs a multi-leg sling, do not exceed the SWL stamped on the ring—the SWL (safe working load) will always be slated for sling legs at 90°.

40° angle

 

wire-rope-sling-multi-leg
30° angle

 

wire-rope-multi-leg-angles
90° angle (max angle)

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Rigging Practices: slinging tubulars with wire rope slings

Tubular items include scaffold tubes, drilling tubulars, construction pipe work and other items like these. When rigging tubulars in a sling, consider the following:

  • Only tubulars  of the same diameter should be placed together;
  • The amount of tubes should be placed so middle tubes are gripped and won’t slip out of the bundle;
  • Tubulars should always be slug with two slings, each with a SWL at least equal to the gross weight of the load;
  • Slings should be placed at an equal distance apart—around 25% from the loads’ end. Place sling legs  1/4 of the tube length from the ends of tubes;
  • Use clamps or bulldog clips on the reeved wire to prevent loosening. Use a tie wrap on the sling’s reeved eye to prevent the sling from slipping over the bulldog;
  • Attach a tag line to one sling when rigging excessively long, tubular bundles.

Remember—it’s dangerous to bundle tube with steel angle, channels, etc. Small bore tube may lay loose in the gaps between differently shaped items of steel and could slide out when lifted. At height with the right amount of force, a tube can become a spear and result in fatal injuries.

Safe Rigging Practices: single-leg vertical hitch

Keep these tips in mind when using a single-leg vertical hitch:

  • The total weight of the load is supported by a single leg;
  • The SWL of the wire rope sling must exceed the load weight;
  • Don’t use your hitch to lift loose materials, long loads (unless using a spreader beam with 2 single-legs—see below) or a load that can tip;
  • Single-leg hitch won’t provide you with good control and is prone to tip.
Single-Leg Vertical Hitch: Spreader Beams

safe-rigging-practices-hercules-slr-spreader-beam-wire-rope

Hercules SLR spreader beam. Use a certified spreader beam for good control to support loads that are long and/or hard-to-handle. They reduce the tendency for the load to slip or bend, and both single legs will support the load—if the load is evenly balanced, each side will carry half the load.

 

Safe Rigging Practices: double-up

Double Basket
  • Make sure two hitches are placed carefully to ensure load is balanced;
  • Ensure legs are kept apart enough to balance the load (don’t cause slippage);
  • Never use a vertical angle bigger than 60°;
  • Double basket hitches don’t have great load control, the capacity depends on the vertical angle formed in the basket.
Double Wrap Basket

A double wrap basket is a basket hitch that’s wrapped around the load. When using this method with wire rope slings, keep in mind:

  • A single hitch doesn’t control load slippage;
  • Adjust legs as load is applied, equalize load balance;
  • Great for loose material handling and smooth loads due to it’s 360° wrap;
  • For good load control, use two hitches when at a horizontal angle of 45° or smaller (depending on load weight).
Double Wrap Choker

A double wrap choker hitch is a choker hitch wrapped around the load—a single hitch won’t control load

safe-rigging-practices-wire-rope-sling
Load on offshore rig lifted by chain slings.

slippage. These are great for handling loose materials as it has a 360° wrap that can be achieved without battening down the eye—gain control by using two hitches at a horizontal angle of 45° or smaller.

Safe Rigging Practices: stabilizing & landing the load

Before you begin lifting your load, you should have a plan and prepared space for the load to land. The type of load will determine how riggers prepare but typically, most loads should be lowered onto timber battens. Slings will be easy to withdraw from the load, but remember—never land a load directly on the sling.

A good rigger will always asses unusual loads and try to estimate their centre of gravity in order to stabilize it. It’s important to attach slings so the centre of gravity is below or within the lift points. If you doubt the load’s stability at all, lift it very slowly. If it tilts, lower it (slowly) and re-sling the load so it’s stable. 

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: lifting with eye bolts

eye-bolt

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: select the right eye bolt

There’s a lot of hardware to consider when researching lifting and rigging equipment. Links, hooks, swivels—today we’re talking eye bolts. Eye bolts are used to attach a securing eye to a structure, so ropes or slings can be pulled through.

Keep reading to discover how to select and use the right type of bolt, their dimensions and Working Load Limits.

Eye bolts are marked with thread size, not with their rated capacities. Make sure you select the correct eye bolt based on type and capacity for the lift you are conducting.

  • Use plain or regular eye bolts (non-shoulder) or ring bolts for vertical loading only. Angle loading on non-shoulder bolts will bend or break them.
  • Use shoulder eye bolts for vertical or angle loading. Be aware that lifting eye bolts at an angle reduces the safe load.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s recommended method for angle loading.
lifting-equipment-incorrect-use-of-shoulder-bolt
Shoulder bolt, used incorrectly.
shoulder-eye-bolt-lifting-equipment
Shoulder eye bolt, with load applied correctly. 
Incorrect way to apply angle load.

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: using eye bolts safely

  • Orient the eye bolt in line with the slings. If the load is applied sideways, the eye bolt may bend.
  • Pack washers between the shoulder and the load surface to ensure that the eye bolt firmly contacts the surface. Ensure that the nut is properly torqued.
  • Engage at least 90% of threads in a receiving hole when using shims or washers.
  • Attach only one sling leg to each eye bolt.
safe-use-eye-bolt-lifting-equipment
Direction of pull

 

  • Inspect and clean the eye bolt threads and the hole.
  • Screw the eye bolt on all the way down and properly seat.
  • Ensure the tapped hole for a screw eye bolt (body bolts) has a minimum depth of 1 1/2 times the bolt diameter.
  • Install the shoulder at right angles to the axis of the hole. The shoulder should be in full contact with the surface of the object being lifted.
  • Use a spreader bar with regular (non-shoulder) eye bolts to keep the lift angle at 90° to the horizontal.
    • Use eye bolts at a horizontal angle greater than 45°. Sling strength at 45° is 71% of vertical sling capacity. Eye bolt strength at 45° horizontal angle drops down to 30% of vertical lifting capacity.
    • Use a swivel hoist ring for angled lifts. The swivel hoist ring will adjust to any sling angle by rotating around the bolt and the hoisting eye pivots 180°.

 

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: eye bolt techniques to avoid

improper-eye-bolt-use-lifting-equipment
Don’t run your sling through an eye bolt!
  • Do not run a sling through a pair of eye bolts: this reduces the effective angle of lift and puts more strain on the rigging.
  • Do not force the slings through eye bolts. This force may alter the load and the angle of loading.
  • Do not use eye bolts that have been ground, machined or stamped.
  • Do not use bars, grips or wrenches to tighten eye bolts.
  • Do not paint an eye bolt. The paint could cover up flaws.
  • Do not force hooks or other fittings into the eye; they must fit freely.
  • Do not shock load eye bolts.
  • Do not use a single eye bolt to lift a load that is free to rotate.
  • Do not use eye bolts that have worn threads or other flaws.
  • Do not insert the point of a hook in an eye bolt. Use a shackle.
  • Do not use non-shouldered bolts to lift horizontally—non-shouldered bolts should only be used to lift vertically.

 

Lifting and Rigging Equipment: eye bolt dimensions

 

Machinery Eye Bolt

lifting-and-rigging-equipment-machinery-eye-bolt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screw Eye Bolt

lifting-rigging-equipment-screw-eye-bolt-dimensions

 

 

 

 

 

Regular Eye Bolt—Forged

lifting-and-rigging-equipment-regular-forged-eye-bolt

  • The Ultimate Load* is 5 times the WLL**. Maximum proof-load*** is 2 times the WLL.
Shoulder Eye Bolt—Forged

lifting-and-rigging-equipment-shoulder-eye-bolt-forged-dimensions

  • Ultimate Load is 5 times the WLL. Maximum proof-load is 2 times the WLL.
Definitions

* Ultimate Load: The load at which the item being tested fails or no longer supports the load.

** Working Load Limit: The maximum combined static and dynamic load in pounds or tonnes should be applied to the product in service, even when the product is new, and when the product is uniformly applied in direct tension to the product.

*** Maximum Proof-Load: The maximum tensile force that can be applied to a bolt without deformation. This is usually between 85-95% of the yield strength.

Need more definitions? Find common securing, rigging and lifting definitions on our ‘Quality and Safety‘ page.

Fact sheet via CCOHS: https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/safety_haz/materials_handling/eye_bolts.html

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.