Lifting Out of this World: Hercules SLR Helps Radarsat Constellation Mission

radarstat constellation mission

Lifting Out of this World: Hercules SLR Helps RADARSAT Constellation Mission

Hercules SLR is committed to safety at every level—Even in outer space. 

On Wednesday, June 12, SpaceX launched the RADARSAT Constellation Mission from Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.  

At 7:17 a.m. PDT (14:17 UTC), the Falcon 9 launched, which was the first of three RADARSAT satellites deployed about 54 minutes following launch. 

After stage separation, the Falcon 9 returned to SpaceX’s Landing Zone 4 at the Air Force Base. The first stage for the RADARSAT Constellation mission previously supported Crew Dragon’s first demo mission in March 2019. 

The RADARSAT Constellation Mission shows Canada’s excellence in Earth observation from Space. The RADARSAT Constellation Mission is made of three identical C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Earth observation satellites built by MDA, a Maxar Company.  

The RADARSAT Constellation Mission will scan and collect daily revisits of Canada’s vast territory and maritime approaches, like the Arctic, up to four times per day. The three-satellite configuration can also access any point of 90% of the world’s surface.  

The RADARSAT Constellation Mission supports the Government of Canada to deliver responsive and cost-effective services for fields like maritime surveillance, ecosystem and climate change observation. 

For example, the RADARSAT Constellation Mission will: 

  • Help create precise sea ice maps of Canada’s oceans and the Great Lakes to facilitate navigation and commercial maritime transportation. Each satellite also carries an Automatic Identification System receiver, allowing improved detection and tracking of vessels of interest.
  • Collect highly-accurate data that will let farmers maximize crop yields, while reducing energy consumption and use of potential pollutants.
  • Take and provide images of areas affected by disaster to help organize emergency response efforts and protect local population. 

Hercules SLR is one of many proud Canadian suppliers to supply rigging equipment, hardware and safety training to make the RADARSAT Constellation Mission possible.  

Learn more about the mission and launch—Checkout the webcast from the SpaceX YouTube channel below. 

Video via SpaceX


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HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? DROP US A LINE, OR GIVE US A CALL!

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Learn to Rig it Right in Hamilton, ON: Meet your Trainer, Steve Hache

hercuels slr rigging trainer steve hache

Meet your Hercules SLR Trainer, Steve Hache CD

Get ready for our first-ever two-day training course, ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ at Hercules SLR in Hamilton, Ontario.

Time to meet the teacher—Steve Hache, CD is one of our experience Training Specialists and will lead the Fundamentals of Rigging course. We sit down with Steve to talk more about his role and why he decided to enter training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background:

Steve: It was a dream of mine to pursue a career in the Canadian Armed Forces so, I joined the Royal Canadian Navy (RNC) when I was 19 years-old. I spent 21 years of dedicated service in the RCN, trained and became qualified in a number of technical aspects that range from complex seamanship evolutions, boarding operations, crane operations, forklift operation, small arms, to rigging and hoisting.

After this, I worked in the Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC—One of the most recognized colleges in the East Coast) faculty and was introduced to the adult education field. I had an interest in safety, so I earned my diploma in Adult Education-Teaching, Learning and went on to complete the Construction Safety Supervisor certification through the Nova Scotia Construction Safety Association.

steve hache, hercules slr trainer
Steve Hache, CD.

In my professional career, I continue to learn—Some of the most memorable experiences were training in the United Arab Emirates in course design at HBI Learning Centers in Sydney, Australia and Adult Education & Assessment at the Global Maritime & Transportation School in New York, USA.  

What made you decide to go into this industry?

I was most accustomed to the safety, rigging & hoisting industries, since there were constant opportunities to operate cranes, forklifts or perform rigging & hoisting operations in the RCN.

Nearly everyday, we removed or replaced machinery from engineering spaces, load or unload missiles, torpedoes, stores and operate cranes—Rigging and hoisting was routine.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Steve: When I retired from the RCN, I accepted a job at an American security company in the United Arab Emirates. There, I was exposed to a new, exciting culture and got to train their Coast Guard in seamanship, basic boat operations, tactical boat operations and maritime law enforcement.

This was an extremely challenging and rewarding experience!

After a couple of years in the UAE, I came home—This was when I joined the faculty as NSCC. I took a temporary position at NSSC as faculty of the Marine-Industrial Rigging program. There, I turned a part-time program into a full-time program. The faculty and staff of NSCC were first-rate! I learned a great deal from each person.

When the temporary position ended, I worked as a training manager and Fall Protection Trainer where I learned & honed my training skills even more. Then came Hercules SLR—The rest is history!

What made you want to transition into training?

Steve: It wasn’t difficult for me to speak to large groups of people, since I’ve been doing it since I entered the workforce—In the military, I had to brief, command on and supervise complex seaman evolutions along with rigging & boat operations.

However, teaching and training didn’t always come naturally. My first role as a trainer in the RCN where I was posted to the Bedford Rifle Range as a small arms instructor. I was nervous at first, but I grew to love it—Who knew I enjoyed speaking in front of people?!

Since, my career has always involved speaking tolarge groups of people, which is a must-have skill for a trainer.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?LEEA Header

Steve: That’s easy – I have always appreciated the staff at Hercules SLR. When I was faculty at NSCC, they consistently treated myself and any student that I sent their way with the utmost respect and care. The program work terms that the students completed were extremely beneficial to them and also ended up with employment for a number of them. We developed and maintained a positive working relationship. 

Is there anything you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry? 

Steve: I hope to take more LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association) courses to further my knowledge —It’s important to never stop learning. However, my main focus is to continue to contribute to today’s safety culture.


FIND MORE INFORMATION ON THE ‘FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING’ COURSE AT HERCULES SLR IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO

LEARN TO RIG IT RIGHT


TRAIN WITH THE BEST AT HERCULES SLR. CONTACT SHERRY BOHM TO LEARN MORE OR SIGN UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

rigging course, fundamentals of rigging in hamilton ontario

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

Learn the skills to life safely, securely & efficiently at the Rigging Fundamentals course at Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario on July 15 and 16 from 8:30am to 4:30pm. 

Join our all-day, LEEA-accredited course with lifting & rigging expert Trainer Steve Hache and learn the fundamental skills of rigging to perform work in the marine, entertainment, construction, oil or transportation industry. 

Rigging is an excellent career or skill if you’re interested in mechanics & how things work, working in a variety of different locations on different machinery and keeping others safe & secure. 

At the Hercules SLR ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ Training Course, you’ll learn:  

  • Regulations and standards relevant in Canada & North America 
  • Risk assessment & management 
  • How to create and execute a rigging plan 
  • How to calculate load weight 
  • What is the rigging triangle
  • How to find the centre of gravity and calculate sling angles 
  • Pre-use inspection
  • How to communicate on a rigging site (I.E. radio, hand signals, etc.) 
  • Learn about and how to use rigging equipment like slings, hitches, hardware and hooks

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU EXPECT AT THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE?

fundamentals of rigging in hamilton, ontario
Couse outline—Click here. 

GET TO KNOW YOUR HERUCLES SLR TRAINER:

MEET STEVE HACHE, CD


TRAIN WITH THE BEST!

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SIGN-UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE CALL OR EMAIL SHERRY BOHM, CSR: 

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Why Chemical Safety is Important | Training Tuesday

why chemical safety is important

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT 

Why is chemical safety important? Hazardous or toxic chemicals are used in many industrial environments on a daily basis. 

Although chemicals make up the world around us, some can be more harmful than others—This is just one reason why chemical safety is important. 

Read on to learn how toxic chemicals can enter the body, how to identify hazards, some tips for using chemicals safely in the workplace and terms you should know. 

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT | 4 TYPES OF EXPOSURE

There are four different ways chemicals can enter the body. These are:

  1. Inhalation: Chemicals that take form in gas, vapour or particulates are easily inhaled. These chemicals can absorb into the respiratory tract, and can head into the bloodstream and organs. This is often noted as the most common way the body absorbs harmful chemicals. 
  2. Skin/Eye absorption: Chemical contact with skin can result in mild dermatitis, or a rash. However, chemicals can also be absorbed into the bloodstream this way. Eyes are also sensitive to most chemicals, so safety glasses must be worn when conducting work with chemicals. Another common scenario that causes eye contact to chemicals (especially if not wearing appropriate safety glasses) is wiping or rubbing at your eyes during chemical exposure.   
  3. Ingestion: Like with inhalation or skin/eye absorption, ingestion can cause the toxic chemicals to travel to the organs. When conducting work in areas where ingestion is likely, like confined spaces, it’s important to have an entry & exit plan, and the proper PPE for the job. 
  4. Injection: This doesn’t necessarily mean directly injecting chemicals into your bloodstream, but if you have a cut or other tear in the skin, chemicals can be absorbed this way. 

Chemicals often travel to the respiratory system, but how? The respiratory system has two main parts. These are the upper & lower airway passages. The upper respiratory system consists of the nose, mouth, pharynx & larynx. The lower respiratory system consists of the vocal cords to the trachea, to the end of the bronchial tree. 

It’s important to note that there are different factors that affect how the degree of hazard caused by the chemical. These are: 

  • How it enters the body 
  • How much enters the body 
  • How toxic the chemical is 
  • When/How it’s removed 
  • Biological variation 

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT | IDENTIFYING HAZARDS

Obviously, chemical exposure in the workplace is unavoidable—But risks and hazards can be managed. 

A risk assessment should be conducted for chemicals, just like is conducted for other workplace hazards.
To identify chemical hazards in the workplace:why is chemical safety important

  • Identify: Determine the chemicals in your workplace and safety hazards that go along with them. For example, if chlorine is used to clean, know that long-term exposure to chlorine can cause nausea & eye discomfort, and have eyewash stations in-place so employees can rinse their eyes if contact occurs. 
  • Assess: Take a look not just at hazardous chemicals in the workplace, but the processes that accompany them.
  • Control: After hazards are identified, put controls in-place to reduce the likelihood of an accident.

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT | TERMS TO KNOW 

ACUTE TOXICITY (SEE TOXICITY BELOW): Refers to exposure to chemicals that humans aren’t often around, or are in contact with due to an accident. For example, a leak at a plant could cause the locals to experience acute toxicity. Sometimes, effects are immediately felt, and in other cases effects can be delayed. 

BIOLOGICAL VARIATION: Characteristics that might be unique to the individual, like weight, height or sex. 

PARTICULATES: Solids or liquids that are dispersed as gas. Particulates can include dust, mist, fumes or other particles that are found in the space. 

TOXICITY: The measure of how poisonous a chemical is. For example, a chemical with a lower toxicity will need a much higher amount to be harmful than a chemical with a high amount of poison or toxicity. 

WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM (WHMIS): This is Canada’s national workplace hazard communication standard. This elements of WHMIS include hazard classification, cautionary labelling, availability of material safety data sheets and educational programs for employees. 

chemical safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TRAINING TUESDAY: TAGLINES

 TRAINING TUESDAY | CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | TRAINING TUESDAY


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? GIVE US A CALL, OR DROP US A LINE.

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

ISO and Road Vehicles

roads and transportation at night

ISO AND ROAD VEHICLES iso and road vehicles statistics

DID YOU KNOW? Anyone who has driven a road vehicle of almost any make, almost anywhere in the world, will have directly benefitted from ISO 2575, which specifies the familiar symbols for controls and indicators we are accustomed to seeing on the dashboard. 

Who benefits from ISO standards for road vehicles? 

We’ve discussed ISO and energy, construction, the supply chain and we’ve debunked some myths – But what about ISO and road vehicles? Read on to learn why ISO and your vehicle are so important. 

Consumers 

ISO standards make driving a vehicle simpler and safer, while protecting passengers (especially children) and pedestrians, and lower the cost of buying vehicles.

Regulators

ISO standards gives technical basis for regularly reviewed & improved legislation on things like safety and pollution. 

Manufacturers 

ISO Standards give specifications for safety, quality, performance and environmental impact. They set out harmonized requirements that enable outsourcing, fair competition, the participation of suppliers from developing countries and drive down costs as they facilitate competitive tendering. 

What do ISO Standards for road vehicles cover? 

iso and road vehicles

 

 

 

 

 

Much of the work in these areas is the focus of the ISO technical committee, called ISO/TC 22, Road Vehicles, which has developed more than 820 standards & updates worldwide. The committee’s made of 75 different participating and observing national standards bodies, as well as automotive-sector associations and international bodies such as the World Health Organization.

These standards aim to: 

  • Improve compatibility, interchangeability and safety
  • Specify the requirements for harmonized test procedures to evaluate performance.  

iso and road vehicles

Why do we need ISO standards for road vehicles?

why we need ISO standards for road vehicles

Electric Vehicles 

ISO/TC 22 Road vehicles has also developed a range of standards specifically for electric, hybrid and fuel-cell road vehicles. A number of these provide requirements for functional safety, test methods, on-board energy storage systems and measuring fuel consumption.

ISO 17409 Electrically Propelled road vehicles connection to an external electric power supply—Safety requirements 

ISO 234741, Hybrid-electric road vehicles exhaust emissions and fuel consumption measurements—Part 1: Non-externally charged vehicles. 

Intelligent Transport Systems 

Increasingly, road vehicles are being equipped with systems and networks based on information and communication technologies intended to improve safety, traffic control, navigation, fee collection and identification. Today’s communication capabilities give vehicles the potential to anticipate and avoid collisions, transmit their position to emergency services in case of an accident, navigate the quickest route to their destination, take advantage of up-to-the-minute traffic reports, identify the nearest available parking space, minimize their carbon emissions and provide multimedia communications.

ISO/TC 204,Intelligent transport systems focuses mainly on this area and has developed more than 220 standards*. 

*These include the ISO 15638 series on telematics applications for regulated commercial freight vehicles (TARV) and ISO 11067, which gives performance requirements and test procedures for curve speed warning systems (CSWS).

Tyres and Other Components 

ISO/TX 3, Tyres, rims and valves has developed 78 standards, including the ISO 4000 series on passenger car tyres and rims and the ISO 4249 series on motorcycle tyres and rims. 

Road Safety

ISO 39001, Road traffic safety (RTS) management systems—Requirements with guidance for use, developed by ISO/TC 241, road traffic safety managementis widely regarded as a major contribution to the United Nations’ Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. 

Future ISO 39002, Good practices for implementing commuting safety management, aims to reduce the amount of fatalities and severity of injuries caused by road accidents, by providing solutions and recommending measures that organizations can use to protect their staff.

 Road-safety-related standards are also developed by other ISO technical committees, for example to make crossing the street safer for disabled persons. 

Vehicle Safety

With the latest technological progress bringing us everything from advanced navigation systems to driverless cars, putting measures in place to spot potential risks across the whole vehicle lifespan is more important than ever.

ISO 26262 (series), Road vehicles—Functional safety, outlines an automotive-specific risk-based approach to help avoid any potential system failures. 

Looking Forward

Cyber Security 

A quick look at your dashboard will give you an idea of how connected vehicles are – and it is only increasing. From your GPS to other gauges and sensors telling you when your tyre pressure is low, there is constant interaction between in-vehicle embedded systems that communicate wirelessly. As this interconnectivity grows, so does the risk of cyber-attacks, threatening not only our safety but our personal information. Work has recently started on standards to address these issues by providing recommendations and solutions for building cyber security into vehicles

Hydrogen Vehicle Stations

If fuel-cell, electric and alternative-fuel vehicles are the future, there need to be adequate stations for refuelling them.

A new technical specification, ISO/TX 19880-1, Gaseous hydrogen—Fuelling stations—Part:1 General requirements, will contribute to the proliferation of hydrogen fuelling stations by providing important guidelines on their safety and performance. It covers everything from hydrogen production and delivery, to compression, storage and fuelling of a hydrogen vehicle, and provides a useful stepping stone to an International Standard in this area, due to be published in 2017.  

This article originally appears on iso.org


CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS FOR RELATED READING:

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HERCULES SLR PROVIDES REPAIRS, INSPECTIONS & MAINTENANCE FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1 (877) 461-4876  


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Forklift Driving | Training Tuesday

forklift operator driving in warehouse

FORKLIFT DRIVING

Forklift driving takes a lot more than just lifting and moving materials – Forklift operators should have an understanding of safety & balance, to keep materials, themselves and others safe. One of the biggest risks forklift drivers face is tipping-over. According to OSHA, approximately 25% of forklift fatalities were from tip-over incidents. 

Yes, it might seem basic, but it’s important to recognize the forklift’s centre of gravity and stability triangle. In this blog, we’ll discuss tips to keep you balanced and everything else you need to know to stay safe in, out and around the forklift.

This Training Tuesday, we’ll cover:

  • Some of the biggest safety risks associated with balance and the most common type of forklift
  • Forklift centre of gravity & the stability triangle
  • Other factors that contribute to forklift accidents and tip-overs 
  • How to conduct visual & operational forklift inspections 
  • Safety tips to remain balanced & safe while driving a forklift

There are four main potential safety risks considering balance and forklift driving. These are:

  1. How likely the forklift is to tip-over forward;
  2. How likely the forklift is to tip-over on its side;
  3. Maximum braking-level (or stopping distance) the forklift can perform;
  4. Maximum level of reversed-acceleration the forklift can perform. 

In Canada, counter-balanced forklifts are one of the most often-seen types of forklift. 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

As we mentioned earlier, a counterbalance forklift has three ways it can tip—forward, or sideways, on the left or right

While driving a forklift, it’s important to maintain its centre of gravity. The centre of gravity lives within the stability triangle

Centre of gravity is defined as the point within the triangle where the bulk of the mass is located. Although we don’t recommend trying it out, the centre of gravity is also the point where the forklift could balance. Again—Take don’t try this one out, we recommend taking our word for it. 

Calculating the forklifts’ centre of gravity is complex (and unnecessary for daily use), but there are a few important things to understand in order to remain balanced as you operate the forklift. 

When the forklift is stationary, it won’t tip as the force is on the centre, but tilts forward when force is applied to the front tines (also called forks) or its back. It’s also worth noting that a forklift is more likely to tip sideways, than forwards. Therefore, adding a load to the front forks decreases the chance the forklift will tip on its side.   

Alternatively, lifting the forks on the truck with a load will cause the forklifts stability to decrease on all sides.

The diagram below shows the stability triangle. 

forklift driving stability triangle diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | WHAT ELSE CONTRIBUTES TO ACCIDENTS? 

Like we mentioned, some types of loads are more likely to cause your forklift to tip. Here are some features of a load that create hazards: 

  • Awkwardly stacked or piled in a way that causes instability
  • Unmaintained pallets 
  • Load is too heavy or blocks the operators vision 

Here are some of the features of a forklift that contribute to forklift accidents, like tip-overs:

  • Faulty steering, brakes, clutch, transmission or mast assembly 
  • Inadequate or malfunctioning safety devices
  • Forklift emissions
  • Poorly organized controls and displays on the forklift 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | SAFETY TIPS

To help maintain centre of gravity, here are a few tips to help you stay stable while operating a forklift with a load: 

  • Don’t distribute load unevenly on the forks, this will increase the frequency of sideways tip-over 
  • Don’t load the forklift beyond its WLL, this will make the forklift prone to tipping 
  • Be sure to move the load all the way to the back of the forks 

What are some risk factors of work design that contribute to forklift accidents?:

  • Stress or increased speed 
  • Not using the correct tools, attachments and/or hardware 
  • Incompetent operator, or improper forklift assigned
  • Badly serviced, unmaintained and/or aging forklift(s)
  • Lack of training for workers/operators 
  • Poor work layout for travel

Here are some risk factors while operating the forklift that contribute to accidents: 

  • Driving at high speeds
  • Driving with an elevated load 
  • Improper parking, reversal, turning, braking or acceleration with forklift  
  • Poor communication and/or warnings for nearby personnel
  • Blocking wheels on semi-trailers of railway car improperly 

If you’re operating a forklift, you should never

  • Drive a forklift without any capacity ratings listed
  • Travel in a forklift with a load raised more than 4inches 
  • Leave truck alone while running, or with a load 
  • Let unauthorized personnel operate a forklift (We’ve all seen the episode of The Office where Michael operates the forklift? Okay, good.) 
  • Attempt to adjust the load from the operating cab
  • Raise a load extending over the load backrest, unless no part of the load can slide back toward the operator 
  • Use pallets with forks as a make-shift elevated work platform (it’s more common than you think!) 
  • Let personnel stand/walk under any elevated part of the forklift 

It’s important to communicate potential hazards for everyone working in a space where forklifts are found, and use proper signals to keep yourself and others safe. Here are some more tips to help keep others safe while driving a forklift: 

  • Restrict access to areas where forklifts are used (and create procedures to keep work safe when they must enter spaces where forklifts operate) 
  • OR, create designated walkways or travelling paths to separate pedestrians from forklifts 
  • Pedestrians should always let the forklift driver know when they’re in the area—Eye contact is a simple way to make your presence know
  • Keep the area, particular the travelling path free from obstacles and ensure it’s well-lit 
  • Be careful when driving around sharp/blind corners, doorways and narrow aisles. Honk your forklift horn at intersections.
  •  Wear hi-vis clothing & PPE
  • Load the forks so your line of vision is clear
  • Avoid driving the forklift near people-heavy areas
  • Don’t walk under or near forks

FORKLIFT DRIVING | INSPECTION

A forklift operator should inspect their forklift daily, at the beginning of each shift and before each use. 

The operator should do a visual circle-check of the forklift (a walk-around) and an operational pre-use check. What do these involve?  

During a visual inspection before use, the operator should: 

  • General condition/cleanliness (this includes the forklift and surrounding floor & overhead work areas)
  • Ensure a charged fire extinguisher is nearby 
  • Make sure engine oil, fuel and radiator fluid levels are correct 
  • Establish that the propane tank’s fuel-tank mounting system, fuel-tank position pin, propane relief valves and hose are in good condition
  • Make sure the battery is fully-charged, there are no exposed wires, plug connections are in good condition, vent caps are clear, electrolyte levels in cells are acceptable and are in-place with hold-downs or brackets 
  • See that bolts, nuts, guards, chains or hydraulic hose reels are not damaged, disconnected or missing
  • Check for wear, damage and air-pressure (pneumatic tires) in wheels & tires 
  • Ensure forks/tines are not bent or chipped and are level & properly positioned—Also check that positioning latches and carriage teeth aren’t broken or worn 
  • Make sure chain anchor pins aren’t worn, loose or bent 
  • Make sure there are no fluid leaks, damp spots or drips 
  • Ensure hoses are secured and not loose, crimped or worn
  • Check for grease & debris in operator compartment
  • Make sure the seatbelt fastens & works properly
  • Guards: Ensure guards, overhead guards and roll-over protection structure (ROPS) are secure & undamaged 

During a pre-operational inspection, the forklift operator should check: 

  • FOOT & PARKING BRAKE: Ensure pedal holds & unit stops smoothly, and brake holds against slight acceleration
  • DEADMAN SEAT BRAKE: Make sure it holds when operator rises from seat
  • CLUTCH & GEARSHIFT: Make sure they shift smoothly, and don’t jump or snag
  • DASH CONTROL PANEL: Check that all lights & gauges are operational
  • HORN: Make sure the horn sounds loudly enough to be heard over work
  • BACK-UP: Make sure the reverse alarm and other warning devices work properly
  • LIGHTS: Ensure headlights and warning lights function properly
  • STEERING: Make sure the steering-wheel works smoothly
  • LIFT MECHANISM: Make sure they operate smoothly—You can check by lifting forks to their maximum height, then lowering them completely
  • TILT MECHANISM: Make sure the tilt mechanism works properly & holds the load—You can check by tilting the mast forward and backwards completely. 
  • CYLINDERS & HOSES: Check these last and make sure they’re not leaking after doing these checks.
  • BE SURE TO LISTEN FOR UNUSUAL SOUNDS/NOISES! 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CONCLUSION

There are many work-related issues that contribute to forklift driving, safety & general operation.

Ensure you conduct the three types of inspections we cover in this blog, be mindful of the forklift’s stability triangle & forks, keep travel slow, steady & free from obstacles to ensure your safety and others around you—And never let someone drive the forklift without proper training, or who hasn’t been designated.  


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

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FORKLIFT SAFETY: TOP TIPS FOR A SAFE WORKPLACE

WAREHOUSE WOW: HOW OUR DISTRIBUTION CENTRE LEADS THE INDUSTRY

WAREHOUSE SAFETY: 8 STEPS TO TAKE AFTER A RACKING ACCIDENT


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

LEEA Training at Hercules SLR: Teaching with an Edge

leea training with crane on skyscraper

Hercules SLR is a full LEEA member, and it’s important for us to stay up-to-date with industry trends, education and certifications, like LEEA training. 

LEEA TRAINING | WHAT’S LEEA?

So, what’s LEEA training? LEEA is the Lifting Equipment Engineer’s Association, and operates across the globe (they’re based in over 69 countries!) as a representative body for everyone involved in the lifting & hoisting industry. 

The association has played a key role in the specialized lifting field for over 70 years, from training & standards setting through to health and safety, the provision of technical and legal advice, and the development of examination and licensing systems.

LEEA TRAINING | AT HERCULES SLR

This month, Inspectors from our branches across Canada participated in LEEA Level-2 General Advanced training. This training covers broad lifting and hoisting principles for inspectors, and includes what to look for on equipment like chain slings, wire rope, shackles and eye bolts. 

Clint, an Inspector from Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario says, “LEEA training is great – It gives us a better understanding of how the equipment actually works, which makes it much easier to identify problems.” 

Clint, an Inspector from Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario says, “LEEA training is great – It gives us a better understanding of how the equipment actually works, which makes it much easier to identify problems.” 
 
 
 
 

 

“I love having the opportunity to learn more, and the training really helps us notice things that sometimes, aren’t blatantly obvious.”

During training, LEEA instructors are accessible and eager to answer questions. Students don’t feel rushed, and learn not just from a book, but from real-world applications that relate to topics in the book and lesson.

At Hercules SLR, we’re proud that all of our inspectors have the LEEA Lifting Equipment General Diploma, and all receive on-going training. LEEA Certification gives inspectors an edge – when you’re LEEA-certified, you receive a LEEA card you can show clients & customers on-site, so they know they’re in good hands. 

Another benefit Hercules SLR Inspectors say LEEA gives, is trust. “Sometimes, a company might not think your diagnosis is correct, or say ‘We’ve always done it this way, so it works’. But when you’re LEEA-certified, your opinion is automatically credible.” says Clint,  Hercules SLR Inspector.

LEEA TRAINING | WHAT’S NEXT? 

The next LEEA training topic on the Hercules SLR docket are manual hoists. What are our inspectors excited for? 

“I can’t wait to gain more insight into the equipment we inspect, especially manual hoists, which are up next. The courses become more niche as you go along, and the next training will be a 50/50 spilt – Time will be spent equally in the classroom and hands-on, with the gear.” says a Hercules SLR Inspector. 

LEEA Training teaches gives our Inspectors a detailed eye to keep your rigging, lifting and hoisting gear safe, durable and read-to-work. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES RIGGING EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

ARE THE TECHNICIANS INSPECTING YOUR GEAR QUALIFIED?

LEEA TRAINED INSPECTORS

INSPECTION TECHNICIAN CAREERS: HIRING IN BRAMPTON, ONTARIO


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Tips for Taglines | Training Tuesday

riggers using taglines to control and secure a load

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES

Taglines — What are they, what are they used for and why do we rig with them? We’ll tell you — Welcome to the new series from Hercules SLR, called Training Tuesday. 

In this series, every Tuesday, we’ll bring you a new topic about rigging, hoisting, fall protection, heavy machinery, workplace safety and more.

We’ll cover why the issue is important, advice for safe-use, application pointers so you get the most from your gear and training tips for employers and employees. 

This week, our Training Tuesday topic will be Taglines—In this blog, we’ll cover:

  • What’s a tagline?
  • When to use a tagline? And how to do it safely 
  • What not to do when using a tagline to lift 
  • Tagline standards, rules and regulations 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHAT ARE TAGLINES? 

So, what’s a tagline? A tagline is a line (often constructed of synthetic materials, otherwise known as a ‘soft line’) that attaches to a load and provides control while minimizing movement of the object during lifting operations. Simply put, taglines are used to prevent line rotation when lifting with cranes. 

Using taglines may add potential hazards to personnel involved in the lifting operation. These hazards should be assessed before the lifting operation begins. So, when is it appropriate to use a tagline to help secure a load? There are a couple of conditions: 

  • The crane’s load will swing back and forth (etc. a load on an especially windy day) 
  • The load’s rotation will create hazards 
  • A load needs to be positioned or connected in a particular way when it lands 

Read on for more tips to use taglines safely, what you should never do when securing a load with taglines and more tips for best-use. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | SAFETY TIPS FOR TAGLINES

When rigging with taglines, make sure:
  • Tagline is free of knots 
  • Taglines should have sealed ends so they don’t fray
  • One rigger should be assigned to each tagline and be able to safely position themselves away from the load 
  • To secure long loads with taglines, attach them to the very ends 
  • Taglines should be long enough that the assigned rigger can be in a safe location for the duration of the lift
  • Taglines must be held so the rigger can easily release the line if the load swings—This is important since it prevents the rigger from being thrown off-balance and into a more dangerous position
  • Wear the proper protective gloves when you handle taglines 
  • You know the working-load limit of the tagline 
  • Taglines are fit according to your company’s procedures/regulations 
  • Taglines are attached at a spot where they can be easily removed 
  • The load rotation can be controlled with taglines (if it’s rotating/swiveling uncontrollably).
When rigging with a tagline, do not
  • Use taglines if they’ll create any sort of safety hazard
  • Use taglines to control a lift during inclement/adverse weather conditions 
  • Go near or beneath, or let another rigger go beneath a load to retrieve a tagline 
  • Detach the tagline from the load until the crane operator and banksman position the load in its final location, with no load on the lifting gear  
  • Loop the tagline around your wrist, or any other part of the body
  • Use taglines for routine back-loading of supply vessels
  • Temporarily or permanently attach, loop, twist or tie a tagline to adjacent structures or equipment in an attempt to control the load
  • Use a tagline if there’s not enough clearance-room for the rigger to move from any spots where the load could fall 
  • Operating the tagline will cause a handler to be near a pinch point (A pinch point is any area where personnel risks having their extremities caught by a machine or equipment)
  • Allow taglines to fall into rotors 
  • When ever possible, attach your hook to a load block to prevent twisting of the hoist line. 

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function.”

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function. In everyday operations, workers handle, transport and store materials. They may do so by hand, manually-operated materials handling equipment, or by power-operated equipment,” says the U.S. Department of Labour/OSHA Training Institute. 

This is why it’s important to eliminate risk whenever possible and ensure taglines provide more help than hazard to a lift—Remember when not to rig with taglines.

taglines controlling a load

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES & OSHA STANDARDS 

In Canada, each province has their own specific Occupational Health & Safety Laws, which are usually broken down into:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Acts 
  • Occupational Health & Safety Regulations/Codes 
  • Standards 
  • Industry Association Code of Practice 

Be sure to check with regulations and standards in your province for further details on how to use taglines. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHEN TO USE TAGLINES

It’s important to note that taglines only work in tension. The handler should be able to hold the tagline at waist or shoulder-level—When the tagline must be held higher than this, it’s less effective it is at controlling the load. 

Sometimes, if the rope’s not long-enough, the handler’s instinct will be to pull the rope down, and end up pulling down on the load. This makes the tagline non-effective, and creates a more likely scenario that the load will fall on the handler. 

Yes, we discuss how taglines can create pinch points, however they can also help prevent them in some cases. Sometimes a load can twist around the crane that’s lifting it, and cause the load to bounce off nearby equipment or other parts of the crane—this can create pinch points, so taglines can be an effective way to control this.

TRAINING TUESDAY | CONCLUSION 

Taglines provide extra security for positioning and landing difficult loads, particular in inclement weather—However, rigger’s should exercise caution before using taglines extraneously.

Using taglines when unnecessary can sometimes create more hazards on-site, like producing pinch points or obstacles that could injure workers—This is why a rigging plan is especially important before conducting any lift , to ensure taglines are the right securing equipment for the application at-hand.

Taglines should be used to control block rotation, secure the load’s landing or when inclement weather will cause the load to swing uncontrollably—But don’t use them if they create more hazardous conditions for the handlers, rigger’s and any other personnel on-site. Remember, preventing injury is the priority of any lift—Safety should always be #1. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Women of Industry | Meet Josée, VSL Territory Sales Manager

Josee Verrette women of industry

Women of Industry | Meet Ville St. Laurent Territory Sales Manager, Josée Verrette

Hercules SLR celebrates women of industry at work and on our blog—Check it out and learn more about our Territory Sales Manager Josée Verrette, and her role at our branch in Ville St-Laurent, Quebec.

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | Tell us about your educational/professional background and your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Well, I had two businesses before I joined Hercules SLR—I was worked in armed security for residential and commercial properties.

Eventually, my partner and I sold the security business and I went into a catering business with my boyfriend. The catering industry wasn’t quite for me, and decided it would be better to separate my personal life from my work life. 

I started to think about what I liked doing in my previous jobs, and how I could use that to look for the next role in my career. I realized when I owned my own business I enjoyed taking care of clients and customers the most—So I decided to make a shift to a customer service role, and it’s a perfect fit. I should have done it sooner! 

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

I decided I wanted to work for a company that did something industrial, but most of the openings I saw expected you to have a lot of technical experience.

I stumbled across Hercules SLR and they weren’t seeking technical expertise—They had a lot of employees who knew the industry and product well, but were looking for personable employees who could lead with service and pick up the technical information as needed. It was a totally new industry, but I enjoyed it because it was a challenge to learn. 

Another aspect of Hercules SLR which I thought was honestly very cool was CertTracker! I was particularly excited since I was taking on a service role, and CertTracker complements service perfectly.

For example, if a customer calls and asks which equipment they have under-the-hook or when their next inspection is, I’m able to tell them right away and it’s all in one convenient place. 

It makes organization a breeze, too. I can pre-program CertTracker to send reminders to myself and the customer that inspections are approaching, and offer them spots to pre-book (inspections fill up fast!) The client doesn’t have to think about inspections or paperwork—This truly makes Hercules SLR a one-stop-shop! 

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | Where have you traveled during your time at Hercules SLR?

So far, I’ve travelled to head office in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. When I was hired, there was no Sales Manager here in Ville St-Laurent, so I did my interview with Troy, from head office and Mourad, the Quebec Area Manager.

After I was hired, I travelled to head office for some training.

I’ve travelled quite a bit throughout Quebec during my time with Hercules SLR because I had a large territory to cover—Around 1 1/2 hours from my place. Since last-month actually, my territory has gotten smaller, and now I just cover part of Montreal which doesn’t take me quite as far! 

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | What kind of training have you completed at Hercules SLR?

I’ve completed a lot of internal training, something I love that’s available to us at Hercules SLR. I’ve completed the Fundamentals of Rigging course, Sling & Rigging course and Fall Protection training in Montreal with Ame, an Engineer at the Montreal branch. 

When I came for my very first interview, I basically knew that Hercules SLR was a crane company. 

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

You know what? Right now, I enjoy being here in Ville St-Laurent! 

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | What’s something you’re most proud to have accomplished in your career at Hercules SLR?

Well, when I first arrived at Hercules SLR the branches team had gotten smaller, which made it difficult to complete as much service as the branch was used to. 

When I started making calls, I would tell prospective clients “Just try me—The worst thing that happens is you don’t like the service, but if you do, we’ll continue!” 

A big success for me was a client that had chosen to have their service done by a different company—Which I saw as a challenge. I love a challenge! I offered to provide them service, and made sure to check-in with them and track their progress. Eventually, our branch was able to do their under-the-hook inspections and supply them slings. 

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | What’s something you love about the securing, lifting and rigging industry?

It might seem funny, but I realized I enjoyed an industrial environment while operating my armed security company. There, we would install the trim-wiring in houses—When you purchase a new house, it contains all the wiring for an alarm system and you install it, so we worked alongside workers from the construction industry.

I love strapping on my hard hat and steel toes, and working alongside so many people with tons of technical knowledge—I learn something new in the securing, lifting and rigging industry everyday! 

WOMEN OF INDUSTRY, JOSÉE VERRETTE | Give us some advice for young people who work, or want to work in an industrial environment:

I think experience in sales is a huge asset for working in this industry, and my role in particular. Here in Ville St-Laurent, I have a variety of roles day-to-day—From being on the road visiting clients, to working in my office, I love the freedom my role at Hercules SLR gives me. Sales experience helps you tremendously with customer service.

It allows you to learn the technical knowledge and deliver excellent valued, customer service. For example, I’ve worked with many crane technicians that have a lot of technical knowledge, but don’t always want to transition into sales. If you already have experience delivering great service and are eager to learn, you can go far in an industrial environment. 


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VISIT OUR BLOG:

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY: ADRIANA MARTIN, BRANCH MANAGER TALKS SECURING & SAFETY IN SUDBURY

GET TO KNOW YOUR TERRITORY MANAGER, MARC ANTOINE-NOLIN

WOMEN WITH SKILL: KELLY BAIRD-PESTELL TALKS RIGGING INDUSTRY & TEAMWORK


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Heavy Lifting with Hercules SLR | How we Lift More than a Million

820-ton splitter vessel alberta

You might have heard about the Splitter vessel that recently travelled from Fort Saskatchewan from Edmonton and was the biggest load to ever travel on Alberta’s streets and provincial highways. 

The vessel, called a Splitter, will be installed at the Heartland Petrochemical Complex—It’s used to produce polypropylene plastic. The Splitter is seriously huge, weighing 820-tons, or 1,807,790lbs and is 96-metres long. This is as long as a CFL football field and as heavy as the Statue of Liberty. After assembly on-site, it weighed 1,200-tons, or 24,000,000lbs. Yep, 24-million pounds. 

The journey itself took 4-days—a trip that normally takes just 45-minutes by vehicle. The vessel travelled through what’s known as “Alberta’s High-Load Corridor” and used guide vehicles, safety personnel and trailers & tires that evenly distributed the load’s weight. The city of Edmonton worked with the province for over a year to plan the big move.

HERCULES SLR & THE SPLITTER VESSEL | WHAT WE DID

The end of the vessel’s journey is where Hercules SLR steps in.

Hercules SLR installed the drill lines for the Splitter vessel. Drill lines are wire rope that’s multi-threaded or reeved through typically in 6-12 parts. They travel between the block and crown so drill strings can lower and lift in-and-out of a wellbore. 

Before the lift, Hercules SLR re-certified all their wire rope slings. Since this lift was so enormous, the risk was amplified. It is considered a critical lift—This means taking proper risk assessment measures is ultra-important to plan and ensure risk is minimized. ASME standards suggest you inspect your lifting equipment and hardware at least once a year.

Hercules SLR performed a rigorous inspection and calculated the lift to all risk factors. Since the rigging holds and secures the load to the crane, this is an extremely important step that Hercules SLR’s rigger’s take to ensure the load will be moved without damaging the equipment, running into obstacles or injure surrounding people. 

Check out photos of this enormous vessel and rigging below.

820lb splitter vessel drill line installation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.