CCOHS Forum 2019: Changing World of Work Explored

Forum: 2019 Changing World of Worksafety-conference

A wise person once said, “safety doesn’t happen by accident.” This is why the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health & Safety will hold it’s 6th conference, called Forum: 2019 The Changing World of Work, which they host every few years. This year, it will be held in Winnipeg, Manitoba on March 5-6, 2019.

The Forum brings together industry leaders, innovators and subject experts who represent government, labourers and Canadian workplaces. At Forum 2019, industry members will discuss their experiences and knowledge of existing and new health and safety issues in the workplace – the focus of 2019’s Forum will be the workplace of today and tomorrow. Topics of discussion will include the changing workforce, the changing workplace and the way the nature of work changes in modern times.

Right now, speakers at Forum 2019: The Changing World of Work include:

forum-2019-changing-world-of-work
Safety gear
  • Futurist Nikolas Badminton will set the stage with a keynote on artificial intelligence and how the world of work may change over the next 5, 10, 15 years and beyond
  • Lionel Laroche, President, MultiCultural Business Solutions Manager on bridging cultural diversity in the workplace
  • Steve Tizzard: building a mentally healthy, peer to peer support program on the Hibernia Platform
  • Darby Allen, Fort McMurray’s Fire Chief (Ret.) will close the event with his inspiring personal story of leading through a crisis

The event is currently being developed, with more details to come. To find more information on Forum 2019: The Changing World of Work, visit ccohs.ca/forum.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Get To Know Your Trainer – Lou Gould, CHSC

Lou Gould-Header

Lou Gould, CHSC is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

Lou: I have established great relationships with the leading manufacturers in safety personal protective equipment. This has allowed me to be involved in
Lou Gould 2many product development discussions providing industry feedback and application recommendations. I have had the opportunity to visit and view their manufacturing processes and facilities enabling me to understand their operations, business model and product offerings. I have participated in numerous hours of product training enabling me to consult and educate to my clients with knowledge, experience and the confidence to recommend the appropriate product for the task.

I am a member of the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering and have achieved the Certified Health and Safety Consultant (CHSC) designation. I currently sit as the Vice Chair on the executive committee for the NS Chapter of the CSSE.

I have achieved the Certificate in Health, Safety and Environmental Processes (CHSEP) from the University of Fredericton.

Certified trainer in Fall Protection, High Angle Rescue, Forklift, Aerial Platform, Telehandler and Respiratory Fit Test Administrator. I have completed courses in Adult Education and instructional design.

What made you decide to enter into this industry?

Lou: Very early in my career I realized that most of the personal protective equipment purchases were made with little or no thought to the hazard, task and application. Customers were purchasing products and training as an afterthought or a directive with little or no explanation. To be blunt: “to get this off their plate” or because someone “told me to”. I found myself researching the task, hazards and applications for the clients and recommending the appropriate products to mitigate their risk while educating them. This became my doorway to evolve from product sales to Health and Safety consulting and training. I have a passion to help and educate. Every day I feel great knowing I am helping someone work safe and go home to their family.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Lou: I have been in the industry since 1994 and have held various roles from Inside Sales, Purchasing, Account Manager, Management and currently Consultant and Trainer. This has allowed me to understand the basis of all business aspects and how health and safety is an integral part to ensure the health of the business and the personnel. I have always been a builder of things and enjoy seeing plans and people grow and prosper.

I have created safety divisions within companies. I have constructed training facilities complete with classrooms and practical exercise areas as well as designing and delivering training courses. As I worked to increase service offerings I have created rental and inspection programs. All these roles have given me the tools to be an effective health and safety consultant and trainer.

What made you want to transition into training?

Lou: I am naturally a storyteller and enjoy being in front of people sharing stories and getting to know each other. I pride myself on providing a positive, nurturing and comfortable environment in which the students can become engaged and educated.  It is very important to me to provide superior knowledge transfer to my students and give them another tool in their toolbox to complete their task safely and efficiently.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Lou: Hercules SLR has a great reputation and is respected in the industry. They have a great company focus and allow the employees growth personally and professionally. It is very important to me to work for a company that provides for all aspects including  design, supply, install, inspection, certification, consulting and for course TRAINING! Hercules SLR does it all.

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

Lou: I support all our branches across Canada and we can offer training for all regions. Most of my time is spent in Ontario and Atlantic Canada.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training?

Lou: Houston, Texas USA was fantastic! Great weather, great food and a good bunch of guys on the course. Also, Long Harbour NL is beautiful place with great people.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Lou: Vancouver would be great in mid-winter! Anywhere in the US would be exciting.

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Lou: I am committed to continue to invest in myself while increasing my accreditation as part of my personal success plan. Displaying leadership, integrity and character will allow me to remain at the top of the safety industry and retain respect from my peers, colleagues and competitors.

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

Hercules’ Tips: Prevent Synthetic Round Sling Damage

roundsling

We’ve discussed what to look for when assessing your synthetic round sling for damage—but how do you prevent damage from happening in the first place?

Read on for essential tips to prolong the life of your synthetic round slings.

Round Sling

First and foremost, you should avoid activities that cause chemical burns, bunching, tears or exposed yarns. To prevent damage to your round sling, refrain from:

  • Dropping or dragging it along the ground or rough surfaces;
  • Pulling slings from under loads when load is resting on the sling—place blocks under load if possible;
  • Shortening or adjusting the sling using unapproved methods;
  • Twisting or knotting the sling;
  • Exposing sling to damaging alkali’s or acids;
  • Exposing sling to sources of heat damage or weld splatter;
  • Using slings or allowing exposure to temperatures above 194° (90°C) or below -40°F (-40°C).
  • “Tip Loading” a sling on a hook rather than centering it in base, or “bowl” of the hook;
  • Using hooks, shackles or other hardware that have edges or other rough surfaces which could damage the sling;
  •  Running/driving over sling with a vehicle or other equipment.

In addition to these factors, exposing synthetic slings to certain chemicals can cause minor or total degradation—time, temperature and concentration factors affect degradation. Consult your sling’s manufacturer for specific applications.

Sharp Edges and your Sling

One of the most crucial aspects of protecting your sling is ensuring it’s kept away from sharp edges. It’s important to note that edges or surfaces in contact with your sling don’t have to be “razor” sharp to cause sling failure. Slings can be damaged, worn down or even torn as tension between your sling, connection points and cargo develops.

Protect damage to your sling from corners, protrusions or contact with any edge that isn’t rounded or smooth. To do so, a qualified person will determine appropriate methods for protecting the sling in relation to the conditions it will be used in. The qualified person may use specially developed protectors like sleeves, wear pads or corner protectors to shield the sling from harsh edges.

Conducting lift tests (in a non-consequence setting) is recommended to test your safe-guarding methods—remember to inspect your sling after each lift test for damage and suitability.

Can my Sling Ever Touch Edges?

Avoid your sling directly contacting edges, unless the edge is:

  • Smooth and well-rounded;
  • The size of the radii is adequately large. Use the table below (Image 1) to determine the minimum edge radii suitable for contact with synthetic slings.
Image 1

Prevent further damage to your sling by storing it in a clean, dry and dark place. Use mild soap and water to wash your sling, and never place it in the washing machine. Avoid storing somewhere your sling may be exposed to acids or other harmful chemicals or splatters.

Overall, even when following every safeguard described above things may go wrong. Be sure to asses your load properly, never place any part of your body between yourself and the sling, and always ensure all personnel are clear from lifted or suspended loads.

Original Article here: https://riggingcanada.ca/articles/safe-usage-guides/round-sling-safety-bulletin/round-sling-safety-bulletin.pdf

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

New: MSA Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

hercules-msa-scba-breathing-apparatus

A new, first-of-its-kind, self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), named the M1 SCBA by MSA was unveiled in September of this year.

Before this, respiratory protection for firefighters was unvarying, and this was the industry norm. However, fire stations have different needs. Each has specific preferences, expectations and needs from their respiratory protection.

MSA designed and developed the M1 SCBA over three years, by listening to industry and customer concerns, and rigorous development and testing.

The M1 SCBA is fully customizable and can be arranged to meet a wide range of needs. The M1 SCBA has customizable features to improve hygiene, ergonomics, and comfort. These features include being machine washable (without having to disassemble), a water-repellent padded harness, one-handed height adjustment, the industry’s lightest-weight backplate and a hip belt which evenly distributes the weight of the breathing apparatus.

Additionally, The M1 SCBA reduces overall cost-of-ownership. How? It includes a high-pressure cylinder connection for fast cylinder exchanges, configurations with and without integrated, electronics and telemetry—it’s also compatible with MSA’s G1 face-piece. If you desire better voice enhancement, it contains a state-of-the-art communications system named the C1 headset that attaches easily to the outside of the facepiece.

Work safe and stay protected—find MSA self-contained breathing apparatus’ and other MSA brand products at Hercules SLR.

Original article here: https://bit.ly/2DegKQc

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

 

Cannabis: Beyond the Cultivating and Harvesting

marijuana-worker-header

Keeping you safe during cannabis manufacturing, growing and processing operations

With the legalization of cannabis manufacturing, growing and processing operations by the Canadian government, licensed operators and workers in cannabis manufacturing operations will need to obey relevant health and safety laws to protect themselves from exposure hazards that could cause immediate and long-term health effects. Do you know how to keep yourself safe from the occupational risks in cannabis-growing operations? 3M do.

3M primary_logo

That’s why they’ve spent decades supplying information that you need to spot potential risks while improving respiratory protection products that help keep you out of harm’s way.

Here’s an overview of what workers need to know to reduce their exposure and minimize immediate and long-term health effects associated with the growing, harvesting and manufacturing of cannabis.

What is cannabis?

Cannabis is a greenish-grey mixture of the dried flowers of the cannabis sativa plant. The main psychoactive chemical in cannabis is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is responsible for its intoxicating effects. This chemical is found in the resin produced by the leaves and buds of the cannabis plant. The plant also contains more than 500 other chemicals, including over 100 compounds that are chemically related to THC called cannabinoids.

Cannabis can be inhaled by smoking hand-rolled cigarettes called joints, in pipes or water pipes called bongs, or in blunts (cannabis rolled in cigar wraps). It can also be ingested through brewed tea or mixed into foods called edibles, such as brownies, cookies or candies.

Cannabis

How could it affect me?

The Canadian federal government introduced a suite of legislation on April 13, 2017, that, establishes a “strict legal framework” for the production, sale, distribution and possession of cannabis. Provinces, territories and municipalities will be able to tailor rules for their own jurisdictions and set their permits or licenses for growing, distributing and retail sales of cannabis. This legislation came into effect in October 2018.

This means that workers who take part in cannabis growing, harvesting and manufacturing could be exposed to numerous health and safety risks and would now be covered by the applicable occupational health and safety regulations.

When am I at risk?

Workers who take part in the growing, harvesting and manufacturing of cannabis have the potential to be exposed to the following

Health risks:

  • Mould exposures in indoor growing and harvesting operations
  • Drug exposure to THC while handling plant buds, which can occur through through inhalation, eye or dermal contact
  • Exposures to pesticides and fertilizers
  • Excessive carbon dioxide (CO₂) exposure in greenhouses with optimized growing environments, i.e., CO₂ is being added to the environment to promote plant growth
  • Accidental carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) exposure from CO₂ producing devices, i.e., in order to raise CO₂ concentrations some companies may direct products of incomplete combustion, which can include CO₂, into the plant grow areas
  • Excessive ultraviolet (UV) exposuret from grow lamps
  • Heat stress in outdoor growing operations

Other safety risks in cannabis-growing operations can include electrical shock and/or cuts, pinches and sprains suffered during harvesting or processing operations.

What can I do to protect myself?

Proper respiratory protection should be used during normal growing and harvesting operations to reduce potentially harmful exposure to mould, pesticides and other chemicals. Respiratory protection selection and use should be based on results of air monitoring, in compliance with the assigned protection factors (APFs) outlined in the CSA Z94.4 standard or other published selection document that the province follows (such as NIOSH & USA OSHA). Based on the employer’s exposure assessment, an N-95 or P-100 disposable respirator, or half-face piece or full-face piece respirator with a combination organic vapour cartridge/P100 filter, may provide appropriate protection.

Maintain proper ventilation
This will help avoid overexposure to gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxides as air purifying respirators will not provide protection against these three gases. Overexposure to these gases remains an acute concern if CO₂ producing devices are not monitored or maintained properly in the manufacturing operation.

Protect eyes from contact with THC, pesticides and other chemicals
Employers should consider the need for protective eyewear, protective eyewear with a face shield, or a full-facepiece respirator. If workers are not required to wear a full-facepiece respirator for pesticide spraying, we suggest indirect venting goggles (e.g. 3M™ Goggle Gear, 500-Series with Clear Scotchgard™ Anti-fog Lens).

Prevent skin contact with THC during cutting and harvesting operations
This will help reduce the risk of dermal exposure to THC, pesticides and fertilizers. Protective coveralls, lab coats, aprons, footwear, and especially gloves should be considered during cutting and harvesting operations, and during the application of pesticides or fertilizing chemicals. In outdoor operations, the potential for increased risk of heat stress should be considered when selecting worker
protective clothing.

References
1. Washington State Department of Labor & Industry. Cannabis Industry Safety & Health (Cannabis). Retrieved on October 19, 2017 from http://www.lni.wa.gov/Safety/Topics/Industries/Marijuana/

2. Martyny, John; Van Dyke, Mike; Schaeffer, Josh; Serrano, Kate Health Effects Associated with Indoor Cannabis Grow Operations. Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO.

3. Koch, Thomas; Chamber, Carol-Lynn; Bucherl, Stacy; Martyny, John; Cotner, John; and Thomas, Stan. Colorado Environmental Health Association Conference, Steamboat Springs, CO., Hashing Out the Issues: IAQ and Health and Safety in the Cannabis Industry, September 26, 2014.

4. Clandestine Indoor Cannabis Grow Operations – Recognition, Assessment, and Remediation Guidance, AIHA. January 1, 2010.

5. 3M Personal Safety Division. Technical Data Bulletin #249: Legal Cannabis Growing Operations. September, 2016. Retrieved from multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/…/tdb-249-legal-Cannabis-growing-operations-pdf

6. Sun Media, Toronto Sun. What to expect from the Liberals’ Cannabis bill. April 13, 2017.

Read the original article here

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

Leading and Sharp Edges – Fall Protection

Leading-And-Sharp-Edge

Leading and sharp edges, what you need to know when It comes to fall protection.

Professional football players need the best protective equipment available to stay safe on the playing field, from helmets to pads to mouth guards and beyond. Construction workers who work on Lambeau Field, the historic football stadium in Green Bay, Wisconsin, face even greater hazards and need the best protective equipment as well—particularly fall protection when they are working at height. They also must use appropriate equipment and use it properly to stay safe.

Two construction crew members who worked on the renovation of Lambeau Field know the value of quality fall protection equipment and proper training firsthand: the first fell from a steel beam six stories above ground. Less than two months later, another worker slipped from a beam and fell. Both escaped injury and possible death because of their fall protection equipment. Fortunately, these workers not only walked away after these accidents—remarkably, they were able to go back to work the same day.

1“Fatalities Prevented, Injuries Minor, Workers’ Comp Costs Slashed,” United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3252/3252.html. Accessed 12/9/14.

But what if they had been using the wrong products, or the wrong anchorage points, or had failed to take into account swing fall hazards or sharp edge hazards? Those workers may never have returned to work!

Many personal fall arrest systems rely on lifeline materials to perform under less than ideal conditions. But there are some applications where use of the wrong product—for example, where a lifeline contacts with a sharp edge—could have catastrophic results.

Product testing and certification organizations in the U.S. and around the world, including the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and CE in Europe, have been reexamining how lifelines in fall protection systems perform when subjected to these “sharp edge” applications. They’ve also placed a new focus on “leading edge” applications. Through this analysis, they have concluded that these two environments are unique in fall protection and involve increased risks due to the lifeline cutting, fraying or becoming otherwise compromised.

The following infographic identifies those applications and demonstrates​ the associated risks involved. 

Leading-And-Sharp-Edge-Infographic

Understanding Leading and Sharp Edges

Sharp Edge
A sharp edge is one that, for practical purposes, is not rounded and has the potential to cut most types of lifelines. The ANSI standard for sharp edges, for example, involves testing the fall arrest device’s lifeline over a piece of steel bar with a radius of no more than 0.005” (5 one thousands of an inch). If the lifeline is cut or severely damaged, the device fails the test and does not comply with ANSI.

Leading and Sharpe Edges

Leading Edge
To visualize a leading edge, imagine a worker installing steel decking on a new building. Now
imagine the worker’s fall protection system is anchored at foot level behind him. As the worker
moves out and away from the anchor point while installing the decking, the worker is exposed
to a potential fall over the edge of the building or the edge of an elevated platform.

Unique Risks of Leading and Sharp Edges
In sharp edge applications the primary risk is the lifeline can be frayed or severed. Examples of
other related risks with falls over leading edges include:

  • Increased Fall Distance: When workers are attached at foot level, as they often are in leading edge applications, they will fall farther than they would if they were anchored at shoulder height or above. The image on the previous page (see Image A) demonstrates the sequence of events that happen when a worker falls off a leading edge, and why a worker needs additional clearance. The required clearance when anchored at foot level varies by product so make sure to reference the product instructions.
  • Lock-up Speed: Self-retracting lifelines react to a fall when the lifeline accelerates out of the housing at a certain velocity, generally about 4.5 feet per second. When self-retracting lifelines are anchored at foot level, the lifeline does not achieve the required acceleration during a fall until after the user’s D-ring passes over the leading edge and below the level of the anchor. This means the user has already fallen about 5 feet before the self-retracting lifeline device will engage to arrest the fall.
  • Increased Fall Arrest Forces: Falling further means the impact on the body through the fall protection system will potentially be higher when the fall is arrested. This is why many leading edge and sharp edge rated products contain additional energy-absorbing devices.
  • Increased Potential for Swing Hazards: If a worker falls, and is off to one side, he may swing like a pendulum. While this in and of itself is dangerous, the danger is compounded if the worker is on a sharp edge and the lifeline saws back and forth across that edge.

In 2012, ANSI released a new standard—ANSI Z359.14 on Self Retracting Devices (SRDs)2—to address leading edge or sharp edge applications for self-retracting devices (SRDs). The Z359.14 standard includes significant changes to the design and testing of leading edge (LE) SRDs. It provides a baseline for manufacturers to test their products against, in order to ensure they are safe and compliant.3 It also requires manufacturers to provide new information in product user instructions and on product markings.

2ANSI/ASSE Z359.14-2012 Safety Requirements for Self-Retracting Devices for Personal Fall Arrest & Rescue Systems, American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), http://www.asse.org. Accessed 12/9/14.
3“Standard/Regulation Information, Safety Requirements for Self-Retracting Devices ANSI Z359.14-2012,” Capital Safety, http://apicapitalsafety.com/api/assets/download/1/9168257. Accessed 12/9/14.

Both Compliant Equipment and Training Needed to Keep Workers Safe
While ANSI-compliant equipment is needed to keep workers on leading edges and sharp edges safe, it’s only effective if crews understand how to use it and why they need it. Proper training is essential to ensure that crews fully engage and understand the unique hazards related to sharp and leading edges. Hercules SLR has experienced training instructors that will come on-site to teach in and around workers’ normal environment to help them better understand and avoid the hazards of sharp and leading edges.

Greater Awareness Also Leads to Greater Safety
Fall protection experts agree that in addition to complying with the applicable standards, keeping workers safe at height also involves a much greater awareness of the unique fall protection risks that exist in particular applications, such as sharp and leading edge applications. This is particularly true for workers who have worked in sharp and leading edge environments for many years and have developed habits over time that may not be the safest practices in today’s environments.

All workers—and their employers—should be up-to-date on products, applications and training so that the appropriate equipment is used properly for any application faced by workers. In sharp and leading edge work, using a traditional product anchored at foot level may increase the risk of injury and create a false sense of security. Fortunately, Hercules and our partners at 3M™ DBI-SALA® MSA Safety offer a number of products specifically designed for foot level tie-off in sharp and leading edge environments.

Please contact a Hercules representative or visit your local branch for additional information.

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Forklift Safety – Top Tips for a Safe Workplace

The Forklift is an incredibly useful piece of equipment, used throughout many industries to enhance productivity, speed up processes and protect the health and safety of employees. But they can also be extremely dangerous, with thousands of forklift accidents every year resulting in sometimes serious injuries, and usually caused by improper and unsafe operation or lack of training for the operatives.

Below are a few tips that will help you keep your workplace safe and ensure you get the most from your equipment and employees.

1.   Know the Stats

It’s important to know the dangers that come with using forklifts on loading docks and in warehouses. Keep these statistics in mind while training workers and safely operating forklifts.

  • Overturned forklifts are the leading cause of deaths involving forklifts; they account for 22% of all forklift-related fatalities
  • Workers on foot struck by forklifts account for 20% of all forklift-related fatalities
  • Victims crushed by forklifts account for 16% of all fatalities and falls from forklifts account for 9% of all forklift fatalities

2.   Know the Classes

These are classifications of six commonly-used types of forklifts, as recognized by OSHA, along with different types of trucks unique to each class.

  • Electric Motor Rider Trucks (such as rider-type counterbalanced forklifts and sit-down, three-wheel electric trucks)
  • Electric Motor Narrow Aisle Trucks (such as high lift straddle trucks and platform side loaders)
  • Electric Motor Hand Trucks or Hand/Rider Trucks (such as low lift pallet trucks and high lift straddle trucks)
  • Internal Combustion Engine Trucks with Solid/Cushion Tires (such as counterbalanced fork trucks with cushion tires)
  • Internal Combustion Engine Trucks with Pneumatic Tires (such as counterbalanced fork trucks with pneumatic tires)
  • Electrical and Internal Combustion Engine Tractors (such as sit-down riders)
  • Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks (such as vertical mast type forklifts, variable reach type forklifts, and truck trailer mounted)

Download a full list here

classes of forklifts

3.   Know the Common Hazards

Here’s a quick look at a few common hazards associated with forklifts.

  • Unsecured loads may fall, crushing pedestrians or drivers.
  • Forklifts may tip over, due to excessive speed or imbalanced loads
  • Workers may fall if they stand on the forks
  • Drivers may not see pedestrians, leading to collisions and fatal accidents
  • Improper or missing floor marking may lead to accidents between forklifts and pedestrians

4.   Know the Requirements

Before any employee takes control of a forklift, ensure they’re trained in accordance with CCOHS requirements. 

  • Employers must have a training program that incorporates general principles of safe operation, the types of vehicle(s) used, any hazards created by using forklifts and powered industrial trucks, and CCOHS general safety requirements.
  • Trained forklift operators must know how to do the job safely, as demonstrated in a workplace evaluation.
  • Employers must provide formal and practical training. This may include using some combination of lecture, video, software training, written material, demonstrations, and practical exercise.
  • Employers must certify that operators have received all necessary training and evaluate each operator at least once every three years.
  • Employers must evaluate the operator’s performance and deem the employee competent to operate a powered industrial truck prior to operating the truck.

5.   Know What to Watch For

Employees and employers should work together to ensure a forklift is safe to use before getting behind the wheel. Follow these steps before using a forklift.

  • Perform a daily inspection of all forklifts in use
  • Examine the tires and oil levels
  • Check for water, oil, or radiator leaks
  • Ensure forks are straight and not cracked
  • Test brakes, lights, the horn, and the steering wheel
  • Look for obstructions, uneven surfaces, overhead obstacles, and other potential hazards

inspections

6.   Stay Safe While Using A Forklift

Workers should do the following while behind the wheel to protect themselves and co-workers:

  • Make sure the load is balanced and fully secure to prevent a forklift from tipping over
  • Ensure both forks are as far under the load as possible before lifting
  • Drive with the load as low as safely possible
  • Pay attention to posted speed limits and warning signs
  • Always look in the direction you’re traveling; if a load blocks the view ahead, travel in reverse
  • Steer clear of areas where forklifts are prohibited or restricted
  • Keep an eye out for signs, floor marking, and other warnings for pedestrians and forklifts
  • Use the horn at intersections and in areas where pedestrians may be present

Travelling on an Incline

Keep the forks pointed downhill without a load, and pointed uphill with a load. Do not attempt to turn the lift truck until it’s on level ground.

Steering

Support the load by the front wheels and turn with the rear wheels. Do not turn the steering wheel sharply when travelling fast. If the lift truck is overloaded, steering will be difficult. Do not exceed load limits, and do not add a counterweight as an attempt to improve steering.

7.   Keep An Eye Out Around Your Facility

Even if you’re not operating a forklift, you can take steps to keep workers safe. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Post forklift safety signs, aisle markers, and forklift procedure labels—using pre-made signs, custom labels, or a combination of the two
  • Implement a floor marking system in your facility
  • Ensure safety signs are at all intersections where pedestrians and vehicles intersect
  • Use steering wheel covers and padlocks when necessary
  • Use proper lockout/tagout equipment to prevent forklifts from inadvertently starting up

Lift Truck Forklift Operator

8.   Safe Loading

It’s important to know the recommended load limit of the forklift (shown on the data plate) and the capacity of the fork, and to never exceed these limits.

Position the load according to the recommended load center. Do not add extra weight to counterbalance an overload. Keep the load close to the front wheels to keep the lift truck stable.

When inserting the fork, keep the mast of the forklift in an upright position before inserting the fork into a pallet. Level the fork before inserting it.

Raising the Load

Do not raise or lower the fork unless the lift truck is stopped and braked. Avoid lifting a load that extends above the load backrest if there’s any risk of the load, or part of it, sliding back toward the operator. Check for adequate overhead clearance before raising a load, and maintain a safe working distance from overhead power lines. Lift the load straight up, then tilt back slightly. Watch that the load doesn’t catch on adjacent loads or obstructions. Don’t back up until the forks are free.

When a load is raised, the lift truck is less stable. The operator must stay on the forklift when the load is in a raised position. Don’t allow anyone to stand or walk under the elevated part of the forklift, whether it’s loaded or unloaded.

Handling Pallets

Ensure that forks are level and high enough to go into the pallet, and that they go all the way under the load. Forks must be the proper width to provide even weight distribution.

Avoid trying to move or adjust any part of the load, the forklift or the surroundings when on the forklift. Do not use pallets elevated by forklifts as an improvised working platform.

9.   Develop a Visual Communication System

Here are a few tips for successful visual communication, which can alert operators and pedestrians to hazards caused by forklifts:

  • Use “Stop” signs, speed limit signs, and other traffic control devices
  • Implement way finding to improve the flow of traffic, keep pedestrians away from forklift paths, and direct forklifts along safe routes
  • Point out loading docks, shelves for inventory, and other important places within a warehouse
  • Post signs at junctions to warn pedestrians and forklift operators to stop and look for hazards
  • Display checklists and inspection requirements where forklifts are stored

10.  At the End of a Shift

Once the task is completed or the operative’s shift ends, the forklift should be returned to the designated area and parked safely in the authorized space.

Operatives should never change mid-shift, or in an unauthorized zone, without the new operative being given the time to check the vehicle and adjust the controls, seat and mirrors to suit them, in a safe and designated area.

Forklift

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Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Get to Know Your Training Specialist – Kevin Giles CRSP

Training -Kevin-Giles

Kevin Giles, CRSP is one of our highly experienced Training Specialists and Safety Consultants. We sat down with him to find out more about him and how he decided to choose training as a career path.

Tell us about your educational background?

Kevin: I’ve always had a passion for the outdoors, so I started my education at the Nova Scotia Community College in the Forestry Program. I went on to further my education at the Maritime Forest Ranger School in Fredericton NB and graduated in in 1997.

During the next 11 years I worked in many different aspects of forestry from privet woodlot management, and saw milling to large scale harvesting operations. In every job I did I always played a strong role in health and safety of the workplace, it became clear to me that this was the area I wanted to concentrate on, and I never turned back.

Training Kevin Giles 2

 

I completed the Health and Safety Professional (HSP) designation and was one of the first people to achieve the designation from the Canadian Association Of Provincial Safety Councils. In 2011 a major highlight of my career was achieving the Canadian Registered Safety Professional (CRSP) designation with the Canadian Board of Registered Safety Professionals.

During my 11 years with Hercules I have furthered my education in many areas including; train the trainer programs, Master Rigger, non-destructive testing, and completing 4 diploma programs with the Lifting Equipment Engineers Association (LEEA). As you can tell I love to grow my knowledge and am highly committed to continuous education, my next goal is to complete the Diploma program in Occupational Health and Safety with the University of New Brunswick, only 3 more courses to go!

What made you decide to go into this industry?

Kevin: As I mentioned the safety industry sort of came to me rather than me seeking it out. With every job I ever had since I was 16 years old I played some kind of role in safety, from being a first aid provider on the ski hills with the Canadian Ski Patrol, to being part of various safety committees, and developing policies and procedures with large industrial forestry operations and sawmills. The rigging industry has given me the opportunity to explore so many aspects of safety I find It amazing to think of.

Can you tell us about your work experience before joining Hercules SLR?

Kevin: Upon graduation from the Maritime Forest Ranger School I worked with the SNB Wood Co-op and the Hants County Woodlot Owners Association helping private woodlot owners manage their woodlots for a verity of forest productivity, environmental, and wildlife goals. This was a very rewarding time and experience in my forestry career.

After 4 years in the privet woodlot industry I moved into several new roles in a more industrial forestry operation with JD Irving ltd., working as harvesting supervisor, planer mill supervisor, and chip plant supervisor. This industrial atmosphere gave me to opportunity to work with contractors, unionized workers, students and many more. Working in these environments which already had a very strong safety culture helped me to build confidence and a broad knowledge base of various safety program elements.

What made you want to transition into training?

Kevin: I’ve always enjoyed helping people and sharing my knowledge whenever I could. I started formally instructing with the Canadian Red Cross first aid programs and have taught for the Canadian Ski Patrol, Saint John Ambulance, Safety Services Nova Scotia, and various employers along the way. I enjoy when I can help a student or coworker have that “lightbulb moment” when everything seems to come together and they get a clear understanding of the topic.

Why did you decide to work for Hercules SLR?

Kevin: When I decided that I wanted to pursue a career in safety the opportunity to Join the Hercules team came available. The timing was right and it was the perfect fit. Having a fulltime safety professional was new for the company and it was new for me. I am very happy to say the company and myself have grown together over the last 11 years to build a strong safety culture.

Where have you traveled during your time as a training specialist for Hercules SLR?

Kevin: The majority of the training that we deliver is based in the maritime provinces, but we are able to deliver training anywhere in Canada.  I’ve delivered training from the coast of NL to the coast of BC and many stops in between, including Ontario, Quebec, PEI, NB and Alberta.

Where have you enjoyed traveling to most for training?

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Kevin: Traveling to different parts of NL over the past few years has been interesting. The people are great, and it has been very interesting to see the change in safety culture since the oil industry has grown so much there. Some of the most memorable places to provide training has been in a federal prison, on various ships, sawmills, and airplane hangars. Sometimes you just don’t know what you are getting into and that is always exciting.

Is there anywhere that you would like to travel to in the future with Hercules SLR?

Kevin: I would really like to travel to the northern parts of Canada maybe up to Yellowknife or somewhere in the North West Territories.

Lastly, is there anything that you hope to accomplish during your career in the industry?

Kevin: I hope to be able to make a great success of our Hercules Training Academy and some day expand the course offerings to include some more of the academic safety programs to help companies build a strong safety culture.

 

Hercules SLR offers a wide array of safety training courses. Alongside our standard courses we can tailor make courses to suit your specific requirements, at our facility or yours. To find out more about our course and how we can help you raise the bar in safety training email us at: training@herculesslr.com

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

 

3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection for Tools

Fall-Protection-for-Tools

Taking gravity out of the equation with an expanded lineup of  3M™ DBI-SALA® Fall Protection for Tools

With over 27,000 recorded incidents of people being struck by falling objects each year in Canada, dropped objects prevention planning helps prevent personal injury, equipment damage and tool loss.

Because we continually develop new products to increase worker health and safety, 3M has leveraged its technology to design ergonomic products that help prevent tools from being dropped by at-height workers including four brand new Fall Protection for Tools products.

Explore the New Fall Protection for Tools Lineup

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA Quick Wrap Tape II

Convenience and safety come together with the 3M™ DBI-SALA Quick Wrap Tape II. Compared to previous generations of our Quick Wrap Tape, this re-engineered tape has a longer shelf life, requires fewer wraps to secure tools (6 wraps vs. a previous 10 wraps for tools up to 2 lbs) and uses proprietary 3M material and adhesive to help resist tears even better than before.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb Tool Retractor

The 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb. Retractable Tool Lanyard features a lightweight, compact housing and a strong Dyneema® Retracting Line. This design helps reduce tangling—minimizing worksite tripping hazards and entanglements—while reducing weight on workers’ belts and harnesses.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Harness Adapter

Our new harness adapter is designed to be used with the new 3M™ DBI-SALA® 5 lb. Retractable Tool Lanyard and can be used on selected products that feature a black and gold carabiner, including the Hook2Hook Coil Tether product lineup.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Hook2Hook Coil Tether with Swivel

Our patented Hook2Hook Coil Tether features a swivel hook, making tools like screwdrivers and wrenches easier to use. Suitable for use from holsters, belts, harnesses and tool pouches alike, the Hook2Hook Coil Tether is a versatile solution that is both resistant to heat and to sharp objects.

Fall Protection for Tools3M™ DBI-SALA® Large 35’ Tape Measure Sleeve

Creating a secure attachment point for use at height, Tape Measure Sleeves are now available in two sizes: Medium (for most tape measures up to 7.62 m / 25 ft) and Large (for most tape measures up to 10.6 m / 35 ft). Featuring an integrated D-ring, the 3M™ DBI-SALA® Tape Measure Sleeve can be tethered in a variety of ways to help protect it from accidental drops.

Find out more about these products here
Order your 3M™ DBI-SALA® products from Hercules SLR, if we don’t have it in stock we can get it for you.

 

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.

Hercules to the Rescue At Voisey Nickel Mine

Voisey-Nickel-Mine

Mid-September, Noah Hawes and Barry Young from the Inspections Department of Hercules SLR Dartmouth, ventured to the isolated Nickel Mine of Voisey Bay in Labrador Newfoundland where in 1993, a large nickel deposit was discovered in the hills along the western shore of Potato Island by Archean Inc. a prospecting firm hired by Diamond Fields Resources Inc.

This nickel deposit is considered to be one of the most substantial mineral discoveries in Canada in the last 40 years and is estimated to contain 141 million tonnes at 1.6% nickel. Surface mining began in Voisey Bay in 2005 to access the nickel deposit. Currently, the mining rights for the Voisey Bay nickel deposit belong to the Toronto-headquartered Vale Inco company, a subsidiary of Vale. The bulk carrier ship Umiak I was built to transport ore from the mine.

On June 11, 2018, Vale announced it is moving forward with its underground mine at Voisey Bay. The move will extend the mine’s operating life by at least 15 years. Over the five-year construction, more than 16,000 person-years of employment will be created, and the first ore is expected no later than April 2021.

Noah and Barry’s task at the Voisey mine was to replace the end post for 3M’s recent roof lifelines recall. There was an element of apprehension as this was the first time they had undertaken a job of this type that was so remote and far away.

“We didn’t know what the job would entail, how complex the job would be, and what weather conditions we may be faced with”.

However, any concerns they had were completely unfounded as they accomplished the job without any issues or complications. They did such a great job in fact, that Vale are now talking about Hercules annually re-certifying all their lifelines.

LEEA Logo

The Hercules Inspections department are the best in the business and widely regarded as industry experts in their field. We ensure that all our inspectors are trained to an exceptionally high standard. Currently we are expanding our inspector training nationally to include LEEA (The Lifting Equipment Engineers Association) certification.

We believe in going that extra mile. We will travel great distances to help our customers and get the job done. We cultivate customer relationships through innovation, expertise and innovation.

Great job Noah and Barry!!

Hercules SLR is part of the Hercules Group of Companies which offers a unique portfolio of businesses nationally with locations from coast to coast. Our companies provide an extensive coverage of products and services that support the success of a wide range of business sectors across Canada including the energy, oil & gas, manufacturing, construction, aerospace, infrastructure, utilities, oil and gas, mining and marine industries.

Hercules Group of Companies is comprised of: Hercules SLRHercules Machining & Millwright ServicesSpartan Industrial MarineStellar Industrial Sales and Wire Rope Atlantic.

We have the ability to provide any solution your business or project will need. Call us today for more information. 1-877-461-4876. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter LinkedIn and Facebook for more news and upcoming events.