CM Guest Blog | The Twenty Year Rule

cm cranes and hoisting equipment

CM ON THE TWENTY YEAR RULE

CM knows it can be easy to fall into the ‘twenty year rule’ trap—but what is it? Read on for tips from Columbus McKinnon (CM) on why some rules actually are made to be broken. 

Their rigging experts discuss safety, inspections & why it’s important to keep your training up to date—No matter how long you’ve been doing it. 

While conducting our overhead lifting safety training it never fails that we get a comment to the effect of,

“We’ve been doing it this way for over twenty years. We never had an accident. And now, you’re telling me it’s wrong?” 

Just because you have been lifting a certain way for the past twenty years and never had an accident only means that you have been lucky. When performing safety training we emphasize all the safety standards and regulations that are applicable. They all serve a purpose.

When performing safety training we emphasize all the safety standards and regulations that are applicable. They all serve a purpose.

ANSI/ASME B30 Safety Standards for overhead lifting began in 1916 as an eight page safety code – now 94 years old. Although ASME is the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, many Canadian organizations and equipment used here observe their standards, so it’s worth noting. 

In Canada, the CSA standard B167.08 began in 1964—It’s 46 years old.

Finally, let us not forget OSHA, which began in 1970, making it 40 years old, who enforces two federal regulations for overhead lifting:  CFR 1910.179 for cranes and 1910.184 for slings. Between all these organizations and safety standards there is a total of 355 years of experience. 355 years trumps your 20 years, every time.

These organizations were not put together to make your life miserable! You can’t take short cuts the way you have been doing the past twenty years. These organizations include people that are involved in all facets of overhead lifting, including riggers and production and construction personnel that perform overhead lifting as part of their job. They want you to be safe in your work habits and environment so that you can go home at the end of your shift or work day to your family.

This blog post was written by Larry Lynn, former Product Trainer for Columbus McKinnon Corporation. 

CM | HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH WHEN IT COMES TO ANNUAL INSPECTION?

So, we know that standards for training, testing & inspections exist for a reason, and it’s important to keep your training and inspection knowledge up-to-date—CM explains more. 

CM was asked, “How do we complete the annual PM (preventative maintenance) per the manual unless we open up the gear box and inspect the internals?” This question is centered around the annual inspection task to inspect ‘Load Bearing Parts.'” 

Tom, a Technical Instructor who specializes in Hoists & Overhead Cranes for the Columbus McKinnon Corporation says: 

We encounter this question frequently in inspection and maintenance training classes. 

ASME Standard B30.16 defines load bearing / load suspension parts as follows; “the load suspension parts of the hoist are the means of suspension (hook or lug), the structure or housing that supports the drum or load sprocket, the drum or load sprocket, the rope or load chain, the sheaves or sprockets, and the load block or hook.”

Brakes, load and holding, gearing, motors, etc. are mechanical parts. They are part of the drive train.

ASME B30.16-2.1.3(b) states, “Covers and other items normally supplied to allow inspection of components should be opened or removed.”

ASME states that required inspection items be prefaced with “Evidence Of.” 

There are several indirect ways of checking for and detecting (finding “evidence of”) excessive wear or abnormal operation of internal parts. If gearbox oil is not degraded, there are no metallic particles attached to the drain plug, the hoist raises and lowers properly (with and without a load), and there are no strange or abnormal sounds from the gearbox, it is unlikely that serious problems exist. If this inspection causes suspicion, refer to ASME B30.16-2.1.3(c) “A designated person shall determine whether conditions found during inspection constitute a hazard and whether disassembly is required.”


FOR RELATED READING, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

TIPS FOR TAGLINES | TRAINING TUESDAY

GET TO KNOW YOUR TRAINING SPECIALIST, JAMIE ENGLAND

GET TO KNOW HERCULES MARKETING SPECIALIST, AMANDA WHITE


WHERE’S YOUR CM?

CONTACT US OR CLICK BELOW TO LEARN MORE ABOUT COLUMBUS MCKINNON HOISTS & LIFTING EQUIPMENT AT HERCULES SLR: 

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM  1 (877) 461-4876

 


Hercules SLR is part of Hercules Group of Companies, with locations and unique businesses coast-to-coast. We provide securing, lifting and rigging services for sectors in Canada and Internationally. Hercules SLR serves the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com

PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT | CM Hurricane 360 °

cm hurricane 360 hand chain hoist by columbus mckinnon

THE CM HURRICANE 360 TACKLES THE MOST CHALLENGING APPLICATIONS

One of the most versatile hand chain hoists yet is the CM Hurricane 360.

Unlike traditional hand chain hoists; the CM Hurricane 360° may be used in any direction due to its patented, one-of-a-kind hand chain cover that rotates 360°, which gives a convenient way to move loads without standing under or near the load.

The CM Hurricane 360 Hook-Mounted Hand Chain Hoist has a Weston-style brake system that gives superior load control and reliable performance, which makes it an excellent choice for challenging applications that require versatility. CM captured the flexibility of the CM Hurricane 360 to show you what a little hoist with big muscles can do for productivity and value. 

Have you ever dealt with these tough conditions when operating a hoist? Check out these videos and see for yourself how well the Hurricane handles the job.

https://youtu.be/79LrgcKAJ5k https://youtu.be/G8dMU5O0kp4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPAi-CHbvzY


FIND MORE COLUMBUS MCKINNON

VIEW CM PRODUCTS, SPECIFICATIONS & MORE FROM HERCULES SLR BELOW

#WheresYourCM?

INFO@HERCULESSLR.COM 1-877-461-4876


FOR READING RELATED TO THE CM HURRICANE 360,

VISIT OUR BLOG:

ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY RIGGING SAFETY | 12 TIPS FROM CM

3 TIPS TO INSTALL YOUR CM TROLLEY

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING EQUIPMENT IN HAZARDOUS AREAS


STAY IN THE LOOP—FOLLOW US

FACEBOOK LINKEDIN  TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies. We have a unique portfolio of businesses nationally, with locations coast-to-coast. Hercules Group of Companies provides extensive coverage of products and services that support a variety of sectors across Canada which includes the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, mining and marine industries. 

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any hoisting solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876 or email info@herculesslr.com. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.

Columbus McKinnon Guest Blog: CM Experts Talk Load Securement

load securement columbus mckinnon at hercules slr

Columbus McKinnon (CM) creates popular, durable hoisting equipment for rigging like the Bandit, and Loadstar—Today, we have a two part piece by two rigging experts from CM on the Hercules SLR talking load securement, and the benefit of ratchet binders versus lever binders. 

Read on and learn load securement tips from Henry Brozyna, Corporate Trainer for CM to tie-down loads safely and securely.

In many cases, the importance of tying down a load on or in a truck is underestimated. It’s interesting to talk to trucking people and find out that they are very in tune with what is expected of them with regards to the vehicle they drive and the maintenance of that vehicle. But when it comes to tie downs and load securement, they usually fall short.load securement columbus mckinnon hercules slr

Securing loads in and on trucks is very important – not just to the driver, but to their customer and most importantly the general public. 

LOAD SECURMENT | Good tie downs go a long way to ensure cargo being hauled on a truck stays on the truck.

A pre-use inspection of the tie downs must be done to ensure the working load limit (WLL) of that tie down is intact. All tie downs have markings to indicate what grade they are or they will be marked with a working load limit. The higher the grade, the stronger the product – as you typically see with chain. Grade 30 is the lowest grade and is not as strong as say, grade 70 or grade 80.

During a roadside inspection by law enforcement, they will look for these markings. If they cannot find any, they will automatically rate the tie down as grade 30, the lowest option. This de-rating may cause him/her to take you and your vehicle out of service due to lack of adequate tie downs. Therefore, it may be helpful to conduct a pre-use inspection, per the manufacturer’s specifications, to ensure the proper type and number of chain tie downs is used.

LOAD SECURMENT | Straps need attention too.

The condition of synthetic straps is one of the most overlooked load securement items. When straps are purchased, the manufacturer assigns a working load limit. That WLL is for straps that are intact and undamaged. This is where a pre-use inspection is needed. Straps that have damage in excess of the manufacturer’s specifications must be removed from service.

LOAD SECURMENT | Take time to check your load securement equipment.

All too often we are in a hurry to get from one place to another. This is usually when we take chances and cut corners. This is also the time that an accident is most likely to happen. It is important to take extra time to make sure the equipment you want to use is in good condition and meets the requirements for use as a load securement device. 

Read on for part two from Columbus McKinnon expert Troy Raines, Chain & Rigging Product Engineering Manager and learn more about using ratchet binders and lever binders for securing loads, and the benefits of each.

LOAD SECUREMENT | People frequently ask, “What type of chain binder should I use?” 

Being an engineer gives my outlook on life an odd slant. I frequently think of things in terms of simple machines and how they can make my life better. Where am I going with this and how do simple machines relate to chain binder selection? Let me explain. 

LOAD SECURMENT | What is a chain binder?

Also known as a load binder, chain binders are tools used to tighten chain when securing a load for transport. There are two basic styles of chain binders – lever binders and ratchet binders. The method of tightening the binder is what differentiates the two.

Lever Binders

load securement lever binder, columbus mckinnon at hercules slr
Lever Binder

A lever binder is made up of a simple machine, a lever, with a tension hook on each end. The lever is used to increase the force applied to a tie down. The lever is hinged and takes up the slack by pulling on one end of the tension hook and will lock itself after a 180-degree rotation of the lever around the hinge. Some of the advantages of choosing a lever-type binder include:

  • Easy installation
  • Fewer moving parts
  • Quick means to secure and release

Ratchet Binders

load securement, ratchet binder by columbus mckinnon at hercules slr
Ratchet Binder

A ratchet binder uses two types of simple machines and has two tension hooks on each end and handle. The handle again serves as a lever plus there is the screw thread. Having both simple machines can multiply the force manually applied to the tie down assembly.

When using a ratchet binder, the lever and screw work together and increase the force manually applied to the tie-down assembly. The result is that it takes much less pulling force on the handle to apply tension than you would need with a lever binder.

Ratchets also allow for slower, steadier loading and unloading of forces. This reduces any undue stress or strain on your body. Since ratchet binders are designed with a gear, handle, pawl and end fittings, they will not store up as much energy in the handle as a lever binder will.

Another advantage of ratchet binders is that take-up is safer. The take-up distance of a ratchet binder is typically eight to ten inches – twice that of a lever binder. While take up with a ratchet binder may take a few extra minutes, it is more controlled and ultimately a safer process.

LOAD SECURMENT | In Conclusion

Both lever binders and ratchet binders work in a similar fashion and should be chosen based on the preference of the operator. As with any type of load securement gear, safe practices need to be followed, including:

  • Always wear gloves to maintain a good grip on the binder handle.
  • Never use cheater bars on the handle in an attempt to increase the tie down tension. Cheater bars can put excessive force on the tie down. This force can be enough to damage or even break the tie down. This energy may be further increased by shifting loads. The stored energy resulting from this force could injure you or someone nearby.
  • Ensure that the lever binder is fully locked and make sure the load doesn’t shift after it is applied.
  • When releasing lever binders, stay clear of the handle to avoid any potential kickback.
  • Specifically on ratchet binders, don’t rush the ratcheting process. Slow and steady is the best way to tension.

ARTICLE REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION VIA COLUMBUS MCKINNON—FIND HERE & HERE


FOR MORE COLUMBUS MCKINNON, CHECK OUT OUR BLOGS:

CROSBY QUIZ: CAN YOU PASS THIS HOOK INSPECTION QUIZ?

CM’S TIPS: CRANE & HOISTING IN HAZARDOUS AREAS

HERCULES SLR AT THE SABLE STRATEGIC WORKSHOP


Need more information on Columbus McKinnon equipment and load securement? We’ll lift you there.

Click here to learn more about our Columbus McKinnon at Hercules SLR. 


FACEBOOK  LINKEDIN TWITTER INSTAGRAM YOUTUBE


Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn for more news and upcoming events.