Sling Inspection Checklist: Hercules How-To

sling inspection checklist

SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Sling inspection is an important part of a rigger’s daily routine – here’s a sling inspection checklist to make life easier.

Check out our sling inspection checklist that includes removal criteria to know when your sling should be removed from service, and help keep your lifting equipment in good, working order. 

You’re welcome. 

SLING INSPECTION: ASME STANDARDS B30.9 

INITIAL INSPECTION 

  • Before use, all new, altered, modified or repaired slings shall be inspected by a designated person. 

FREQUENT INSPECTION

  • A visual inspection for damage shall be performed by the user or other designated person each day or shift the sling is used.

PERIODIC INSPECTION

  • A complete inspection for damage of the sling shall be periodically performed by a designated person.

ROUND SLINGS: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Remove your synthetic round sling for service if these conditions are present: 

  • Missing or illegible sling identification.
  • Acid/caustic burns.
  • Evidence of heat damage.
  • Holes, tears, cuts, abrasive wear or snags that expose the core yarns.
  • Broken or damaged core yarns.
  • Weld splatter that exposes core yarns.
  • Knots in the round sling,  except for core yarns inside the cover.
  • Fittings that are pitted, corroded, cracked, bent twisted, gouged, or broken.
  • For hooks, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.10.
  • For rigging hardware, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.26.
  • Other conditions, including visible damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling.

CHAIN SLINGS: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Remove your alloy chain sling from service if these conditions are present: 

  • Missing or illegible sling identification (see Section 9-1.7).
  • Cracks or breaks.
  • Excessive wear, nicks, or gouges. Minimum thickness on chain links must not be below the values listed in Table 1.
  • Stretched chain links or components.
  • Evidence of heat damage.
  • Excessive pitting or corrosion.
  • Lack of ability of chain or components to hinge (articulate) freely.
  • Weld splatter.
  • For hooks, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.10.
  • For rigging hardware, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.26.
  • Other conditions, including visible damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling.

SYNTHETIC WEB SLINGS: SLING INSPECTION CHECKLIST

Remove your synthetic web sling from service if the following conditions are present: 

  • Missing or illegible sling identification (see ASME Section 9-5.7).
  • Acid or caustic burns.
  • Melting or charring of any part of the sling.
  • Holes, tears, cuts or snags.
  • Broken or worn stitching in load bearing splices.
  • Excessive abrasive wear.
  • Knots in any part of the sling. Discoloration and brittle or stiff areas on any part of the sling, which may mean chemical or ultraviolet/sunlight damage.
  • Fittings that are pitted, corroded, cracked, bent, twisted, gouged, or broken.
  • For hooks, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.10.
  • For rigging hardware, removal criteria as stated in ASME B30.26.
  • Other conditions, including visible damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling.

INSPECTION FREQUENCY

How often should you inspect your slings? Frequency is based on these factors: 

  • Frequency of use
  • Severity of service conditions
  • Nature of lifts being made
  • Experience gained on the service life of slings used in similar circumstances. 

NOTE ON SAFETY & REPAIRS

Slings must be repaired by the sling manufacturer, or a qualified person, per ASME B30.9. 

As mentioned above, a sling must be inspected by a designated competent person before it’s used to determine that the sling meets the manufacturer’s required specifications. 

Employers must take necessary measures to protect and ensure the health, safety and physical well-being of every worker. The employer must use methods and techniques intended for the identification, control and elimination of risks to their workers. The inspection of lifting equipment is required to satisfy this obligation.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.