NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

rigging course, fundamentals of rigging in hamilton ontario

NEW! Train with the Best in Hamilton, Ontario

Learn the skills to life safely, securely & efficiently at the Rigging Fundamentals course at Hercules SLR in Brampton, Ontario on July 15 and 16 from 8:30am to 4:30pm. 

Join our all-day, LEEA-accredited course with lifting & rigging expert Trainer Steve Hache and learn the fundamental skills of rigging to perform work in the marine, entertainment, construction, oil or transportation industry. 

Rigging is an excellent career or skill if you’re interested in mechanics & how things work, working in a variety of different locations on different machinery and keeping others safe & secure. 

At the Hercules SLR ‘Fundamentals of Rigging’ Training Course, you’ll learn:  

  • Regulations and standards relevant in Canada & North America 
  • Risk assessment & management 
  • How to create and execute a rigging plan 
  • How to calculate load weight 
  • What is the rigging triangle
  • How to find the centre of gravity and calculate sling angles 
  • Pre-use inspection
  • How to communicate on a rigging site (I.E. radio, hand signals, etc.) 
  • Learn about and how to use rigging equipment like slings, hitches, hardware and hooks

WHAT ELSE CAN YOU EXPECT AT THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE?

fundamentals of rigging in hamilton, ontario
Couse outline—Click here. 

GET TO KNOW YOUR HERUCLES SLR TRAINER:

MEET STEVE HACHE, CD


TRAIN WITH THE BEST!

FOR MORE INFORMATION, OR TO SIGN-UP FOR THE FUNDAMENTALS OF RIGGING COURSE CALL OR EMAIL SHERRY BOHM, CSR: 

SBOHM@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (905) 538-3217


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

How to Handle a Workplace Emergency

workplace emergency toy responder

How-to Handle a Workplace Emergency

We’ve discussed Emergency Preparedness Week earlier this week on the blog – But what about how to handle a workplace emergency? Emergency Preparedness Week is held for one week each year, and this week it’s May 5-11.

To celebrate, we’re sharing some of our best tips for emergency preparedness. 

Emergencies don’t wait until you’re home. We’ve covered general emergency preparedness, like what your emergency plan & kit should include, and that you should keep a version of both an emergency plan and kit in your workplace. 

It’s smart to be prepared for emergency situations no matter where you are. Many tips for emergency preparedness in the home apply to the workplace, but there are a few other situations and procedures unique to work that are worth being prepared for. (It’s also an essential part of any Occupational Health & Safety program). 

Emergencies you could encounter at work are:

  • Fires/Structural failures 
  • Medical emergencies
  • Attacks (Shootings, active assailants, etc.) 
  • Industrial accidents (Ex. hazardous chemical spills, burns, etc.) 

How can you prepare for emergencies in the workplace? We recommend: 

  • Conduct a workplace risk assessment
  • Hold emergency drills at least once a year 
  • Have an emergency kit in your office or workplace (Consider where the highest risk is, the amount of people and gather materials like blankets, food & water accordingly) 
  • Have a rescue procedure for falls, slips and other accidents relevant that are relevant to your workplace 
Four elements of a workplace emergency management program are:
  1. Prevention: Policies and procedures that minimize emergencies 
  2. Preparation: Hold drills and activities to make sure personnel is familiar with the procedure 
  3. Response: Action to take when emergency occurs 
  4. Recovery: Practices to resume normal business operations 
Here are six steps to plan for a workplace emergency: 
  1. Establish a planning team. The team should include representatives from different departments including senior management. 
  2. Assess the risks and how the company can respond.
  3. Develop an emergency response plan.
  4. Implement the plan—Get supplies, communicate & train others 
  5. Test the plan—Hold drills or exercises 
  6. Improve the plan continuously. Revisit the plan at least once a year.

So, what should you include in step 3? Here are some things you should include in your written workplace emergency response plan: 

  • Scope and outline potential emergencies 
  • Alarms and other methods of initiating a response 
  • Site-specific response procedures 
  • Command structure, roles & responsibilities 
  • How to shut down power & relevant machinery 
  • How to evacuate the premises
  • Communication systems and protocols 
  • Emergency contact lists 
  • Resource list 

Extra Workplace Emergency Tips  

  • Hold random emergency drills now and then—It can be worthwhile to show employees what a perceived threat is like, and how to ‘jump into action’ when you’re unprepared, and the hazard or incident is unplanned. 
  • Don’t forget about visitors—If you have customers, clients or other personnel that are likely to be in the workplace, don’t forget to include provisions for them in your plan 
  • Have accessible emergency information available—Having accessible emergency information includes posters and training videos 

We hope this gives you an idea of what to include in your workplace emergency plan. This is a loose guideline for handling workplace emergencies, as we mention at the beginning of the article it’s wise to prepare for emergencies that are relevant to your workplace—For example, if you work at heights often, an emergency plan for workers who have arrested a fall will be a necessary emergency plan to have. 


DEALING WITH A WORKPLACE EMERGENCY? CHECK OUT THESE BLOGS: 

STUCK IN A TIGHT SPOT? WHAT TO KNOW IN A CONFINED SPACE

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK | WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES REPAIRS, INSPECTIONS & MAINTENANCE FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876  


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

National Emergency Preparedness Week | What you Need to Know

national emergency preparedness week header

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK

Since 1996, National Emergency Preparedness week happens each year in Canada for one week. This year, it’s being held from May 5-11. 

This is a national awareness campaign and is a collaboration between the provinces, emergency organizations and other groups across the country. It’s a great time to make sure your workplace, and your home is equipped with an emergency plan and kit to stay safe if an emergency happens. 

National Emergency Preparedness Week is meant to showcase the importance of being prepared for a range of emergencies—These three steps are recommended to prepare: 

  • Know the risks 
  • Make a plan 
  • Get an emergency kit 

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 1) KNOW THE RISKS 

One of the most useful (yet simple) things you can do to be prepared for an emergency is to understand the region you live in. Natural disasters are a risk in Canada, and they can vary depending on which region you live in. 

There are some risks other than natural disaster that are important to prepare for—These can include technological hazards, industrial or transportation accidents or power outages. 

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 2) MAKE A PLAN 

It’s important to have a plan in-case of an emergency. You can have an emergency plan that works for a variety of different circumstances. 

They plans might be different depending on your family, location and other factors. It doesn’t take long to create an emergency preparedness kit either—20 minutes is all it takes to ensure you, your workplace and family is safe in case of an emergency situation. 

Some important things to keep in mind when creating your emergency plan are: 

  • Be familiar/Have copies of your provincial emergency response plan. 
  • Plan how your family/workforce will communicate with each other if an emergency happens and you’re not together 
  • Plan for specific risks like earthquakes, power outages and severe storms 
  • Keep people from your neighbourhood in mind that may need extra help during an emergency, for example, an elderly neighbour, and assign ‘block buddies’ for those who require one. 

GET YOUR DOWNLOADABLE EMERGENCY PLAN CHECKLIST HERE

NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 3) GET AN EMERGENCY KIT 

Emergency kits can be bought from places like Red Cross First Aid, the Salvation Army, or you can create you own. 

We recommend looking at your emergency kit each year and be sure to replace the food inside. 

GET YOUR DOWNLOADABLE EMERGENCY KIT CHECKLIST HERE

Here are some additional items you might want to keep in your emergency kit (beyond the basic items found on the checklist above). 

In your car:

  • Blanket 
  • Candle & matches 
  • Spare clothes and shoes 
  • First aid kit with seatbelt cutter 
  • Flashlight (crank or battery-powered)—Replace batteries once a year 
  • Non-perishable food 
  • Contact information
  • Radio—Replace batteries once a year 
  • Small shovel, scraper and snowbrush
  • Warning light or road flares 
  • Water 
  • Whistle
  • Antifreeze, windshield washer fluid
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Road maps
  • Sand, salt or cat litter (non-clumping)
  • Tow rope and jumper cables 

FAST FACTS:

  • Around 5,000 earthquakes happen in Canada each year.
  • The Saguenay flood of 1996 was Canada’s first billion-dollar disaster and caused mud, rocks, water and trees to become dislodged and 12,000 people had to evacuate their homes.
  • Only 40% of Canadians have an emergency kit prepared, yet 85% of Canadians say it’s important to have one. 
  • Hailstones range in size—They can be the size of peas or baseballs.
  • Hurricanes can cause more widespread damage than tornadoes—Their damage can hit over 1,000 kilometres.
  • In storms, power lines, ice or branches can fall even hours after the storm has ended. 
  • One of the worst storms in Canadian history was an ice storm on the East Coast in 1998—Power outages lasted up to 4 weeks, and restoration efforts cost nearly $3billion. 
  • In 2007, 410 severe weather events plagued the prairie provinces—This is almost double their nearly average of 221 severe weather events.
  • The cost of natural disasters worldwide has increased by $7billion over the past decade. 
  • The biggest landslide in Canadian history saw a 40-metre deep scar that covered 80 city blocks in 1894 at Saint-Alban, Quebec. 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS INSTRUCTIONS 

We’ve given you a lot of tips about what you should include in your emergency preparedness kit. Here are more steps you can take for an emergency plan: 

In an emergency

  • Follow your emergency plan
  • Get your emergency kit 
  • Make sure you’re safe before assisting others 
  • Listen to the radio or television for information from authorities—Local officials might advise you to stay where you are. Follow their instructions! 
  • Stay where you are until it’s safe to evacuate. 

Evacuation orders

  • NOTE: Authorities won’t ask you to leave home unless they have a reason to believe you’re in danger 
  • If ordered to evacuate, take your emergency kit, wallet, personal identification for each family member and copies of essential family documents with you. Bring a celluar phone and spare battery or charger with you, if you have one. Use travel routes specified by local authorities. 
  • If you have time, call or e-mail your out-of-town contact (Here’s a printable list you can use to write down contact information) 
  • If there’s time, leave a note that tells others when you left and what you’ve shut off. If officials give the direction, shut off water and electricity. 
  • If you have a natural gas service, leave it on unless officials tell you to turn it off. If you do turn off the gas, the gas company will have to reconnect it—Note that in a major emergency, it could take weeks for a professional to respond in a major emergency. 
  • If you have them, take pets with you. Lock your home and follow instructions from authorities. 
  • If you go to an evacuation centre, register personal information at the registration desk—Leave only when authorities advise it’s safe. 

FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOG:

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: BUILDING A SAFETY CULTURE AT HERCULES SLR

FALL PROTECTION SAFETY: WHAT’S YOUR IQ?


SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT—HERCULES SLR PROVIDES WORKPLACE SAFETY TRAINING, INSPECTIONS & MORE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876


 FACEBOOK LINKEDIN  TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

April 28, Day of Mourning: Fight for the Living, Mourn for the Dead

blue, white and yellow hard hats for day of mourning

APRIL 28, DAY OF MOURNING | ABOUT

Every year in Canada, April 28 is the Day of Mourning. This is to commemorate workers who have lost their life, been injured or made ill at work.

The Day of Mourning has grown to include more than 120 countries around the world. In many of these places, it’s known as the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, or Worker’s Memorial Day. 

The purpose of this day is to not only remember and honour those lost to workplace accidents, but to inform and educate workers about workplace accidents and talk about how we can prevent these tragedies. 

APRIL 28, DAY OF MOURNING | FAST FACTS ON WORKPLACE INJURY

  • In 1984, the Canadian Labour congress created the National Day of Mourning in Canada 
  • In 1991, the Parliament of Canada passed the Workers Mourning Day Act to recognize April 28 as an official date of mourning 
  • Young worker’s aged 18-24 are most likely to be injured on the job. 
  • In 2017, 951 workplace fatalities were recorded in Canada—46 more than 2016. 23 of these deaths were workers aged 15-24. 
  • 251,508 accepted claims from workplace injury (An increase of 10,000 accepted claims from 2016) for lost time due to a work-related injury or disease. 
  • Canadian flags on Parliament fly at half-mast 
  • To show respect for others who have lost their life, people wear yellow ribbons, black, light candles and/or observe a moment of silence at 11am. 

APRIL 28, DAY OF MOURNING | WHAT YOU CAN DO

On the Day of Mourning, there are a few things you can do at your workplace to commemorate the day, pay respects and commit to safety. Here are a few ideas: 

  • Have a health & safety meeting covering safety-related topics like PPE 
  • Have your team share stories about different safety-related situations or issues they’ve dealt with
  • Brainstorm ideas to make your workplace safer with your team

We remember those who died, were injured or made ill from their work. We commit to protecting workers and preventing further workplace tragedies. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

POLY-WHAT?! ALL ABOUT SYNTHETIC SLINGS

SYNTHETIC ROUNDSLING—FREE INSPECTION DOWNLOAD GUIDE

HERCULES HOW-TO: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Don’t Believe Us—Just Watch: Book your 3M Fall Protection Demo

3m fall protection gear for tools

NEW! 3M Fall Protection Demo Bag 

Hercules SLR knows the value of fall prevention—That’s why we’ve put together kits with some of our favourite 3M fall protection gear to show you the difference it makes. 

3M FALL PROTECTION | WHY IS FALL PREVENTION IMPORTANT? 

In Canada, every year over 14,000 workers are injured due to falls and over 27,000 workers are injured due to dropped objects like hammers, cell phones and work-radios—These are just the recorded incidents. 

Fall protection for all kinds of workers should include the right kind of PPE for the kind of work you do, but prevention plans, rescue & retrieval plans and tool fall protection equipment, plans and risk assessment measures. 

3M FALL PROTECTION FOR TOOLS | STOP THE DROP

It can be easy to underestimate the impact of slips and falls—It can be even easier to underestimate the impact of dropped tools and equipment, so it’s important to take preventative steps to eliminate the risk of injury. 

Often, tools fall from heights due to poor risk assessment & planning, human error, poorly stored tools and fixtures & fittings on-site that have failed. Since tools are often dropped by accident, focus should be on preventing these incidents from happening at all.

Tool fall protection normally focuses on secondary protective measures, like safety nets and toe boards, but it’s rare that tool fall protection plans employ a primary system to prevent drops. These precautions are often taken after an accident or injury occurs. 

WHAT KIND OF DAMAGE DOES A DROPPED TOOL DO? 

There are two main kinds of incidents when tools fall—These are direct impact and deflection. Direct impact injuries happen when the dropped object hits you directly on the head, and deflection happens when the tool bounces off another surface and strikes you. 

Let’s imagine a scenario—You’re working at heights, 200-feet (or 6-metres) above ground on scaffolding. You stop to check something, when your foot nudges the tape measure and it slides out and falls to the ground. 200-feet below. Even though the tape measure only weighs about 1.5lbs, it hits with a force of 3,750lbs. To put that in perspective, a hippo’s average weight is 3,300-4000lbs. 

This happened to a worker in New Jersey, who was delivering sheet metal to a work site when he was killed by a falling tape measure. Falling objects pose risk to the worker who drops it too, since the knee-jerk reaction is often to reach out and try to catch it which could cause you to slip and fall. 

Fall protection protects you from falls, while tool fall protection is designed to save others. We’ve covered comfortable fall protection equipment on the blog before and that it’s important to remember a safety harness isn’t a one-size fits all solution. Tool fall protection is the same.

Many workers find tool fall protection distractive and obtrusive—This is why it’s important to select a drop prevention system that’s comfortable and reasonable for workers to use. 

WHAT SHOULD MY PLAN INCLUDE? 

Your fall prevention plan should consider and plan to account for: 

  • Tool size & fit
  • Tool form & function
  • Attachment points for each tool (great starting point for tool protection) 
  • Drop-tests with attachment points, before used on the worksite 

3M FALL PROTECTION DEMO BAG | WHAT’S INSIDE?

3M fall protection, protecta vest-style harness at hercules securing, lifting and rigging
The 3M Protecta® Vest-Style Harness has back D-rings, tongue-buckle rings and pass-thru chest connections that give maximum comfort and protection.

 

3m protecta rebel SRL
The Protecta® Rebel Self-Retracting Lifeline (SRL, web) is compact, lightweight and has a swiveling anchorage with self-locking snap-hooks and fast-acting speed-sending brake system. It also has thermoplastic housing for extra agility and protection.
 
3m fall protection shock-absorbing lanyard
The 3M Twin-Leg Shock-Absorbing Lanyard has double-leg loops for 100% tie-off with convenient snap-hook and flat, steel rebar hooks at leg ends to keep you balanced in case you fall. 
3m fall protection dbi-sala harness
The 3M DBI-SALA® Vest-Style Harness has back D-ring and tongue-buckle leg straps, quick-connect and pass-through buckles with detachable shoulder padding that give ultimate comfort. It has an industrial-strength magnet that secures your items, even when tipped upside down.
 

3M SAFE BUCKET

3m fall protection demo safe bucket

The 3M safe bucket is your best friend for preventing dropped tools. 

The 3M Safe Bucket (100lb Load Rated Drawstring Canvas) includes: 

  • Adjustable Radio Holster (1500089)
  • Hard Hat Tether (1500178) 
  • Tool Lanyard, Coil Ether, 5lb. (2.3kg) capacity—Single-leg with self-locking carabiner with hooks at both ends. (1500063)
  • Python Canvas pouch (1500119) 

3M FALL PROTECTION DEMO BAG | BOOK YOUR DEMO NOW 

What’s a Fall Protection Demo, you ask? Book a fall protection demo with your local Hercules SLR branch and a representative will: 

  • Share the features & benefits of the 3M Fall Protection Demo Bag Products 
  • Show you how to use the tool fall protection attachment points 
  • Discuss your unique PPE needs based on your employees and type of work 

BOOK YOUR FALL PROTECTION DEMO NOW

SHOW & TELL ISN’T JUST FOR KIDS—HERCULES SLR WILL SHOW YOU HOW 3M EQUIPMENT  WORKS AND KEEP YOU SAFE

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK LINKEDIN TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Fall Protection Safety: What’s your IQ?

fall protection safety quiz

Think you know how to stay safe at heights? Maybe you’ve read our fall protection glossary and think you’re an expert? Now’s your time to prove it—Take our fall protection safety quiz and find out if you have a high IQ, or if you have a little more training to do. 

Think you have what it takes? Find out below! 

FALL PROTECTION SAFETY | TAKE THE QUIZ

0%

There is no question


FALL PROTECTION SAFETY

Fall protection is not a waste of time—It’s often seen as a burden, but safety equipment exists to help workers, not hurt them. The right fall protection PPE lets you go home safely each day.

You have the right to stay alive at work—Which is worth it, if you ask us.  

To learn more about fall protection and what you need to stay safe, book a free fall protection demo with your local Hercules SLR branch. They’ll show you how harnesses, SRL’s and tool fall prevention equipment works, how it feels and what is best for you. 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


SAFETY IS NO ACCIDENT

FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT OUR FALL PROTECTION SAFETY SERVICES & PRODUCTS 

 


FOR MORE ARTICLES ON FALL PROTECTION SAFETY

VISIT OUR BLOG:

FALL ARREST SYSTEM: DON’T FOOL WITH YOUR TOOLS

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

SAFETY INSPECTION: MAKE YOUR HARNESS A HABIT


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn and YouTube for more news and upcoming events.

Under Construction: Building Safety Culture at Hercules SLR

safety culture at hercules slr

Hercules SLR has been building a safety culture for over 45 years—Yes, we literally got here by playing it safe.

When it comes to rigging, Hercules SLR does it all, and we does it safely. How do we build a safety culture? Read on to learn how we make safety cool, (really). 

SAFETY CULTURE | why we’re proud 

We approach safety with everything we do, from how we inspect cranes to how we pull into our parking lot each morning (It’s true, we back in—It’s the safest way).  

It’s important to lead by example. Behaviour-based safety training has long-been used as a framework to build a safety culture. This approach says that human-behaviour is the main cause of workplace accidents, and to prevent workplace accidents, employees should tell supervisors and managers when unsafe behaviours take place, and discipline or reward them—And yes, while human error is up there on the list of reasons why, it’s also been proven that discipline alone and placing blame doesn’t actually make a workplace safer.

It’s much more effective to lead by example, ingrain safety in your daily actions and get feedback from coworkers and employees on the safety culture at your organization. To us, it’s important to know why employees work safe—Why do you want to go home at the end of each day? Whether it’s to spend time with family, play hockey or go ATVing, our safety culture lets us do what we love outside of work. 

SAFETY CULTURE | leading by example

We provide training and on-going learning opportunities for our employees—These include:

  • Support and training for all branches across Canada by our in-house trainer, Lisa Barkhouse  
  • Rich online resource library (powerpoints, manuals & video)
  • Opportunities for external training and certifications 
  • The Hercules Training Academy—our cutting-edge training academy is equipped with a crane that supports 10-tonnes, smaller gantry cranes and materials to lift and rig you’ll actually encounter on-site

Overall, Canadian workplaces lack on-the-job training, and Hercules SLR is passionate about providing on-the-job training. We know it’s important to give our employees the skills they need to be safe.

SAFETY CULTURE | health, safety & life at Hercules SLR

Health and safety go hand-in-hand. How does Hercules SLR make sure we support a healthy lifestyle? We: 

  • Offer incentives for employees to get out and get moving
  • Benefits comparable to industry standards
  • Social outings and team-building activities 

We’re also proud of our diverse workforce. We have staff hailing from China to England—And Canada, of course. 

What else is great about work at Herc? There’s:

  • Strong sense of teamwork 
  • Management team that recognizes individual achievements you reach and exceed
  • Bonuses and sales incentives for our team of Customer Service Representative’s (CSR’s) and salespeople 
  • Exciting growth opportunities for those who are eager to learn—For example, of one our inspectors expressed interest in gaining more certification, and we made it happen for her. 

SAFETY CULTURE | is work at Hercules SLR right for you?

Is #HercAtWork right for you? If you’re:

  • Engaged
  • Motivated
  • A self-advocate
  • Excited to learn

You’ll fit right in. Find information on current career openings below. 


WORK WITH HERC

VIEW & APPLY FOR POSITIONS AT HERCULES SLR BELOW

HR@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR RELATED READING

VISIT OUR BLOG:

MEET YOUR HERCULES SLR INSPECTOR, QUINCY WARNER

MEET QUALITY ASSURANCE & SAFETY SPECIALIST, JAMES GOLEMIC

WELCOME TO HAMILTON, ONTARIO: MEET RIGGER JIM CASE


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN  TWITTER  INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

The Westray Bill & Weed: What you Need to Know About Bill C-45

You may be familiar with Bill C-45, otherwise known as the Cannabis Act, a piece of legislation that legalized weed throughout Canada – but what does this mean for the workplace?

Read on to learn more about Bill C-45, what it means for employers, employees & organizations and how to stay compliant & safe at work.

BILL C-45: WHAT IS IT?

Bill C-45, also known as the Westray Bill, was legislation enacted as law to Canada’s Criminal Code in 2004. Bill C-45 was created following the Westray Mining tragedy, where 26 miners died due to preventable, unsafe work conditions. In a report made after the tragedy, the owner of the mine, Curragh Resources, safety inspectors and even politicians’ were found to all have some sort of responsibility for the tragedy.

This legislation aimed to create legal responsibility for companies regarding workplace health and safety. It detailed rules to attribute criminal liability to organizations, and those who direct the work of others, like supervisors, managers, or anyone else with the responsibility of directing/supervising others. This specification is made because sometimes, a job title doesn’t specify whether they are responsible to manage others and assign responsibilities & duties.

The 2004 bill amended the criminal code to place responsibility on organizations and others responsible. Sections 217.1, 22.1 and 22.2 were added. These sections state:

217.1

217.1—Everyone who undertakes, or has the authority, to direct how another person does work or performs a task is under a legal duty to take reasonable steps to prevent bodily harm to that person, or any other person, arising from that work or task.”

22.1

22.1—In respect of an offence that requires the prosecution to prove negligence, an organization is a party to the offence if (a) acting within the scope of their authority, (i) one of its representatives is a party to the offence, or (ii) two or more of its representatives engage in conduct, whether by act or omission, such that, if it had been the conduct of only one representative, that representative would have been a party to the offence; and (b) the senior officer who is responsible for the aspect of the organization’s activities that is relevant to the offence departs – or the senior officers, collectively, depart – markedly from the standard of care that, in the circumstances, could reasonably be expected to prevent a representative of the organization from being a party to the offence.

22.2

22.2—In respect of an offence that requires the prosecution to prove fault — other than negligence — an organization is a party to the offence if, with the intent at least in part to benefit the organization, one of its senior officers (a) acting within the scope of their authority, is a party to the offence; (b) having the mental state required to be a party to the offence and acting within the scope of their authority, directs the work of other representatives of the organization so that they do the act or make the omission specified in the offence; or (c) knowing that a representative of the organization is or is about to be a party to the offence, does not take all reasonable measures to stop them from being a party to the offence.”

BILL C-45: THE CANNABIS ACT 

In 2017, the cannabis act was proposed as part of Bill C-45 and was introduced to Parliament in April, 2017. Marijuana was legalized for recreational use throughout Canada in October 2018 – with this, of course, comes potential safety issues for both employers and employees.

BILL C-45: WEED IN THE WORKPLACE

There are limited studies about how weed impacts those in the workplace (for obvious reasons) – however, there are quite a few well-known side effects that generally, will impact the way you work. Symptoms of marijuana use include:

  • Dizziness, drowsiness, feeling faint or light-headed, fatigue, headache(s)
  • Impaired memory and disturbances in attention, concentration and ability to think and make decisions
  • Disorientation, confusion, feeling drunk, feeling abnormal or having abnormal thoughts, feeling “too high”, feelings of unreality, feeling an extreme slowing of time
  • Suspiciousness, nervousness, episodes of anxiety that resemble a panic attack, paranoia (loss of contact with reality), hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that don’t exist)
  • Impairment of motor skills and perception, altered bodily perceptions, losing control of bodily movements, falls
  • Dry mouth, throat irritation, coughing
  • Worsening of seizures
  • Hypersensitivity (worsening of dermatitis or hives)
  • Higher or lower blood levels of certain medications
  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Fast heartbeat

Overall, Health Canada (2016) says about cannabis-use, “Using cannabis or any cannabis product can impair your concentration, your ability to think and make decisions, and your reaction time and coordination. This can affect your motor skills, including your ability to drive. It can also increase anxiety and cause panic attacks, and in some cases cause paranoia and hallucinations.

You should not be impaired at work under any circumstances – but particularly if you work in an industry that relies strongly on safety standards, or risk & hazard assessment to keep yourself and others safe. As we mentioned in the list above, marijuana can impair your ability to think clearly and your motor-skill ability & agility. Its effects can last up to 24-hours.

BILL C-45: HOW TO STAY COMPLIANT

FOR EMPLOYERS 

As Bill C-45 states, employers in Canada have a responsibility to provide a safe work environment for employees and take reasonable measures to protect the health and safety of workers. Employers must show due diligence by creating safety precautions before an accident occurs – not after. How does an employer do this?

Well, there are many factors to consider when it comes to workplace safety and both employers and employees play a role to make it happen. Here are easy steps you can take to stay compliant, and have transparent communication with staff about weed at work:

  • Does your organization have an EFAP (Employee & Family Assistance Program) in place? Typically, this gives employees a private, confidential place to ask questions about the resources available to help with issues like stress, depression and addiction. They will often, at no charge to the employee, tell you what kind of services are available to deal with these issues, and if your employee benefits will help you access them.

FOR EMPLOYEES

Employees have a responsibility to show up ready to work and keep themselves, and others safe – employees must work sober, alert and take measures to not be fatigued, all of which increase the risk of injury.


Have questions about our workplace safety? Hercules SLR will lift you there.

Click here to learn more about safety training courses at Hercules SLR.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

PPE-volution – How the Golden Gate Bridge Inspired PPE

Brooklyn bridge workers

America’s Industrial Revolution and ingenuity brought about many important advances in worker safety and PPE (Personal Protection Equipment).

At the start of the American Industrial Revolution, worker safety and health were nowhere near the priority they are today. As manufacturing grew, so too did worker injuries and deaths. The idea of safe work grew slowly from a small glimmer to a bright flame inside the collective consciousness of the American workforce.

Although the creation of OSHA regulations was many decades away, the evolution of PPE progressed on its own with the creation of new types of protective devices and advancements in pre-existing devices. Much of this early PPE had a major influence on worker safety’s advancement and will continue to do so.

Hard-Headed PPE Golden Gate Bridge
San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, built in 1933, is an excellent early example of PPE’s influence on safety. Constructing a cable-suspension bridge that was 4,200 feet long was a task that had not been attempted before, one that presented many hazards. The project’s chief engineer, Joseph Strauss, was committed to making its construction as safe as possible.

The bridge’s construction played a particularly significant role in the successful development of one form PPE: It was the first major project that required all of its workers to wear hard hats. Although the hard hat was in its infancy at the time, head protection wasn’t new; gold miners had learned long before the importance of taking steps to protect against falling debris. Michael Lloyd, head protection manager at Bullard – a company in business since 1898, said many early miners wore bowler hats, which were hard felt hats with rounded crowns. Often dubbed “Iron Hats,” these were stuffed with cotton to create a cushioning barrier against blows.

Inspired by the design of his “doughboy” Army helmet, Edward Bullard returned home from World War I and began designing what was to become known as the “hard-boiled hat.” The hat was made of layered canvas that was steamed to impregnate it with resin, sewn together, and varnished into its molded shape. Bullard was awarded the patent in 1919. Later that year, the Navy approached Bullard with a request for some sort of head protection for its shipyard workers. The hat’s first internal suspension was added to increase its effectiveness, and the product’s use quickly spread to lumber workers, utility workers, and construction workers. By the time of the Hoover Dam’s construction in 1931, many workers were voluntarily wearing the headgear. Soon after, the Golden Gate Bridge construction provided a true test of the hard hat’s protective capability because falling rivets were one of the major dangers during the project.

Other innovations came in the form of different materials. In 1938, Bullard released the first aluminum hard hat. It was more durable and comfortable, but it conducted electricity and did not hold up well to the elements. In the ’40s, phenolic hats became available as a predecessor to fiberglass hats. Thermoplastics became the preferred material a decade later for many head protection products; it’s still used by many manufacturers today.
PPE-Hard-hats
From Left to right: Vintage Bullard Miners hats, Vintage Bullard Hard Boiled Hard Hat 1930’s (Used on the Golden Gate Bridge Project, Hard Boiled aluminum Safety hard hat w/Liner and a current day hard hat

In 1953, Bullard introduced the process of injection-molded hats. “Before, [thermoplastic] was kind of laid out on a mold. In the injection-mold process you actually have a closed mold that you pump into. It makes a more consistent helmet and a higher-quality product, which in the long run is also going to be the same thickness all the way through. It’s going to be a safer helmet,” Lloyd said.

Despite the hard hat’s effectiveness and relatively low cost, its use wasn’t officially required at most job sites until the passage of the Occupational Safety and Health Act in 1970. OSHA’s head protection standard, 1910.135, obligated employees to protect workers and instructed manufacturers and employers to turn to the American National Standards Institute’s Z89.1 standard for the appropriate usage guidelines.

Many new materials have since been created, such as the use of General Electric’s high-heat-resistant polyphthalate-carbonate resin in firefighters’ helmets. New hard hats have been designed that provide side protection, which are designated type 2 hats in ANSI Z89.1. “A hard hat was originally designed to protect if something falls from that sky and hits you in the head,” Lloyd said. “But what happens if you run into something? What happens if you bend over and something hits your helmet?”

Because hard hats are a mature market, except for the development of other materials, most innovations will be comfort features and technologies enabling them to withstand different temperature extremes, Lloyd predicted. Easier-to-use designs are appearing that allow users to adjust a hard hat’s suspension with one hand. In the last couple of years, manufacturers have come up with different types of vented helmets designed to help workers keep cool. Hats are accessorized with attachable face shields, visors, and ear muffs, and some have perspiration-absorbing liners. Some come with AM/FM radios, walkie-talkies, and camcorders.

Netting a Safe Return
Although primitive by today’s standards, the solution for the problem of falls also was addressed during construction of the Golden Gate Bridge. Three years into the construction, delays had convinced Strauss to invest more than $130,000 (these were Depression-era dollars, remember) on a vast net similar to those used in a circus. Suspended under the bridge, it extended 10 feet wider and 15 feet farther than the bridge itself. This gave workers the confidence to move quickly across the slippery steel construction. There were reports of workers being threatened with immediate dismissal if found purposely diving into the net.

Strauss’ net was heralded as a huge success until the morning of Feb. 16, 1937, when the west side of a stripping platform bearing a crew of 11 men broke free from its moorings. After tilting precariously for a moment, the other side broke free and the platform collapsed into the net, which contained two other crew members who were scraping away debris. One platform worker, Tom Casey, managed to jump and grab a bridge beam before the platform fell; he hung there until rescued. The net held the platform and the others for a few seconds before it ripped and fell into the water. Two of the 12 men who fell survived.

Read the original article here.

At Hercules SLR we provide a wide range of PPE solutions, from Lanyards and harnesses, to hard hats and rescue equipment.  We also repair, service and certify PPE equipment. We stock leading industry brands and can provide you with expert advise on your PPE options depending on your project. Call us on 1-877-461-4876 for more information.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

PPE Fall Protection in North America

Abseiling

PPE Fall Protection: the early lanyard

PPE Fall Protection devices were used in the early 20th Century by many professionals, although they used rope lanyards made of natural fibers, such as manila hemp, and simple body belts with no shock-absorbing properties. Clarence W. Rose–who early in his career was a window washer–became a pioneer in fall protection when he started the Rose Mfg. Co. in 1934 and began producing safety belts and lanyards for window washers. On Nov. 24, 1959, Rose was awarded a patent for an easy-to-use cable connector for safety belts that also had some shock-absorbing properties (U.S. Patent 2,914,139). Listed in the patent was a statement that the connector could, among other things, “be adapted to slip somewhat responsive to a sudden jerk as when the safety rope checks the fall of a wearer and thereby eases the shock to the wearer incurred by checking the fall.”

PPE Fall Protection
Madison Avenue Window Cleaner

PPE Fall Protection: shock-absorption major leap forward

Joseph Feldstein, manager of Technical Services at MSA, which purchased the Rose Mfg. Co. in 1996, said the idea of a shock absorber was a major step forward in protecting against the large braking forces generated in arresting falls, especially during Rose’s time.

“If you can imagine, workers with a simple belt and lanyard arrangement that was common up until that point would be exposed to a fall that could not only damage them internally because of the forces exerted to the soft tissues of the abdomen around the belt, but also you could generate such forces that you could separate the lanyard,” he said.

Rose continued to develop his shock-absorbing concept and was awarded several patents for newer and better shock absorbers. Ultimately, his designs influenced the creation of the modern-day shock absorber. Rose also received many other patents related in some way to preventing or protecting workers from falls. An example is the patent for an early “Ladder Climber” harness system (U.S. Patent 2,886,227) that contains two hook lanyards that are both attached to a harness. While ascending or descending, a worker grasps one hook in each hand and secures them over alternating ladder rungs.

Decades later, the industry would see the emergence of locking snap hook connectors and full-body harnesses, both gaining much more acceptance in the 1980s. In 1990, OSHA enacted regulation 1910.66. Craig Firl, product marketing manager in Hardgoods for Capital Safety-USA, said appendix C in this regulation was the key to getting several areas of fall protection technology up to date.

“Even though that particular standard at that time allowed for non-locking-type hooks to be used in a fall protection-type system, they recommended the locking type to be used because they were safer hooks and more compatible,” Firl said.

PPE Fall Protection: more hardware than ever

Feldstein agreed, adding that the acceptance of the locking snap hook led to the creation of a whole new series of connecting anchorage systems: straps, D-rings, and more. “And that’s continued to evolve to its current state, where we now have personalized anchorage connectors for almost every application, whether it’s building construction or general industry,” he said. Even though body belts were still allowed, Feldstein said appendix C acknowledged that OSHA recognized full-body harnesses as a major innovation in fall arrest. “Belts are still permissible in positioning, but in a fall, you definitely want to be protected by a full-body harness. It distributes the load across your chest and the bony mass of your hip, where your body is most capable of absorbing a blow, and it protects the soft tissue of the abdomen,” Feldstein said.

Two years after 1910.66 arrived, the ANSI committee released standard Z359.1, the key fall protection standard in use today. Most notably, it required the use of full-body harnesses and self-locking snap hooks. Firl said this voluntary compliance standard put pressure on OSHA to recognize that its existing standard needed updating and encouraged the completion of another fall protection standard for the construction industry, Subpart M, in 1995. According to this standard, as of Jan. 1, 1998, the use of body belts and non-locking snap hooks was prohibited.

During the ’80s, Self-Retracting Lanyards (SRLs) gained in development and use. They had been developed in the 1950s for offshore oil production in the North Sea but quickly became a common component in fall protection systems worldwide. Feldstein said SRLs became so valuable because they allowed workers to be protected along a much greater length of travel, increasing productivity without sacrificing safety. He described a scenario for rail car workers:

“Workers could be protected from the ground level and all the way up to the top of the rail car while they were working along the train’s length because the SRL could be mounted mobilely overhead. So that afforded a new type of protection for all types of workers in transportation, everything from rail cars, truck load-outs, and air craft maintenance.”

Regarding fall protection’s future, Firl and Feldstein said they believe comfort will continue to advance. Firl also foresees advances into niche markets with specialized materials and components, similar to the vacuum anchors’ progression into the airline industry for maintenance work on aircraft, whose surfaces can’t be penetrated with traditional-type anchors.
“In the past, a harness was a harness. It didn’t really matter if it was for construction, or utility work, or warehousing, it was a harness,” he said. “Now, you’re starting to see more specialized gear. . .  As an example, in the utility segment, you would see extensively the use of flame-resistant materials . . . because they’re concerned about heat resistance; they’re concerned about being able to resist arc flash and so forth.”

At Hercules SLR we stock MSA, 3M and Honeywell Miller PPE and fall protection products, to provide you with an extensive, high quality range of PPE Fall Protection products. Our in-house experts will advise you on what equipment best suits your project. When it comes time for your yearly inspections and service, our technicians can inspect, repair and certify your gear. For more information on our Fall Protection products and Services, please call: 1-877-461-4876.

References
https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2007/01/01/PPEvolution.aspx?Page=4

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.