CM Guest Blog: 3 Safety Tips to Install your CM Trolley

cm-trolley-hercules-slr

Read on to discover tips from rigging and load securing experts at Columbus McKinnon – today, they’re sharing their top three safety tips to remember when you install your CM trolley.

Whether it’s a hoist, trolley or rigging equipment, proper use, inspection and maintenance is important to ensure operator safety at all times. Operators of material handling equipment should adhere to the manufacturer’s installation, inspection and maintenance requirements outlined in the product’s operation and maintenance manual (O&M manual).

Beam clamps and trolleys are critical components of a complete lifting system and demand the same attention to safety as hoists and below-the-hook rigging. The following three safety tips are important to consider when installing and inspecting a CM Series 633 Trolley.

1. CM Trolley Safety Tip: Consider the flange and shape of the I-beam to ensure proper fit and clearance. Measure the I-beam flange and check the distance between track wheel flanges. This distance should be 1/8 to 3/16 inch greater than the beam flange width for a straight runway. Additional clearance may be required for the trolley to negotiate track sections with curves. This clearance should be kept to a minimum to ensure the trolley operates properly on both the straight track sections and the curved track sections. See Figure 1.

cm-trolley-hercules-slr-rigging
Figure 1

2. CM Trolley Safety Tip: Ensure the equalizer pin nuts have been installed properly, in accordance with the O&M manual recommendations. The pins should be tight and locked position. Nuts should be regularly inspected to ensure they’re tight and secure during periodic inspections, which can be monthly or yearly – depending on service. Refer to your O&M manual, and/or ASME Standard B30.17.

3. CM Trolley Safety Tip: It is recommended that the trolley is mounted to the hoist prior to final installation onto the beam. Follow the washer and spacer instructions in your O&M manual to properly set the trolley based on the application’s beam flange width.

Please note: washer and spacer arrangement recommendations shown in the O&M manual are affected by structural variations. The accuracy of the final adjustment should be verified by the installer to ensure proper clearance is achieved between the trolley wheel flanges and the toe of the runway beam. See Figure 2.

cm-trolley-hercules-slr-rigging-services
Figure 2

Remember, any trolley installation should always be done in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or the recommendations of a qualified person. Improper installation can cause unequal loading on the trolley and side beam, and as a result can cause the trolley to fall from the beam. It’s also recommended that a load test is performed to 100-125% of the rated capacity of the crane after installation.

Want more CM? Visit our Columbus McKinnon brand page for more information on Hercules SLR’s CM offerings.

Reprinted with permission via Columbus McKinnon – original article here


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Bird-Caging, Never Saddle a Dead Horse and Singing: huh?

rigging terms, jargon by hercules slr

Rigging Slang

rigging-slang-terms-never-saddle-a-dead-horse
Spoiler alert—”never saddle a dead horse” has nothing to do with horseback riding!  

In the rigging and lifting industry, you’ll probably hear a lot of rigging slang thrown around – “don’t saddle a dead horse!”, bird-caging, cabling, diving, drum-crushing, end-for-ended, singing and more – but what do they all mean? Here’s a hint – saddling a dead horse has nothing to do with a rodeo!

In the rigging industry, equipment, hardware or the methods used to rig a load are known by different slang terms – it’s just as important to know these slang terms as it its to know the “proper” terms. Communication on a work site is essential to complete the job safely and efficiently, and using slang on the job is part of that.

Read on to find out common rigging slang terms used on the worksite and exactly what they mean.

Battening Down

Battening-down happens when a sling in a choke hitch is hit, which is done to force the slack, looped part of the sling in closer contact with the load. This is a dangerous practice and should not be done – allow slings to assume their natural angle.

Bird-Caging

Bird-caging happens when wire rope becomes twisted, or when it’s released suddenly from an load. It’s called this as it resembles – you guess it, a bird cage. Essentially, the wire rope strands become untwisted (often due to mis-use or abuse) from the core, and puff-out forming a ‘cage’.

Wire rope with multiple strands can bird-cage due to torsional vibration (the angular vibration of an object, often a shaft along its axis of rotation), sudden release of tension or being forced through a sheave. 

Come-Along

Another name for a pulley or beam-trolley.

Clevis

Another term for a shackle – ‘clevis’ is a term that was used by the agricultural industry and was typically used to describe a shackle used with machinery operated by farm animals.

Diving

Refers to the wire rope’s drum, when it becomes displaced from the way it lays in the spool.

Drum-Crushing

Drum-crushing happens when wire rope is winded too loosely on the drum, and is then pulled from strands underneath and is crushed, which alters the shape.

End-for-ended

End-for-ended rope is rope that’s been spliced using a specific technique where rope tails are tucked into each side.

Saddle a dead horse

To “saddle a dead horse” means to place u-bolts in the wrong spot. The cable has two parts – it’s end (called a dead-end) and the part that is attached to the load. The cable that attaches to the load should be on the bottom. Therefore, you shouldn’t add u-bolts to the ‘dead-end’ of the cable – add them to the end attached to the load, or you are ‘saddling a dead horse’.

Wire rope “singing”

When wire rope needs lubrication, it will make a high-pitched noise, which resembles a high-note being sung.


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.