Why Chemical Safety is Important | Training Tuesday

why chemical safety is important

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT 

Why is chemical safety important? Hazardous or toxic chemicals are used in many industrial environments on a daily basis. 

Although chemicals make up the world around us, some can be more harmful than others—This is just one reason why chemical safety is important. 

Read on to learn how toxic chemicals can enter the body, how to identify hazards, some tips for using chemicals safely in the workplace and terms you should know. 

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT | 4 TYPES OF EXPOSURE

There are four different ways chemicals can enter the body. These are:

  1. Inhalation: Chemicals that take form in gas, vapour or particulates are easily inhaled. These chemicals can absorb into the respiratory tract, and can head into the bloodstream and organs. This is often noted as the most common way the body absorbs harmful chemicals. 
  2. Skin/Eye absorption: Chemical contact with skin can result in mild dermatitis, or a rash. However, chemicals can also be absorbed into the bloodstream this way. Eyes are also sensitive to most chemicals, so safety glasses must be worn when conducting work with chemicals. Another common scenario that causes eye contact to chemicals (especially if not wearing appropriate safety glasses) is wiping or rubbing at your eyes during chemical exposure.   
  3. Ingestion: Like with inhalation or skin/eye absorption, ingestion can cause the toxic chemicals to travel to the organs. When conducting work in areas where ingestion is likely, like confined spaces, it’s important to have an entry & exit plan, and the proper PPE for the job. 
  4. Injection: This doesn’t necessarily mean directly injecting chemicals into your bloodstream, but if you have a cut or other tear in the skin, chemicals can be absorbed this way. 

Chemicals often travel to the respiratory system, but how? The respiratory system has two main parts. These are the upper & lower airway passages. The upper respiratory system consists of the nose, mouth, pharynx & larynx. The lower respiratory system consists of the vocal cords to the trachea, to the end of the bronchial tree. 

It’s important to note that there are different factors that affect how the degree of hazard caused by the chemical. These are: 

  • How it enters the body 
  • How much enters the body 
  • How toxic the chemical is 
  • When/How it’s removed 
  • Biological variation 

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT | IDENTIFYING HAZARDS

Obviously, chemical exposure in the workplace is unavoidable—But risks and hazards can be managed. 

A risk assessment should be conducted for chemicals, just like is conducted for other workplace hazards.
To identify chemical hazards in the workplace:why is chemical safety important

  • Identify: Determine the chemicals in your workplace and safety hazards that go along with them. For example, if chlorine is used to clean, know that long-term exposure to chlorine can cause nausea & eye discomfort, and have eyewash stations in-place so employees can rinse their eyes if contact occurs. 
  • Assess: Take a look not just at hazardous chemicals in the workplace, but the processes that accompany them.
  • Control: After hazards are identified, put controls in-place to reduce the likelihood of an accident.

WHY CHEMICAL SAFETY IS IMPORTANT | TERMS TO KNOW 

ACUTE TOXICITY (SEE TOXICITY BELOW): Refers to exposure to chemicals that humans aren’t often around, or are in contact with due to an accident. For example, a leak at a plant could cause the locals to experience acute toxicity. Sometimes, effects are immediately felt, and in other cases effects can be delayed. 

BIOLOGICAL VARIATION: Characteristics that might be unique to the individual, like weight, height or sex. 

PARTICULATES: Solids or liquids that are dispersed as gas. Particulates can include dust, mist, fumes or other particles that are found in the space. 

TOXICITY: The measure of how poisonous a chemical is. For example, a chemical with a lower toxicity will need a much higher amount to be harmful than a chemical with a high amount of poison or toxicity. 

WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM (WHMIS): This is Canada’s national workplace hazard communication standard. This elements of WHMIS include hazard classification, cautionary labelling, availability of material safety data sheets and educational programs for employees. 

chemical safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TRAINING TUESDAY: TAGLINES

 TRAINING TUESDAY | CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | TRAINING TUESDAY


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? GIVE US A CALL, OR DROP US A LINE.

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Why wear safety glasses? | Training Tuesday

why wear safety glasses

Why wear safety glasses?

Why wear safety glasses? Luckily, it’s Training Tuesday at Hercules SLR, where we bring you training tips for rigging, securing, lifting, safety and more each week. 

This week, the focus is on eye safety and why you should wear safety glasses—Even when it seems trivial. 

First of all, why wear safety glasses? Well, even with all we know about the importance of eye safety and the availability of eye glasses, approximately 700 eye injuries happen to Canadian workers each day, and each year about 720,000 eye injuries occur at work and home—According to the Workplace Safety & Prevention Services, nearly 90% of these injuries are preventable. One in four people who sustain eye injuries must take time off school or work. 

So, why don’t workers wear safety glasses? There are a few reasons. For every 5 workers injured, 3 were not wearing eye protection. 

Common excuses for not wearing eye protection include: 

  • Don’t fit comfortably over their prescription glasses 
  • They don’t fit well, slip, are tight, etc. 
  • Think the rule doesn’t really apply to them or is unnecessary 

Yes, these issues can make PPE uncomfortable, but are easily remedied to give you comfort and safety. Low-cost, scratch-resistant prescription safety glasses or lens-covers are available. Yes, it’s important to wear a pair of comfortable glasses, and safety glasses are available in a variety of styles and fits so everyone can find a style that suits their needs. As far as being unnecessary, if there’s a rule in place that states you should wear safety glasses—You should.

Even if you’re just doing what seems like ‘a quick job’, accidents and injuries also happen quickly. 

So, why wear safety glasses?

Well, safety glasses are a defense against hazards at work that could injure your eyes (or other body parts, for that matter). 

safety glasses statistics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of these hazards include: 

  • Dust, dirt and other debris 
  • Chemicals, like irritants and corrosives 
  • UV radiation from electrical or welding work 
  • Flying particles from cutting, drilling, digging, etc. 
  • Tree branches or other obstacles faced when working at heights or in natural environments 

Safety glasses are a great step to take to reduce these hazards, and eliminate eye injuries. In addition to safety glasses, employers and workers should take these additional steps to reduce, or eliminate hazards and prevent injury—To reduce eye-related hazards in general: 

  • Use protective screens/side shields with your safety glasses as needed to prevent particles from falling into eyes. 
  • Try to enclose sources of irritants (Gases, fumes, dusts, etc.) 
  • Isolate hazards whenever possible (EX. Keep equipment, like table saws, away from high-traffic areas or from workers who don’t use them). 
  • Keep work areas well-lighted to reduce glare from ignitions and other light sources 

Types of Safety Glasses

Good protective eyewear should be light, comfortable, allow a clear line of vision, block radiation if/when possible, be adaptable to working conditions, have good ventilation and be scratch-resistant. 

Certification or the manufacturer mark should be available on all safety glass lenses, frames, side shields and any other parts of the glasses. The frames should be designed to prevent lenses from dislodging from frames and into eyes, have more strength than typical optical glasses and are usually heat-resistant. 

There are 6 classes of eye (and face) protection. These are: 

CLASS 1: Safety glasses

CLASS 2: Safety goggles

CLASS 3: Welding helmets 

CLASS 4: Welding hand shields 

CLASS 5: Hoods 

CLASS 6: Face shields 

According to the Canadian Standards Association (CSA), safety glasses should be impact-resistant. They outline three different, common types of lens materials—But not all should be used. 

The three different and common types of lens materials are: 

POLYCARBONATE 

  • Strongest for impact-resistance
  • Can have scratch-resistant coating and UV protection

PLASTIC (CR39)

  • Lightweight (Weighs about 1/2 of what glass does)
  • Resistant to solvents & pitting 

GLASS

  • Highly-dense material
  • Loses impact-resistance when scratched, and are prone to scratching 
  • Glass lenses do not meet the CSA impact criteria

TRIVEX 

  • More impact-resistant than CR39 plastic 
  • Less impact-resistant than polycarbonate 
  • Has properties to help absorb UV rays 

HI-VEX

  • More impact-resistant than CR39 plastic 
  • Less impact-resistant than polycarbonate 
  • Has properties to help absorb UV rays 

So, why wear safety glasses? 

7 Tips to Protect your Eyes 

Now that you know why it’s important to wear safety glasses, check out our seven tips to keep your eyes safe and prevent injury at work (and everywhere, really).  

why wear safety glasses? tips to protect your eyes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TRAINING TUESDAY: TAGLINES

 TRAINING TUESDAY | CONFINED SPACE HAZARDS

RIGGING AND LIFTING SLINGS | TRAINING TUESDAY


HERCULES SLR PROVIDES MAINTENANCE, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR RIGGING EQUIPMENT

NEED A LIFT? GIVE US A CALL, OR DROP US A LINE.

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Forklift Driving | Training Tuesday

forklift operator driving in warehouse

FORKLIFT DRIVING

Forklift driving takes a lot more than just lifting and moving materials – Forklift operators should have an understanding of safety & balance, to keep materials, themselves and others safe. One of the biggest risks forklift drivers face is tipping-over. According to OSHA, approximately 25% of forklift fatalities were from tip-over incidents. 

Yes, it might seem basic, but it’s important to recognize the forklift’s centre of gravity and stability triangle. In this blog, we’ll discuss tips to keep you balanced and everything else you need to know to stay safe in, out and around the forklift.

This Training Tuesday, we’ll cover:

  • Some of the biggest safety risks associated with balance and the most common type of forklift
  • Forklift centre of gravity & the stability triangle
  • Other factors that contribute to forklift accidents and tip-overs 
  • How to conduct visual & operational forklift inspections 
  • Safety tips to remain balanced & safe while driving a forklift

There are four main potential safety risks considering balance and forklift driving. These are:

  1. How likely the forklift is to tip-over forward;
  2. How likely the forklift is to tip-over on its side;
  3. Maximum braking-level (or stopping distance) the forklift can perform;
  4. Maximum level of reversed-acceleration the forklift can perform. 

In Canada, counter-balanced forklifts are one of the most often-seen types of forklift. 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

CENTRE OF GRAVITY & STABILITY TRIANGLE

As we mentioned earlier, a counterbalance forklift has three ways it can tip—forward, or sideways, on the left or right

While driving a forklift, it’s important to maintain its centre of gravity. The centre of gravity lives within the stability triangle

Centre of gravity is defined as the point within the triangle where the bulk of the mass is located. Although we don’t recommend trying it out, the centre of gravity is also the point where the forklift could balance. Again—Take don’t try this one out, we recommend taking our word for it. 

Calculating the forklifts’ centre of gravity is complex (and unnecessary for daily use), but there are a few important things to understand in order to remain balanced as you operate the forklift. 

When the forklift is stationary, it won’t tip as the force is on the centre, but tilts forward when force is applied to the front tines (also called forks) or its back. It’s also worth noting that a forklift is more likely to tip sideways, than forwards. Therefore, adding a load to the front forks decreases the chance the forklift will tip on its side.   

Alternatively, lifting the forks on the truck with a load will cause the forklifts stability to decrease on all sides.

The diagram below shows the stability triangle. 

forklift driving stability triangle diagram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | WHAT ELSE CONTRIBUTES TO ACCIDENTS? 

Like we mentioned, some types of loads are more likely to cause your forklift to tip. Here are some features of a load that create hazards: 

  • Awkwardly stacked or piled in a way that causes instability
  • Unmaintained pallets 
  • Load is too heavy or blocks the operators vision 

Here are some of the features of a forklift that contribute to forklift accidents, like tip-overs:

  • Faulty steering, brakes, clutch, transmission or mast assembly 
  • Inadequate or malfunctioning safety devices
  • Forklift emissions
  • Poorly organized controls and displays on the forklift 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | SAFETY TIPS

To help maintain centre of gravity, here are a few tips to help you stay stable while operating a forklift with a load: 

  • Don’t distribute load unevenly on the forks, this will increase the frequency of sideways tip-over 
  • Don’t load the forklift beyond its WLL, this will make the forklift prone to tipping 
  • Be sure to move the load all the way to the back of the forks 

What are some risk factors of work design that contribute to forklift accidents?:

  • Stress or increased speed 
  • Not using the correct tools, attachments and/or hardware 
  • Incompetent operator, or improper forklift assigned
  • Badly serviced, unmaintained and/or aging forklift(s)
  • Lack of training for workers/operators 
  • Poor work layout for travel

Here are some risk factors while operating the forklift that contribute to accidents: 

  • Driving at high speeds
  • Driving with an elevated load 
  • Improper parking, reversal, turning, braking or acceleration with forklift  
  • Poor communication and/or warnings for nearby personnel
  • Blocking wheels on semi-trailers of railway car improperly 

If you’re operating a forklift, you should never

  • Drive a forklift without any capacity ratings listed
  • Travel in a forklift with a load raised more than 4inches 
  • Leave truck alone while running, or with a load 
  • Let unauthorized personnel operate a forklift (We’ve all seen the episode of The Office where Michael operates the forklift? Okay, good.) 
  • Attempt to adjust the load from the operating cab
  • Raise a load extending over the load backrest, unless no part of the load can slide back toward the operator 
  • Use pallets with forks as a make-shift elevated work platform (it’s more common than you think!) 
  • Let personnel stand/walk under any elevated part of the forklift 

It’s important to communicate potential hazards for everyone working in a space where forklifts are found, and use proper signals to keep yourself and others safe. Here are some more tips to help keep others safe while driving a forklift: 

  • Restrict access to areas where forklifts are used (and create procedures to keep work safe when they must enter spaces where forklifts operate) 
  • OR, create designated walkways or travelling paths to separate pedestrians from forklifts 
  • Pedestrians should always let the forklift driver know when they’re in the area—Eye contact is a simple way to make your presence know
  • Keep the area, particular the travelling path free from obstacles and ensure it’s well-lit 
  • Be careful when driving around sharp/blind corners, doorways and narrow aisles. Honk your forklift horn at intersections.
  •  Wear hi-vis clothing & PPE
  • Load the forks so your line of vision is clear
  • Avoid driving the forklift near people-heavy areas
  • Don’t walk under or near forks

FORKLIFT DRIVING | INSPECTION

A forklift operator should inspect their forklift daily, at the beginning of each shift and before each use. 

The operator should do a visual circle-check of the forklift (a walk-around) and an operational pre-use check. What do these involve?  

During a visual inspection before use, the operator should: 

  • General condition/cleanliness (this includes the forklift and surrounding floor & overhead work areas)
  • Ensure a charged fire extinguisher is nearby 
  • Make sure engine oil, fuel and radiator fluid levels are correct 
  • Establish that the propane tank’s fuel-tank mounting system, fuel-tank position pin, propane relief valves and hose are in good condition
  • Make sure the battery is fully-charged, there are no exposed wires, plug connections are in good condition, vent caps are clear, electrolyte levels in cells are acceptable and are in-place with hold-downs or brackets 
  • See that bolts, nuts, guards, chains or hydraulic hose reels are not damaged, disconnected or missing
  • Check for wear, damage and air-pressure (pneumatic tires) in wheels & tires 
  • Ensure forks/tines are not bent or chipped and are level & properly positioned—Also check that positioning latches and carriage teeth aren’t broken or worn 
  • Make sure chain anchor pins aren’t worn, loose or bent 
  • Make sure there are no fluid leaks, damp spots or drips 
  • Ensure hoses are secured and not loose, crimped or worn
  • Check for grease & debris in operator compartment
  • Make sure the seatbelt fastens & works properly
  • Guards: Ensure guards, overhead guards and roll-over protection structure (ROPS) are secure & undamaged 

During a pre-operational inspection, the forklift operator should check: 

  • FOOT & PARKING BRAKE: Ensure pedal holds & unit stops smoothly, and brake holds against slight acceleration
  • DEADMAN SEAT BRAKE: Make sure it holds when operator rises from seat
  • CLUTCH & GEARSHIFT: Make sure they shift smoothly, and don’t jump or snag
  • DASH CONTROL PANEL: Check that all lights & gauges are operational
  • HORN: Make sure the horn sounds loudly enough to be heard over work
  • BACK-UP: Make sure the reverse alarm and other warning devices work properly
  • LIGHTS: Ensure headlights and warning lights function properly
  • STEERING: Make sure the steering-wheel works smoothly
  • LIFT MECHANISM: Make sure they operate smoothly—You can check by lifting forks to their maximum height, then lowering them completely
  • TILT MECHANISM: Make sure the tilt mechanism works properly & holds the load—You can check by tilting the mast forward and backwards completely. 
  • CYLINDERS & HOSES: Check these last and make sure they’re not leaking after doing these checks.
  • BE SURE TO LISTEN FOR UNUSUAL SOUNDS/NOISES! 

FORKLIFT DRIVING | CONCLUSION

There are many work-related issues that contribute to forklift driving, safety & general operation.

Ensure you conduct the three types of inspections we cover in this blog, be mindful of the forklift’s stability triangle & forks, keep travel slow, steady & free from obstacles to ensure your safety and others around you—And never let someone drive the forklift without proper training, or who hasn’t been designated.  


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES RIGGING EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS 

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FOR ARTICLES RELATED TO FORKLIFT DRIVING,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

FORKLIFT SAFETY: TOP TIPS FOR A SAFE WORKPLACE

WAREHOUSE WOW: HOW OUR DISTRIBUTION CENTRE LEADS THE INDUSTRY

WAREHOUSE SAFETY: 8 STEPS TO TAKE AFTER A RACKING ACCIDENT


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Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

Tips for Taglines | Training Tuesday

riggers using taglines to control and secure a load

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES

Taglines — What are they, what are they used for and why do we rig with them? We’ll tell you — Welcome to the new series from Hercules SLR, called Training Tuesday. 

In this series, every Tuesday, we’ll bring you a new topic about rigging, hoisting, fall protection, heavy machinery, workplace safety and more.

We’ll cover why the issue is important, advice for safe-use, application pointers so you get the most from your gear and training tips for employers and employees. 

This week, our Training Tuesday topic will be Taglines—In this blog, we’ll cover:

  • What’s a tagline?
  • When to use a tagline? And how to do it safely 
  • What not to do when using a tagline to lift 
  • Tagline standards, rules and regulations 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHAT ARE TAGLINES? 

So, what’s a tagline? A tagline is a line (often constructed of synthetic materials, otherwise known as a ‘soft line’) that attaches to a load and provides control while minimizing movement of the object during lifting operations. Simply put, taglines are used to prevent line rotation when lifting with cranes. 

Using taglines may add potential hazards to personnel involved in the lifting operation. These hazards should be assessed before the lifting operation begins. So, when is it appropriate to use a tagline to help secure a load? There are a couple of conditions: 

  • The crane’s load will swing back and forth (etc. a load on an especially windy day) 
  • The load’s rotation will create hazards 
  • A load needs to be positioned or connected in a particular way when it lands 

Read on for more tips to use taglines safely, what you should never do when securing a load with taglines and more tips for best-use. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | SAFETY TIPS FOR TAGLINES

When rigging with taglines, make sure:
  • Tagline is free of knots 
  • Taglines should have sealed ends so they don’t fray
  • One rigger should be assigned to each tagline and be able to safely position themselves away from the load 
  • To secure long loads with taglines, attach them to the very ends 
  • Taglines should be long enough that the assigned rigger can be in a safe location for the duration of the lift
  • Taglines must be held so the rigger can easily release the line if the load swings—This is important since it prevents the rigger from being thrown off-balance and into a more dangerous position
  • Wear the proper protective gloves when you handle taglines 
  • You know the working-load limit of the tagline 
  • Taglines are fit according to your company’s procedures/regulations 
  • Taglines are attached at a spot where they can be easily removed 
  • The load rotation can be controlled with taglines (if it’s rotating/swiveling uncontrollably).
When rigging with a tagline, do not
  • Use taglines if they’ll create any sort of safety hazard
  • Use taglines to control a lift during inclement/adverse weather conditions 
  • Go near or beneath, or let another rigger go beneath a load to retrieve a tagline 
  • Detach the tagline from the load until the crane operator and banksman position the load in its final location, with no load on the lifting gear  
  • Loop the tagline around your wrist, or any other part of the body
  • Use taglines for routine back-loading of supply vessels
  • Temporarily or permanently attach, loop, twist or tie a tagline to adjacent structures or equipment in an attempt to control the load
  • Use a tagline if there’s not enough clearance-room for the rigger to move from any spots where the load could fall 
  • Operating the tagline will cause a handler to be near a pinch point (A pinch point is any area where personnel risks having their extremities caught by a machine or equipment)
  • Allow taglines to fall into rotors 
  • When ever possible, attach your hook to a load block to prevent twisting of the hoist line. 

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function.”

“More employees are injured in industry moving materials than while performing any other single function. In everyday operations, workers handle, transport and store materials. They may do so by hand, manually-operated materials handling equipment, or by power-operated equipment,” says the U.S. Department of Labour/OSHA Training Institute. 

This is why it’s important to eliminate risk whenever possible and ensure taglines provide more help than hazard to a lift—Remember when not to rig with taglines.

taglines controlling a load

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRAINING TUESDAY | TAGLINES & OSHA STANDARDS 

In Canada, each province has their own specific Occupational Health & Safety Laws, which are usually broken down into:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Acts 
  • Occupational Health & Safety Regulations/Codes 
  • Standards 
  • Industry Association Code of Practice 

Be sure to check with regulations and standards in your province for further details on how to use taglines. 

TRAINING TUESDAY | WHEN TO USE TAGLINES

It’s important to note that taglines only work in tension. The handler should be able to hold the tagline at waist or shoulder-level—When the tagline must be held higher than this, it’s less effective it is at controlling the load. 

Sometimes, if the rope’s not long-enough, the handler’s instinct will be to pull the rope down, and end up pulling down on the load. This makes the tagline non-effective, and creates a more likely scenario that the load will fall on the handler. 

Yes, we discuss how taglines can create pinch points, however they can also help prevent them in some cases. Sometimes a load can twist around the crane that’s lifting it, and cause the load to bounce off nearby equipment or other parts of the crane—this can create pinch points, so taglines can be an effective way to control this.

TRAINING TUESDAY | CONCLUSION 

Taglines provide extra security for positioning and landing difficult loads, particular in inclement weather—However, rigger’s should exercise caution before using taglines extraneously.

Using taglines when unnecessary can sometimes create more hazards on-site, like producing pinch points or obstacles that could injure workers—This is why a rigging plan is especially important before conducting any lift , to ensure taglines are the right securing equipment for the application at-hand.

Taglines should be used to control block rotation, secure the load’s landing or when inclement weather will cause the load to swing uncontrollably—But don’t use them if they create more hazardous conditions for the handlers, rigger’s and any other personnel on-site. Remember, preventing injury is the priority of any lift—Safety should always be #1. 


HERCULES SLR RIGS IT RIGHT

NEED A LIFT? HERCULES SLR PROVIDES EQUIPMENT, INSPECTIONS & REPAIRS FOR ALL YOUR RIGGING NEEDS—WE LIFT ANYTHING

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1-877-461-4877


FOR RELATED ARTICLES

VISIT OUR BLOG:

DON’T SLIP UP: FALL PROTECTION GLOSSARY

HERCULES’ TIPS: IS YOUR SAFETY HARNESS COMFORTABLE?

CONFINED SPACES: CHOOSE THE BEST FALL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT


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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com