Get to Know Your Training Specialist – Kevin Giles CRSP

Training -Kevin-Giles

Kevin Giles, CRSP is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists and Safety Consultants. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

Kevin: I’ve always had a passion for the outdoors, so I started my education at the Nova Scotia Community College in the Forestry Program. I went on to further my education at the Maritime Forest Ranger School in Fredericton NB and graduated in in 1997.

During the next 11 years I worked in many different aspects of forestry from privet woodlot management, and saw milling to large scale harvesting operations. In every job I did I always played a strong role in health and safety of the workplace, it became clear to me that this was the area I wanted to concentrate on, and I never turned back.

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I completed the Health and Safety Professional (HSP) designation and was one of the first people to achieve the designation from the Canadian Association Of Provincial Safety Councils. In 2011 a major highlight of my career was achieving the Canadian Registered Safety Professional (CRSP) designation with the Canadian Board of Registered Safety Professionals.

During my 11 years with Hercules I have furthered my education in many areas including; train the trainer programs, Master Rigger, non-destructive testing, and completing 4 diploma programs with the Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA). As you can tell I love to grow my knowledge and am highly committed to continuous education, my next goal is to complete the Diploma program in Occupational Health and Safety with the University of New Brunswick, only 3 more courses to go!

What made you decide to go into this industry?

Kevin: As I mentioned the safety industry sort of came to me rather than me seeking it out. With every job I ever had since I was 16 years old I played some kind of role in safety, from being a first aid provider on the ski hills with the Canadian Ski Patrol, to being part of various safety committees, and developing policies and procedures with large industrial forestry operations and sawmills. The rigging industry has given me the opportunity to explore so many aspects of safety I find It amazing to think of.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Kevin: Upon graduation from the Maritime Forest Ranger School I worked with the SNB Wood Co-op and the Hants County Woodlot Owners Association helping private woodlot owners manage their woodlots for a verity of forest productivity, environmental, and wildlife goals. This was a very rewarding time and experience in my forestry career.

After 4 years in the privet woodlot industry I moved into several new roles in a more industrial forestry operation with JD Irving ltd., working as harvesting supervisor, planer mill supervisor, and chip plant supervisor. This industrial atmosphere gave me to opportunity to work with contractors, unionized workers, students and many more. Working in these environments which already had a very strong safety culture helped me to build confidence and a broad knowledge base of various safety program elements.

What made you want to transition into training?

Kevin: I’ve always enjoyed helping people and sharing my knowledge whenever I could. I started formally instructing with the Canadian Red Cross first aid programs and have taught for the Canadian Ski Patrol, Saint John Ambulance, Safety Services Nova Scotia, and various employers along the way. I enjoy when I can help a student or coworker have that “lightbulb moment” when everything seems to come together and they get a clear understanding of the topic.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Kevin: When I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in safety the opportunity to Join the Hercules team came available. The timing was right and it was the perfect fit. Having a fulltime safety professional was new for the company and it was new for me. I am very happy to say the company and myself have grown together over the last 11 years to build a strong safety culture.

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

Kevin: The majority of the training that we deliver is based in the maritime provinces, but we are able to deliver training anywhere in Canada.  I’ve delivered training from the coast of NL to the coast of BC and many stops in between, including Ontario, Quebec, PEI, NB and Alberta.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training?

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Kevin: Traveling to different parts of NL over the past few years has been interesting. The people are great, and it has been very interesting to see the change in safety culture since the oil industry has grown so much there. Some of the most memorable places to provide training has been in a federal prison, on various ships, sawmills, and airplane hangars. Sometimes you just don’t know what you are getting into and that is always exciting.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Kevin: I would really like to travel to the northern parts of Canada maybe up to Yellowknife or somewhere in the North West Territories.

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Kevin: I hope to be able to make a great success of our Hercules Training Academy and some day expand the course offerings to include some more of the academic safety programs to help companies build a strong safety culture.

 

Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses we can tailor make courses to suit your specific requirements, at our facility or yours. To find out more about our course and how we can help you raise the bar in safety training email us at: training@herculesslr.com

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection for Tools

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Taking gravity out of the equation with an expanded lineup of  3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection for Tools

With over 27,000 recorded incidents of people being struck by falling objects each year in Canada, dropped objects prevention planning helps prevent personal injury, equipment damage and tool loss.

Because we continually develop new products to increase worker health and safety, 3M has leveraged its technology to design ergonomic products that help prevent tools from being dropped by at-height workers including four brand new Fall Protection for Tools products.

Explore the New Fall Protection for Tools Lineup

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA Quick Wrap Tape II

Convenience and safety come together with the 3M™ DBI-SALA Quick Wrap Tape II. Compared to previous generations of our Quick Wrap Tape, this re-engineered tape has a longer shelf life, requires fewer wraps to secure tools (6 wraps vs. a previous 10 wraps for tools up to 2 lbs) and uses proprietary 3M material and adhesive to help resist tears even better than before.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb Tool Retractor

The 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb. Retractable Tool Lanyard features a lightweight, compact housing and a strong Dyneema® Retracting Line. This design helps reduce tangling—minimizing worksite tripping hazards and entanglements—while reducing weight on workers’ belts and harnesses.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Harness Adapter

Our new harness adapter is designed to be used with the new 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb. Retractable Tool Lanyard and can be used on selected products that feature a black and gold carabiner, including the Hook2Hook Coil Tether product lineup.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Hook2Hook Coil Tether with Swivel

Our patented Hook2Hook Coil Tether features a swivel hook, making tools like screwdrivers and wrenches easier to use. Suitable for use from holsters, belts, harnesses and tool pouches alike, the Hook2Hook Coil Tether is a versatile solution that is both resistant to heat and to sharp objects.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Large 35’ Tape Measure Sleeve

Creating a secure attachment point for use at height, Tape Measure Sleeves are now available in two sizes: Medium (for most tape measures up to 7.62 m / 25 ft) and Large (for most tape measures up to 10.6 m / 35 ft). Featuring an integrated D-ring, the 3M™ DBI-SALA® Tape Measure Sleeve can be tethered in a variety of ways to help protect it from accidental drops.

Find out more about these products here
Order your 3M™ DBI-SALA® products from Hercules SLR, if we don’t have it in stock we can get it for you.

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Crane Hand Signals – Downloadable Reference Sheet

Crane-hand-signals

A crane operator can’t hear you. So when your team removes an old rooftop unit and positions a new one, the people on the ground and on the rooftop must use established hand signals to communicate safely with the crane operator.

Ask any crane operator and they will tell you that one of the main factors for a successful project is coordination.

Working in-sync with your team on the ground is not only crucial for safety but can help your project run smoothly, on schedule and keep the boss happy. With absolute precision and accuracy needed for a job, being able to clearly communicate direction is critical – but this is not always an easy task. Construction sites can be exceptionally loud and busy, meaning verbal communication is at risk of being drowned out by roaring machinery.

So how does an operator, with a load suspended in air, follow instructions from their team? Using the simple but effective method of hand signals. This age-old technique is used by crane operators across the world, aiding them to accurately receive unmistakable directions without the need for fancy equipment or even words!

A Simple Solution
Hand signals provide a simple solution for the communication issues faced by crane operators. Although radios can be used to relay messages across the site, there are some situations when an operator will need extra assistance.

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Construction sites are loud. They produce a high level of noise from activities such as digging, piling, and drilling, therefore it can be difficult to convey instruction in an accurate and time efficient way. There are also times when an operator’s directional visibility is obstructed or the visibility of a load area is partially blocked, conducting a lift within these types of conditions can put the operator and the workers around them at serious risk of injury.

Although it recommended to use hand signals during all lifts, it is in these situations when a signal person will definitely be called upon. Easy to understand, hand signals help the operator avoid any potential hazards, completing actions in a safe and timely manner.

The Role of a Signal Person
As the eyes and the ears of a dedicated area or crane, a signal person carries many responsibilities.  Before a person can direct the operation of a crane they must first undergo formal training and complete a qualification in crane signaling. In training, a person will not only develop an understanding of standard hand signals, but they will also be required to become familiar with many different types of cranes, how each crane functions and any hand signals specific to particular equipment. The trainee signal person is required to grasp an understanding of the large library of signals without any memory prompts and show competence in recalling these during an examination by a third-party provider.

The signal person is also responsible for preventing injury and accidents to the best of their ability, this is done by following strict procedure during crane operation, for instance standing in clear view of the crane operator, ensuring the operating area is clear of people or hazardous objects and performing one signal at a time to avoid confusion.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard method of signaling must be used when operating a crane unless non-standard hand signals are discussed during the pre-job meeting. OSHA enforces standards and training requirements for safe working environments across multiple industries, including construction in the United States.

Safety First
Safety is the number one concern for crane operators, a person performing the hand signals stand at a vantage point which allows them to view the load area from a perspective that is not visible to the crane operator. From this point, the signal person is able to confirm whether a maneuver is safe to perform and halt all activity if they observe a potential risk.

Cranes have incredible capabilities however if operated incorrectly, they can pose a significant danger to construction workers on the site and in some cases the public.  Hand signals have been established as a reliable, low tech and universal way to improve safety during operation and avoid accidents.

Download your Hercules, handy reference sheet illustrating the correct hand signals here

Crane-Hand-Signals-Illustration

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE FULL LIST OF OSHA STANDARD METHOD HAND SIGNALS.

Fall Protection for Tools – Stop the Drop!

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Fall Protection for Tools.

Everything you need to stop the drop.

3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection for Tools makes work environments safer and more productive by drastically reducing falling object incidents resulting in personal injury, equipment damage, and tool loss.​​​​​

Their drop prevention solutions are designed with the craft in mind, and are third-party tested in the harshest possible conditions. Learn more about their comprehensive collection of tool lanyards, tool holsters​, attachment points, and other drop prevention products​​.​

The science of fighting gravity

Protecting workers takes more than just keeping them from falling. Their equipment also needs to be kept safe at height. That’s why for over 10 years, 3M™ DBI-SALA® have been pioneering an innovative line of products and solutions to prevent dropped tools and equipment. From construction sites to oil rigs, they help make work environments safer and more productive by protecting workers from hazards that can result in personal injury, equipment damage and tool loss.

Certified and Tested our onsite ISO 17025 their accredited lab allows them to simulate heat, cold, moisture, corrosion and abrasion—the challenges you face every day. They conduct dynamic and static strength tests, both in the field and in their ISO 90001 certified manufacturing facilities, ensuring you get the highest quality, most reliable fall protection for tools.

Download the Fall Protection  for Tools, Pocket Reference Guide here

Falling-Objects

Hercules is a proud supplier of 3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection products. If you would like to know more about these or need advice on Fall protection equipment, please give us a call.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Working Load Limit Vs. Breaking Strength

Working Load

When it comes to rigging like ratchet straps, winch straps, and just about any other type of strap in the industry, working load limit (WLL) and breaking strength are commonly used measuring metrics.

Every piece of load-bearing wire or rigging equipment carries its own working load limit and break strength rating. These numbers let the user know how much weight that piece of rigging is capable of securing. Though they are usually clearly stated, there is often some confusion about what the two terms mean.

Working Load Limit

WLL refers to the maximum allowed weight that a piece of rigging can handle under normal conditions. For instance, a winch strap with a WLL of 6,000 pounds should not be used to secure any load above that weight, as it exceeds what it is rated for. WLL is 1/3 of the breaking strength rating, therefore a strap with a WLL of 6,000 pounds would have a breaking strength of 18,000 pounds.

Break Strength

Break strength refers to the point at which any section of a given cargo strap or piece of rigging will f

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ail. Break strength is determined by the weakest point of the rigging in question, whether it be the webbing, end fittings, or tensioning device.

For example, if a ratchet strap is made with end fittings, webbing, and a ratchet that are all rated for 10,000 pounds breaking strength, the overall strength of the product is 10,000 pounds. If any component of the ratchet strap has a lower breaking strength though, the break strength of the unit drops to the rating of the weakest component.

It is critical to understand the differences between the two figures and to make sure that any time you are securing a load, you do so with capable rigging. A failure could not only be costly, but dangerous as well.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

 

MSA Press Release – New Jet Style Firefighter Helmet

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MSA Logo

FROM: MSA (MSA Safety Incorporated)

New “Jet-Style” Firefighter Helmet from MSA Now Certified to NFPA Performance Standards

Shipments of New Helmet to Begin Immediately

PITTSBURGH, September 26, 2018 – Global safety equipment manufacturer MSA Safety
Incorporated (NYSE: MSA) today announced that its new jet-style fire helmet, called the Cairns®
XF1, has received third-party certification as compliant to the 2018 edition of the National Fire
Protection Association’s (NFPA) 1971 performance standards for structural firefighting. It is also
certified as compliant to the 2013 edition of the NFPA’s 1951 performance standards for
technical rescue. With this certification, MSA can begin shipping orders for the Cairns XF1
immediately.

The Cairns XF1, which was previewed in April at the Fire Department Instructor’s
Conference (FDIC) in Indianapolis, Ind., represents a new addition to the MSA firefighter helmet
line. The helmet, which resembles a firefighter jet pilot helmet, represents a significant design
departure from the “brim-style” helmet traditionally preferred by North American firefighters. The
new style delivers enhanced technology integration while maintaining the quality, durability, and
safety performance firefighters have come to expect from MSA’s Cairns brand.

The XF1 helmet incorporates a number of optional user features, which include a
protective visor, an integrated communication system and LED lights that, because of their
placement on either side of the helmet, rather than at the top of the head, significantly improve
visibility without blinding others on scene.

Additionally, and like all other Cairns helmet models, the XF1’s soft goods are removable,
washable and replaceable – all without requiring the use of tools – which will help firefighters
comply with various cancer prevention directives published by leading agencies like the
Firefighter Cancer Support Network (FCSN).

Jason Traynor, MSA’s General Manager for Global Respiratory Protection and Fire
Helmets, explained that the introduction of MSA’s newest jet-style helmet is not meant to replace
any of the traditional helmet models the company currently manufactures, but rather serve as
another option when choosing a fire helmet.

“Choosing a fire helmet is a very personal decision. It’s an icon of the profession and, for
that reason, it represents a source of pride for many firefighters. And that’s why we solicited
feedback from hundreds of firefighters throughout the design process. From these Voice-of Customer
conversations, we knew the time was right to bring a jet-style fire helmet to the North
American fire service market,” commented Mr. Traynor.

“At MSA, we’re dedicated to providing firefighters with the latest technology to help protect
them when lives are on the line,” Mr. Traynor continued. “The Cairns XF1 looks entirely different
than the ‘traditional’ brim-style helmet that U.S. firefighters wear today. And that’s the point. The
Cairns XF1 represents a new and now NFPA compliant option that wasn’t previously available.
As the global leader in fire helmets, we’re excited about the opportunities this helmet will bring to
the possibility of interconnected personal protective equipment.”

About MSA

Established in 1914, MSA Safety Incorporated is the global leader in the development, manufacture and
supply of safety products that protect people and facility infrastructures. Many MSA products integrate a
combination of electronics, mechanical systems and advanced materials to protect users against
hazardous or life-threatening situations. The company’s comprehensive product line is used by workers
around the world in a broad range of markets, including the oil, gas and petrochemical industry, the fire
service, the construction industry, mining and the military. MSA’s core products include self-contained
breathing apparatus, fixed gas and flame detection systems, portable gas detection instruments, industrial
head protection products, firefighter protective apparel and helmets, and fall protection devices. With 2017
revenues of $1.2 billion, MSA employs approximately 4,700 people worldwide. The company is
headquartered north of Pittsburgh in Cranberry Township, Pa., and has manufacturing operations in the
United States, Europe, Asia and Latin America. With more than 40 international locations, MSA realizes
approximately half of its revenue from outside North America.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

3M™ DBI-SALA® Smart Lock Self-Retracting Lifelines

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Magnetic intelligence. Smarter retraction, smoother reaction.
3M™ DBI-SALA® Smart Lock Self-Retracting Lifelines

Unlock your productivity. From reducing unintentional lockups,*  to simplifying inspections, every detail of the new 3M™ DBI-SALA® Smart Lock Self-Retracting Lifelines is designed to help increase your productivity and convenience.

Feature-packed SRLs for horizontal or vertical applications (Horizonal) Leading Edge features below:

Swiveling anchorage & carabiner included
Magnetic retraction control
The lifeline rewinds at an evenly controlled pace, helping reduce the possibility for harm to people or equipment (compared to solutions with gear-based retraction).

Patent-pending dual label system

An extra label stored in the bumper on the
smart lock 2lifeline allows users to easily access critical
asset information and keeps it protected from
damage to help reduce cost of ownership.

Ergonomic handle

Designed for easy transport and support
during overhead installation.
420 lb (190 kg) weight capacity
1,350 lb (612 kg) Maximum
Arresting Force (MAF)
Highly visible orange
energy-absorber cover
Identifies product as meeting leading edge
standards and allows you to more easily confirm
that workers are tied off (horizontal models).

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3M’s Science of Safety at work.

How did we create an SRL that reduces unintentional lockups? Using advanced motion capture technology, 3M studied the way users work, move and interact with SRLs on a typical job site. This data helped us engineer an arrest mechanism designed to better accommodate your natural work motions—resulting in fewer unintentional lockups.*

For ordering information or more details on this or any other fall Protection product call us today at: 1-877-461-4876.

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Hercules to the Rescue At Voisey Nickel Mine

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Mid-September, Noah Hawes and Barry Young from the Inspections Department of Hercules SLR Dartmouth, ventured to the isolated Nickel Mine of Voisey Bay in Labrador Newfoundland where in 1993, a large nickel deposit was discovered in the hills along the western shore of Potato Island by Archean Inc. a prospecting firm hired by Diamond Fields Resources Inc.

This nickel deposit is considered to be one of the most substantial mineral discoveries in Canada in the last 40 years and is estimated to contain 141 million tonnes at 1.6% nickel. Surface mining began in Voisey Bay in 2005 to access the nickel deposit. Currently, the mining rights for the Voisey Bay nickel deposit belong to the Toronto-headquartered Vale Inco company, a subsidiary of Vale. The bulk carrier ship Umiak I was built to transport ore from the mine.

On June 11, 2018, Vale announced it is moving forward with its underground mine at Voisey Bay. The move will extend the mine’s operating life by at least 15 years. Over the five-year construction, more than 16,000 person-years of employment will be created, and the first ore is expected no later than April 2021.

Noah and Barry’s task at the Voisey mine was to replace the end post for 3M’s recent roof lifelines recall. There was an element of apprehension as this was the first time they had undertaken a job of this type that was so remote and far away.

“We didn’t know what the job would entail, how complex the job would be, and what weather conditions we may be faced with”.

However, any concerns they had were completely unfounded as they accomplished the job without any issues or complications. They did such a great job in fact, that Vale are now talking about Hercules annually re-certifying all their lifelines.

LEEA Logo

The Hercules Inspections department are the best in the business and widely regarded as industry experts in their field. We ensure that all our inspectors are trained to an exceptionally high standard. Currently we are expanding our inspector training nationally to include LEEA (The Lifting Equipment Engineers Association) certification.

We believe in going that extra mile. We will travel great distances to help our customers and get the job done. We cultivate customer relationships through innovation, expertise and innovation.

Great job Noah and Barry!!

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

Get to Know Our Trainers: Steve Hache, CD

Steve-Hache

Steve Hache, CD is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

Steve: It was a dream of mine to pursue a career in the Canadian Armed Forces so, I joined the Royal Canadian Navy at 19 years old. In the 21 years of dedicated service in the RCN, I trained in and became qualified in a number of technical aspects ranging from complex seamanship evolutions, boarding operations, Steve Hachecrane operations, forklift operation, small arms, etc. to rigging and hoisting.

During my time as faculty with Nova Scotia Community College, I was introduced to the field of adult education and obtained my Community College Education Diploma (adult education – teaching, learning). I had an interest in safety so I successfully completed the Construction Safety Supervisor certification through Nova Scotia Construction Safety Association.

While I was employed with MSA Security in the United Arab Emirates I took courses in course design (HBI Learning Centers, Sydney, Australia) and adult education and assessment (Global Maritime And Transportation School, NY, USA).

What made you decide to go into this industry?

Steve: It made sense to continue with the field of safety and, rigging and hoisting since that’s what I was accustomed to. While I was in the RCN, there were constant opportunities to operate cranes or forklifts and perform rigging or hoisting tasks. Almost daily, we were called upon to remove or replace machinery out of engineering spaces, load or unload missiles, torpedoes, stores, operate cranes, etc., so, rigging and hoisting was a regular occurrence.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Steve: Upon retirement from the Royal Canadian Navy I accepted a job working for an American security company in the United Arab Emirates. There I would be exposed to a whole new and exciting culture, training their Coast Guard in seamanship, basic boat operations, tactical boat operations and maritime law enforcement. This was an extremely challenging and rewarding experience!

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After a couple of years in the UAE, I came home and accepted a temporary position at NSCC as faculty of the Marine-Industrial Rigging program where I was tasked with turning a part-time program into a full-time program. The faculty and staff of NSCC were first-rate! I learned a great deal from each and every one of them.

After my temporary position at the community college, I was employed as a training manager and fall protection trainer for Total Fall Protection. There I gained a great deal of experience in training and gained a huge appreciation for the wide variety of industries within the maritime provinces.

What made you want to transition into training?

Steve: Speaking to groups of people was not a difficult thing for me to do since I have been doing so ever since I entered the workforce. In the military, I had to brief command on, and supervise, complex seamanship evolutions, rigging operations, boat operations, etc. However, teaching and training didn’t come naturally. My first role as a trainer was in the Royal Canadian Navy where I was posted to the Bedford Rifle Range as a small arms instructor. Nervous at first, but I grew to love it! I actually enjoyed speaking in front of people!

From there, my career path has been based on speaking in front of groups of people.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Steve: That’s easy – I have always appreciated the staff at Hercules SLR. When I was faculty at NSCC, they consistently treated myself and any student that I sent their way with the utmost respect and care. The program work terms that the students completed were extremely beneficial to them and also ended up with employment for a number of them. We developed and maintained a positive working relationship.

training

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

Steve: A great deal of the training that we deliver is based in the maritime provinces but we are able to deliver training anywhere in Canada. The majority of the training I’ve delivered is mainly in Nova Scotia but I’ve also delivered training in Ontario and New Brunswick as well.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training?

Steve: Abu Dhabi, UAE was awesome!! I met a great deal of fantastic people there and would welcome any chance to go back.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Steve: I would love to travel back to British Columbia! Hercules SLR has branches across the country and I’ve always loved BC. Other than that, I’d love to go back to Europe, Australia, United States, or Asia.

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Steve: I am hoping to get more LEEA (Lifting Equipment Engineering Association) courses under my belt to further my knowledge in the field. My main focus though is to continue to contribute to today’s safety culture.

Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses we can tailor make courses to suit your specific requirements, at our facility or yours. To find out more about our course and how we can help you raise the bar in safety training email us at: training@herculesslr.com

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Aerial Work Platform an Overview of Safety Practices

aerial-work-platform

Aerial Work Platforms (AWP’s) are generally used for temporary, flexible access purposes such as maintenance and construction work or by firefighters for emergency access, which distinguishes them from permanent access equipment such as elevators. They are designed to lift limited weights — usually less than a ton, although some have a higher safe working load (SWL)) – distinguishing them from most types of cranes. They are usually capable of being set up and operated by a single person.

Aerial devices were once exclusively operated by hydraulic pistons, powered by diesel or gasoline motors on the base unit. Lightweight electrically powered units are gaining popularity for window-cleaning or other maintenance operations, especially indoors and in isolated courtyards, where heavier hydraulic equipment cannot be used. Aerial devices are the closest in appearance to a crane- consisting of a number of jointed sections, which can be controlled to extend the lift in a number of different directions, which can often include “up and over” applications.800px-Hebebuehne_Scissorlift

The majority of manufacturers and operators have strict safety criteria for the operation of Aerial Work Platforms. In some countries, a licence and/or insurance is required to operate some types of Aerial Work Platforms. Most protocols advocate training every operator, whether mandated or not. Most operators also prescribe a range of pre-usage checks of the unit, and manufacturers recommend regular maintenance schedules.

Work platforms are fitted with safety or guard rails around the platform itself to contain operators and passengers. This is supplemented in most models by a restraining point, designed to secure a harness or fall arrester. Some work platforms also have a lip around the floor of the platform itself to avoid tools or supplies being accidentally kicked off the platform. Some protocols require all equipment to be attached to the structure by individual lanyards.

Extreme caution must be taken when using AWPs in the vicinity of overhead power lines, as electrocution may result if the lift comes in contact with energized wiring. Non-conductive materials, such as fiberglass, may be used to reduce this hazard.

AWPs often come equipped with a variety of tilt sensors. The most commonly activated sensor (especially with two people on a lift), will cause the machine to refuse to raise the platform beyond a certain height. Sensors within the machine detect that weight on the platform is off balance to such a point as to risk a possible tip-over if the platform is raised further. Another sensor will refuse to extend the platform if the machine is on a significant incline. Some models of Aerial Work Platforms additionally feature counterweights, which extend in order to offset the danger of tipping the machine inherent in extending items like booms or bridges. Some lifts are also fitted with sensors which will prevent operation if the weight on the platform exceeds the safe working load.

As with most dangerous mechanical devices, all AWPs are fitted with an emergency stop button or buttons for use in the event of a malfunction or danger. Best practice dictates fitting of emergency stop buttons on the platform and at the base as a minimum. Other safety features include automatic self-checking of the AWP’s working parts, including a voltmeter that detects if the lift has insufficient power to complete its tasks and preventing operation if supply voltage is insufficient. Some AWPs provide manual lowering levers at the base of the machine, allowing operators to lower the platform to the ground in the event of a power or control failure or deliberate use of the machine, e.g., by unauthorized persons.

Read more about Aerial Work Platforms here

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.