Product Spotlight | Vulcan ETOP from Samson Rope

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Product Spotlight | Vulcan ETOP from Samson Rope

Today, the Hercules SLR spotlight is on the Vulcan ETOP from Samson Rope

samson rope marine etop kit
A Samson Rope ETOP Kit

WHAT’S AN EMERGENCY TOW-OFF PENDANT? 

An emergency tow-off pendant (ETOP) is often referred to as a ‘fire wire’. They’re used to help tow the ship away from the dock if there’s a fire. 

The Vulcan ETOP is a synthetic alternative to traditional wire ropes, developed by Samson Rope. It’s lighter, and eliminates fish hooks—Broken wires that bulge out from the wire and can cause hand injuries. The synthetic Vulcan ETOP can also help reduce maintenance costs. 

WHAT’S THE VULCAN ETOP MADE OF? 

The Vulcan ETOP is made of Technora® fibre with a proprietary fire-resistant coating that withstands exposure to flames & a high-temperature environment that still meets OCIMF-required breaking strength standards.  

OTHER FEATURES & BENEFITS INCLUDE: 

  • 60-70% (2/3rds) lighter than wire
  • Abrasion resistant
  • Easily stored when not in use
  • Easy to adjust 
  • Heat & flame resistant
  • Lightweight
  • No lubrication necessary
  • Reduces mooring-related injuries & claims 

SPECIFICATIONS

vulcan imperial spec chart

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
samson rope vulcan etop spec chart
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Samson Rope ISO Vulcan ETOP Spec Chart
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WATCH A SAMSON VULCAN COMBUSTON TEST BELOW

WANT MORE? CHECK OUT OUR BLOG:

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: BUILDING A SAFETY CULTURE AT HERCULES SLR

FALL PROTECTION SAFETY: WHAT’S YOUR IQ?


STAY IN THE LOOP – FIND SAMSON ROPE AT HERCULES SLR 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Which Rope Has the Greatest Tension?

wire rope rigging, Which Rope Has the Greatest Tension?

WHICH ROPE HAS THE GREATEST TENSION?

Which rope has the greatest tension? That’s a good question, with many answers that might surprise you. 

Rope tension can be a confusing concept for some to grasp (they’ve even studied why students have such a hard time grasping the concept of tension with a block and pulley)—we’re going to explain why ‘which rope has the greatest tension?’ isn’t necessarily the best question to ask.

Instead, we’re going to discuss how tension affects rope, and why different rope will demonstrate different tensions depending on the conditions. 

Rope tension is affected by a number of things. like the size/weight of the load, length of rope, diameter of the sheave, speed/velocity of the pull and any wear & tear the rope has been placed under. 

In this article, we’ll cover:

  • What’s rope tension, and why does it matter? 
  • Hoisting equipment selection
  • Tension fatigue—What is it? 
  • Tensile strength—What is it? 
  • Rope at Hercules SLR 

WHICH ROPE HAS THE GREATEST TENSION?

WHAT IS ROPE TENSION? 

Tension refers to what happens when a rope or cable is used to transmit a force. Put even simpler, rope is under tension when it’s attached to something. 

Consider what happens when a rope and hoist pulls a piece of building material. In this scenario, the rigger themselves isn’t in contact with the load, they’re not placing direct force on the load—The rope is. 

It’s a simple concept, with many ways to calculate, which all depend on different circumatances, like the weight the rope must lift and other factors that might impact tension. 

WHICH ROPE HAS THE GREATEST TENSION? 

There are many ways to discuss rope tension. Steel (iron combined with other mined materials) is considered to have one of the greatest tensile strengths. However, steel wire rope’s construction and fabrication can impact tensile strength, and its rated capacity.

This might seem a bit over-complicated, but it’s worth understanding how tension works, even if you’re not a physicist. Most mechanical applications use tension, which is calculated in newton’s. 

What’s a newton? A newton is the force you need to accelerate a 1-kilogram mass by 1-metre per second if no friction is present. However, this can change very quickly—that’s why for the sake of practicality, we won’t discuss what these calculations are, but how tension impacts a rigging operation. 

EQUIPMENT SELECTION & TENSION

Tension can help you understand rope’s breaking strength, as well. Breaking strength refers to the weakest point of the rigging (in this case, a rope) whether it be the webbing, end-fittings, or tensioning device.

A tensioning device is used to apply force at a particular point in the rigging to create tension. This is typically done to reduce hazards that would happen otherwise.  

TENSION FATIGUE

Tension fatigue happens to steel wire rope or synthetic rope when it’s subjected to different stress-levels (represented by the stress level exerted on the rope).

Basically, tension deteriorates with time and the older a rope is, the less accurate it’s original ratings become.

TENSILE STRENGTH

First of all—What’s tensile strength? Tensile strength (in this case) measures the force that would break the rope when under pressure. 

There are three kinds of tensile strength—They are:

1) Yield Strength

Yield strength refers to the highest amount of stress the rope can withstand without causing any deformations to the original rope dimension’s. 

2) Ultimate Strength

The ultimate tensile strength refers to the total amount of stress or force the rope can take.

3) Breaking Strength 

Breaking strength refers to a rope’s ability to withstand a lift, pull or move at a specific point. 

ROPE AT HERCULES SLR 

Although we didn’t necessarily tell you ‘which rope has the greatest tension’, we hope this helps you decide which rope to choose based on their tensile properties and what works best for the application, lift and load.

Hercules SLR carries rope for marine, safety, rescue, arborist applications and more—Drop us a line and we’ll pair you with the best rope for whatever application you have. 


RIG IT RIGHT

WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR RELATED READING,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

RIGGING TIPS: AVOID COMMON WIRE ROPE DAMAGE

STOP THE SNAP: PREVENT ROPE SNAPBACK

SAMSON K-100 HOIST LINE: THE FIRST SYNTHETIC CRANE ROPE


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Stop the Snap: Prevent Rope Snapback

rope snapback, rigging service, hercules slr

Dwayne Fader’s been with Hercules SLR for over 30 years and recently, he decided to ditch the dark Canadian Winter for summery, sunny Florida—before he flies away, we sit down with Dwayne to ask him a few questions about rope snapback. 

Rope snapback never fails to shock workers – it’s fast, forceful and damaging, yet preventable. Read on to learn more about the dangers of rope snapback, and discover our tips to prevent it. 

WHY DOES ROPE SNAPBACK?

When rope has too much tension applied to it and it breaks, it will snapback toward the direction of the pull because of kinetic energy—both wire and synthetic rope does this. Rope will always snapback, but you can’t always determine how fast it will snapback. It will always snapback to its pulling point, which is visible before or when you lift. This can cause terrible injuries, or even be fatal. 

The biggest thing you can do to prevent rope snapback is to inspect your rope before, during and after use. 

If you notice that there’s a lot of tension applied to the rope, you should re-rig the operation.  

rope snapback, rope, hercules slr, rigging ropeHOW-TO PREVENT ROPE SNAPBACK

How does one prevent rope snapback? Unfortunately, once the rope has broke there is nearly nothing you can do – except try to get out of its way.

Prevention is the main way to prevent injuries and fatalities caused by rope snap back. No matter the strength of a rope, it undergoes wear and tear like exposure to chemicals, harsh environments, friction and bends – this causes rope fibres to degrade over time. 

The best way to do this is with education and training for all workers—not just those who operate the rope. To keep rope in good working order, educate workers on:

  1. How to select the correct type of rope to use for the application/job; 
  2. Proper methods to handle the rope for application and beyond;
  3. When to remove the rope from service. 

To know when to remove your rope from service, you must conduct a rope inspection. To do this, inspect ropes before, during and after use. Training should also include inspection criteria for the ropes being used on the job, which can vary depending on the type of rope. This will help workers know what to look for, so they can tell if a rope should be taken out of service, or not. 

It should also cover the reality of what happens when a rope snaps back, areas where it’s most likely to snapback in a dangerous way (for example, sailboats typically have marked off “snapback zones” that indicate dangerous zones to stay away from) and an emergency plan of what to do when snapback occurs. 

ROPE MAINTENANCE TO PREVENT SNAPBACK 

SPLICING

Rope splicing is a method use to add a termination or join two ropes together without tying a knot.

Don’t tie a knot in rope, as knots reduce their safe-working load – splice rope instead to add terminations to a rope’s end. This also (typically) retains all of the rope’s strength or WLL. 

END-FOR-ENDING

End-for-ended rope is rope that’s rotated – the frequency depends on the rope and the application its used for. End-for-ending rope adds variety to the points of the rope where stress is regularly applied, which allows you to get more life from your rope. 

STORAGE

It may sound like common sense, but it’s important to store your rope properly. Improper storage could make your rope deteriorate and fail faster. 

ROPE SNAPBACK TRAINING

An effective method to make people aware of how wrong snapback can go is to educate them in the areas and methods discussed above – and to show how scary the reality is. 

Watch the video ‘Aircraft Carrier Cable Snap’ below for a frightening example of rope snapback. Note the crew near the back who are knocked to the ground by its force, also see the person who jumps it – TWICE: 

FINAL THOUGHTS

Remember – to prevent rope snapback, ensure you’re using the right kind of rope for the move or lift you’re planning. Be sure to train workers on proper use of rope, like rope splicing, end-for-ending and safety issues. 

 

References: Miles, A., & Prentice, G. (1986). Synthetic Line Snapback (pp. 1-9, Rep.). Naval Sea Systems Command., https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BuIbvX_B7sY, https://www.samsonrope.com/resources/rope-care, http://www.workingwaterfrontarchives.org/2015/01/29/rope-snap-back-and-parting-among-marine-safety-hazards/, https://www.ukpandi.com/knowledge-publications/article/best-practice-mooring-snap-back-zones-135637/, https://samsonrope.com/resources/rope-care 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Important: Preventative Equipment Maintenance

Preventative Maintenance

Underestimating the importance of equipment maintenance could be taking a toll on your bottom line. The saying “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” is too often the way some view equipment maintenance. Why pay for service on your equipment if there’s nothing wrong with it? Believe it or not, there are several reasons. All equipment is an investment — one that requires time and money to keep in optimal shape.

BENEFITS OF MAINTENANCE

Preventative equipment maintenance is key to extending equipment life and ultimately saving you time and money. While your perception may be that paying for preventative maintenance is unnecessary spending, the reality is that without it, you’re often left with more expensive repairs. At Hercules SLR we believe in the importance of preventative maintenance, here are just some of the reasons why:

KEEP EQUIPMENT RUNNING EFFICIENTLY

When equipment runs efficiently, work get done on schedule, keeping that optimal condition is key to maintaining that level of equipment efficiency. If maintenance is overlooked, efficiency suffers and ultimately, your bottom line suffers as a result.

SMALL PROBLEMS BECOME BIGGER PROBLEMS OVER TIME

We’ve all seen it; something isn’t working exactly the way it used to, but it isn’t affecting the job, so we continue, sometimes even adjusting how we use the piece of equipment to keep things moving. While it may seem like this is the most efficient way to get the job done in the short term, it could cause you major problems long-term.

THE BIGGER THE PROBLEM, THE MORE THE EXPENSE

While it may seem like it makes no sense to spend the time and money to have your equipment inspected or repaired when you’re able to work around it, the reality is that waiting, is going to cost you even more. Bigger, more complex repairs come with a bigger price tag. Think of more than parts? yes, a more complex problem will likely come with having to replace more and/or larger parts that are expensive, but it doesn’t end there.

Larger problems often translate to more downtime, the more downtime means you’re suddenly behind schedule and/or unable to take on a new project. Employees scheduled to use that equipment need paying, so now you are paying for work that cannot be done during the downtime.

Don’t wait for the bigger problem — invest in the small one.

REDUCE INJURIES AND FATALITIES

Within the construction industry, 17% of fatal construction accidents are due to contact with objects and equipment. If your equipment isn’t being serviced on a regular basis, there’s a chance it isn’t working properly. If it isn’t working properly, you’re increasing your chances of workplace injury or death because of equipment failure.

Regardless of how much safety training you or your employees have been through, they don’t have control over equipment failure. Of course, there will always be unexpected breakdowns, but you can minimize them through being proactive about your equipment maintenance.

Workplace injuries and fatalities are tragic and expensive. Company morale suffers, and so does your bottom line. One of the benefits of maintenance doubles as a proactive step in reducing the number of injuries or fatalities you have on site. You can’t put a price on your team’s safety in the field.

cert-track-en

Service records and documentation answer many of these questions and put many of the concerns of the unknown to rest. At Hercules SLR all our customers have access to CertTracker®, our FREE online equipment management system.

CertTracker® delivers innovative solutions that streamline any inspection and maintenance process. Mobile computing, Radio Frequency (RFID) tagging and internet applications provide you with enhanced accuracy and operational efficiency. Not to mention eliminating most of the paperwork.

CertTracker Cycle

The CertTracker Advantage

 TRAIN OPERATORS AND TECHNICIANS

In conjunction with technology, there is no substitution for the human touch. It takes a trained operator to understand the problem and a trained technician to know how to fix it or to alert someone that it needs repairing. Educating your equipment operators and any technicians you have on staff is key to extending the life of your equipment, as they will be sure that small problems don’t turn in to big ones.

If training isn’t feasible, there needs to be a summary of best practices and an operation manual in place so you can ensure operators are using the equipment the way it was meant to be used. Always respect all weight limits and guidelines. An untrained equipment operator could unintentionally cause costly repairs, so make sure the best practices and expectations are outlined clearly and regularly.

SET AND STICK TO A MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE

Every piece of equipment is different. They all have their own intricacies and need a maintenance and repair schedule to match. Rather than waiting for parts to cause a problem, replace them when they are scheduled to be replaced.

How do you know when that is? The piece of equipment will have an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) maintenance recommendation. Commit to it. It may seem like by being proactive you’re attempting to fix something that isn’t broken, but trust us, neglecting to do this will result in expensive repairs.

CONDUCT REGULAR INSPECTIONS

No, inspections are not the same thing as maintenance schedules. equipment should be inspected every time it’s used. Trained operators should know what to look and listen for to ensure equipment is working properly. Checking for simple things, like signs of wear on equipment, can go a long way. The reality is equipment is often used with vibration, high temperatures and friction? all of which contribute to the wear and tear. Add age to the mix, and you have a recipe for deterioration.

This happens with all equipment, and the key to extending equipment life is to make sure you do something as simple as adding an operator visual inspection to your equipment use requirements. Noticing slight wear and tear may seem small, but these things can be identified through a visual inspection and fixed before they cause a larger problem.

HOW QUALIFIED ARE THE TECHNICIANS INSPECTING YOUR GEAR?

When it comes to inspections, testing, repairs and certification, you need to know that you and your equipment are in safe and experienced hands.

The Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA) is established across the globe as the leading representative body for all those involved in the lifting industry worldwide. They provide third party training and examination for technicians in the lifting equipment industry.

At Hercules our inspectors have undergone this internationally recognized training and some hold multiple diplomas.

OUR TECHNICIANS ARE:

  • Familiar with the most recent technology in the lifting industry
  • Skilled and confident in their inspection skills
  • Constantly learning and expanding their knowledge
  • LEEA Registered Technicians

LEEA Header

For all your maintenance requirements, let our experts help. If you need to book your equipment in for service or have any concerns, questions or call us Toll Free on:  1-877-461-4876.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

 

 

 

Steel Wire Rope – How, Where, What and Why

steel wire rope

Steel wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix forming a composite “rope”, in a pattern known as “laid rope”. Larger diameter wire rope consists of multiple strands of such laid rope in a pattern known as “cable laid”.

In stricter senses the term “steel wire rope” refers to diameter larger than 3/8 inch (9.52 mm), with smaller gauges designated cable or cords. Initially wrought iron wires were used, but today steel is the main material used for wire ropes.

Historically, steel wire rope evolved from wrought iron chains, which had a record of mechanical failure. While Fraying_steel_wire_ropeflaws in chain links or solid steel bars can lead to catastrophic failure, flaws in the wires making up a steel cable are less critical as the other wires easily take up the load. While friction between the individual wires and strands causes wear over the life of the rope, it also helps to compensate for minor failures in the short run.

Steel wire ropes were developed starting with mining hoist applications in the 1830s. Wire ropes are used dynamically for lifting and hoisting in cranes and elevators, and for transmission of mechanical power. Wire rope is also used to transmit force in mechanisms, such as a Bowden cable or the control surfaces of an airplane connected to levers and pedals in the cockpit. Only aircraft cables have WSC (wire strand core). Also, aircraft cables are available in smaller diameters than steel wire rope. For example, aircraft cables are available in 3/64 in. diameter while most wire ropes begin at a 1/4 in. diameter. Static wire ropes are used to support structures such as suspension bridges or as guy wires to support towers. An aerial tramway relies on wire rope to support and move cargo overhead.

History

Modern steel wire rope was invented by the German mining engineer Wilhelm Albert in the years between 1831 and 1834 for use in mining in the Harz Mountains in Clausthal, Lower Saxony, Germany. It was quickly accepted because it proved superior to ropes made of hemp or to metal chains, such as had been used before.

Wilhelm Albert’s first ropes consisted of three strands consisting of four wires each. In 1840, Scotsman Robert Stirling Newall improved the process further. In America wire rope was manufactured by John A. Roebling, starting in 1841 and forming the basis for his success in suspension bridge building. Roebling introduced a number of innovations in the design, materials and manufacture of wire rope. Ever with an ear to technology developments in mining and railroading, Josiah White and Erskine Hazard, principal owners[9] of the Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company (LC&N Co.) — as they had with the first blast furnaces in the Lehigh Valley — built a Wire Rope factory in Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania in 1848, which provided lift cables for the Ashley Planes project, then the back track planes of the Summit Hill & Mauch Chunk Railroad, improving its attractiveness as a premier tourism destination, and vastly improving the throughput of the coal capacity since return of cars dropped from nearly four hours to less than 20 minutes. The decades were witness to a burgeoning increase in deep shaft mining in both Europe and North America as surface mineral deposits were exhausted and miners had to chase layers along inclined layers. The era was early in railroad development and steam engines lacked sufficient tractive effort to climb steep slopes, so incline plane railways were common. This pushed development of cable hoists rapidly in the United States as surface deposits in the Anthracite Coal Region north and south dove deeper every year, and even the rich deposits in the Panther Creek Valley required LC&N Co. to drive their first shafts into lower slopes beginning Lansford and its Schuylkill County twin-town Coaldale.

The German engineering firm of Adolf Bleichert & Co. was founded in 1874 and began to build bicable aerial tramways for mining in the Ruhr Valley. With important patents, and dozens of working systems in Europe, Bleichert dominated the global industry, later licensing its designs and manufacturing techniques to Trenton Iron Works, New Jersey, USA which built systems across America. Adolf Bleichert & Co. went on to build hundreds of aerial tramways around the world: from Alaska to Argentina, Australia and Spitsbergen. The Bleichert company also built hundreds of aerial tramways for both the Imperial German Army and the Wehrmacht.

In the last half of the 19th century, steel wire rope systems were used as a means of transmitting mechanical power including for the new cable cars. Wire rope systems cost one-tenth as much and had lower friction losses than line shafts. Because of these advantages, wire rope systems were used to transmit power for a distance of a few miles or kilometers.

Safety

The steel wire ropes are stressed by fluctuating forces, by wear, by corrosion and in seldom cases by extreme forces. The rope life is finite and the safety is only ensured by inspection for the detection of wire breaks on a reference rope length, of cross-section loss, as well as other failures so that the wire rope can be replaced before a dangerous situation occurs. Installations should be designed to facilitate the inspection of the wire ropes.

Read more about Wire Rope here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLR, Hercules Machining & Millwright Services, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Loadshackle Supports Research at ITC Championship

loadshackle-tree-climbing

A 6.5t capacity wireless loadshackle from Straightpoint, which is based on a Crosby G2130 shackle, was used to measure loads during competitors’ climbs at this year’s International Tree Climbing Championship (ITCC). The competition took place this summer at the U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C.

Tree Climbing 1

More than 60 of the world’s best male and female professional tree climbers, representing 13 countries, competed for the title of World Champion. The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) provides training and education on safe work practices for tree care providers. Organized by ISA and presented by The

Loadshackle and tree

Davey Tree Expert Company, the event was free and open to the public.

The Straightpoint Wireless Loadshackle was used in the Ascent Event, which tests a competitor’s ability to efficiently and safely use their selected and approved ascent system. The event evaluates competitors’ efficiency in attaching the system to the ascent line(s), climbing to the bell, and transferring into a descent system. Points are earned for speed as well as for meeting predetermined safety objectives.

Tree Climbing 2

The loadshackle was installed between the haul rope and the rigging hub. The ascent lines are connected to an attachment point, controlled by a ground technician using the haul line. Additionally, an overhead belay system secured competitors while aloft.

Dr. Brian Kane, Professor of Arboriculture at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, was collecting data as part of an ongoing research project supported by the TREE Fund, which works to sustain the world’s urban forests by providing funding for scientific research, education programs, and scholarships related to arboriculture and urban forestry.

You can learn more about ISA here: https://www.isa-arbor.com/

You can also learn more & donate to the TREE Fund here: https://www.treefund.org/ways-to-give

Read the original article here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLR, Hercules Machining & Millwright Services, Spartan Industrial Marine, Stellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.